History (HIS)

Note: Some courses listed here may run only once per academic year, or every other academic year. Not all courses are available on both campuses. The catalog is constantly changing. Visit the pace website to view the most current class schedule, class descriptions, and required or suggested prerequisites.

 

HIS 265 American Urban History (3 credits )
This course will deal with the process of urbanization during the 20th century. An in-depth analysis will include the following: the impact of industry and technology; the urban environment, housing, and homelessness; "inner cities" and the role of government in resolving urban problems.

HIS 297M Topic: History of the American Environment (3 credits)
This course will examine the whole sweep of how Americans have regarded their lands and waters, how government has come to play the key role in protecting the environment and conserving natural resources, what the science and practice of public health have meant, and how politics has influenced and been influenced by the environmental movement. The textbook will be A Fierce Green Fire by Philip Shabecoff, veteran environmental journalist, editor, and author. The textbook will be supplemented with readings from Emerson, Thoreau, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, John McPhee, Barry Commoner, Bill McKibben, and Elizabeth Kolbert, among others. There will be two 3-5 page papers, and a 12-15 page final paper, as well as some quizzes. Class discussion will be an integral part of the course.

HIS 324 - Problems in Twentieth Century Westchester (3 credits )
A topical approach to key issues confronting the county and its citizens from 1900 to the present; transportation; trolleys to the MTA; zoning and the quality of suburban life; urbanization of the county; on-campus meetings with county and municipal governmental leaders; corporate officials and journalists.

HIS 367 History and Geography of New York (3 credits)
This course deals with the history and geography of the Empire State. Topics will include: topography, waterways, natural resources, geography and the economy of New York, Native Peoples, colonial settlement patterns, New York in the American Revolution, New York as the nation's first capital, 19th century transportation innovations: canals, steamboats, railroads; industrialization, 20th century New York: suburbanization, urban decay and renewal, the post-industrial age, environmental challenges, New York State government. Prerequisite: 3 credits in History or equivalent Learning Community/Interdisciplinary or topics course.
 

Note: Some courses listed here may run only once per academic year, or every other academic year. Not all courses are available on both campuses. The catalog is constantly changing. Visit the pace website to view the most current class schedule, class descriptions, and required or suggested prerequisites.