PhD in Computer Science Faculty

Bio-sketches of the key faculty members who lead and support our Ph.D. in Computer Science program:
 
Dr. Amar Gupta, Professor of Computer Science, Dean of the Seidenberg School
 
Dr. Amar Gupta received his Ph.D. in decision support systems from I.I.T Delhi in 1980. He wrote his doctoral dissertation at MIT (1979-80). Before joining Pace University as Dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Dr. Gupta worked at the University of Arizona (2004-12) and MIT (full-time from 1980 to 2004 and part of the year since 2004). When he was with the University of Arizona, he was the Thomas R. Brown Endowed Professor of Management and Technology in the Office of the Dean of the Eller College of Management, tenured and Endowed Professor in the field of Entrepreneurship, Professor of Computer Science, and the Founder-Head of the “Nexus of Entrepreneurship and Technology” Initiative. When he was with MIT, he was the founding Co-Director of the Productivity from Information Technology (PROFIT) Initiative, Director of the Research Program on Communications Policy, and Associate Director of MIT’s International Financial Services Research Center.
 
As an established computer science professor, researcher and innovator, Dr. Gupta has published 12 books and over 150 papers and articles, and pioneered in areas of the concept of 24-Hour-Knowledge Factory (from 2004 onwards), three-faceted approach to diverse Healthcare Applications including Mammography, and IBM PC-based presentation graphics. In addition, he is the lead inventor of a broad patent on electronic processing of bank checks. He has mentored over 75 graduate students whose research was supervised by him. Dr. Gupta’s research has been supported by several millions dollars of grants and awards by US government agencies (including DARPA, NSF, the US Air Force, and the US Department of Transportation), and diverse companies including IBM and Honeywell.
 
 
Dr. D. Paul Benjamin, Professor of Computer Science
 
Dr. Benjamin earned his doctorate in computer science from New York University in 1985. He worked for six years in industry before entering academia. Currently, he is professor of computer science and founder and director of the Robotics Lab at Pace University in New York City.
 
His research focuses on issues of problem solving and representation in cognitive architectures. He and two collaborators from Fordham University and Brigham Young University have been developing a robotic cognitive architecture over the past ten years. In addition, he and his research group at the Pace Robotics Lab have been building cognitive agents in cyber-security.
 
Dr. Benjamin’s research has been supported by over $2.5 million in research grants from federal agencies including the NSF, DARPA, AFOSR, ARO, and the Dept. of Energy.
 
 
Dr. Sung-Hyuk Cha, Professor of Computer Science
 
Dr. Sung-Hyuk. Cha received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 2001 and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He graduated with High Honors and received High Honors in Computer Science. From 1996 to 1998, he was working in the area of medical information systems such as PACS, teleradiology, and telemedicine at Information Technology R&D Center, Samsung SDS. During his Ph.D. years, he was affiliated with the Center of Excellence for Document Analysis and Recognition (CEDAR). Major contribution made at CEDAR includes dichotomy model to establish the individuality of handwriting, distance measures on histograms and strings, a nearest neighbor search algorithm, apriori algorithm, etc. supervised by Prof. Sargur N. Srihari. The individuality of handwriting project which was funded by National Institute of Justice Research Award: (1999-IJ-CX-K010, $428,000) led to the United States patent (7580551 B1) in 2009. He has been a faculty member of Computer Science department at Pace University since 2001 and has been advising over ten doctorate and ten M.S. dissertations. He served as a chair panel speaker, plenary speaker, or committee member on many conferences, and invited speakers for numerous seminars. Since 2009, he became an Industrial Advisory Board Member for the NSF Scholarship Program in Pharmaceutical Statistics. His main interests include computer vision, data mining, and pattern matching & recognition. He is a member of AAAI, and IEEE and its Computer Society. He has over one hundred publications in highly rated ISI journals and conference proceedings with an h-index of 19 with over 1570 citations.
 
 
Dr. Li-Chiou Chen, Associate Professor of Information Technology
 
Dr. Li-Chiou Chen has a Ph.D. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and was affiliated with the Center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems (CASOS).  While at CMU, she built a computational simulation tool to investigate policy decisions in countering distributed denial-of-service attacks. In addition, she participated in a DARPA-funded research project, BioWar, where she analyzed policy decisions to respond against the spread of biological agents.  Her current research has been focused on the impact of policy and managerial decisions on countering computer attacks on the Internet. Specific topics include web application vulnerability testing, security usability and security regulatory compliance. She has published papers in top academic journals, including Computer & Security, Decision Support Systems and IEEE Transactions. She supervises doctoral students for their dissertation research. Her students have been working on cyber security related topics including: domain name systems security, authorship authentication, corporate security policy compliance, and computer security risk perception.
 
Dr. Chen has extensive grant management experiences. She is a principle investigator (PI) on three National Science Foundation grants, a Co-PI on one Department of Defense grant, and a PI on three Thinkfinity grants supported by the Verizon Foundation. She currently serves as the program director of the Scholarship for Service (SFS) program in Pace University supported by the National Science Foundation. The SFS program trains Pace students to become Information Assurance professionals who are obligated to enter the federal workforce upon graduation. She is also an advisor to students in Pace’s Information Assurance Scholarship Program, a similar cyber security scholarship program supported by the Department of Defense. Dr. Chen has taught numerous courses on the theory and practice of computer security and developed hands-on computer security laboratory teaching modules.
 
 
Dr. Fred Grossman, Professor and Program Chair, DPS in computing
 
Dr. Fred Grossman graduated from Polytechnic Institute of New York University - Graduate School of Engineering & Science, Ph.D. (Computer Science) in 1973.
 
