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"Taipei Times" featured Dyson Professor Joseph Tse-hei Lee's piece "N Korea-US summit is a milestone"

06/18/2018

"Taipei Times" featured Dyson Professor Joseph Tse-hei Lee's piece "N Korea-US summit is a milestone"

Joseph Tse-Hei Lee is a professor of history at Pace University in New York City.

Under Soviet and Chinese pressure in the mid-1950s, Kim II-sung introduced the concept of juche in 1955. Permeating all levels of society, the ideology motivated the entire population to sacrifice for state-building and nullified US pressure to force a regime collapse.

For decades, Pyongyang has demanded that Washington withdraw its military from the peninsula and sign a peace treaty formally ending the Korean War, but the US dismissed the North’s demands. Against this backdrop, North Korea acquired nuclear technology from Pakistani scientists in the 1990s.

By 2001, when Bush took office, the North had the scientific knowledge and skills to produce nuclear weapons. For the US, the objective of diplomatic engagement was to persuade Pyongyang to slow down, if not dismantle, its nuclear weapons programs.

By comparison, China has shown a great deal of hesitation toward the Trump-Kim summit. China strives to replace the Cold War structure with a new multilateral order against the US.

China’s involvement in the previous rounds of six-nation nuclear talks was a defense against any potential US attacks on the North and a response to the Sino-American rivalry over Taiwan.

It can be anticipated that any settlement with North Korea will inevitably lead to a clarification of the US policy on Taiwan.

The latest efforts by Trump and Kim to seek common ground on the nuclear issue signaled a qualitative change in the bilateral relationship. The summit in Singapore suggests that the US publicly acknowledges North Korea as an equal in substantive negotiations.

To Kim Jong-un, political survival and power consolidation dictate his decision to reduce tensions with the US. Since proclaiming itself a nuclear state, North Korea appears to be operating in a larger international arena.

Dissatisfied with its status as a client of the US, South Korea has reached out to the North directly. This reconciliatory sentiment manifested itself in the Moon-Kim summit in Panmunjom in April.

Key for the US is how to contain a nuclear North Korea while preserving its defense alliances with South Korea and Japan.

In these webs of geopolitical encounters, North Korea has taken advantage of Sino-US rivalries, playing one against the other to empower itself.

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"Broadway World" featured Lubin alumni in "Pace University Gets A Seat At The Tony Awards"

06/06/2018

"Broadway World" featured Lubin alumni in "Pace University Gets A Seat At The Tony Awards"

Two Pace University graduates have been recognized for their work by the American Theatre Wing's Tony Awards.

The Tony Awards Administration Committee will present the 2018 Tony Honors for Excellence in the Theatre to outstanding contributors to the Broadway industry and among them is Pace alumnus Bruce Barish and his wife, Sarah Barish. Bruce earned a management degree from Pace's Lubin School of Business in 1986.

The story goes back more than a century. In 1908 Ernest Winzer was the Master Drycleaner and Dyer to the Broadway stage productions of the day. Family folklore has it that Winzer began by handling the costumes worn by Broadway greats like George M. Cohan, Helen Hayes, Laurette Taylor, the Barrymores and Billie Burke. Today, Bruce Barish, is the third generation of the Steinhorn family to preside over Ernest Winzer Cleaners. In keeping with his grandfather's service philosophy, Bruce takes personal responsibility for seeing to it that Winzer always satisfies demands of its most discriminating customer. He takes particular joy in indulging his personal passion for garment restoration work, an expertise he shared with his grandfather, Al.

"We see stuff the average cleaner would never know what to do with - beaded stuff, hand-painted stuff," Barish told the New York Post. Their busiest time is Sunday night, when their trucks pick up the costumes after the shows. Barish and his crew get up at midnight to begin cleaning and mending.

Recent graduate, Reilly Hickey has been nominated for a Tony for her work as a producer on the Broadway show "Once On This Island." The whimsical show is up for a total of eight Tony Award nominations including "Best Musical Revival." Hickey was an honors student and worked on the show while she was a student. She graduated last week with her Bachelor's Degree in Arts and Entertainment Management from Pace's Lubin School of Business. The ceremony took place at Radio City Music Hall.

