How do I make Google Scholar link to Pace Full-Text?

   

Access to Full-Text Articles via Google Scholar
 
Google Scholar provides the ability to search a selection of the scholarly literature available on the World Wide Web. On the Google Scholar web site, they state: “you can search across many disciplines and sources: peer-reviewed papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles, from academic publishers, professional societies, preprint repositories, universities and other scholarly organizations” (http://scholar.google.com/scholar/about.html).
 
Many of the results links in Google Scholar will bring you to immediately available full-text documents. For many other documents, content is only available via a subscription service and you may be asked for a username and password, or a credit card number.
 
You can configure Google Scholar to show you links for those documents to which the Pace Library currently provides full-text access via one or more of our subscription databases. Then, when attempting to access one of these documents, you will be granted access after entering your MyPace Portal username and password.
 
  • Go to Google Scholar (http://scholar.google.com/), and select the “Settings” link.
  • On the “Settings” page, go to the Library Links area
  • In the search box, type “Pace University” and then click the check box to add that to the list of libraries, it will look like this after you add Pace University Library to your list:
 
Library Links
  (what's this?)
  
 
Show library access links for (choose up to three libraries):
 
Pace University Library (Full-Text @ Pace U.)
Open WorldCat (Library Search)
 
 
 
In the Results Window area, click inside the box to select this option.
 
Results Window
  Open search results in a new browser window.
 
By selecting this option, when you are off campus you will only have to authenticate once by providing your MyPace Portal username and password. Otherwise, you will have to re-open another browser and go back to Google scholar and go through the authentication process again.
 
Save your preferences when finished and return to search.
 
 
 
 
 
Now you can run a search in Google Scholar using your search terms, for example:
 
 
 
In the list of results, there are usually journal articles listed as well as books; in the journal article citations look for: Full-Text @ Pace U.”:
 
 
 
When clicked, the “Full-Text @ Pace U.” link launches a “Search for Article” window that indicates when we have access to a publication. Follow the links to the articles or journals in the “Search for Article” box (as seen below). Click on Article to take you directly to the full-text article.
 
  Content is available via the following links:
 
CoverageRange
Links to content
Resource
03/01/2001 - 1 year ago
 
 
 
If you are off-campus, you will be prompted to enter  your MyPace portal username and password, and then the article will be displayed, like so:
 
 
Full Text (18961   words)
Copyright ASLIB. The Association for Information Management Mar 2001
[Headnote]
The concepts of `information literacy' and `digital literacy' are described, and reviewed, by way of a literature survey and analysis. Related concepts, including computer literacy, library literacy, network literacy, Internet literacy and hyper-literacy are also discussed, and their relationships elucidated. After a general introduction, the paper begins with the basic concept of 'literacy', which is then expanded to include newer forms of literacy, more suitable for complex information environments. Some of these, for example library, media and computer literacies, are based largely on specific skills, but have some extension beyond them. They lead to general concepts, such as information literacy and digital literacy, which are based on knowledge, perceptions and attitudes, though reliant on the simpler skills-based literacies.
 
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact a librarian!
 
Birnbaum Reference Desk: (212) 346-1331
Mortola Reference Desk: (914) 773-3381