main navigation
my pace

Lienhard School of Nursing

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Women in Higher Education" featured Dr. Harriet Feldman of the College of Health Professions, Pace University in "Nursing Educator Builds Future Generations"

04/10/2018

"Women in Higher Education" featured Dr. Harriet Feldman of the College of Health Professions, Pace University in "Nursing Educator Builds Future Generations"

As the United States faces a nursing crisis, Dr. Harriet Feldman of the College of Health Professions/Lienhard School of Nursing Pace University NY works to educate not only nurses who will fill crucial roles in contemporary health care, but also develop nursing educators who will keep the field thriving. Throughout her years at Pace, Feldman, who is dean and professor of the nursing school, has sought innovative ways to grow the nursing profession as well as increase diversity.

Early Career
Like many women in the mid-1960s, after high school Feldman enrolled in a nursing program. Shortly before graduating the diploma program, a faculty member suggested she continue her education and pursue a bachelor’s degree. Wanting to get to work, she took a job, but also decided to take one course. That course made her want to continue her education.

As Feldman progressed, leaders in nursing kept encouraging her to push further—earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees. She didn’t see herself as a future leader, but she enjoyed the education and found a passion for nursing. Toward the end of her master’s program, she was asked if she wanted to teach, so she did a bit of it while finishing her master’s and then became a full-time instructor.

After getting married and starting a family, she went back into clinical practice, but part of her role was teaching hospital staff. Feldman began to see the bigger picture—not only was she having an impact on the patients with whom she directly interacted, but, through training others, she was having an impact on many other patients as well. She made the decision to commit to a career in nursing education—earning a doctorate and taking on greater and greater leadership roles.

Changes in Nursing
Since the late 1960s, Feldman has been a proponent of moving nursing forward and giving the profession greater prestige. The first graduate course she taught was in change theory.

“I had taken a similar course myself, but teaching it was such a different kind of experience—preparing for it, working closely with the students,” says Feldman. “That set the stage for my interest in making change for the greater good. My path early in my career and even now is because I’m a risk-taker. I like the idea of making an impact and doing something to help this profession.”

In 1993, Feldman became dean of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing, and with that, her influence solidified. Thanks to forward-thinking educators, nursing has evolved, starting with more stringent educational requirements to become a registered nurse. Today’s nursing requires more critical thinking and evidence-based practice.

“The thing that’s changed the whole landscape is the technology that we use in health care,” Feldman says. “I don’t mean just the electronic records, but the equipment. The changes help inform people so they can make better decisions.”

Pace was an early adopter of technology in the curriculum,\ such as blackboard sites. This enabled the development of hybrid (mixing online and onsite) graduate courses as well as online courses. Feldman keeps informed on technological advances and tries to introduce them at Pace as soon as possible.

Feldman says faculty members have been committed to making Pace’s nursing program stellar. Data is gathered and analyzed on student success. The professors have been open to revising curricula and approaches so as to maximize student outcomes—the goal being 100 percent success on licensure exams. It’s also important to ensure the faculty have all the tools they need.

“I send them to conferences regularly for development in terms of teaching strategies and content,” says Feldman. “People have said how welcome they feel here and how the culture is so supportive.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Pace College of Health Professions Health Center in "Pace opens expanded university health care center in Pleasantville"

04/09/2018

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Pace College of Health Professions Health Center in "Pace opens expanded university health care center in Pleasantville"

Pace University made history in 1978 when it opened the first-ever nurse-managed medical facility on the campus of a U.S. college. Forty years later, the school celebrated the anniversary and renewed its commitment to the program with the completion of a new and expanded health care center.

Pace held a ribbon cutting Thursday, April 5 for the new 2,000-square-foot health center space inside the Paton House, which also hosts Pace’s career services office. The health care center features four patient exam rooms, a procedure room and lab. It also has a larger reception area than the previous location, which was in the college’s Goldstein Fitness Center.

About 1,700 patients – a mix that is mostly students but also includes staff, faculty and even alumni – are treated by the school’s health center annually. With that number growing, Pace College of Health Professions Dean Harriet R. Feldman, said it was time to expand.

