School of Education Course Descriptions - ED

ED-Level Courses

 

 

ED 500 - Teaching English Language Learners: Applied Psycho-Sociolinguistics  (3 credits)

This course is an overview of the current theories and research in psycho-sociolinguistics and their application in second language acquisition. It begins with a discussion on what is means to be a second language learner in a broad social, cultural, and historical context. It then examines some important factors that influence second language acquisitions such as the on-set age of exposure to a second language, the effects of the first language (L1) on the acquisition of a second language (L2), the L1 and L2 learning environments, the cultural patterns of discourse, the parents’ educational and socio-economic background, their child-rearing beliefs, gender and individual differences, and the potential effect of L2 acquisition has on the development of the learner’s emotion, cognition, and identity. Finally, it focuses on L2 learning in the school context by exploring various teaching strategies that aim to utilize the funds of knowledge of second language learners and maximize their learning potential.

 

ED 501 - Survey of Mathematics  (3 credits)

The course is the first course in an intensive mathematics immersion program for candidates seeking to be teachers of mathematics. Topics will be drawn from the big ideas of mathematics, including mathematical reasoning and communication, number sense and operation, algebra, geometry, calculus, trigonometry, probability, statistics and discrete mathematics.

 

ED 502 - Survey of Geometry  (3 credits)

This course provides candidates with an opportunity to deepen their content area knowledge in geometry. Topics from Euclidean geometry include symmetry, area and volume, polygons, polyhedra, and rigid motions. Euclidean geometry and non-Euclidean geometrics are compared and contrasted. The course emphasizes mathematical reasoning rather than mathematical results. Instruction in communicating mathematics is important component. Candidates will demonstrate understanding of concepts and operations in geometry or an advanced level. Candidates will be able to utilize concepts and operations in geometry for the creation of lesson and unit plans appropriate for grades 7-12 students.

 

ED 503 - Survey of Algebra  (3 credits)

This course provides candidates with an opportunity to deepen their content area knowledge in algebra. Topics include graphing, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Topics also include matrix operations, systems of equations, sequences and series, combinatorics and topics in abstract algebra. The course emphasizes mathematical reason rather than mathematical results. Instruction in communicating mathematics is an important component. Candidates will demonstrate understanding of concepts and operations in algebra at an advanced level. Candidates will be able to utilize concepts and operations in algebra at an advanced level. Candidates will be able to utilize concepts and operations in algebra for the creation of lesson and unit plans appropriate for grade 7-12 students.

 

ED 523 - Middle Childhood / Early Adolescence: Community, Culture & Identity  (3 credits)

This course is both a celebration of Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence and their families and an opportunity to examine the extent to which the New York State Standards support this purpose. To this end, this student and community-centered interdisciplinary course (sociology, psychology, philosophy) explores the lives of Middle Childhood/Early Adolescents through the lenses of youth culture, popular culture, community, and interpersonal relationships. This course is integrated through field-based experiences/apprenticeships in such settings as juvenile detention centers, community service agencies, popular culture sites and a diverse range of middle schools.

 

ED 524 - Differentiating Curriculum and Instruction: Middle Childhood Education  (3 credits)

This course builds on the theme established in ED 523 and involves the student in the relationship between the unique culture of Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence and best practice in teaching. Attention is given to the immigrant/Diaspora experience of Middle Childhood as well as the effect of variant levels of literacy and English language skills on content-area instruction. Using technology to enhance Middle Childhood learning is explored. The field-based experience/apprenticeship for this course will focus on curriculum and provide the student with an opportunity to observe the effect of literacy development (including English language learning), socio-economic status, and youth and popular cultures on curriculum selection and academic instruction.
 

ED 550A - Teacher Opportunity Corps - A  (1 credit)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.

 

ED 550B - Teacher Opportunity Corps - B  (1 credit)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.

 

ED 550C - Teacher Opportunity Corps - C  (1 credit)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.

 

ED 551 - Foundations of Bilingual Education  (3 credits)

This course provides the current research and theories forming the foundation of bilingual education as well as foundations of socio- and psycholinguistics. You will examine the philosophical, sociological and historical perspectives on bilingual education, nationwide bilingual education and English as a second language program models, and multicultural perspectives in bilingual education and bilingualism. This course is required for all students seeking a Bilingual Education Extension to a NYS teaching certificate through Pace University.

 

ED 552 - Methods and Materials of Teaching in the Pre K-6 Bilingual Classroom  (3 credits)

Using culture literature, this course focuses on helping students construct meaning in classroom literacy activities. The course examines language teaching methods and models, and effective, integrative instructional practices in teaching of reading and language arts and other core subjects (mathematics, science and social studies) to the bilingual child. This course is required for all students seeking a Bilingual Education Extension to a NYS teaching certificate at the Childhood or Early Childhood Levels. Field experience and/or an Apprenticeship in bilingual settings and successful completion of NY State assessments in bilingual education are also required for the certification extension.

 

ED 553 - Methods and Materials of Teaching in Pre K-6 in the Bilingual Classroom  (3 credits)

Using culture literature, this course focuses on helping students construct meaning in classroom literacy activities. The course examines language teaching methods and models, and effective, integrative instructional practices in teaching of reading and language arts and other core subjects (mathematics, science and social studies) to the bilingual child. Included are methods of teaching English language arts and literacy to bilingual English learners, using the native language and English and methods of teaching native language arts to bilingual English language learners. Field experience/apprenticeship in bilingual classroom is required. This course is required for all students seeking a Bilingual Education Extension to a NYS teaching certificate at the Childhood or Early Childhood Levels through Pace University.

 

ED 554 - Methods of Teaching Students in the Content Areas (Grades 7-12) (3 credits)

Using cultural literature and subject matter content, this course focuses on helping students construct meaning in classroom literacy and content-instruction activities. In this course you will examine language teaching methods and models, and effective, integrative instructional practices in the teaching of content area subjects (i.e. mathematics, science, etc.) to the bilingual student. Included are methods of teaching English language arts and literacy to bilingual English learners, using the native language and English and methods of teaching native language arts to bilingual English learners. This course explores methods of assessment, instructional design and classroom management appropriate for content specific classrooms in which bilingual students are participants. This course is required for all students seeking a Bilingual Education Extension to a NYS teaching certificate at the Middle Childhood or Adolescent Levels. Field experience and/or an Apprenticeship in bilingual settings and successful completion of NY State assessments in bilingual education are also required for certification. This course is required for all students seeking a Bilingual Education Extension to a NYS teaching certificate at the Middle Childhood or Adolescent levels at Pace University.

 

ED 556A Curriculum, Methods, and Assessment: Teaching English Language and Literacy to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students (3 credits)

This course examines topics and issues related to teaching English language and literacy to culturally and linguistically diverse students in line with a brief overview language acquisition and development. Candidates are introduced to curriculum, methods and assessment in the TESOL field and these materials are examined for their effectiveness in helping English introduction language learners. Major topics covered include second language and literacy development; a historical overview of language teaching methods and approaches; current interactive teaching methods; planning and implementing for standards -based ESL and content instruction; using resources and technology effectively in ESL and content instruction; teaching the language and literacy skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing to English language learners; and integrative approaches. Issues of assessment for English language learners, language proficiency assessment, and classroom-based assessment for ESL are also introduced in this course. This course is required for all TESOL and Bilingual Education teacher candidates. Field experience in an ESOL/bilingual setting is required. Pre-requisite or co-requisite: None

ED 556B: Curriculum, Methods and Assessment: Teaching Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Across the Content Areas (3 credits)

This course focuses on helping bilingual English learners construct meaning in classroom literacy and content-instruction activities in content areas in all grade-levels and beyond. In this course candidates examine language teaching methods and models, and effective, integrative instructional practices in teaching of content area subjects (i.e., mathematics, science, etc.) to the emergent bilinguals. Included are methods of teaching English language arts and literacy to bilingual English learners, using the native language and English, and methods of teaching native language arts to bilingual English language learners. This course also explores curriculum standards, methods and practice of assessment for English language learners, including in-depth discussion of language proficiency assessment, classroom-based assessment, and identification of English language learners; ESL and special education; instructional design and classroom management appropriate for content specific classrooms in which emergent bilinguals are participants. This course is required for all TESOL and Bilingual Education candidates. Field experience in an ESOL/bilingual setting is required. Prerequisite or co-requisite: None

 

ED 600 - Independent Study in Graduate Education  (1-9 credits/lecture hours)

 

ED 600A - Independent Study in Grad Education  (1-9 credits/lecture hours)

 

ED 610 - Goal Directed Teaching and Learning  (3 credits)

This course helps you: to establish clear, measurable goals based on high expectations for students, and plan your instructional program around these goals; to invest and engage students and students' families in the goals and in the process for achieving those goals; to employ effective strategies to ensure that your students reach the academic goals; assess your students regularly to check for understanding, and make adjustments when necessary to maximize student learning; to establish a classroom environment that supports and inspires students to achieve their goals; to determine how to operate most effectively as a new member of your school and community; and to measure your success against student goals and work to constantly improve your students' performance. This course is provided as a component of the pre-service TFA Summer Institute.
 

