ED COURSES (ED 523 - ED 659)

 

ED 523 MIDDLE CHILDHOOD/EARLY ADOLESCENCE: COMMUNITY, CULTURE AND IDENTITY (3 credits)
This course is both a celebration of Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence and their families and an opportunity to examine the extent to which the New York State Standards support this purpose. To this end, this student and community-centered interdisciplinary course (sociology, psychology, philosophy) explores the lives of Middle Childhood/Early Adolescents through the lenses of youth culture, popular culture, community, and interpersonal relationships. This course is integrated through field-based experiences/apprenticeships in such settings as juvenile detention centers, community service agencies, popular culture sites and a diverse range of middle schools.
 
ED 524 DIFFERENTIATING CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION: MIDDLE CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3 credits)
This course builds on the themes established in ED 523 and involves the student in the relationship between the unique culture of Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence and best practice in teaching. Attention is given to the immigrant/diaspora experience of Middle Childhood as well as the effect of variant levels of literacy and English language skills on content-area instruction. Using technology to enhance Middle Childhood learning is explored. The field-based experience/apprenticeship for this course will focus on curriculum and provide the student with an opportunity to observe the effect of literacy development (including English language learning), socio-economic status, and youth and popular cultures on curriculum selection and academic instruction.
Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 523
 
ED 551 FOUNDATIONS OF LINGUISTICS AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION (3 credits)
This course provides the current research and theories forming the foundation of bilingual education as well as foundations of socio- and psycholinguistics. Candidates will examine the philosophical, sociological and historical perspectives on bilingual education, nationwide bilingual education and English as a second language program models, and multicultural perspectives in bilingual education and bilingualism. This course is required for all candidates seeking a Bilingual Education Extension to a NYS teaching certificate through Pace University.
 
ED 553 METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING IN THE PRE K-6 BILINGUAL CLASSROOM (3 credits)
Using culture literature, this course focuses on helping students construct meaning in classroom literacy activities. The course examines language teaching methods and models, and effective, integrative instructional practices in teaching of reading and language arts and other core subjects (mathematics, science and social studies) to the bilingual child. Included are methods of teaching English language arts and literacy to bilingual English learners, using the native language and English and methods of teaching native language arts to bilingual English language learners. Field experience/apprenticeship in bilingual classroom is required. This course is required for all candidates seeking a Bilingual Education Extension to a NYS teaching certificate at the Childhood or Early Childhood Levels through Pace University.
 
ED 554 METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING BILINGUAL STUDENTS IN GRADES 7-12 CONTENT AREAS (3 credits)
Using cultural literature and subject matter content, this course focuses on helping students construct meaning in classroom literacy and content-instruction activities. In this course candidates examine language teaching methods and models, and effective, integrative instructional practices in teaching of content area subjects (i.e., mathematics, science, etc.) to the bilingual student. Included are methods of teaching English language arts and literacy to bilingual English-learners, using the native language and English, and methods of teaching native language arts to bilingual English-language learners. This course explores methods of assessment, instructional design and classroom management appropriate for content specific classrooms in which bilingual students are participants. Field experience in a bilingual setting is required. This course is required for all candidates seeking a Bilingual Education Extension to a NYS teaching certificate at the Middle Childhood or Adolescent levels at Pace University.
 
ED 615 ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR EDUCATING STUDENTS WITH LOW-INCIDENCE DISABILITIES (3 credits)
The student will explore a wide range of technology applications for children with disabilities and consider needs based on the type of disabling condition, such as physical, cognitive, sensory disabilities or multiple complex needs as demonstrated by children with pervasive developmental needs. Explorations of technology emphasizes the integration of assistive technology into effective instructional practices that improve learning outcomes and increase technology information and review research on best practices for implementation of technology-based solutions. Note: this course is taken through the New York Medical College  through a special collaborative agreement with the Pace University  School of Education.
 
ED 616 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT & INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING WITH TECHNOLOGY (3 credits)
The student will develop curriculum materials that integrate technology. They will use instructional techniques that foster cooperative learning, collaborative research and inquiry, reflective teaching, and constructivist approaches to instruction. The student will create instructional applications designed to improve learning for all students. Prerequisites: TS 654.
 
