Robert Scott Pace

Robert Scott Pace was appointed president of Pace Institute in 1942, following the death of his father, Homer S Pace. Robert Pace served in the armed forces but returned in 1945 to see the school through a hectic post-World War II period, which saw the institution mature physically and intellectually and become accepted into the ranks of colleges and universities. During Pace’s tenure, from 1942 to 1960, Pace Institute became Pace College; New York State approved the BBA and BA degrees; Pace moved from a few rented floors at 225 Broadway to its own 16-story building at 41 Park Row; and the Graduate Division was established. Widely recognized for the strength of its business education, even the Ivy League offered praise when a Princeton faculty member wrote, “It is accepted here at Princeton that your training program is superior to those offered at the Wharton School, Temple University, and Rutgers University.”

Robert Pace nominated Edward J. Mortola, who was then vice president at Pace, to be the college's third President. Robert Pace was fully convinced that his designated successor was the right person to shepherd Pace’s plans. Robert Pace retired from the presidency in 1960 and shortly thereafter Edward J. Mortola became President of Pace College.

On November 19, 1989, after having been retired for 29 years, Robert Pace died of respiratory failure at King's Row Adult Residence in Middletown, New Jersey. He was 85 years old.