ED 613 - Project-based Learning Across the Curriculum  (3-6 credits)

Candidates in this course will develop, implement and analyze instruction for teaching cross-curricular concepts that are often misunderstood by youth. Through an analysis of their planning and practice, candidates will explore the patterns and implications of multiple approaches of teaching for understanding. Children's substantive understanding of difficult concepts is best supported through learning that is connected, contextual, and hands-on. Candidates will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design differentiated instruction.
 

ED 615 - Assistive Technology for Students with Learning Disabilities  (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Permission of department.
The student will explore a wide range of assistive technology applications for children with disabilities and consider needs based on the type of disabling condition, such as physical, cognitive, sensory disabilities or multiple complex needs as demonstrated by children with pervasive developmental disorders. Explorations of technology emphasizes the integration of assistive technology into effective instructional practices that improve learning outcomes and increase technology information and review research on best practices for implementation of technology-based solutions. Note: this course is taken through the New York Medical College through a special collaborative agreement with the Pace University School of Education.

 

ED 616 - Curriculum Development and Instructional Planning with Technology  (3 credits)

The student will explore applications for integrating technology with instructional techniques that foster cooperative learning, collaborative research and inquiry, reflective teaching, and constructivist approaches to instruction. The student will create instructional applications designed to improve learning for all students.

 

ED 620 - Elementary Methods: Learning to Teach  (3 credits)

This course focuses on how to plan and teach, using the learning standards as both bodies of knowledge and ways of asking and answering questions, in ways that contribute meaning to the lives of children and their families. Students are provided models for instructional planning and teaching that incorporates different approaches to learning and integrates technology as both content and tool. The "Caring Classroom" is presented as a context for teaching and learning that is both accepting and empowering. Literacy is examined both from the perspective of students for whom learning to read is an emergent process and those for whom literacy is difficult to attain and requires direct instruction.

 

ED 621 - Classroom Context  (0-3 credits)

Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair.
This course focuses on how to plan and teach, using the learning standards as both bodies of knowledge and ways of asking and answering questions, in ways that contribute meaning to the lives of children and their families. You will be provided with models for instructional planning and teaching that incorporates different approaches to learning and integrates technology as both content and tool. The "Caring Classroom" is presented as a context for teaching and learning that is both accepting and empowering. Literacy is examined both from the perspective of students whom leaning to read is an emergent process and those for whim literacy is difficult to attain and requires direct instruction. Literacy and the use of children's literature provide a context for instructional strategies across the subject areas of mathematics, science, and social studies. This coursework is provided as a component of a pre-service TFA or New York City Teaching Fellow Institute.

 

ED 621M - Classroom Context: Mathematics  (3 credits)

 

ED 625 - Teaching Seminar I: Reflective Practice  (3 credits)

This course is designed to assist first-year Fellows to explore issues likely to arise in secondary classrooms. By guiding students to reflect meaningfully on their experiences, to collaborate with peers, and to maintain perspective on the larger issues of urban education, a central goal for ED 625 is to help students be as effective as possible during their first teaching semester. Among other things, we will review and discuss the instructional strategies and theories Fellows learned this summer, expand on them in different ways professionals can share their work, get constructive and meaningful feedback, and work consciously to create a professional community in our classroom.

 

ED 626 - Teaching Seminar II: Reflective Practice  (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Permission of Dr. Avdul is required.

 

ED 627 - Literacy and Humanities  (3 credits)

This course will focus on specific theories and practices designed to encourage candidates to infuse and integrate literacy knowledge and skills into humanities instruction in the elementary school classroom. This course will provide candidates with opportunities for planning instruction and creating curriculum materials with the goal of promoting all students, including those with disabilities and special needs, to develop to the highest level of achievement and independence. The course will emphasize the role that literacy plays in developing knowledge in the content areas associated with humanities. Candidates will develop appropriate strategies for teaching and assessing both formally and informally and differentiating instruction to meet student needs. All candidates will develop technology skills as they explore resources and techniques to enhance their professional development. Simultaneously, they will model new literacy based media skills for teaching humanities and enhancing student achievement. Field work is required.
 

ED 629M - Assessment and Evaluation for Teachers of Mathematics  (3 credits)

In this course you will examine assessment and evaluation as components integral to the teaching and learning of mathematics. Standardized, authentic, and curriculum-based assessments will be compared along with ways to use assessment as a teaching tool. Additionally, assessment as a way of 'sitting down beside someone' is addressed as a means of problem-solving, focusing specifically on the needs of students of mathematics. Mandated New York State and New York City assessments and the development and use of rubrics will be reviewed in detail as well as the issues surrounding high-stakes testing and standardized testing in mathematics.

ED 629S - Assessment and Evaluation of Regular and Special Needs Students  (3 credits)

In this course you will examine assessment and evaluation as components integral to the learning cycle. Standardized, authentic, and curriculum-based assessments will be compared along with ways to use assessment as a teaching tool. Additionally, assessment as a way of "sitting down beside someone" is addressed as a means of problem-solving. Mandated New York State and New York City assessments and the development and use of rubrics will be reviewed in detail as well as the issues surrounding high-stakes testing and standardized testing.

 

ED 630 - Human Development in the School Context  (3 credits)

Prerequisite:Department approval required.

This course provides an overview of the theories and current research in the area of human development from the prenatal period to adolescence. It focuses on the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and moral development of typically developing children and children with special needs. Various aspects of developmental contexts will be explored, including but not necessarily limited to: heredity, culture, community, socioeconomic levels/backgrounds, and family. Students will apply developmental theories to the school context. Fieldwork is required.

 

ED 631 - Educational Psychology  (3 credits)

In this course, students will understand and identify differences in approaches to learning and performance, including different learning styles, and ways students demonstrate learning. Students will explore how individual experiences, talents, disabilities, and prior learning influence learning. They will examine the impact of language, culture, family, and community values on learning and behavior. Students will examine successful models of collaboration with specialists and families to address students' exceptional learning needs. This course will also focus on formal and informal methods of assessing student learning to identify learner strengths and differentiate instruction for a wide variety of student needs to facilitate academic success as well as social and personal development. Course participants will learn, understand and utilize results of assessment and principles of curriculum development to plan instructional tasks appropriate to the needs of all students. They will explore the role of technology in diverse classrooms, and will learn to reflect on their own practices, act on feedback, and change what does not work. Fieldwork is required.

 

ED 632 - Language, Meaning, and Development of Global Perspectives  (3 credits)

This course will expose students to theories of how language is used in the school context and how it affects cognitive and social development. Content includes an overview of the relationship between language and thought, understanding classroom discourse by discussing the foundational issues related to language, exploring how students construct meaning in everyday classroom discourse, and how teachers can help students use language to develop critical thinking abilities and positive social relationships with peers. Students will learn to take a worldview, examining how various cultures contribute to the complexity of what and how we learn and know, using technology to make connections with teachers and students across the globe. Fieldwork is required.

 

ED 633 - Foundations of Education  (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Department approval required.
In this course students will study the history, philosophy, and sociology of education. They will examine ethical, legal, political, and economic issues as well as current trends in education including technology's effect on education. They will learn about the roles and responsibilities of teachers and other professional staff, students, parents, community members, school administrators, and others with regard to education. Students will learn about the structure and organization of New York State's educational system. In order to develop productive relationships and interactions among school, home, and community, they will focus on various strategies including conflict resolution. Fieldwork is required.

 

ED 634 - Early Childhood Literacy: Processes and Practices  (3 credits)

This introductory methods course will focus on instructional practices that support children's growth in reading and writing at the emergent and early levels. Language acquisition theories and early childhood literacy models will be explored within the context of an integrated, balanced literacy curriculum. Specific topics will include the literate environment, organizing for and planning instruction, differentiating instruction through flexible grouping, using children's literature as a vehicle for instruction, using technology, and authentic assessment techniques as well as mandated, standardized assessments. The course will provide insights into early prevention programs and collaboration strategies for supporting students with special needs. Fieldwork is required.

 

ED 634S - Early Childhood Literacy: Processes and Practices for Special and General Educators (3 credits)

This introductory methods course will focus on instructional practices that support children's growth in reading and writing at the emergent and early levels in general and special education settings. Language acquisition theories and early childhood literacy models will be explored within the context of an integrated, balanced literacy curriculum. Specific topics will include the literate environment, organizing for and planning instruction, differentiating instruction through flexible grouping, using children's literature as a vehicle for instruction, using technology, and authentic assessment techniques as well as mandated, standardized assessments. The course will provide insights into early prevention programs and collaboration strategies for supporting students with special needs.
 

ED 635 - Literacy: Reflective Practices  (3 credits)

This course will continue the exploration of the reading and writing processes and practices that support the literacy development of children in the intermediate grades, with a dual focus on learning to read and reading to learn across the curriculum. Topics will include literacy theory and models at the intermediate level. Students will learn to organize instruction to meet diverse needs, plan integrated, thematic literature-based units, word study and vocabulary development, examine reading and writing in the content areas, use technology to support literacy development and metacognitive strategies. They will examine the role of the classroom teacher in reading assessment, diagnosis, and prescription. Insights into the social contexts of literacy will be provided, along with the need for collaboration and the impact of local and state literacy standards and testing mandates. Fieldwork is required.

