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The Sacramento Bee: "Nikki Haley, usually a U.N. star, steps aside this week for Trump"

09/19/2017

The Sacramento Bee: "Nikki Haley, usually a U.N. star, steps aside this week for Trump"

...“It can be an awkward time for an ambassador of the U.N. because they have worked on cultivating messages and relationships … the day-to-day business of being a diplomat at the U.N. is a very delicate endeavor, everything is carefully phrased and thought through, and that is not how an elected politician necessarily works,” said Matthew Bolton, director of the International Disarmament Institute at Pace University and an expert on the U.N.

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U.S. News & World Report: "What's in an Online Physician Assistant Master's Program"

09/14/2017

U.S. News & World Report: "What's in an Online Physician Assistant Master's Program"

When researching different physician assistant jobs, Dave Cosenza realized that earning a master's degree would qualify him for more positions.

But he also knew that taking off from work for a full-time, on-campus program would result in lost income. His solution: pursue a physician assistant postgraduate degree online through the University of Nebraska Medical Center, which allows him to complete coursework around his own schedule, even far away from campus.

Open to practicing physician assistants, the virtual program allows Cosenza and his classmates to take courses in subjects including research, medical ethics and health care policy.

"It allows me to work and go at my own pace, whether I want to take seven or eight credits or just three or four credits a semester," says the 46-year-old Connecticut resident, who expects to graduate next year.

Consenza isn't alone. Some universities now offer master's programs online for practicing physician assistants who already have a bachelor's degree. That's happening as employer demand for PAs is projected to rise 30 percent between 2014 and 2024, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In the past, PAs typically just needed an undergraduate education, says Denise Rizzolo, program director for the PA master's completion program at the Pace University College of Health Professions. But today, experts say, a master's is the industry standard.

Experts say these online completion programs enable PAs with college degrees to earn a master's, preparing them for more advanced roles. Some states also now require practicing PAs to complete that level of education, Rizzolo says.

At this time, there are few accredited online programs that provide initial PA training, experts say; that curriculum involves a lot of face-to-face interaction in a clinical setting. Because master's completion students generally already have on-site, real-world experience, a fully in-person education may not be as essential at that stage, though there may still be clinical or similar requirements, depending on a student's concentration.

PAs often work odd hours, and students generally live across time zones, says Rizzolo. Many courses in online master's programs are therefore self-paced, or asynchronous. While there are set deadlines, students can typically complete coursework whenever they wish during the week.

That doesn't mean courses aren't as challenging as those on a physical campus, school officials say.

"It is time-consuming for them," says Bert Simon, department chair of PA studies at A.T. Still University of Health Sciences—Mesa, a health sciences university in Arizona offering an online master's for PAs. "Even though it's flexible, it still is a commitment." Online students at ATSU should expect 10 to 20 hours of coursework a week, he adds.

Given the range of subjects that PA master's programs may cover, the types of assignments generally vary, experts say. Cosenza says he regularly completes research papers and open-book exams.

Students may also participate in discussion boards. In one online course at Pace University, says Rizzolo, students were asked in a forum about what changes in technology are having the greatest impact on their health care practices. They responded to the original question and then to each other, starting a dialogue.

Group work may also be assigned. Michael Huckabee, director of the division of PA education at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, says that in an online clinical inquiry and writing course, students post a peer-reviewed article on a topic of their choice at the beginning of the term and then continue posting related studies every two weeks to explore the subject in greater depth. Students review two other classmates' articles, in the process answering questions and starting discussions.

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Daily Mail: "Massive credit bureau hack raises troubling questions"

09/08/2017

Daily Mail: "Massive credit bureau hack raises troubling questions"

It could be the worst-ever data breach for American consumers, exposing some of the most sensitive data for a vast number of US households.

The hack disclosed this week at Equifax, one of the three major credit bureaus which collect consumer financial data, potentially affects 143 million US customers, or more than half the adult population.

While not the largest breach -- Yahoo attacks leaked data on as many as one billion accounts -- the Equifax incident could be the most damaging because of the nature of data collected: bank and social security numbers and other personal information of value to hackers and others.

"This is the data that every hacker wants to steal your identity and compromise your accounts," said Darren Hayes, a Pace University professor specializing in digital forensics and cybersecurity.

"It's not like the Yahoo breach where you could reset your password. Your information is gone. There's nothing to reset."

Some reports suggested Equifax data was being sold on "dark web" marketplaces, but analysts said it was too soon to know who was behind the attack and the motivation.

"This could be a mercenary group or it could be a nation-state compiling it with other data" for espionage purposes, said James Scott, a senior fellow at the Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology, a Washington think tank.

"This is the kind of information I would go after if I were a nation-state, to set up psychographic targeting for information and political warfare."