ED 630 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN THE SCHOOL CONTEXT (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of the theories and current research in the area of human development from the prenatal period to adolescence. It focuses on the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and moral development of typically-developing children and children with special needs. Various aspects of developmental contexts will be explored, including but not necessarily limited to: heredity, culture, community, socioeconomic levels/backgrounds, and family. Candidates will apply developmental theories to the school context. Fieldwork required. Prerequisites: None
 
ED 631 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)
In this course, candidates will understand and identify differences in approaches to learning and performance, including different learning styles, and ways students demonstrate learning. Candidates will explore how individual experiences, talents, disabilities, and prior learning influence learning. They will examine the impact of language, culture, family, and community values on learning and behavior. Candidates will examine successful models of collaboration with specialists and families to address students’ exceptional learning needs. This course will also focus on formal and informal methods of assessing student learning to identify learner strengths and differentiate instruction for a wide variety of student needs to facilitate academic success as well as social and personal development. Course participants will learn, understand and utilize results of assessment and principles of curriculum development to plan instructional tasks appropriate to the needs of all students. They will explore the role of technology in diverse classrooms, and will learn to reflect on their own practices, act on feedback, and change what does not work. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisites: None
 
ED 632 LANGUAGE, MEANING, AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN DIVERSE SCHOOLS (3 credits)
This course will expose candidates to theories of how language is used in the school context and how it affects cognitive and social development. Content includes an overview of the relationship between language and thought, understanding classroom discourse by discussing the foundational issues related to language, exploring how students construct meaning in everyday classroom discourse, and how teachers can help students use language to develop critical thinking abilities and positive social relationship with peers. Candidates will learn to take a worldview, examining how various cultures contribute to the complexity of what and how we learn and know, using technology to make connections with teachers and students across the globe. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisites: None
 
ED 633 FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (3 credits)
In this course candidates will study the history, philosophy, and sociology of education. They will examine ethical, legal, political and economic issues as well as current trends in education including technology’s effect on education. They will learn about the roles and responsibilities of teachers and other professional staff, students, parents, community members, school administrators, and other with regard to education. Candidates will learn about the structure and organization of New York State’s educational system. In order to develop productive relationships and interactions among school, home, and community they will focus on various strategies including conflict resolution. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisites: None
 
ED 634 EARLY CHILDHOOD LITERACY: PROCESSES AND PRACTICES (3 credits)
This introductory methods course will focus on instructional practices that support children’s growth in reading and writing at the emergent and early levels. Language acquisition theories and early childhood literacy models will be explored within the context of an integrated, balanced literacy curriculum. Specific topics will include the literate environment, organizing for and planning instruction, differentiating instruction through flexible grouping, using children’s literature as a vehicle for instruction, using technology, and authentic assessment techniques as well as mandated, standardized assessments. The course will provide insights into early prevention programs and collaboration strategies for supporting students with special needs. Fieldwork is required.
 
ED 635 LITERACY: REFLECTIVE PRACTICES (3 credits)
This course will continue the exploration of the reading and writing processes and practices that support the literacy development of children in the intermediate grades, with a dual focus on learning to read and reading to learn across the curriculum. Topics will include literacy theory and
models at the intermediate level. Candidates will learn to organize instruction to meet diverse needs, plan integrated, thematic literature-based units, word study and vocabulary development, examine reading and writing in the content areas, use technology to support literacy development and metacognitive strategies. They will examine the role of the classroom teacher in reading assessment, diagnosis, and prescription. Insights into the social contexts of literacy will be provided, along with the need for collaboration and the impact of local and state literacy standards and testing mandates. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisites: ED 634
 
ED 636 METHODS: SCIENCE INTERDISCIPLINARY TEACHING, GRADES 1-6 (3 credits)
In this course, candidates will learn about how to teach elementary science by integrating and extending lesson development through linking the sciences to writing, social studies, mathematics, and the arts. Given this, candidates will engage in curriculum development and personal instructional planning with strategies designed to all students, including those with disabilities and special needs to attain the highest level of academic achievement and independence. Candidates will use formal and informal methods of assessment as a means not only for analyzing student learning, but also for differentiating instruction. All candidates will be required to include technology and video as a means of developing and extending personal lesson planning as an adjunct to their professional growth and their ability to fully participate in student overall achievement. Fieldwork is required.
 
ED 637 METHODS: MATHEMATICS INTERDISCIPLINARY TEACHING, GRADES 1-6 (3 credits)
This course is designed to help provide prospective elementary school teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching mathematics for students within the full range of abilities. Candidates will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective differentiated instruction to improve student learning. They will include creative and appropriate use of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in mathematics. Candidates will also articulate a personal development plan to improve their own performance in mathematics and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement. Fieldwork is required.
 
ED 638 METHODS: SOCIAL STUDIES INTERDISCIPLINARY TEACHING, GRADES 1-6 (3 credits)
This course will focus on specific methodology designed to guide students into becoming effective social studies teachers. The course, interdisciplinary in nature, will provide candidates with opportunities for planning instruction and creating curriculum materials with the full intention of allowing all students, including those with disabilities and special needs to develop to the highest level of achievement and independence. Formal and informal methods of assessing students will be introduced as a means of identifying learner needs and creating an understanding of how to develop differentiated curriculum learner needs. All candidates will develop technology skills as they explore ways to upgrade and strengthen their potential for lesson development while xpanding their own skills for teaching social studies and enhancing student achievement. Fieldwork is required.
 