 

ED 636 - Methods: Science Interdisciplinary Teaching, Grades 1-6  (3 credits)

In this course, students will learn about how to teach elementary science by integrating and extending lesson development through linking the sciences to writing, social studies, mathematics, and the arts. Given this, students will engage in curriculum development and personal instructional planning with strategies designed to all students, including those with disabilities and special needs to attain the highest level of academic achievement and independence. Students will use formal and informal methods of assessment as a means not only for analyzing student learning, but also for differentiating instruction. All students will be required to include technology and video as a means of developing and extending personal lesson planning as an adjunct to their professional growth and their ability to fully participate in student overall achievement. Fieldwork is required.

 

ED 637 - Methods: Mathematics Interdisciplinary Teaching, Grades 1-6  (3 credits)

This course is designed to help provide prospective elementary school teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching mathematics for students within the full range of abilities. Students will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective differentiated instruction to improve student learning. They will include creative and appropriate use of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in mathematics. Students will also articulate a personal development plan to improve their own performance in mathematics and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement. Fieldwork is required.

 

ED 638 - Methods: Social Studies Interdisciplinary Teaching, Grades 1-6  (3 credits)

This course will focus on specific methodology designed to guide students into becoming effective social studies teachers. The course, interdisciplinary in nature, will provide students with opportunities for planning instruction and creating curriculum materials with the full intention of allowing all students, including those with disabilities and special needs to develop to the highest level of achievement and independence. Formal and informal methods of assessing students will be introduced as a means of identifying learner needs and creating an understanding of how to develop differentiated curriculum learner needs. All students will develop technology skills as they explore ways to upgrade and strengthen their potential for lesson development while expanding their own skills for teaching social studies and enhancing student achievement. Fieldwork is required.

 

ED 639A - Internship Experience with Children I  (0-3 credits)

Prerequisite:Department approval required.
This optional internship experience provides an extended field experience opportunity for those graduate students who may be seeking the best "fit" for their interests and background. Either ED 639A or ED 639B can be taken for credit ranging from 0 to 3 elective credits. Students may wish to combine the two courses for a year-long experience in one or more schools. The experience is guided by a faculty sponsor and two field-based mentor teachers and must entail experience at more than one developmental level.

 

ED 639B - Internship Experience with Children II  (0-3 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of department required.
This optional internship experience provides an extended field experience opportunity for those graduate students who may be seeking the best "fit" for their interests and background. Either ED 639A or ED 639B can be taken for credit ranging from 0 to 3 elective credits. Students may wish to combine the two courses for a year-long experience in one or more schools. The experience is guided by a faculty sponsor and two field-based mentor teachers and must entail experience at more than one developmental level.

 

ED 640 - Secondary Methods: Learning to Teach (3 credits)

This course provides a variety of instructional strategies to facilitate learning today's secondary classrooms. Students will explore the divergent structures, schedules, student body and philosophies of contemporary secondary schools. Skills emphasized include: curriculum design, lesson planning, procedures for collaboration with peers to encourage high academic achievement and independence for all students including students with disabilities and special health-care needs, and instructional uses of technology to acquire information and to communicate to enhance learning. Formal and informal assessment of student learning and instructional practices, including "sizing up," standardized, paper and pencil, standards-based state assessments, and performance assessments and the development of appropriate rubrics will be introduced. Students will learn procedures to use assessment data to differentiate instruction for a wide range of student needs. Fieldwork is required.

ED 640M - Secondary Method: Learning to Teach Mathematics (3 credits)

This course provides a variety of instructional strategies to facilitate learning in today's secondary mathematics classrooms. You will explore the divergent structures, schedules, student body, and philosophies of teaching mathematics in contemporary secondary schools. Skills emphasized include: curriculum design, lesson planning, and procedures for collaboration with peers to encourage high academic achievement and independence for all students including students with disabilities and special health-care needs, and instructional uses of technology to acquire information and to communicate to enhance learning. Formal and informal assessment of student leaning and instructional practices in mathematics, including "sizing up", standardized, paper and pencil, standards-based state assessments, and performance assessments and the development of appropriate rubrics will be introduced. You will learn procedures to use assessment data to differentiate instruction for a wide range of student mathematical needs.
 

ED 640S - Secondary Methods: Learning to Teach for Special Education Teachers  (3 credits)

MST Graduate Teacher Preparation program in the School of Education. Specialty track for the NYC Teaching Fellows.
 

ED 641 - Secondary Method: Making English Meaningful, 7-12  (3 credits)

This course provides the beginning teacher with an opportunity to explore content specific issues, strategies for curriculum design, pedagogical methods and lesson planning facilitating meaningful learning for secondary students in English Language Arts (ELA). Collegial interaction to encourage high achievement in literacy for all secondary students (including youngsters with disabilities and special health-care needs) will be emphasized and an opportunity provided to explore instructional uses of technology (including assistive technology) to acquire information, to communicate and to enhance learning. Formal and informal assessment of the integrated strands of reading/writing/listening/speaking, including various types of literacy assessments (teacher-designed and state-wide standards-based assessments) will be introduced as well as procedures to utilize this assessment data in order to differentiate instruction for a wide range of student needs. Analysis of literary elements/techniques ("form follows meaning") will be central to building skills in teaching poetry, the short story, the novel, the Shakespearean and contemporary play, the research project, the newspaper and non-fiction. Students will practice presenting genre-based ELA micro-lessons with interdisciplinary connections for peer/instructor feedback. Fieldwork is required.


ED 642 - Secondary Methods: Making Social Studies Meaningful 7-12  (3 credits)

This course is designed to help provide prospective Social Studies teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching Social Studies to students with a wide range of abilities. Students will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Students will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Students will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in Social Studies and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement.


ED 643 - Secondary Methods: Making Math Meaningful, Grades 7-12  (3 credits)

This course is designed to help provide prospective Mathematics teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching Mathematics to students with a wide range of abilities. Students will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Students will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Students will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in Mathematics and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement.

 

ED 644 - Secondary Methods: Making Science Meaningful 7-12  (3 credits)

This course is designed to help provide prospective Science teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching Science to students with a wide range of abilities. Students will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Students will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Students will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in Science and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement.


ED 645 - Making World Languages Meaningful 7-12  (3 credits)

This course is designed to help provide prospective Modern Language teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching Modern Languages to students with a wide range of abilities. Students will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Students will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Students will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in Modern Languages and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement.

 

ED 646 - Secondary Methods: Making Business Meaningful 7-12  (3 credits)

This course is designed to help provide prospective Business teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching Business to students with a wide range of abilities. Students will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Students will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Students will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in Business and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement.

 

ED 647 - Secondary Methods: Making Art Meaningful 7-12  (3 credits)

This course is designed to help provide prospective Art teachers with the opportunity to develop curriculum materials and plan instruction for teaching Art to students with a wide range of abilities. Students will use formal and informal methods of assessment to design effective instruction to improve student learning. They will practice differentiating instruction to meet the needs, skills, and interests of diverse students. Students will include creative and appropriate uses of technology as a tool to enhance student learning in science. Students will reflect on their own instructional practices and articulate a personal development plan to improve their own teaching in Art and to expand their own teaching repertoire to facilitate student achievement.

 

ED 648M - Secondary Methods: Interdisciplinary Teaching in Math (3 credits)

This course builds on the pedagogical skills, curriculum design and lesson planning strategies initiated in the subject specific methods courses. Students will explore in depth collaborative techniques to integrate learning across the content areas in order to encourage high-level critical thinking/communication skills for all secondary students (embracing ESL youngsters and those with special health-care needs and/or disabilities). Technology (including assistive technology) will be explored as a way to "build bridges" across the disciplines. Participants will gain expertise in teaching their subject area by in-depth seminars with practicing professionals in their content field and then bring back this growing pedagogical proficiency in their discipline to team design interdisciplinary micro-lessons incorporating the expertise of peers from other subject areas. Assessment issues applicable to all subject disciplines, e.g., planning remedial programs, testing literacy skills (expository writing in the content areas), designing performance-based assessments (e.g., oral presentations and/or research projects), as well as constructing appropriate rubrics will be shared in the context of a contemporary school without content specific "walls."

 

ED 649A - Internship Experience with Adolescents I  (0-3 credits)

Prerequisite: Department approval required.
Formerly TCH 641A. Extended field experience for those who elect to acquire extensive experience across several adolescent situations and development levels. For many, this is an opportunity to earn elective credit while exploring particular courses, age levels, and/or teaching methodologies. Students are supervised by a faculty sponsor and guided through the experience by field-based mentor teachers.

