Honors Courses (Spring 2011)

Honors courses are designed to be innovative and challenging. They may be interdisciplinary, focus on great works and ideas, cover issues of keen interest, or present a topic in great depth with a faculty member who has expertise in the subject. Honors courses are open only to students in the Pforzheimer Honors College. Students who are not in the Honors College may be permitted to register for an Honors course with written permission from the Director of Honors, contingent upon the student’s GPA and space availability in the course. Each Honors course carries Honors credit which appears on the student’s transcript counts toward completing the requirements of the Honors College. For additional information, contact Dr. Joseph Morreale, Acting Director, Pforzheimer Honors College, Mortola Library, third floor, Pleasantville campus, at 914 773-3848 or JMorreale@pace.edu.

 

LEARNING COMMUNITY INT 198G TOPIC: NATURE EXPOSED: EXPLORING NATURE THROUGH THE LENS, 3 credits, CRN 22953

Prerequisites: None
(This course includes elements of ART 153 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY and ENV 130 NATURALISTS)
Fulfills:  AOK 4
Day: T 12:20-3:05pm, Angelo Spillo and Carla Shapiro (Prof. Spillo is Director of Pace's Environmental Center and Prof. Shapiro is a photographer)

Course description: This course challenges students to investigate nature beyond the surface in order to understand how natural systems work in harmony. Students record their interpretations through the lens of a camera, creating a convergence of nature and photographic technology. Field study combined with essays and other readings expose students to the beautiful simplicities as well as the intricacies of the plant and animal world. Correlations are made between human impact and current environmental issues. Students must have use of a 35-MM film camera with manual focus and manual exposure.

BIO 123 BIOLOGY AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY, 4 credits, CRN 21629/21630

Prerequisites: None
Fulfills: Lab science foundation requirement, AOK 5, meets for 4 hours (2 lecture, 2 lab)
Lab fee: $45
Evening: T lecture 5:30-7:20pm, lab 7:30-9:20pm, Charlene Hoegler

Course description:  This is an inquiry-based science course. Discussions focus on issues that impact human biology and/or biodiversity from practical, theoretical, and political standpoints. Emphasis is on the interdependence of human, plant, and animal biology and the environment. This course has lecture and hands-on laboratory components. Students choose three issues for further research and present their findings in commentary format. Includes a field trip to Cabbage Hill Farm, Mt. Kisco.

COM 200   PUBLIC SPEAKING, 3 credits, CRN 21418

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Foundation requirement
Day, W 9:05-11:50pm, Ellen Mandel

Course description:  This course is devoted to instruction in the mechanisms of writing and presenting one’s own material. Included are outlining, addressing various audiences, style, and appropriate techniques of delivery, as well as the use of technology to enhance one’s presentation. This pragmatic, skills-oriented course is designed to provide a context for practicing the construction and presentation of well-reasoned public messages.

EDU 201D    SEMINAR: INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION, 3 credits, 22926

Prerequisites: None
Fulfills: Elective
Day: R  12:20-3:05 pm, Xiao-Lei Wang

Course description: This course examines nonverbal behavior as it affects communication style and competence in the communication process. Theories and research on nonverbal communication will be discussed in cultural, gender, and professional contexts. Students analyze their experiences and practice new skills through class discussions and assignments. The topics addressed in this course include physical appearance, gestures, movements, facial behavior, eye behavior, vocal behavior, touch, space, time, and environment.

ENG 201   WRITING IN THE DISCIPLINES, 3 credits, CRN 20925

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 120, suggested for second semester sophomores and juniors
Fee: $20
Fulfills: Foundation requirement
Day:  T 4:30-5:25pm, R 3:35-5:20pm, Deborah Poe

Course description: This course is an upper level writing requirement. It focuses on writing effective essays and research papers in disciplinary modes and in students’ fields of interest. It may include interviews, analysis of journal articles, and appropriate documentation style formats.

HIS 134   MODERN LATIN AMERICA: 1960s TO THE PRESENT, 3 credits, CRN 20342

Prerequisites: None
Fulfills: AOK 3
Evening: M 6:00-8:45pm, Harold Weishaus

Course description: This course provides a survey of meaningful and relevant events that have influenced modern Latin American history. Topics to be addressed include: Castro and Cuba; human rights issues in El Salvador and Chile; the Iran-Contra scandal in Nicaragua; Mexico and NAFTA; drug trafficking from Latin America into the United States; illegal immigration into the United States; Hugo Chavez and the Venezuelan oil crisis; and the earthquake in Haiti.