“We needed a lot more space because we were seeing a lot more students,” said Harriet R. Feldman, dean of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “This space is about three times the size of what we had before, and we’re already starting to see more students show up at the door.”

The previous location had also become a bit too noisy for a health care facility, Feldman said. Renovations to the fitness center last year placed a weight room directly above the health center, requiring staff to work through barbell-induced thuds.

The new location puts the health center near three residence halls. “It’s easy access for the students,” Feldman said. “They don’t have to go down the hall and through the gym. They’re right next door.”

The health center is staffed by three nurses, including two nurse practitioners whom receive assistance primarily from student employees. The staff can treat most common illnesses, prescribe or refill medications, order lab and radiology tests and refer students to specialty care.

“It’s pretty much all of your primary care services,” Feldman said.

The health center also acts as a clinical setting for nursing students in the Pace College of Health Professions.

Feldman said students typically have insurance through family plans or through the school. The university opened the health center as part of its celebration of 40 years on campus. Pace was the first in the country to use nurse practitioners to operate its health center, which Feldman said has become a model for the rest of the country.

Pace also plans to open a new health center on its New York City campus later this year.

Read the article.

Read the newspaper article (PDF).

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Daily Voice" featured Dean Harriet Feldman and Associate Director of University Health Care Karen Martin in "Pace Opens New Health Care Center On Pleasantville Campus"

04/09/2018

"Daily Voice" featured Dean Harriet Feldman and Associate Director of University Health Care Karen Martin in "Pace Opens New Health Care Center On Pleasantville Campus"

From left to right, Pace Dean Harriet R. Feldman, Karen Martin of UHC, Ellen Rich, Jamie Newland, Andréa Sonenberg. (back row) Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett, UHC Director Audrey Hoover, and Marykate Aquisto of state Sen. Terrence Murphy's office.

Pace University opened a new and enlarged health care center on its Pleasantville campus on Thursday, April 5, celebrating the 40th anniversary of its University Health Center.

The first nurse-managed academic health care service on a university campus in the United States, UHC opened its doors at Pace in 1977. A novel concept at the time, the use of nurse practitioners is now common practice in primary care.

UHC offers a wide range of primary health care services and its leading-edge care continues to be a model, nationally and internationally.

The new Pace location, which moved from the Goldstein Fitness Center to the Paton House, is approximately 2,000-square-feet with four patient exam rooms, a procedure room, larger reception area and a lab.

More than 1,700 patients, including students, staff, faculty, alumni, and their families are treated there each year.

UHC’s nurse practitioners can treat most common illnesses, prescribe or refill medications, order lab and radiology tests, and refer to speciality care. Considered in network to multiple health care insurance providers, UHC also acts as a clinical setting for nursing students and preceptorships.

“This new facility will allow us to see more patients in a more comfortable setting and we have already begun to see an increase in patients,” said Harriet R. Feldman, dean of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “We are carrying on a great tradition of patient-centered healthcare in a new, more modern facility that will better serve our campus community.’’

In honor of the milestone, Dean Feldman and Karen Martin, associate director of University Health Care, accepted a proclamation from the office of state Sen. Terrence Murphy.

The day’s activities began with a conference “University Health Care at 40: Emerging Trends in Primary Care,” which examined the evolution of the role of nurse practitioner and successful trends in health care. The conference included a panel of nurse practitioners who helped build and shape UHC throughout the years.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Dean Harriet Feldman, College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing, featured in "Diverse Issues in Higher Education" on "Meeting Nursing Demands Through Diversity"

02/26/2018

Dean Harriet Feldman, College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing Dean featured in "Diverse Issues in Higher Education" on "Meeting Nursing Demands Through Diversity"

Diverse Issues in Higher Education: "Meeting Nursing Demand Through Diversity"

by Lois Elfman

From "Diverse Issues:"

...At the College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, two home grown faculty members have already taken their spots. They are teaching undergraduate students and are working on developing their research. Pace’s “grow our own” specifically targets minority students.

“We recently started a Ph.D. program and we have about 10 students in that program,” says Dr. Harriet Feldman, a professor and dean of Pace’s nursing school. “Two of them are [currently] clinical faculty (teaching clinical practice and working with students in the field). Assuming everything goes well, they will reach their Ph.D.s in a few years and be able to enter tenure-track roles, whether here or somewhere else.”