 

ED 649B - Internship Experience with Adolescents II  (0-3 credits)

Prerequisite:Department approval required.
Extended field experience for those who elect to acquire extensive experience across several adolescent situations and development levels. For many, this is an opportunity to earn elective credit while exploring particular courses, age levels, and/or teaching methodologies. Students are supervised by a faculty sponsor and guided through the experience by field-based mentor teachers.

 

ED 650 - Research/Theory in Developing Literacy  (3 credits)

This foundation course focuses on research and theory regarding the processes of literacy development from the emergent to the proficient reader/writer. Theories of language and cognition are considered within historical/social context. Topics include the developmental nature of reading and writing, factors that affect literacy acquisition, the relation between oral language and literacy development, and the impact of sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics and brain research on literacy acquisition.


 

ED 651 - Models of Literacy Instruction and Technology B-12  (3 credits)

This course investigates models of literacy instruction, which have emerged from theory and research, birth through grade 12. Effective literacy models will be reviewed including visual literacy programs taht support, monitor and assess progress in literacy development. Topics will include an investigation of technologies for reading and writing development across the curriculum as well as an analysis of instructional models. Students will learn about the importance of collaboration between teachers in the regular classroom and teachers of students with disabilities and with students whose ltieracy skills are deficient. Students will learn how to work as a member of a professional multidisciplinary team in assessing, evaluating, planning, creating and utilizing planning for literacy as well as IFSSP and IEPs (as well as 504 accommodation plans). Students will learn how to communicate with and advocate for families and young children with developmental and acquired disorders and disabilites. Fieldwork/apprenticeship is required with this course.

 

ED 652 - Assessment in Literacy: Grades B - 12  (3 credits)

This course will inform the students of the various techniques and tools to assess literacy development, birth through grade 12. Students will have the opportunity to administer various assessments and measurement instruments including standardized tests, IRI, and the respective statewide literacy instruments used in assess reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students will gain experience in administering and interpreting various tests and using actuarial data in processing instruction and sharing test results with parents and stakeholders.


ED 653 - District-Wide/Schlool-Level Supervision of the Literacy Progam N-12  (3 credits)

This course examines the organization and administration of district-wide/school wide literacy programs (N-12). The course focuses on issues related to the establishment, supervision, and assessment of literacy programs at the elementary and secondary levels. Topics include current educational developments affecting literacy curriculum and supervision; roles and responsibilities of literacy consultants and supervisors; designing, monitoring, evaluating school/district programs; literacy programs; in-service program design and assessment; supervision/collaboration skills; development of community/community reporting systems to all stakeholders: annual NYS report card, parent/board of education presentations, and district/local newsletters.
 

ED 654 - Children's and Adolescent Literature, Grades (B-12)  (3 credits)

This course explores a wide range of the best in children's literature, B-12, and focuses on the selection and evaluation of literature in the various literary genres of fiction and non-fiction for instructional, information, and recreational purposes. The course reviews current theories, research and issues in literature study including historical milestones in children's literature. Literary genres, elements, forms and structures are examined with an emphasis on the uses of children's literature in reading and writing instruction through literature-based literary lessons and thematic units of study, the development of critical thinking/reading skills, and motivational strategies that promote respect for cultural diversity through literature and develop life-long reading habits in children.

 

ED 655 - Literacy Instruction Across Early and Intermediate Schooling B-6  (3 credits)

This course offers in-depth exploration of the reading and writing processes involved as children in early childhood and in the intermediate grades incrementally develop reading skills that allow them to learn to read and read to learn. Literacy theory and models at the intermediate level focus on the creation of the literate environment (Hansen model: Time, Choice, Response, Structure, Community). Topics include organizing instruction to meet diverse needs: developing fluency through word study, vocabulary development, spelling; reading for meaning (exploring prior knowledge and metacognitive strategies); reading/writing across the curriculum via thematic instruction; using children's literature; narrative and expository text structures in reading and writing; exploring authentic assessment methods/materials. The course examines the value of portfolio assessment and checklists. ELA standards/assessments including parallel task design will be reviewed as well as strategies for working with at-risk students.

 

ED 655A - Early Literacy Instruction  (3 credits)

This course reviews the developmental aspects of literacy acquisition, and provides insights into early literacy processes and instructional practices from multiple perspectives. Candidates will investigate current research on early childhood instructional models and best practices. They will examine their assumptions regarding the concept of balance in integrated literacy programs, as balance relates to the literate environment, organization, and management of early literacy programs, word study, the construction of meaning, the utilization of literature-based programs, differentiation of instruction, and authentic assessment.

 

ED 655B - Literacy Instruction in the Intermediate Grades 3-6  (3 credits)

The course offers in-depth exploration of the reading and writing processes involved as children, in the intermediate grades, continue to learn to read and read to learn. Candidates will apply current research on best practices, as they investigate instructional models, and focus on integrating literacy processes and instructional practices across the disciplines. Topics will include the development of instructional strategies to meet diverse needs; growth in fluency through word study and vocabulary development; the utilization of metacognitive strategies in the construction of meaning; reading/writing across the curriculum via integrated thematic instruction; the use of children's literature in developing narrative and expository text structures; parallel task design in reading and writing, as required by state ELA standards and mandated ELA assessments.

 

ED 656 - Literacy in the Content Area  (3 credits)

This course explores to build literacy in the content area, grades 5-12. Issues discussed include strategies for building reading comprehension, constructing meaning, and building fluency through the use of non-fiction selections in the content areas. Approaches for developing skills in vocabulary, study skills, listening, writing, and speaking are examined throughout all disciplines. The course includes an analysis of reading-writing tasks on state/local exams in addition to procedures to develop parallel tasks in the classroom. Current scoring/assessment practices of the NYS ELA: 4th, 8th are examined. Regents exams are addressed, as well as the exploration of diagnostic, informal reading inventories, and the use of literacy portfolios at the intermediate and secondary levels.

 

ED 657 - Models and Methods for Supporting Needs of Literacy at Adolescence (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Core courses in the MST Program or the Literacy Specialist MSEd
This course focuses on research and theory regarding the process of literacy at the adolescent level. Theories of language and cognition are considered within historic and social contexts Topics include the developmental nature of reading and writing, the relationship between the oral language and literacy development, factors that affect literacy development, and the impact of sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, and brain research on literacy acquisition.
 

ED 658 - Understanding Writing Processes  (3 credits)

This course introduces a repertoire of strategies for writing with children and explores models of integrated writing programs. Writing is examined as a recursive, developmental process. Participants will explore the writing process through their own writing experiences as well as through an investigation of relevant professional reading and current research. Topics addressed include the teacher as writer, research on students' writing development and writing instruction, processes and modes of writing; descriptive, narrative, expository, persuasive, and writing assessment models.

 

ED 660 - Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Education  (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the field of early childhood in the United States as well as in some other cultures. Students will study the philosophical, sociological and theoretical foundations of the field of early childhood education. They will learn about the impact of critical historical events on early childhood education. They will observe and analyze different program models. Current topics and issues, such as advocacy, professionalism, ethics, and accreditation, will be considered. Fieldwork/apprenticeship required.
 

ED 661 - Understanding Young Children in the School Context  (3 credits)

This course focuses on how to apply child development theories in the school context. Students will learn how context (culture, community, family, etc.) can influence early development and how educators can incorporate the contextual information in early childhood classrooms. They will examine how educators can cultivate the physical, cognitive, language, literacy, social, emotional and moral development of young children (both with typical development and with developmental and acquired disorders and disabilities) through play, peer relations, and a variety of innovative classroom activities. Fieldwork/apprenticeship required.
 

ED 662 - Curriculum Design and Development in Early Childhood  (3 credits)

This course focuses on the guidelines and principles of curriculum development in different areas (language, literacy, logical thinking, scientific inquiry, social and emotional etc.) within the framework of integrated curricula. Students will learn about the importance of play in early childhood and what actually constitutes developmentally appropriate curriculum and instruction. Students will begin to select, construct and evaluate developmentally appropriate materials to foster learning and development. Students will also focus on the influence of the environment and classroom management on children's development and learning. Emphasis is placed on how to apply effective behavior management strategies to promote everyday learning and development of young children. The use of technology in the early childhood classroom is explored. Field experience/Apprenticeship required.
 

ED 663 - Curriculum in Early Childhood Education  (3 credits)

Students will build on experiences from prior courses and develop, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate integrated learning experiences that meet New York State standards. Attention will be paid to implementing and evaluating curriculum materials and activities to enhance children's language and literacy development. Students will utilize informal and formal assessment in their planning and evaluation. Fieldwork/apprenticeship experience is required.
 

ED 665 - Research Seminar in Early Childhood Education  (3 credits)

This research seminar accompanies the Early Childhood Practicum and features an action research project at the early childhood level. The research/product represents the student's capstone experience for their M.S.Ed. in Early Childhood and must demonstrate the teacher as change agent at the Early Childhood level.

 

ED 666 - Pre-kindergarten and Kindergarten Practicum  (3 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of Early Childhood Coordinator required.