ED 639A & B INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE WITH CHILDREN I & II (3 credits)
These two optional internship experiences provide an extended field experience opportunity for those graduate students who may be seeking the best “fit” for their interests and background. Either course can be taken for credit ranging from 0 to 3 elective credits. Candidates may wish to combine the two courses for a year-long experience in one or more schools. The experience is guided by a faculty sponsor and two field-based mentor teachers and must entail experience at more than one developmental level. Prerequisites: Permission of the Chair.
 
ED 640 SECONDARY METHODS: LEARNING TO TEACH (3 credits)
This course provides a variety of instructional strategies to facilitate learning in today’s secondary classrooms. Candidates will explore the divergent structures, schedules, student body and philosophies of contemporary secondary schools. Skills emphasized include: curriculum design, lesson planning, procedures for collaboration with peers to encourage high academic achievement and independence for all students including students with disabilities and special health-care needs, and instructional uses of technology to acquire information and to communicate to enhance learning. Formal and informal assessment of student learning and instructional practices, including “sizing up,” standardized, paper and pencil, standards-based state assessments, and performance assessments and the development of appropriate rubrics will be introduced. Candidates will learn procedures to use assessment data to differentiate instruction for a wide range of student needs. Fieldwork is required.
 
ED 641 SECONDARY METHODS: MAKING ENGLISH MEANINGFUL, GRADES 7-12 (3 credits)
This course provides the beginning teacher with an opportunity to explore content specific issues, strategies for curriculum design, pedagogical methods and lesson planning facilitating meaningful learning for secondary students in English Language Arts (ELA). Collegial interaction to encourage high achievement in literacy for all secondary students (including youngsters with disabilities and special health-care needs) will be emphasized and an opportunity provided to explore instructional uses of technology (including assistive technology) to acquire information, to communicate and to enhance learning. Formal and informal assessment of the integrated strands of  reading/writing/listening/speaking, including various types of literacy assessments (teacher-designed and state-wide standards-based assessments) will be introduced as well as procedures to utilize this assessment data in order to differentiate instruction for a wide range of student needs. Analysis of literary elements/ techniques (“form follows meaning”) will be central to building skills in teaching poetry, the short story, the novel, the Shakespearean and contemporary play, the research project, the newspaper and non-fiction. Candidates will practice presenting genre-based ELA micro-lessons with interdisciplinary connections for peer/instructor feedback. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: ED 640
 
ED 642 SECONDARY METHODS: MAKING SOCIAL STUDIES MEANINGFUL, GRADES 7-12 (3 credits)
This course is designed to help provide prospective social studies teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching social studies to students with a wide range of abilities. Candidates will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Candidates will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Candidates will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in social studies and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: ED 640
 
ED 643 SECONDARY METHODS: MAKING MATHEMATICS MEANINGFUL, GRADES 7-12 (3 credits)
This course is designed to help provide prospective mathematics teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching mathematics to students with a wide range of abilities. Candidates will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Candidates will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Candidates will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in mathematics and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: ED 640
 
ED 644 SECONDARY METHODS: MAKING SCIENCE MEANINGFUL, GRADES 7-12  (3 credits)
This course is designed to help provide prospective science teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching science to students with a wide range of abilities. Candidates will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction  to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Candidates will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Candidates will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in science and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: ED 640
 
ED 645 SECONDARY METHODS: MAKING MODERN LANGUAGE MEANINGFUL, GRADES 7-12 (3 credits)
This course is designed to help provide prospective modern language teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching modern languages to students with a wide range of abilities. Candidates will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Candidates will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Candidates will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in modern languages and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: ED 640
 
ED 646 SECONDARY METHODS: MAKING BUSINESS MEANINGFUL, GRADES 7-12 (3 credits)
This course is designed to help provide prospective business teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching business to students with a wide range of abilities. Candidates will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Candidates will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Candidates will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in business and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement. Fieldwork is required.  Prerequisite: ED 640
 
ED 647 SECONDARY METHODS: MAKING ART MEANINGFUL, GRADES 7-12  (3 credits)
This course is designed to help provide prospective art teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching art to students with a wide range of abilities. Candidates will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Candidates will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Candidates will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in art and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisites: ED 640
 
ED 649 A & B INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE WITH ADOLESCENTS I & II  (0-3 credits [each])
Extended field experience for those who elect to acquire extensive experience across several adolescent situations and developmental levels. For many, this is an opportunity to earn elective credit while exploring particular courses, age levels, and/or teaching methodologies. Candidates are supervised by a faculty sponsor and guided through the experience by field-based mentor teachers.
 
