Sociology (SOC)

Note: Some courses listed here may run only once per academic year, or every other academic year. Not all courses are available on both campuses. The catalog is constantly changing. Visit the pace website to view the most current class schedule, class descriptions, and required or suggested prerequisites.

 

SOC 111 Urban Sociology (3 credits)
Among the topics considered are: the history of the development of the city; urban ecology and social structure; city politics and government; urban problems such as housing, employment, minorities, religion, education, and recreation; and the city of tomorrow.

SOC 113A Dynamics of Change (4 credits)
This course will examine the circumstances under which social change occurs, and investigate how changes in the economy, the environment, in family forms, and in technology have impacted both the United States and the world. Over the course of the semester we will examine how the internet has changed the way we work, talk, learn and date; how fluctuating economic patterns alter the choices individuals make, and how a shifting global environment is alternating the world we will inhabit in the future. We will also explore the role of social movements in creating social change both in the U.S. and abroad, and will conclude the course by discussing the role that individuals play in creating, and changing the social world.

SOC 231 Critical Criminology: Explorations of Political, Corporate, White-Collar and Environmental Crimes (3 credits)
Most criminology courses attempt to answer the question, “What causes crime?” However, such course defines the term narrowly by focusing almost exclusively on “street” crime (i.e. robbery, burglary, rape, drug offenses). While these crimes are clearly harmful, we do not pay nearly enough attention to crimes committed by powerful groups and institutions. This course will focus exclusively on crimes of the ‘criminal elite’: political crime (war crimes; state terrorism; torture; police brutality); corporate crime (harmful working conditions and the production and sale of dangerous products); white-collar crime (fraud, bribery, corruption); and environmental crime (harms against environment and animals). Alternative theoretical approaches will be used to explore these types of crime including Green Criminology; Marxist Criminology; Left Realism; Postmodern Criminology; Feminist Theory; and Restorative Justice. We will explore the harms associated with these behaviors/crimes and critically analyze laws and public policies mean to confront them. In this course we will employ a critical approach wherein students will consider the impact of public policies on marginalized communities, groups (particularly people of color, women, working-class people and the poor), and environments.

SOC 296T Topic: Environmental Sociology (3 credits)
Course examines the social consequences of the environmental crisis confronting us today. Students will develop an understanding of the relationship between capitalism, environmental degradation, and the ways through which people have attempted to confront these issues.
 

Note: Some courses listed here may run only once per academic year, or every other academic year. Not all courses are available on both campuses. The catalog is constantly changing. Visit the pace website to view the most current class schedule, class descriptions, and required or suggested prerequisites.