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The Journal News: "For young DACA immigrants like me, U.S. is home: View"

09/08/2017

The Journal News: "For young DACA immigrants like me, U.S. is home: View"

With the announcement that President Donald Trump plans to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, I am more grateful than ever for the opportunities this program afforded me. Without DACA, I would not have been able to attend college.

I spent the first nine years of my life in the Dominican Republic. Growing up in Miami, Florida, many of my high school classmates came from a range of Latin American countries at young ages. For as long as I can remember, I knew that I was undocumented. So many of the people around me were surviving sin papeles (without papers). I didn’t really know what that meant when I was young but as I grew older, identification became a delicate subject for me. 

My mother spent many years quietly trying to gain legal status for us while I was happily reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. It wasn’t until my senior year of high school that I was able to gain temporary protected status by applying for DACA.

My mom, sisters and I have now been able to become naturalized citizens but it wasn’t an easy journey. These experiences made me especially appreciative. When I came to Pace University, I was very motivated to take full advantage of all the resources and opportunities presented to me. 

During my freshman year I applied for, and was fortunate to be awarded, a Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship. Through this fellowship program, I interned at the Institute of International Education. I was also a racial equity intern at 100 Resilient Cities.

In 2015, I received a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship that allowed me to travel to Bolivia and research femicide in the country.

In May, I was selected as a Truman Scholar. Through this program I will receive a scholarship toward graduate school. My goal is to become an immigration attorney to help undocumented immigrant high school students. I want to help these students overcome the barriers that prevent them from entering college and from becoming residents or citizens. 

For now, I am helping give back in any way I can. I have started a new student club at Pace called Advocates Bringing Resources to Immigrants and Refugees, through which we organize college application workshops for undocumented students. ABRIR, which means "open" in Spanish, intends to open doors of opportunity for these students.

After interning at the New York City Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, I now recruit Pace students to volunteer for the office’s “We Are New York” program and help facilitate English conversation classes.

But I will be limited in the ways in which I will be able to help immigrant students if DACA is discontinued. Many young people will not even apply to college for fear of drawing attention to their undocumented status.

I stand with others like me in calling for our leaders in Congress to solve this issue permanently through legislation that will allow young immigrants across the nation to legally attain a college education and work toward their piece of the American dream.

For young people like me, the United States is the only country we have known. It is our home. 

The writer is an honors student at Pace University. She is a double major studying political science and peace and justice studies.

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CNET: "Amazon wants a second HQ, and it's got $5 billion to spend"

09/08/2017

CNET: "Amazon wants a second HQ, and it's got $5 billion to spend"

Amazon is now so big it wants a second headquarters.

The world's largest online retailer said Thursday it plans to build a corporate basein a major North American city that will be an equal to its existing Seattle headquarters. It expects to spend over $5 billion on the project, called Amazon HQ2, and hire as many as 50,000 people for high-paying jobs over the next 15 to 17 years.

"We expect HQ2 to be a full equal to our Seattle headquarters," Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said in a statement. "We're excited to find a second home."

Amazon said it has over 40,000 employees working at its Seattle headquarters, where it has 33 buildings. It spent $3.7 billion on buildings and infrastructure to create the urban campus there.

The company is seeking requests for proposals from cities, to be sent in by Oct. 19. The final site selection is expected to be announced sometime next year.

With the company expanding so quickly, it may now realize it's outgrown the Seattle market and needs to go somewhere else to draw in more talent. In the process of getting that talent, Amazon is likely making this announcement to generate excitement from multiple cities and states in hopes of sparking a bidding war. It could find itself with millions or billions of dollars in tax breaks and other incentives for agreeing to come to any given location.

It's likely many cities will be falling over themselves to bring home a major tech company to bolster their monikers as a "Silicon Something" (Silicon Alley, Silicon Slopes, Silicon Prairie, the list goes on). Other locales may be more hesitant since Amazon has already taken over large chunks of downtown Seattle, helping drive up housing costs in the area. 

"They need to go where they can sustain longer-term growth, because there's going to be more," Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University's Lubin School of Business, said Thursday. 

He added that Amazon will probably head where it can plan expansions into future industries, plot for additional acquisitions and find ways to connect its vast sets of businesses, from books to clothing to food to web services.

There is precedent in the business world to developing additional headquarters. Several major companies have done so, especially after merging with another big firm and agreeing to maintain both companies' headquarters.

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The Chronicle of Higher Education: "Our Academic Book Tour"

09/04/2017

The Chronicle of Higher Education: "Our Academic Book Tour"

Two professors embarked on a successful book tour that included Pace. They wrote of their adventure in "The Chronicle of Higher Education." They discussed their new book, Listen, We Need to Talk: How to Change Attitudes About LGBT Rights."