Dr. Fred Grossman was Director of the Ph.D. in Computer Science and advisor to 6 computer science Ph.D. students at Polytechnic University; developer and Program Chair of the DPS in computing at Pace University and advisor of 19 completed students in the DPS in computing and 2 in the DPS in Business; currently advising 18 students in the DPS in computing.
 
The grants & awards that Dr. Fred Grossman has received include IBM Center for Advanced Study Faculty Grant Award 2006-2007, “Agile Software Development in a Highly Distributed Project Domain”; and IBM Center for Advanced Study Faculty Grant Award 2003-2004, “Introducing Extreme Programming (XP) into the corporate Webmaster domain”.
Dr. Fred Grossman has been a professor of Computer Science and Information Systems for almost 40 years, and has been involved in software development for 50 years. His principal research interests are in software engineering, agile methodologies and processes, automated systems development, automated programming, very-high-level language design, and the integration of information systems and organization strategies. Some recent work includes:
 
  • An agile outsourcing model – empirical and conceptual modeling of software development outsourcing using agile methods (extreme programming)
  • Distributed agile development – an empirical study to determine and model distributed extreme programming (also Scrum) in a real environment
  • Agile think/agile do – applying agile values, principles, and practices in non-software development projects and processes
 
Dr. Grossman has trained and coached eXtreme Programming (XP) teams in academic and industrial settings, and is a Certified ScrumMaster. He has developed and employed various games and exercises in agile and XP training and coaching. Pair Storytelling is an exercise designed to demonstrate the creativity of pairing in a context open to programmers and non-programmers. Extreme Construction is a hands-on agile immersion activity that lets one experience all of the agile (XP and Scrum) practices and values.
 
 
Dr. Bel G. Raggad, Professor of Information Technology
 
Dr. Bel G. Raggad is a Professor of Information Technology. He obtained his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University in 1989. His dissertation was supervised by Kalyan Chatterjee, a student of Howard Raiffa, a Frank P. Ramsey Professor of Managerial Economics, a joint chair held by the Business School and the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and the eminent pioneer in the field of decision analysis. His Ph.D. dissertation was also co-chaired by Gary Lilen, one among top scholarly researchers in Management Science.
 
Dr. Raggad’s MS thesis in Computer Science was supervised by Farouk Kammoun, a student of Klein Rock, the UCLA scholar known as the father of the Internet.
 
His research interest is in Intelligent Decision Support and Information Security. He has written several books in the area of IA, including a recent textbook “Information Security Management: Concepts and Practice,” published by CRC Press. He has published a large number of articles in refereed journals, including the Journal of CIS, Managerial Decision, Journal of Management and Information Processing, Managerial Finance, Journal of Data and Industrial Systems, etc.
 
Dr Raggad has received several internal and external grants to conduct scholarly research. Dr. Raggad has supervised more than a dozen MS theses and several doctoral theses.
 
 
Dr. Namchul Shin, Professor of Information Technology
 
Namchul Shin is Professor of Information Systems. He received his Ph.D. in Management (specialization in MIS) from the University of California at Irvine in 1997. His current research interests focus on the areas of globalization of innovation and production networks, IT business value, organizational and strategic impacts of IT, and electronic commerce. His work has been published in journals such as Industry & Innovation, Decision Support Systems, European Journal of Information Systems, International Journal of Information Management, Electronic Commerce Research and Applications, Journal of Computer Information Systems, Journal of Electronic Commerce Research, and Journal of Information Technology Theory and Application, among other journals.
 
He is associate editor of Journal of Electronic Commerce Research (2001 to present) and a member of the editorial board of Business Process Management Journal (2001 to present). He has also worked as a reviewer for thirty-four journals and eleven different conferences for the past seventeen years. He is a faculty research associate at the Personal Computing Industry Center (PCIC) affiliated to the University of California at Irvine (2009 to present). He was also a faculty research associate at the Center for Research on Information Technology and Organizations (CRITO) affiliated to the University of California at Irvine (2009 to 2012).
 
He has advised several students for the Doctor of Professional Studies (DPS) Program at the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems as a dissertation chair or a committee member.
 
 
Dr. Lixin Tao, Professor of Computer Science
 
Dr. Tao received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Pennsylvania in 1988. Before he joined Pace University in 2001, he was associate professor of computer science with Concordia University in Montreal for 8 years. Dr. Tao is an IEEE senior member, and an ABET national program evaluator for computer science. He has published over 150 papers in refereed international journals and conference proceedings in areas of Internet and web computing, cloud and utility computing, XML and web services, operations research and combinatorial optimization, parallel and distributed computing, functional simulation, and computing education.
 
Dr. Tao has a track record for quality sponsored research. During 1992-1995, Dr. Tao was PI for the Environment for Portable Parallel Programming project sponsored by Strategic Technology Program of Industry, Science and Technology Canada, Digital, and IBM, with a budget of $4.2 million per year. From 1997 to 2005, Dr. Tao consulted for MITRE Corporation (mitre.org, federal funded IT research centers on defense, aviation, IRS, homeland security and U.S. courts); Bell Atlantic (now Verizon) in Atlanta; and Fleet Boston (now Bank of America) on CORBA (distributed objects) technology and Application-Service-Provider model of computing (predecessor of today’s utility computing and cloud computing). From 2005 to 2006, as an international pioneer on cloud computing, Dr. Tao consulted for USAA (usaa.org) on the use of cloud technology to deliver financial services to soldiers on aircraft carriers and in foreign territories. Dr. Tao has graduated 5 Ph.D. students, 9 DPS doctorate students, and supervised dozens of master theses.