Practicum at the pre-kindergarten and kindergarten level. This experience requires a total of 20 full days to be spent in an Early Childhood Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten setting or both. The time may be divided between the two levels (Pre-K and K) with additional hours spent in a community-based setting. For those currently teaching, community-based settings are available as summer programs. Additionally, with permission of the student's school district, the time can be distributed between classes on site and under the supervision of both the practicum representative and practicum mentor.


ED 667 - Grades I and II Practicum (3 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of Early Childhood Coordinator required.

Practicum at the first and second grade level for those who have had no prior experience at that level. This experience requires a total of 20 full days to be spent in grades one or two or both. With the permission of the student's school district, the time can be distributed between classes on site and under the supervision of both the practicum representative and practicum mentor.
 

ED 670 - Trends and Issues in Special Education  (3 credits)

This course investigates current findings regarding the symptomatology and etiology of developmental and acquired disabilities, disorders and language-based learning problems. Legal and educational issues surrounding disabilities and disorders are examined as well as responsibilities of professionals involved in the evaluation and educational process. The course takes a prenatal to adulthood perspective and emphasizes the role of the early childhood, childhood, middle childhood, adolescent teaching in the identification, assessment, planning, instruction, support, transition services and technology appropriate to the needs of the student and the level of instruction. Required field experience/Apprenticeship accompanies this course.

 

ED 671 - Assessment, Diagnosis, Evaluation and Instructional Planning  (3 credits)

Formerly EDL 632. This course is an applied course in standardized and curriculum-based assessment, functional behavioral assessment, as well as multidisciplinary diagnosis, evaluation and instructional planning for students who are suspected or confirmed to have disorders or disabilities that negatively impact their ability to learn or maintain appropriate classroom and/or social behavior. This course also covers developmental assessment as it relates to making appropriate educational plans. This is a required course for those seeking certification in Teaching Students with Disabilities (early childhood, childhood, middle childhood and adolescent levels). Professional Seminars and field experiences accompany this course.

 

ED 672 - Differentiating Curriculum and Instruction (3 credits)

The selection and differentiation of curriculum and instruction is examined from the perspective of students whose individual learning needs cannot be met through the curriculum or instructional model used for general classroom instruction. This course is designed to provide Early Childhood, Childhood, Middle Childhood and Adolescent teachers with the skills needed to include students whose individual needs vary along a continuum from giftedness to moderate and severe disabilities (includes students with 504 accommodation needs, students with high-incidence disorders and disabilities, and those from diverse background such as English language learners and those for whom attaining basic literacy is a struggle) in the regular classroom. This course is a required course for those seeking certification in Teaching Students with Disabilities, Literacy, and for students seeking gifted extension.


ED 672A - Differentiating Instruction in Inclusive Secondary Settings  (3 credits)

Prerequisite:ED 640 and ED 641-647 or equivalent methods courses.
This course will explore the selection and differentiation of curriculum and instruction from the perspective of students in secondary inclusive classrooms. The extraordinary needs of adolescent students identified as disabled, gifted and talented, and culturally and linguistically diverse will be the focus. Through class discussions and course assignments, participants will acquire an understanding of the dynamics of differentiated instruction, design classrooms that facilitate differentiated instruction and plan, employ and assess differentiated lessons in inclusive secondary subject area classes. Fieldwork in inclusive settings is required.
 

ED 673 - Methods for Teaching Childhood Students with Disabilities  (3 credits)

An advanced course for those seeking certification in Teaching Students with Disabilities at the early childhood, childhood, middle adolescence or adolescence levels, certification in differentiated instruction, or for graduate students wishing to expand their breadth and depth of knowledge in differentiating instruction for students across the continuum of special needs (including those identified as gifted and/or talented). The course is designed to assist the professional educator in the complex task of planning and implementing classroom, instructional, and support services for students with complex needs. Appropriate selection and implementation of assistive and regular technology is emphasized. You will also learn how to participate in collaborative family, school, and community partnerships as well as advocate for families and students with disorders, disabilities, and therapeutic needs.
 

ED 673M - Advanced Instruction in the Therapeutic Classroom  (3 credits)

 

ED 674 - Classroom Community and Management  (3 credits)

This course will provide students with the theoretical and practical bases for developing classroom communities that are grounded in the concepts of caring, mutual respect, trust, safety, and valuing each member of the community. Such classrooms required teachers to model these attributes and behaviors and to teach them directly to their students, as systematically as they would teach literacy, mathematics, and science. Students will study the research and writings of educators who espouse cooperation in place of competition and who eschew "classroom management" in favor of "caring communities". They will have opportunities to develop key aspects of caring classrooms, and they will observe the classrooms of teachers who practice these principles in their daily teaching.

 

ED 675 - Students with Severe Disabilities (3 credits)

This course provides students with an understanding of individuals who have been diagnosed with severe or multiple disabilities. The course will take a life-span perspective by focusing on preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults, and will include discussion of individuals who have retardation, autism, those who demonstrate significant behavioral challenges, and/or those who have special health care needs. Students will study the psychological, social, and physical characteristics of individuals with severe disabilities, laws pertaining to educating students with severe disabilities, and theoretical and philosophical foundations underlying current practice. Students will study, observe, and implement research-based strategies for teaching students with severe disabilities in inclusive school and community settings. Students will understand and conduct ecological assessments of students and environments and explore the use of assistive technology to enhance autonomy and learning. Knowledge will be acquired through coursework, discussions, and required fieldwork.

 

ED 676 - Action Research  (3 credits)

In this course, which is a required co-requisite of student teaching, students will develop the skills of reflection and inquiry within the context of their own teaching. Students will practice using different tools for reflective inquiry as they explore issues relevant to novice teachers (i.e., creating and maintaining caring, inclusing, and productive learning environments. Students will design and implement a research project in their classroom to focus on an issue of relevance to them in their present teaching situation. The course will intergrate theory and practice so that students may develop the skills and dispositions needed for conducting action research throughout their profession careers.

 

ED 677 - Literacy for Children with Special Needs (3 credits)

This course examines literacy development for children with diverse learning needs related to cognitive, behavioral, linguistic, cultural and gender factors. Issues explored include the identification/special assessment/intervention process, the impact of mandated state literacy assessments on compensatory literacy programs, and the role of the literacy specialist in supporting students both through inclusion and pull-out programs. There will be a focus on remedial reading/writing strategies to support students experiencing difficulty in decoding/encoding, vocabulary development, and reading comprehension.

 

ED 679 - Practicum in Special Education  (0-3 credits)

Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students in the early adolescent (grades 7-9) and adolescent (grades 10-12) classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching. These internships comprise the year-long, 6 -credit option for the teaching internship.

 

ED 679A - Practicum in Special Education  (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Department approval required.
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students with disabilities by integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instructions with actual teaching practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching.

 

ED 680 - Working with Families  (3 credits)

In this course, students will study families from a historical, cultural and theoretical perspective. Students will investigate home/school policies. They will learn about parent involvement and parent education, and develop a range of effective strategies and methods for communicating with families. This course is required for students in the Early Childhood and Teaching Students with Disabilities at the Early Childhood Level programs.

 

ED 681 - Assessment and Evaluation in Education  (3 credits)

In this course students will learn about a variety of formal and informal assessment instruments and develop the skills to select, evaluate and interpret these instruments. There will be opportunities to use a variety of assessments for monitoring child growth and development and sharing those results with families and team members. Students will apply the data from assessments to identify learner strengths and individualize instruction to facilitate academic success.

 

ED 682 - Collaboration with Professionals and Families (3 credits)

Students will learn about the importance of collaboration between teachers in the regular classroom and teachers of students with disabilities. Students will learn how to work as a member of a professional multidisciplinary team in assessing, evaluating, planning, creating, and utilizing both an IFSSP and an IEP (as well as a 504 accommodation plan). Students will learn how to communicate with and advocate for families and young children with developmental and acquired disorders and disabilities. Fieldwork/apprenticeship is required with this course. This is a required course for those in the Early Childhood and Teaching Students with Disabilities in Early Childhood, Childhood, Middle Childhood, and Adolescence programs.
 

ED 684 - Classroom Management and Collaboration in Inclusive Secondary Schools  (3 credits)

This course will provide candidates with the theoretical and practical bases for developing classroom communities that are grounded in the concepts of caring, respect, trust, and membership. Course content is grounded in theory and research on classroom management, positive behavior supports, collaborative decision-making, consultation, and co-teaching. Through field-based projects, reflection and research, candidates will be encouraged to develop the skills necessary to create supportive and well-managed learning environments and to work collaboratively with other professionals and teaching assistants to ensure that all students are fully participating members of the class with meaningful access to the general education curriculum. Field work in inclusive secondary settings will be required.

 

ED 685 - Methods for Teaching Adolescent Students with Disabilities  (3 credits)

This is an advanced course for those seeking certification in Teaching Students with Disabilities at the Adolescence level or for graduate students wishing to expand their breadth and depth of knowledge in adapting instruction for students across the continuum of special needs. This course is designed to assist the professional educator in the task of planning and implementing classroom, instructional, and support services for students with complex needs. Appropriate selection of assistive and regular technology is addressed.