 

 

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Miami Herald: "In Charlottesville’s wake, notorious Florida-born racist forum sees traffic spike"

08/16/2017

Miami Herald: "In Charlottesville’s wake, notorious Florida-born racist forum sees traffic spike"

...Posts on Stormfront and another racist site, The Daily Stormer, have been highlighted on national newscasts and even the Jon Oliver show, elevating the status of a site that had already grown into a digital gathering space for racists across the nation, said Adam Klein, an assistant professor of communications study at Pace University in New York who’s written extensively about the white supremacist movement online.

“Stormfront was, in its own way, really revolutionary,” said Klein.

Unlike other hate sites, which functioned basically as brochures for their hateful ideologies, Stormfront, which bills itself "the voice of the new, embattled White minority,’’ was the first to function as an open forum. It gave racists a place to chat and radicalize from the comfort of their own home.

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The Ladders: "Why we should get rid of generational labels in the workplace"

08/15/2017

The Ladders: "Why we should get rid of generational labels in the workplace"

They isolate employees

Helene Cruz, Director of Career Counseling at Pace University Career Services, said she is proud that her team is multi-generational.

“We have established a culture that cultivates learning from one another across seven generations,” she said. “We appreciate our millennial colleagues and rely on the fact that they are technically-savvy and creative, ready to bring new ideas to the table and not afraid to embark on new initiatives.”

All employees, no matter their age, contribute to the organization, Cruz said. 

“We glean a tremendous amount of insight from our millennial teammates because they are closer in age to the students and can more fully express the student perspective/experience,” she said. “In turn, because employer representatives are also our clients, many Baby Boomers and Gen X staff have previously worked in various industries, have hired employees, and therefore can speak to the needs of the employers, which we share with our millennial teammates.”   

The focus should not be on how generations differ, but on how they can work together, Cruz said.

“Establish environments where they interact with multiple generations,” she said. “Highlight the strengths of people at different ages in life, and how each person adds value. Find or create situations where different generations can interact meaningfully.”

 

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Statement on Racism and Violence in Charlottesville, Virginia

08/14/2017

Statement on Racism and Violence in Charlottesville, Virginia

What occurred in Charlottesville, VA, is tragic and I condemn the bigotry and hatred exhibited. The Pace Community mourns the loss of life and the injuries inflicted on those who were defending what we hold dear in our country—equality and respect for one another no matter our race, creed, or ethnic background.

As we observe Constitution Day this September 18 and the document that created our government and laws, and guaranteed basic rights for every citizen, we will thoughtfully and respectfully discuss our current cultural climate and different perspectives. It is our common bond and a reminder of what is right and just, and wrong and indefensible, of who we are as a people, and of who we must always strive to be. It is proof that bigotry, violence, and hatred can never prevail.

Ours is a diverse, inclusive, and welcoming community and we can show by example our openness to learn from one another. There is no better place for this to occur than at an institution devoted to education. I look forward to these discussions.

Marvin Krislov
President
Pace University

 

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El Paso Times: "UTEP among nation's best at lifting students from poorest backgrounds, study finds"

08/14/2017

El Paso Times: "UTEP among nation's best at lifting students from poorest backgrounds, study finds"

The University of Texas at El Paso is one of several of the nation’s schools that is helping generate large returns for students from the poorest backgrounds, according to a working paper released recently week by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

The report lists UTEP among 10 schools that are strong engines of upward mobility for the nation’s poorest children. But, the report contends, those engines are slowing down.

The study, which was drafted in part by Raj Chetty and Emmanuel Saez, pioneering economists of socioeconomic inequality and mobility, focuses on each university’s “mobility rate,” the share of its students who come from the lowest fifth of the U.S. income distribution and end up in the top 20 percent. This metric is measured by multiplying the fraction of students from the lowest income bracket, or “access,” by the share who end up with incomes in the top fifth, or “success rate.” Researchers used data for more than 30 million college students from 1999 to 2013 for the study.

 

For UTEP, the findings indicate that just less than 25 percent of its students from the poorest backgrounds reach the uppermost income quintile. That is well behind the 58 percent of students who reach the highest quintile from “Ivy Plus” schools, the report’s listing of Ivy League universities and other elite schools such as Stanford and Duke. But only 3.8 percent of Ivy Plus students are from the lowest income bracket, compared with UTEP’s 28 percent. That gives UTEP a mobility rate (6.8 percent) that is more than three times higher than the Ivy Plus schools’ 2.18 percent.

The school with the highest mobility rate, according to the study, is California State University, Los Angeles with 9.9 percent. The school with the highest number of students from poor backgrounds who reached the uppermost income quintile was Pace University in New York, which boasts a success rate of 55.6 percent. Pace’s mobility rate, according to the study, is 8.4 percent.

 

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