Books

Thicker Than Water: America’s Addiction to Cheap Flood Insurance

This paper is broken down into three parts. Part I traces the history and evolution of flood insurance in the United States, including the establishment of federal flood insurance and key reforms over the 20th and 21st centuries. Part II discusses the 2012 flood insurance reform package, subsequent legal challenges to the reforms, and the government’s response to political pressure over the reform. Part III concludes discussing the continued need for flood insurance reform, especially in a world of rising sea levels and more frequent, stronger weather events.

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Sirius XM Radio, Inc., Defendant: The Case for a Unified Federal Copyright System for Sound Recordings

This article observes the surviving gap between state and federal protection of music recordings through the lens of the current litigation against Sirius XM. Part II sets out a history of copyright protection in the music industry. Part III outlines the relevant provisions of the federal Copyright Act and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the role played in the federal system by the Copyright Royalty Board. Part IV examines the pertinent statutory property protection of music recordings in the state of California. Part V then discusses the merits of the current lawsuits against Sirius XM. After considering the potential legal and economic ramifications of the current lawsuits, Part VI then concludes by advocating for a unified federal system of copyright protection for all sound recordings regardless of the date on which they were originally fixed.

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When Are the People Ready? The Interplay Between Facial Sufficiency and Readiness Under CPL Section 30.30

In this article, we will explore the intersecting concepts of conversion, facial sufficiency, and readiness. As we shall see, readiness for trial does not necessarily follow from the conversion of a complaint and dismissal on CPL section 30.30 grounds does not necessarily follow from a finding of facial insufficiency.

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It’s Not That Difficult: The Shared Economic Growth Solution to Tax Reform

In this article, I outline the latest version of the Shared Economic Growth package proposal and explain how it accomplishes all of its goals, with reference to some of the recent scholarly works that support it. I then walk through the derivation of the numbers to show that it really works, based on conservative assumptions and without any reliance on economic growth or voodoo, and that it would provide a substantial addition to revenue in the coming years. These numbers are based on 2010 data, the most recent comprehensive data available, and thus prove that the proposal works in the post-2008 economy. I next compare the proposal to the emerging “corporate consensus.” Finally, I walk through an analysis of the propriety of certain offsets that can only work as part of the Shared Economic Growth package.

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Asadi: Renegade or Precursor of Who Is a Whistleblower Under the Dodd-Frank Act?

Whistleblowers have a long and honorable history. From Ralph Nader blowing the whistle on the hazards of GM’s Corvair in Unsafe at Any Speed1 in the 1960’s to Jeffrey Wigand in 1996 exposing the duplicity of the tobacco industry, whistleblowers have put conscience ahead of career and personal success to expose corporate fraud and wrongdoing. Not surprisingly, they have had to endure ridicule and ostracism as well as financial hardship. Legislation has sought to protect them from retribution, often with mixed success. The most recent legislative effort is the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) that allows whistleblowers to collect a bounty for the whistleblowing and also protects the whistleblower from retaliatory acts by his or her employer. One of the challenges currently dividing the courts is determining who should come within the protection of the legislation. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, in Asadi v. GE Energy, interpreted the definition of “whistleblower” quite narrowly to encompass only those individuals who make information available directly to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). This interpretation by the Fifth Circuit not only rejects the broader interpretation of SEC regulations, but is also inconsistent with the decisions of various district courts that have considered this question. Part I opens with a discussion of the requirements of “whistleblower” status under both the statutory language of Dodd-Frank and the accompanying SEC regulations. Part II reviews the Asadi decision and calls into question the soundness of the court’s decision to disregard SEC regulations. Part III explores the circumstances in which administrative regulations are entitled to deference and those situations in which they may be disregarded as an overreach of power. Part IV surveys several district court decisions that have interpreted the term “whistleblower” under Dodd-Frank. Part V argues that even public policy dictates that the courts should adopt a broad interpretation of “whistleblower” so as to provide maximum safeguards against fraud and abuse. The paper concludes that the Fifth Circuit in Asadi reached an incorrect result, and, therefore, that this renegade decision which advocates a narrow scope of whistleblower protection should be rejected in future judicial interpretations of who is a whistleblower.

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Begone, Euclid!: Leasing Custom and Zoning Provision Engaging Retail Consumer Tastes and Technologies in Thriving Urban Centers

Is urban center retailing in a death spiral? Competition for consumers with Internet vendors is afoot; winners and losers shall be anointed. The threats to physical retailing in an era of the “Internet of Goods” initially are described below. Adaptations by tenants, landlords, and stakeholders in urban centers will be required quickly, and new perspectives and partnerships, including those among local and regional governments, are instrumental if physical retail operations in municipal cores are to survive. The balance of this article describes these needs from the vantage point of each stakeholder; but this article argues that integrating information and communication technological infrastructure into retail leasing practices and land use planning and zoning strategies is inescapable for the maintenance of resilient town centers. Part II of this article describes the overwhelming impact of Internet consumerism upon physical retailing while Part III explains the physical milieu’s remaining but shrinking opportunities to remain competitive with the online consumer realm. Parts IV and V demonstrate how information and communication technologies, with innovative strategizing by retailers and their landlords, can be leveraged to incite lasting consumer interest in physical shopping environments within a community’s commercial nodes. Parts VI and VII articulate the municipal imperatives, including policies to implement robust technology infrastructure and capitalizing on ICT’s inherent “intelligence,” required to maintain commercial core competitiveness.

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Mixing Law and Equity Causes of Action Does Not Preclude a Jury Trial

This article addresses the issue of the preclusion of jury trials in actions which contemplate both legal and equitable relief. Part II of this article addresses the constitutional and statutory history of New York Civil Practice Law and Rules (“CPLR”) Section 4101 concerning issues triable by a jury and the dichotomy between those actions triable by a jury and equitable actions triable by the court alone. Part III of this article addresses the interplay between CPLR Sections 4101 and 4102, concerning demand and waiver of trial by jury, and the analysis developed by the courts to determine whether a jury trial has been waived in the context of civil actions seeking both legal and equitable relief arising out of the same transaction. Part IV of this article addresses the evolution toward non-jury trial in England and Wales and the policy in favor of non-jury trials in civil actions today.

This article is written to encourage New York advocates to examine closely the analyses developed and the results which have emerged concerning waiver of a jury trial by the joinder of law and equity claims. Trial by jury, so fundamental to the American and New York systems of jurisprudence, should not be deemed waived, and is not waived, merely because litigants seek both legal and equitable relief arising from the same transaction. There is a careful analysis meant to be employed to protect the sacred right to a trial by jury, and an advocate confronted with the issue should make certain that the court properly utilizes it.

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The theory of matrices, by F.R. Gantmacher. [Translation by K.A. Hirsch]

Catalog: New Book Titles - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 08:03
Gantmakher, F. R. (Feliks Ruvimovich)
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Economic analysis of law [by] Richard A. Posner

Catalog: New Book Titles - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 08:03
Posner, Richard A
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Mathematics for decision making, a programmed basic text [by] E. Wainright Martin, Jr

Catalog: New Book Titles - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 08:03
Martin, E. Wainright (Edley Wainright)
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Face the music : a life exposed / Paul Stanley

Catalog: New Book Titles - Fri, 06/19/2015 - 08:00
Stanley, Paul, 1952-
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