Ross says that, when she was an undergraduate nursing student at Coppin State University, the professors created a love for the profession and a desire to continue the school’s legacy.

“When professors create that desire in the students to give back to the university and to their community, that’s when those students want to come back and teach,” says Ross, who also strongly voices the opinion that, if faculty positions paid salaries commensurate with clinical work, more people in the nursing workforce would pursue teaching.

To help build motivation among Pace students, education courses are in the graduate curriculum. At present, approximately half the students in the school of nursing are underrepresented minorities.

“We’re planting seeds,” says Feldman, who is also launching a distinguished lecture series to provide exposure for the nursing program to diverse individuals. “We’ve also built an environment where people want to teach. We have terrific outcomes in terms of our students finding employment and passing licensure and certification exams.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Journal News: "Career Change: Grill 3 pros who went back to school at 'The Spiel'"

11/07/2017

Career Change: Grill 3 pros who went back to school at 'The Spiel' (The Journal News)

Are you thinking about a career switch? Should you go back to school for it?

The next installment of The Spiel, an after-hours professional mixer, will be held at The Journal News office in White Plains on Wednesday, Nov. 15, at 7 p.m.

The mixer will be focused on how to change your career by going back to school.

Hear from three people who have been there and done that, and mingle over a glass of wine and nibbles.

Meet a former police officer who now works in business development at a college, a former event planner who is now a nurse and a fundraising expert who works as a health advocate at a hospital.

Who: Cleopatra “Cleo” Mack Scheublin

Before: Event manager, MS, Publishing

Back to School: Bachelor of Nursing, Pace University, pursuing MS, Nursing, Pace University 

Current Job Title: Unit Leader and staff nurse, White Plains Hospital Center

 

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

U.S. News & World Report: "What's in an Online Physician Assistant Master's Program"

09/14/2017

U.S. News & World Report: "What's in an Online Physician Assistant Master's Program"

When researching different physician assistant jobs, Dave Cosenza realized that earning a master's degree would qualify him for more positions.

But he also knew that taking off from work for a full-time, on-campus program would result in lost income. His solution: pursue a physician assistant postgraduate degree online through the University of Nebraska Medical Center, which allows him to complete coursework around his own schedule, even far away from campus.

Open to practicing physician assistants, the virtual program allows Cosenza and his classmates to take courses in subjects including research, medical ethics and health care policy.

"It allows me to work and go at my own pace, whether I want to take seven or eight credits or just three or four credits a semester," says the 46-year-old Connecticut resident, who expects to graduate next year.

Consenza isn't alone. Some universities now offer master's programs online for practicing physician assistants who already have a bachelor's degree. That's happening as employer demand for PAs is projected to rise 30 percent between 2014 and 2024, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In the past, PAs typically just needed an undergraduate education, says Denise Rizzolo, program director for the PA master's completion program at the Pace University College of Health Professions. But today, experts say, a master's is the industry standard.

Experts say these online completion programs enable PAs with college degrees to earn a master's, preparing them for more advanced roles. Some states also now require practicing PAs to complete that level of education, Rizzolo says.

At this time, there are few accredited online programs that provide initial PA training, experts say; that curriculum involves a lot of face-to-face interaction in a clinical setting. Because master's completion students generally already have on-site, real-world experience, a fully in-person education may not be as essential at that stage, though there may still be clinical or similar requirements, depending on a student's concentration.

PAs often work odd hours, and students generally live across time zones, says Rizzolo. Many courses in online master's programs are therefore self-paced, or asynchronous. While there are set deadlines, students can typically complete coursework whenever they wish during the week.

That doesn't mean courses aren't as challenging as those on a physical campus, school officials say.

"It is time-consuming for them," says Bert Simon, department chair of PA studies at A.T. Still University of Health Sciences—Mesa, a health sciences university in Arizona offering an online master's for PAs. "Even though it's flexible, it still is a commitment." Online students at ATSU should expect 10 to 20 hours of coursework a week, he adds.

