Dyson News at a Glance: June 2018

 

STREAMING THE ACTION OF THE WORLD CUP

Matteo Ceurvels ‘13, Spanish and Latin American Studies, authored an article in Business Insider about the 2018 FIFA World Cup, and how fans around the world plan to watch and stream all the action. With more streaming options than ever before, including through mobile and social platforms, this year’s events have been called by some, the “Digital Cup.”

 

ASDS ALUMNUS CO-WRITING NEW PLAY

Actors Studio Drama School Alumnus Jeremy Kareken is co-writing a new Broadway play, as reported by The New York Times. The Lifespan of a Fact is an adaptation of a book about a thought-provoking battle between a writer and a fact-checker, and the challenges they face in the Information Age. The show will star Bobby Cannavale, Cherry Jones, and Daniel Radcliffe. Previews begin September 20 and the show opens on October 18 at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

DYSON SHINES AT SPIRIT OF PACE AWARDS

JaimeLee Rizzo, Chemistry and Physical Science; and Mark Weinstock, Economics, were each awarded The Homer and Charles Pace Faculty Award at the 2018 Spirit of Pace Awards on June 13, 2018, at the American Museum of Natural History. The award honors faculty members whose commitment to education has had a transformative effect on generations of talented and successful students. It honors professors who have a proven record of setting their students off on a path to achievement and self-fulfillment. See photos from this year's event.

 

2018 KENAN AWARD WINNERS

Three Dyson College professors have been awarded the 2018 Kenan Award for Teaching Excellence. Each year the University selects faculty members, whose teaching performance their peers consider to be exemplary, and the recipients are recognized at Commencement. This year’s winners are Marcy Kelly, Biology; Len Mitchell, Philosophy and Religious Studies; and Bureen Ruffin, English.

 

PUTTING POLYMERS IN THE PUTTY

Pace students from the American Chemical Society (ACS), Pleasantville campus chapter, worked with visually impaired and emotionally compromised children to teach them about concepts in polymer chemistry. The New York Institute for Special Education hosted a science fair where Pace students and these children created substances such as putty and slime, using household items, to demonstrate how the mixing of compounds makes different substances. “I think it’s important to instill an interest in chemistry at a young age, because everything has a chemical basis, and this event accomplished that,” says recent Pace graduate and ACS chapter President Sarah Rahni. Watch video.