2018 Spring Schedule
 

Promoting Gender Equality in Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia: Challenges and Successes

Speaker: Tamara Martsenyuk, National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy (Ukraine), Fulbright scholar, Harriman Institute, Columbia University

Monday, February 26, 2018
12:10pm - 1:10pm
Room W607, One Pace Plaza, New York City

Abstract:

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, gender equality was proclaimed as one of the values in the society in general and in education particularly. Projects of nation and state building in Post-Soviet Russia, Belarus' and Ukraine resulted in the revival of traditional gender roles. In education and research they also faced similar ambivalent challenges. In the 1990s, supported by international donors and BGOs, gender centers and gender studies began to appear in Ukraine (Kharkiv, Kyiv, Odesa), Belarus (Minsk), Russia (Moscow, St Petersburg). However, gender studies have not yet been officially recognized as a separate discipline. Moreover, there are certain groups which harass and threaten activists and scholars whose research is focused on gender, feminist, and LGBT issues. The discourse of "Gay-Europe" vs. Eurointegration also tends to influence gender studies and gender scholars in Eastern Europe

About the Speaker:

Dr. Tamara Martsenyuk is currently a Fulbright scholar at Columbia University. She is an Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology at the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy (Ukraine). Her research focuses on the social structure of society, including gender relations. She has been lately exploring women's activism in Ukraine, particularly in the so-called Euromaidan protests in Kyiv in 2013-2014 and in the war in Donbas (Ukraine). She is a holder of various prestigious fellowships and an author of dozens of publications dealing with gender, politics, and society in Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia.
 

Faculty Book Presentation

Speakers: Iride Lamartina-Lens, Professor of Modern Languages and Cultures and Susan Berardini, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Cultures, Pace University

Monday, March 26, 2018
12:10pm - 1:10pm
Room W607, One Pace Plaza, New York City

Abstract:

Iride Lamartina-Lens and Susan Berardini, coeditors and codirectors of Estreno Contemporary Spanish Plays, will present volume 40 of this translation series. Collectively titled Love on the Rocks, this book includes the recent plays Prague, by Javier de Dios (translated by Iride Lamartina-Lens), and Iceberg, by Yolanda Garcia Serrano (translated by Julio Perillan). Both of these plays are delightful comedies that explore the joys and challenges of personal relationships, as well as the limits and consequences of social facades. While Prague takes place during a celebratory dinner party among friends, Iceberg plays out during the final voyage of the Titanic. While the characters of both plays try to navigate the ebb and flow of their relationships, dreams, and disillusions, we accompany them as the masks start to fall and new truths are revealed in their lives.
 

Documenting Nature's Secrets: Lost Wonder Programs and the Art of Popular Science Filmmaking in America, 1920-1960

Speaker: Colin Williamson, Assistant Professor of Film and Screen Studies, Pace University

Monday, April 9, 2018
12:10pm - 1:10pm
Room W607, One Pace Plaza, New York City

Abstract:

From the 1920s through the 1950s, the field of natural history filmmaking in the United States was shaped powerfully by two figures who have been almost entirely left out of histories of the cinema: Arthur Pillsbury and John Ott. Collectively, Pillsbury and Ott produced over 1000 time-lapse films about plants for scientific research, education, and popular entertainment. Almost all of these films have been lost, and what little remains of their work has not been seen outside of their original exhibition contexts. In this project, I write Pillsbury and Ott back into film history by mapping intersections between their time-lapse photography and everything from conservationism, natural theology, and the history of dance, to Walt Disney and Cold War science in the popular imagination. At the center is the question of how their films used "wonder" to shape American audiences' perceptions of the changing relationship between nature and technology during the first half of the 20th century. The project builds on new archival research and a collaboration in which I am involved to preserve and exhibit Pillsbury's and Ott's films for the first time in more than fifty years.

About the Speaker:

Colin Williamson is an assistant professor of Film and Screen Studies who specializes in early cinema, nonfiction film and animation, and the history of science. He is the author of Hidden in Plain Sight: An Archaeology of Magic and the Cinema (Rutgers 2015), and has published in such edited collections and journals as Thinking in the Dark: Cinema, Theory, Practice (Rutgers 2016), Leonardo, The Moving Image, and Animation: An Interdisciplinary Journal (ANM). He is also a reviews editor at ANM and serves on the Executive Committee of Domitor, The International Society for the Study of Early Cinema. Colin received his Ph.D. in Cinema and Media Studies from the University of Chicago.