 

ED 687 - Classroom Management and Collaboration in Inclusive Settings  (3 credits)

This course will provide candidates with the theoretical and practical bases for developing classroom communities that reflect the principles of care, respect, trust, and membership. Course content id grounded in theory and research on classroom management, positive behavior supports, collaborative decision-making, consultation, and co-teaching. Candidates will learn how to work as a team that includes other professionals, family members and teaching assistants . Through field-based projects, reflection and research , candidates will develop the skills necessary to create supportive and well-managed learning environments and to work collaboratively with family members and professionals to ensure that all students are fully participating members of the class with meaningful access to the general education curriculum. Field work will be required.
 

ED 690 - Teacher as Researcher  (3 credits)

In this course, which is a required co-requisite with student teaching, students will develop the skills of reflection and inquiry within the context of their own teaching. Students will practice using different tools for reflective inquiry as they explore issues relevant to novice teachers, i.e., creating and maintaining caring, inclusive, and productive learning environments. Students will design and implement a research project in their classroom that focuses on an issue of relevance to them in their present teaching situation. The course will integrate theory and practice so that students may develop the skills and dispositions needed for conducting action research throughout their professional careers.

 

ED 690A - Teacher as Researcher I  (3 credits)

In this course, which is a required co-requisite with student teaching, students will develop the skills of reflection and inquiry within the context of their own teaching. Students will practice using different tools for reflective inquiry as they explore issues relevant to novice teachers, i.e., creating and maintaining caring, inclusive, and productive learning environments. Students will design and implement a research project in their classroom that focuses on an issue of relevance to them in their present teaching situation. The course will integrate theory and practice so that students may develop the skills and dispositions needed for conducting action research throughout their professional careers.
 

ED 690B - Teacher as Researcher: Part II  (3 credits)

 

ED 690S - Teacher as Researcher  (3 credits)

In this course, candidates will develop the skills of reflection and inquiry within the context of their own teaching in the special education setting. Candidates will be introduced to different tools for reflective inquiry as they explore issues relevant to novice teachers (i.e., creating and maintaining caring, inclusive, and productive learning environments). Students will design and a plan a research project in their classroom that focuses on a special education issue of relevance to them in their present teaching situation. The course will integrate theory and practice so that students may develop the knowledge and skills for the conducting action research throughout their professional careers.

 

ED 690T - Teacher as Researcher in Special Education Classroom I & II  (3 credits)

In this course, candidates will develop the skills of reflection and inquiry within the context of their own teaching in the special education setting. Candidates will be introduced to different tools for reflective inquiry as they explore issues relevant to novice teachers (i.e., creating and maintaining caring, inclusive, and productive learning environments). Students will design and plan a research project in their classroom that focuses on a special education issue of relevance to them in their present teaching situation. The course will integrate theory and practice so that students may develop the knowledge and skills for conducting action research throughout their professional careers.

 

ED 691 - Student Teaching and Seminar in the Childhood Classroom  (0-6 credits/lecture hours)

Prerequisite:Department approval required.
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with children in the primary (grades 1-3) and intermediate (grades 4-6) classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction with actual teaching and practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on aspects of their teaching.


ED 691A - Teaching Internship in the Childhood Classroom (0-3 credits/lecture hours)

Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students in the primary [grades 1-3] and intermediate [grades 4-6] classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. During this semester-long experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching. These internships comprise the year-long, 6 credit option for the student teaching internship.

 

ED 691B - Teaching Internship and Seminar in Childhood Classroom  (0-3 credits/lecture hours)

Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students in the primary [grades 1-3] and intermediate [grades 4-6] classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. During this semester-long experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching. These internships comprise the yearlong, 6 credit option for the student teaching internship.


ED 691C - Teachng Internship and Seminar in the Childhood Classroom  (0 credits)

Prerequisite: Departmental approval required.
 

ED 691E - Student Teaching in the Early Childhood Classroom (0-6 credits)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and 24 - 30 credits in major.

ED 691L - Student Teaching in the Childhood Literacy Classroom (0-6 credits)

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor and 24 - 30 credits in major.
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students, integrating theories of language and literacy acquisition. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching.


ED 691S - Student Teaching in Childhood Special Education Classroom (0-6 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of instructor and 24-30 credits in major.
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students with disabilities by integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instructions with actual teaching practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching.

 

ED 692 - Student Teaching and Seminar in the Adolescent Classroom (0-6 credits)

Prerequisite:Department approval required.
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with children in the early adolescent (grades 7-9) and adolescent (grades 10-12) classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction with actual teaching and practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on aspects of their teaching.

 

ED 692A - Teaching Internship in the Adolescent Classroom (0-3 credits)

Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students in the early adolescent (grades 7-9) and adolescent (grades 10-12) classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching. These internships comprise the year-long, 6 -credit option for the teaching internship.

 

ED 692B - Teaching Internship and Seminar in the Adolescent Classroom (0-3 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of department required.
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students in the early adolescent (grades 7-9) and adolescent (grades 10-12) classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of their curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching. These internships comprise the year-long, 6-credit option for the teaching internship.

 

ED 692C - Student Teaching and Seminar in the Adolescent Classroom  (0 credits)

 

ED 692L - Student Teaching in the Adolescent Literacy Classroom  (0-6 credits)

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor and 24-30 credits in Major.

 

ED 692S - Student Teaching in Adolescent Special Education Classroom  (0-6 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of Instructor required and 24-30 credits in major.

 

ED 692T - Student Teaching in Educational Technology  (0-6 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of Instructor required and 24-30 credits in major.
 Students will develop their teaching skills using technology designed to engage in educational problem-solving in childhood and adolescent settings, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. During this semester-long experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching. This course requires mandatory seminar attendance.

 

ED 693 - Literacy Practicum Birth-Grade VI  (6 credits)

 

ED 693A - Literacy Practicum I: Birth - Grade 6  (3 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of Program Coordinator.
The clinical practicum that is required as part of the M.S.ED. in Literacy program for those seeking certification at the grades 5-12 level. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours working with children from grade 6 through grade 12 in literacy assessment and instruction. The student may choose from several practica locations. Faculty supervision is provided as the student provides assessment, instruction, and consultation/collaboration with the client's home and/or school.

 

ED 693B - Literacy Practicum II: Birth - Grade 6  (3 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of Program Coordinator required.
This clinical practicum is required as part of the M.S.ED. in Literacy program for those seeking certification at the Birth-Grade 6 level. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours working with children from birth through grade 6 in literacy assessment and instruction. The student may choose from several practical locations. Faculty supervision is provided as the student provides assessment, instruction, and consultation/collaboration with the client's home and/or school.

 

ED 694 - Literacy Practicum (grades 5-12)  (6 credits)

The clinical practicum that is required as part of the M.S.Ed. in Literacy program for those seeking certification at the Gr. 5-12 level. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours working with children from grade 6 through grade 12 in literacy assessment and instruction. The student may choose from several practica locations. Faculty supervision is provided as the student provides assessment, instruction, and consultation/collaboration with the client's home and/or school. Concurrent enrollment in ED 696 Literacy Capstone Project is required.

 

ED 694A - Literacy Practicum I Grades 5-12  (3 credits)

The clinical practicum that is required as part of the M.S.Ed. in Literacy program for those seeking certification at the grades 5-12 level. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours working with children from grade 6 through grade 12 in literacy assessment and instruction. The student may choose from several practicum locations. Faculty supervision is provided as the student provides assessment, instruction, and consultation/collaboration with the client's home and/or school. Concurrent enrollment in ED 696 Literacy Capstone Project is required.

 

ED 694B - Literacy Practicum II Grades 5-12  (3 credits)

The clinical practicum that is required as part of the M.S.Ed. in Literacy program for those seeking certification at the grades 5-12 level. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours working with children from grade 6 through grade 12 in literacy assessment and instruction. The student may choose from several practica locations. Faculty supervision is provided as the student provides assessment, instruction, and consultation/collaboration with the client's home and/or school. Concurrent enrollment in ED 696 Literacy Capstone Project is required
 

ED 695 - Literacy Practicum Birth-grade 12  (6 credits)

This clinical practicum is required as part of the M.S.Ed. in Literacy program for those seeking certification at the Birth through Gr. 12 level. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours working with children from birth through grade 12 in literacy assessment and instruction. The 100 clock hours are equally divided between Birth through grade 6 and Grade 5 through 12. The student may choose from several practica locations. Faculty supervision is provided as the student provides assessment, instruction, and consultation/collaboration with the client's home and/or school. Concurrent enrollment in ED 696 Literacy Capstone Project is required.

 

ED 695A - Literacy Practicum I Birth-grade 12   (3 credits)

 

ED 695B - Literacy Practicum II Birth-grade 12  (3 credits)

 

ED 696 - Literacy Capstone Project  (3 credits)

This Capstone Project entails the creation of a case study using a client from the practicum setting. The case study will be developed through assistance from supervising faculty, peer case conferences, and individual clinical experience. The final case study document will contain pre-and-post assessments, an instructional plan, a literacy log that documents weekly instructional activities and strategies, progress measures, client comments, and personal self-reflections. Additionally, the case study will contain a case summary and post-instructional recommendations. Concurrent enrollment in ED 693, 694, or 695 is required.