ED 650 RESEARCH AND THEORIES IN LITERACY DEVELOPMENT: LITERACY LEARNING, BIRTH-GRADE 12 (3 credits)
This foundation course focuses on research and theory regarding the process of literacy development from the early emergent through the intermediate levels. Theories of language and cognition are considered within historical and social contexts. Topics include the developmental nature of reading and writing, the relationship between oral language and literacy development, factors that affect literacy development and the impact of sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, and brain research on literacy acquisition.
 
ED 654 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE IN THE PRIMARY AND INTERMEDIATE GRADES (3 credits)
This course explores a wide range of children’s literature, appropriate for birth through grade 6, and focuses on the selection and evaluation of literature in the genres of fiction and non-fiction, for instructional and recreational purposes. The course reviews current theories, research, and issues related to literature study, critical literacy, literary elements, genres and narrative/expository text structures. The utilization of children’s literature in reading and writing instruction across the disciplines will be emphasized, as well as strategies that promote respect for diversity through multicultural literature, and the promotion of life-long reading habits in children.
 
ED 655A EARLY LITERACY LEARNING: INSTRUCTIONAL MODELS AND METHODS I BIRTH-GRADE 3 (3 credits)
This course reviews the developmental aspects of literacy acquisition, and provides insights into early literacy processes and instructional practices from multiple perspectives. Candidates will investigate current research on early childhood instructional models and best practices. They will examine their assumptions regarding the concept of balance in integrated literacy programs, as balance relates to the literate environment, organization and anagement of early literacy programs, word study, the construction of meaning, the utilization of literature-based programs, differentiation of instruction, and authentic assessment.
 
ED 655B LITERACY INSTRUCTION IN THE INTERMEDIATE GRADES: INSTRUCTIONAL MODELS AND METHODS II GRADES 3-6 (3 credits)
This course offers in-depth exploration of the reading and writing processes involved as children, in the intermediate grades, continue to learn to read and read to learn. Candidates will apply current research on best practices, as they investigate instructional models, and focus on integrating literacy processes and instructional practices across the disciplines. Topics will include the development of instructional strategies to meet diverse needs; growth in fluency through word study and vocabulary development; the utilization of metacognitive strategies in the construction of meaning; reading/writing across the curriculum via integrated thematic instruction; the use of children’s literature in developing narrative and expository text structures; parallel task design in reading and writing, as required by state ELA standards and mandated ELA assessments.
 
ED 656 LITERACY IN THE CONTENT AREA (GR. 5-12)  (3 credits)
This course explores to build literacy in the content areas, grades 5-12. Issues discussed include strategies for building reading comprehension, constructing meaning, and building fluency through the use of non-fiction selections in the content areas. Approaches for developing skills in vocabulary, study skills, listening, writing, speaking are examined throughout all disciplines. The course includes an analysis of reading/writing tasks on state/local exams in addition to procedures to develop parallel tasks in classroom. Current scoring/assessment practices of the NYS ELA: 4th, 8th are examined. Regents exams are addressed, as well as the exploration of diagnostic, informal reading inventories, and the use of literacy portfolios at the intermediate and secondary levels.
 
ED 657 RESEARCH AND THEORIES IN DEVELOPING LITERACY: THE PROFICIENT LEARNERS (GR. 5-12) (3 credits)
This course focuses on research and theory regarding the process of literacy at the adolescent level. Theories of language and cognition are considered within historic and social contexts. Topics include the developmental nature of reading and writing, the relationship between oral language and literacy development, factors that affect literacy development and the impact of sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, and brain research on literacy acquisition.
 
ED 658 UNDERSTANDING WRITING PROCESS AND CLASSROOM APPLICATION IN THE ELEMENTARY AND ADOLESCENT GRADES (3 credits)
This course introduces a repertoire of strategies for writing with children and explores model integrated writing programs. Writing is examined, as a recursive, developmental process, and participants will explore the writing process through their own writing experiences as well as through an investigation of relevant professional reading and current research. Topics addressed include the teacher as writer, research on children’s writing development and writing instruction, processes and modes of writing (descriptive, narrative, expository, persuasive), and writing assessment models.
 
ED 659 ADOLESCENT LITERATURE (3 credits)
This course provides a survey of the best in adolescent literature in grades 5-12, emphasizing the importance of matching the interests and needs of the student to specific reading materials. Topics will include the selection and evaluation of adolescent/young adult literature in fiction and non-fiction, including poetry and drama; the functions of literature and how literature is shaped by social, cultural and historical processes; the authentic portrayal of cultural diversity in literature; the importance of literature in promoting personal and social growth. There will be a focus on instructional strategies that integrate the language arts strands through tasks that require the analysis of literary elements, as well as the creative expression in response to selected works.