MGT 396S   ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY, 3 credits, CRN 22922

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Elective
Day: W 1:25-4:10pm, Robert Isaak (Dr. Isaak is the author of the book Green Logic: Ecopreneurship, Theory, and Ethics)

Course Description: Is the Ecopreneur a creative free-rider or an existential manager committed to sustainability? Students will answer this question by exploring contrasting cultural views and theories of creativity, entrepreneurship, eco-design, and government eco-regulation. They will create individual green business plans for an actual start-up that is sustainable both economically and environmentally, and will 'pitch' these designs at the end of this celebration of community sustainability and learning.

NUR 247   PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND THE ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA, 3 credits, CRN 22903

Prerequisite: BIO 152 and BIO 153 and CHEM 101
Fulfills: Elective, Writing Enhanced
Day: W 4:30-7:15pm, Elizabeth Berro

Course description: This course focuses on analysis of media portrayals of disease manifestations, which are assessed and contrasted to evidence-based disease manifestations and clinical experience. The effect of accurate and inaccurate disease portrayals on health care, health policy, and the general public is examined.

 

POL 114   INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, 3 credits, CRN 22901

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: AOK 3, Contemporary Global Studies
Day: R 12:20-3:05pm, Gregory Julian

Course Description: This course explores power relationships between the major political entities in the world, including both nation-states and non-state actors. How major schools of thought interpret the way the world works are explored. Topics include the processes of globalization, global and regional security, terrorism, global environmental crises, transnational social movements, war, peacemaking/keeping, trade, diplomacy, colonialism, and human rights. Particular attention is paid to the United Nations, the effect of systems/institutions on real people, and the phenomena of civil society producing changes in a global context. Debates, simulations, and active listening offer opportunities to increase understanding about the planet we share with others. This course is especially appropriate for students who expect to work in a global context.

RES 231   THE BIBLE: HEBREW SCRIPTURES, 3 credits, CRN 22902

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: AOK 2
Evening: R 6:00-8:45pm, Lawrence Hundersmarck

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the history, literature, and religion of the ancient Hebrews in the cultural framework of the ancient Near East. Attention is given to the formation, development, and major themes of the Pentateuch, as well as the historical, prophetic, and poetical aspects of the books of the Bible and their wisdom.

SCI 226   GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS, 3 credits, CRN 21281

Prerequisites: None
Fulfills: AOK 1
Day:  M 1:25-4:10pm, Mary Margaret Minnis

Course description: By creating and analyzing geographic data, students learn how spatial information is used to answer environmental, economic, social, and business questions. GIS is an integrated computer-based system designed to capture, store, edit, analyze, and display geographic information having many applications in state and local governments, consulting agencies, environmental planning agencies, and education. GIS helps perform numerous analytical operations to support decision-making processes, such as site suitability analyses for future landfills or soil erosion potential within a specific region. Students work with a community group or municipality to develop maps that help them with their geographic decisions. 

HONORS INDEPENDENT RESEARCH COURSES, 3 credits

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, 3.3 GPA minimum. With the written approval of the appropriate professor, the department chairperson, and the Director of the Honors College, a student may select a topic that is not included in the usual course offerings for guided research. The student meets regularly with the professor to review progress. To receive Honors College credit, the results of this independent research must be presented at the Honors Independent Research Conference held every year at the end of April or beginning of May. Students may have their papers published in Transactions, the scholarly journal of the Dyson Society of Fellows, and also made available through Pace University’s Digital Commons.

HONORS OPTIONS COURSES, 3 credits

Prerequisite: None

The Honors Option is designed for Honors-level work in a non-Honors course. To receive Honors College credit, an additional paper (10-20 pages), project, or presentation is required. Written approval of the appropriate professor and the Director of the Honors College are necessary. Depending upon the number of credits completed prior to entering the Honors College, Honors students are limited to either one or two Honors options; other Honors course requirements must be completed in Honors courses.

 

*The Business Honors 495 course for seniors may also count as an Honors College course if you present the results of your research at the Honors Independent Research Conference.