 

ED 698 - Student Teaching in Educational Technology  (3 credits)

Prerequisite:Permission of Program Coordinator is required.

This practicum is particularly designed to engage in educational problem-solving using technology. Students will be given one or more educational problems and asked to analyze and solve the problem. Problems will be authentic and may be proposed by either university or public school teachers or administrators. Examples include but are not limited to creation of on-line courses or course supplements, hardware or software problems, internet-based problems linking public schools to appropriate internet sites and resources, etc. Students will learn to ask the right questions, research existing solutions, and create ones unique to the problem posed.
 

ED 701 - Issues and Trends in Early Childhood Development, Learning, and Intervention  (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of contemporary opportunities and challenges of the early childhood field, situated in the larger context of the multiple systems (educational, developmental, family support, and health) that intersect to provide comprehensive early childhood supports and services for all young children, birth to 8 years, and their families. Philosophies, theories, and research models that guide practices within and across a variety early childhood programs will be examines. The evolution of inclusive programs and blended curriculum will be explored. The roles of culture and community, and legal, ethical, public policy, organizational, and systems issue shaping the learning opportunities, experiences, and outcomes for young children, including those who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse, and their families will be investigated. Strategies for accessing, understanding, and critiquing research as the foundation for evidence-based practices will be developed. Advocacy, professionalism, and ethics will be considered. Candidates will engage in critical, reflective analysis of their role as emerging early childhood professional.

 

ED 702 - Understanding Young Children: Developement and Developmental Transactions  (3 credits)

This course focuses on the theories, reaerach, and related current developmental concepts that inform early childhood development, prenatal to 8 years. This course will examine child development and the influence of multiple factors, inclusing biology, family, community, language, culture, and specific developmental disabilities or delays, through a contextual, transactional framework. The notion of competence within the various developmental processes of early childhood, including social interactions, meaning making, self-regulation, moral, and self-concept development, will be examined, recognizing the multiple forms in which competence can be expressed. The integration of developmetnal domains, and developmental transactions as optimal learning opportunities, will be emphasized. This course relies on observation and interpretation of theoretical and empirical knowledge to understand and apply developmental concepts to identification, assessment, and programming for all children in home, classroom, and community settings. 10 hours of fieldwork is required.
 

ED 703 - Family Professional Partnerships: Theories and Practices (3 credits)

This course addresses the processes and considerations for creating effective family-professional partnerships to maximize child learning and development, prenatal to 8 years. This course focuses on the centrality of the family, the commonalities and diversity in family systems and parenting processes, including culture, language, and individual characteristics, and how these factors influence family-professional partnership development and support provision. This course examines approaches to addressing individual family priorities for their child and their family as they strive to meet their parenting goals. Specific approaches include community mapping, identifying formal and informal supports for individual families, and planning and implementing resource-based supports. This course investigates and identifies processes toward achieving family outcomes, including understanding their child’s learning characteristics; supporting their child to learn and develop; having family and community supports; accessing desired community supports; and advocating for their children and family. 60 hours of fieldwork is required.

 

ED 704 - Blended Curricular Approaches in Early Childhood  (3 credits)

This course focuses on curriculum design and differentiation to promote learning and development for all children, birth through grade 2, in classroom, home, and community settings. Practices traditionally “owned” by early childhood education and early intervention/early childhood special education are blended into a holistic approach where developmental domainds and curricular areas are integrated across activities throughout the day to promote all children’s access to an full participation in learning activities. The foundations of curriculum development, most particularly using play and everyday routine activities as the context for learning, applying various adult facilitation strategies, observing and recording children’s behavior for planning and evaluating effectiveness, and embedding technology into appropriate learning experiences will be explored. Practices addressed in this course include drawing on each child’s individual strengths as well as home culture and language; meeting the unique needs of each child, including development in integration of IEP/IFSP outcomes and strategies; creating a positive physical learning environment through attention to space, materials, schedules, and transitions; and maximizing effectiveness by collaborating with families and professional team members using interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches. Various curricular approaches and methods and developmentally appropriate practices and EI/ECSE recommended practices will be emphasized. 10 hours fieldwork is required.

 

ED 706 - Creating Responsive Early Childhood Environments  (3 credits)

This course focuses on creating home, community, and classroom environments that are responsive to the individual strengths and needs of each child in the setting, and attuned to their cultural and linguistic characteristics. The theoretical and practical bases for developing environments that are grounded in the concepts of caring, multual respect, trust, safety, and valuing each member of the community will be explored. This course will investigate both social aspects of responsive environments –appraoches to responsive caregiving, caring communities, and fostering positive peer relationships –and physical characteristics, such as scheduling, room arrangement, materials, and physical adaptations. Opportunities to explore responsive approaches such as relationship-based programming, modeling and encouraging classroom communities, strategies to promote self-determination, and tiered interventions for promoting social-emotional competence, including positive behavior supports, will be integrated into the course through observations and hands on experiences. 10 hours of fieldwork is required.

 

ED 708 - Early Childhood Arts, Humanities, and Social Studies: Processes and Practices (3 credits)

This course focuses on the development of creative expression, understanding of self within the context of community, and understanding the specific communities of classroom, family, neighborhood, and the outside world for all children, who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse, from birth through grade2. Approaches to supporting children as they engage in multiple forms of creative arts and discovery of citizenship will be explored. Skills in understanding the essential concepts, inquiry tools, and structures, and knowledge of resources for developing meaningful and challenging curriculum for all young children, will be developed. This course provides an intorduction to New York State standards and immersion in NAEYC developmentally appropriate practices in arts, humanities, and social studies, and how to utlize DEC recommended practices in integrated, differentiated activities so all children can learn. Specific, evidence based methods, embedded within classroom, home, and community activities, and across curricular areas, will be analyzed so that emmerging professionals, and the families they support, can assess and promote arts, humanities, and social studies learning.

 

ED 709 - Early Chilhood Mathematics Development and Scientific Inquiry: Processes and Practices  (3 credits)

This course focuses on the development of mathematics and scientific inquiry from birth through grade 2, and the process for promoting this development in all children, who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse. Approaches to supporting children as they engage in investigation and discovery, use the scientific process, problem solve and reason, and develop quantitative thinking to make meaning of their world will be explored. Skills in understanding the essential concepts, inquiry tools, and structures of mathematics and science, and knowledge of resources for developing meaningful and challenging curriculum for all young children will be developed. This course provides an introduction to New York State standards and NAEYC developmentally appropriate practices in mathematics and science, and how to utilize DEC recommended practices in integrated, differentiated activites so all children can learn. Specific, evidence based methods, embedded within classroom, home, and community activities, and across curricular areas, will be analyzed so that emmerging professionals, and the families they support, can assess and promote mathematics and science learning.
 

ED 710 - Development Promotion and Intervention:Prenatal through Toddlerhood  (3 credits)

This course focuses on advanced infant-toddler development (birth through 2 years), the responsive interactions between young children and their family members and other caregivers, and the prenatal and infant-toddler programs that provide the earliest supports to families of cultural, linguistic, and ability diversity. Biological, medical, and environmental factors that are frequently identified during the pre-peri, and postnatal period, and how they contribute to a child’s development course, will be investigated. This course uses observations and field experiences in infant-toddler settings to connect theory and research to practice. Interventions and adaptations embedded into the play and routine activities in home, community, and classroom settings, individualized to the context, culture, and individual family, created and implemented using relationship-based interventions, transdisciplinary teaming, and collaborative coaching of families and other caregivers will be emphasized. IFSP development, transition planning, and the legislative requirements and evidence-based practices of Part C of IDEA, Early Head Start, and other developmental promotion programs will be explored. 90 hours of fieldwork is required.


ED 712 - Developmentally Appropriate Early Chlidhood Assessment Practices (3 credits)

This course focuses on the role of assessment as an ongoing, collaborative process of gathering and interpreting objective information about young children's (birth to 8 years) behaviors and the social and physical environment to make decisions regarding appropriate services and supports. Assessment terminology and legal and ethical principles of assessment will be explored. An emphasis will be placed on developmentally appropriate assessment practices- including partnering with families- applying interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary teaming approaches throughout the assessment process, identifying appropriate assessment methods and tools for the decisions being made, and linking assessment to programming. A variety of formal and authentic assessment methods and tools will be explored and critiqued to determine their strengths and limitations in making decisions for children who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse. 10 hours of fieldwork is required.
 

ED 713 - Early Childhood Internship (3 credits)

This course focsues on developing candidates’ expertise in early childhood development, learning, and intervention in professional practicum will occur in home, community, or school-based programs that focus on children and families prenatal to 8 years, or a particular subset of that age range. Experiences will be based on the implementation of an individual professional development plan aligned to the candidate’s professional goals. These plans include competencies in leadership, interagency and cross-system collaboration, family-professional partnerships, and fostering positive child learning experiences.
 