Given the range of subjects that PA master's programs may cover, the types of assignments generally vary, experts say. Cosenza says he regularly completes research papers and open-book exams.

Students may also participate in discussion boards. In one online course at Pace University, says Rizzolo, students were asked in a forum about what changes in technology are having the greatest impact on their health care practices. They responded to the original question and then to each other, starting a dialogue.

Group work may also be assigned. Michael Huckabee, director of the division of PA education at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, says that in an online clinical inquiry and writing course, students post a peer-reviewed article on a topic of their choice at the beginning of the term and then continue posting related studies every two weeks to explore the subject in greater depth. Students review two other classmates' articles, in the process answering questions and starting discussions.

Read more

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Greenwich Sentinel: "Greenwich Resident Receives ANA-NY Award"

08/08/2017

Greenwich Sentinel: "Greenwich Resident Receives ANA-NY Award"

The American Nurses Association – New York (ANA-NY) introduced the 31 recipients of its 2017 Future Nurse Leader Awards. Started in 2014 to recognize the high quality of students graduating from nursing schools in New York and foster engagement and ongoing professional development, the award is given to graduating students in honor of their scholarship, professional dedication and commitment to community service.

The 2017 cohort of Future Nurse Leaders includes Old Greenwich-resident Henry L. Snyder, who graduated from Pace University in May. His nominator writes, “Henry’s service to our nursing program has been unparalleled… Henry’s work with the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) and our Nursing First Year Interest Group highlight his leadership and ability to mentor students. He works tirelessly to advance nursing on campus and engage students in community activities, such as the Dance marathon that raises funds for our local children’s hospital.” Snyder served as Co-Chair, Nursing First Year Interest Group; Vice President, Resident Assistant Council; Director, P4K Dance Marathon; President, National Residence Hall Honorary; CHP Representative, Student Government; and Chair, Setters Leadership Conference. He was also the Founding President of the NSNA Pace University Chapter.

Read more:

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

New York Times: "Trump’s Twists and Turns on the Health Bill"

07/19/2017

New York Times: "Trump’s Twists and Turns on the Health Bill"

Photo: President Trump at the White House on Tuesday. Credit Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

To the Editor:

Re “How a Health Care Bill Failed: G.O.P. Divisions and a Fed-Up President” (news article, July 19):

Here we go again with health care legislation! Einstein is credited with saying, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results.” It is time, President Trump, to shift tactics and form an inclusive team to consider an improved approach to ensuring health care that builds on what we already have.

Trying to tear down an entrenched system behind closed doors won’t work. A bipartisan commission of senators and representatives, along with health providers, consumers, insurers and other high-stakes groups, and a one-year timeline to forge a new plan is what we need, not the “old boys” concocting a plan in isolation.

HARRIET R. FELDMAN

BELLMORE, N.Y.

The writer is dean and a professor at the College of Health Professions and the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/opinion/trumps-vow-to-let-obamacare-fail.html

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Register Citizen: "Pace University partners with Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities"

04/10/2017

Register Citizen: "Pace University partners with Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities"

NEW YORK >> Pace University’s College of Health Professions has launched the first college curriculum on service and therapy dogs in health care, according to a press release from Pace and Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities (ECAD), which is based in Torrington.

Inspired by the advocacy work of Iraq War veteran and author, Luis Carlos Montalván along with his service dog Tuesday, Pace faculty members Joanne K. Singleton, PhD, RN, and Lucille Ferrara, EdD, RN, joined forces with them and Lu Picard, co-founder and director of programs for ECAD, to develop the curriculum.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace launches Ph.D. in nursing program"

03/24/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace launches Ph.D. in nursing program"

Pace University’s College of Health Professions will launch a new PhD in nursing program in the fall on the college’s Pleasantville campus.

The program will be the only Ph.D. in nursing degree obtainable in the Hudson Valley.

Keville Frederickson, a professor at the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace, will serve as the program project leader. Fredrickson called the program “an exceptional milestone” for the college.

“Our graduates will be prepared as nurse leaders, scientists, policy makers and innovators in health care,” she said. “Their research will focus on primary health care (and) a people-centered approach to health that makes prevention as important as cure.”

Read more here.

Pages