Anthropology (ANT)

Note: Some courses listed here may run only once per academic year, or every other academic year. Not all courses are available on both campuses. The catalog is constantly changing. Visit the pace website to view the most current class schedule, class descriptions, and required or suggested prerequisites.


ANT 101 Introduction to Anthropology (3 credits)
Through discussions and films, this course is a voyage to discover: 1) When, where and how humans appeared; 2) How they evolved in their understanding and use of nature to develop a wide diversity of cultures within environmental constraints; and 3) The hundreds of different ways they devised for meeting needs for food, sex, courtship, marriage, shelter, communications, tools, child-rearing, medical practices, religious beliefs, and social, political, and economic organization.

ANT 108 Global Culture and Local Identities (3 credits)
This course focuses on the strategies of identity formation employed amid the global flows of migration, capital, and information. It analyzes the benefits and risks involved in the increasingly rapid and transnational circulation of culture, products, and ideas in the "developed" and the "developing" world. The course introduces students to major anthropological debate on the politics of identity in the face of globalization. It explores the way people develop identities around the globe at the end of the 20th century.

ANT 245 Humans and Their Food (3 credits)
What people choose to eat, how they acquire, prepare, and eat food and how food (or lack of it) relates to cultural beliefs, social organization and disease. These aspects will be examined through films, discussions, and several guest lectures by food and health experts.

ANT 297B Topic: Policy and Culture in the European Union (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the history and institutions, policy and culture of the European Union, and prepares them to simulate the EU, like Model UN, on a current policy issue. Over the course of a semester, students will research assigned member states, and at the end of the semester, taking on the roles of their alter egos, debate a particular policy in conference-style.
 


 

Note: Some courses listed here may run only once per academic year, or every other academic year. Not all courses are available on both campuses. The catalog is constantly changing. Visit the pace website to view the most current class schedule, class descriptions, and required or suggested prerequisites.