ED 714 - Student Teaching Preschool  (3 credits)

This course focsues on the applied practice of purposeful planning and intentional teaching of all children in a preschool (3 to 5 years) and developmental Kindergarten classroom through an intensive, full-time experience and accompanying seminar. Under the mentorship of a master teacher, candidates will evolve in their practices toward independent planning, differentiation, and implementation of classroom activities and scheduling that provide individualized and developmentally appropriate learning opportunities for all children, with attention to the cultural, linguistic, and ability diversity in the classroom. This course applies theory, research, and recommended practices into a professional apprenticeship experience. Specific areas of development include collaboration, assessment, planning and implementation of individual, small and large group learning experiences, and scheduling and environmental arrangement. Candidates will develop a capstone project over the year of student teaching in this course as well as the Student Teaching in the Primary Years course.

ED 715 - Student Teaching in the Primary Years  (3 credits)

This course focuses on the applied practice of purposeful planning and intentional teaching of all children in a primary (Kindergarten, first grade, second grade) classroom through an intensive full-time experience and accompanying seminar. Under the mentorship of a master teacher, candidates will evolve in their practices toward independent planning, differentiation, and implementation of classroom activities, and scheduling that provide individualized and developmentally appropriate learning opportunities for all children, with attention to the cultural, linguistic, and ability diversity in the classroom. This course is intended to apply theory, research., and recommended practices into a professional apprenticeship experience. Specific areas of development include collaboration, assessment, planning and implementation of individual, small group, and large group experiences, and scheduling and environmental arrangement. Candidates will develop a capstone project over the year of student teaching in this course as well as the Student Teaching in Preschool and Developmental Kindergarten course.
 

ED 754 - Literature and Digital Storytelling  (3 credits)

This course further considers a wide range of children’s and adolescents’ literature, and focuses on the selection and evaluation of literature in the genres of fiction and non-fiction for instructional and recreational purposes. This course scrutinizes current theories, research, and issues related to literature study, critical literacy, literacy elements, genres and narratives/expository text structures. The utilization of children’s literature in reading and writing instruction across the disciplines will be emphasized, as well as that promote respect for diversity through multicultural literature, and the promotion of lifelong reading habits in children. This class will build competencies in knowledge of information, application of strategies in classrooms, and coaching/mentoring activities for professionals and community members. Technological approaches to creating digital formats for storytelling will be learned and applied in classroom assignments. Field experience is required.
 

ED 755B - Literacy Instruction and Technological Applications for the Middle Grades (4-8)  (3 credits)

This course will facilitate candidates’ active exploration of the reading and writing processes and practices that support the literacy development of children in the intermediate to middle school grades (i.e., 4-8). Candidates will apply current research focusing on this specific population as they investigate models of assessment and instruction. This class will build competencies in knowledge of technology to mediate information and to coach/mentor educational professionals and community members in these same applications. Field experience is required.
 

ED 757 - Content Area Literacy and Technology: Instructional Models and Methods for Secondary Grades (9-12)  (3 credits)

This course deepens knowledge of the burgeoning need for the integration of literacy and technology in the content areas. The course will focus on research-based strategies for building reading comprehension, constructing meaning, building fluency through the use of non-fiction selections, digital literacy, and new media applications in the content areas. Approaches for developing skills vocabulary, study skills, listening, writing, speaking are examined and applied in print and non-print (i.e., new literacies) formats for disciplinary knowledge. This course will introduce practical experiences with technology. In addition candidates will learn to look forward use of new media strategies to work with and teach students in grades 4-9 classrooms. This class will build competencies in knowledge of information, application of strategies in classrooms, and coaching/mentoring activities for professionals and community members. Field experience is required.
 

ED 758 - Writing Process and Media Production (with one unit on animation)  (3 credits)

This course deepens understanding of the repertoire of strategies for writing with children and explores models of integrated writing programs. Writing is examined as a recursive, developmental process, and candidates will explore the writing process through their own experiences as well as through as investigation of relevant professional reading and current research. Formats and strategies for media production will be introduced and applied in classroom assignments. This class will build competencies in knowledge of information, application of strategies in classrooms, and coaching/mentoring activities for professionals and community members. Field experience is required.
 

ED 775 - Teaching Students with Severe Disabilities (3 credits)

This course provides students with an understanding of individuals who have been diagnosed with severe disabilities. The course will take a life-span perspective by focusing on preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults, and will include discussion of individuals who have mental retardation, autism, those who demonstrate significant behavioral challenges, and/or those who have special health care needs. Students will study the psychological, social, and physical characteristics of individuals with severe disabilities, laws pertaining to educating students with severe disabilities, and theoretical and philosophical foundations underlying recent practice. Students will study, observe, and implement research-based strategies for teaching students with severe disabilities in inclusive school and community settings. Students will understand and conduct ecological assessments of students and environments and explore the use of assistive technology to enhance autonomy and learning. Knowledge will be acquired through coursework, discussions, and required fieldwork.

 

ED 776 - Instructional Methods for Students with Autism and Developmental Disabilities  (3 credits)

An advanced course for those seeking a specialization in Teaching Students with Autism and Severe Disabilities, at the Early Childhood, Childhood, Middle Adolescence, Adolescence levels, certification in differentiating instruction, or for graduate students wishing to expand their breadth and depth of knowledge in differentiating instruction for students across the continuum of special needs. This course is designed to assist the professional educator in the complex task of planning and implementing classroom, instructional, and support services for students with complex needs, including students with autism. Appropriate selection of assistive and regular technology is addressed. Students will also learn how to participate in collaborative family, school, and community partnerships, as well as advocate for families and students with disorders, disabilities, and therapeutic needs.

 

ED 779A - Practicum in Autism and Severe Disabilities I  (1 credit)

This practicum experience will prepare candidates to teach students with autism in inclusive school settings. The candidates will participate in the practicum experience for three semesters and receive one credit for each semester completed. Candidates will develop their teaching skills through working with children and youth with autism spectrum disorders, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. A seminar that coordinates with the practicum experience will meet monthly during the semester. Pertinent issues related to the practicum experience will be discussed at the seminar.

 

ED 779B - Practicum in Autism and Severe Disabilities II  (1 credit)

This practicum experience will prepare candidates to teach students with autism in inclusive school settings. The candidates will participate in the practicum experience for three semesters and receive one credit for each semester completed. Candidates will develop their teaching skills through working with children and youth with autism spectrum disorders, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. A seminar that coordinates with the practicum experience will meet monthly during the semester. Pertinent issues related to the practicum experience will be discussed at the seminar.
 

ED 779C - Practicum in Autism and Severe Disabilities III  (1 credit)

This practicum experience will prepare candidates to teach students with autism in inclusive school settings. The candidates will participate in the practicum experience for three semesters and receive one credit for each semester completed. Candidates will develop their teaching skills through working with children and youth with autism spectrum disorders, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. A seminar that coordinates with the practicum experience will meet monthly during the semester. Pertinent issues related to the practicum experience will be discussed at the seminar.

 

ED 782 - Transdisciplinary Teams to Support Students with Autism and Developmental Disabilities in Inclusive   (3 credits)

This course is designed to prepare teachers to collaborate with others in similar and allied professions, support personnel, parents, and students, to design, implement, and evaluate effective instruction to meet the needs of individual students with and without disabilities. The course will encourage students to develop and use the skills and dispositions necessary to work collaboratively in educational settings with general educators. Course content is grounded in theory and research on collaborative decision-making, consultation, and co-teaching. Furthermore, this course is designed in accord with federal initiatives maintaining that the education of students with disabilities is a multidisciplinary endeavor; the goal of which is to provide all students with access to the general education curriculum in general education classes.

 

ED 789 - Diagnosis and Treatment of Autism and Developmental Disabilities  (3 credits)

In this course, students will learn to identify the core symptoms of children who are diagnosed on the Autistic Spectrum. Due to the unusual array of symptoms that make up the spectrum diagnosis, video presentations of children on the spectrum will be used to enhance this learning objective. The video presentations also act as a catalyst to spur student interaction and the integration of the didactic material with the clinical presentation. A number of additional factors add to the diagnostic confusion of children on the spectrum: 1) Autism is a dynamic diagnosis, not a static diagnosis. Hence, the symptom severity and quality can change over time as the child develops. 2) Autism has a very high co-morbidity rate with a number of additional psychiatric disorders including: ADHD, OCD, Tourette's Disorder, Anxiety Disorders, and Mood Disorders. This is the biggest source of diagnostic confusion in that there is a lot of overlap of symptoms between these various disorders. 3) The internal regulation difficulties (impulse, affect, and mood) and the executive function deficits of children on the spectrum add further confusion and challenge to their presentation in the classroom. These additional issues are dealt with in this course by focusing on the developmental perspective and by our careful review of these additional developmental and diagnostic areas as they interface with children on the spectrum. Video presentations of these additional areas of concern are used to help the student integrate the didactic with the clinical presentation. Current treatment interventions for Autism and these related disorders will also be reviewed in detail.

 

a/ 5/5/2014