"One of the unique opportunities that comes with getting a business education in New York is the exposure to theater and the opportunity to apply what you learn to something you love," said Lubin School Dean Neil Braun. "It's exciting to see Lubin alumni leveraging their education to fulfill their career aspirations. Lubin business majors also have the advantage of being able to specialize in specific areas of interest such as Arts and Entertainment Management."

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"Hudson Valley News Network" featured Pace University's Jim Stenerson in "14 Appointed to LGBTQ Advisory Board"

06/05/2018

"Hudson Valley News Network" featured Pace University's Jim Stenerson in "14 Appointed to LGBTQ Advisory Board"

Westchester County Executive George Latimer has announced the appointment of fourteen members to the LGBTQ Advisory Board.

Members of the Board include lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and allies with a broad range of backgrounds and experiences.

Latimer said, “I am eager to get to work with the LGBTQ Board, to bring Westchester County up to speed on the issues that matter to the LGBTQ communities. This dynamic group of people will be tasked with making recommendations about new legislation, services, programs, funding or anything else these advisors feel is appropriate.”

Chair of the LGBTQ Advisory Board Christopher Oldi said, “The Westchester County LGBTQ Advisory Board looks forward to working with the Latimer administration on ensuring that the needs of LGBTQ Westchester residents are being met throughout the County.  The Advisory Board is committed to having open and honest conversations with the new administration in order to provide any advice, guidance or assistance that is requested of the Board.  We thank the County Executive for his commitment to LGBTQ rights, and I appreciate being appointed to the Board.”

The newly appointed LGBTQ Advisory Board members are as follows:

Jim Stenerson of Yonkers, is the Executive Director of the Faculty Center for Innovating Teaching & Professional Development at Pace University. Stenerson is also co-advisor of the College’s Gay-Straight Alliance Student Organization, and previously served on the Board of Directors for SAGE, Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders.

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"The New York Times" featured Lubin Professor Larry Chiagouris in "A Sign of ‘Modern Society’: More Multiracial Families in Commercials"

06/04/2018

"The New York Times" featured Lubin Professor Larry Chiagouris in "A Sign of ‘Modern Society’: More Multiracial Families in Commercials"

A hapless man stands on the sidewalk, watching and wincing as an ex-girlfriend tosses his possessions out a second-floor window in a commercial for DirecTV Now. A husband and wife are overjoyed to learn from a Fidelity investments adviser that, yes, they have saved enough for retirement to realize their fondest dream, one that involves a boat and a grandchild. And a considerably younger couple is delighted with the possibilities presented by the Clearblue ovulation test system.

The men and women vary in age, circumstances and happiness levels, but they have one thing in common. They are all part of interracial couples.

Recently, companies and brands like JPMorgan Chase, Humira, State Farm, Smile Direct Club, Coors Light, Macy’s, Tide and Cadillac have featured multiracial couples or families in their advertising.

“There’s no doubt that the incidence of these commercials is at least double what it was five years ago,” said Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at the Pace University Lubin School of Business.

“For the longest time, ads presented the typical American household as Caucasian, heterosexual, two children and two cars in the driveway,” he added. “There’s still a part of the world that’s like that, but there’s a large portion that is nothing like the ‘Father Knows Best’ Americana image. It’s taken the advertising community, and particularly their clients, a long time to come to grips with that. They’re risk averse.”

That relatively new awareness, Mr. Chiagouris said, has resulted in not only more ads with interracial couples, but also more gay and lesbian couples.

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"Hawaii News Now" featured Pace University in "Pace University’s School of Education and College of Health Professions Launch New Bachelor’s and Master’s Programs this Fall"

05/30/2018

"Hawaii News Now" featured Pace University in "Pace University’s School of Education and College of Health Professions Launch New Bachelor’s and Master’s Programs this Fall"

 Pace University is launching a Bachelor of Science program in Early Childhood Education in lower Manhattan and in Westchester as well as a new Master of Science program in Nutrition and Dietetics at its campus in Pleasantville.

The Early Childhood Education program prepares students to support the learning and development of all young children and includes a cultural competence component to prepare students to better serve children who come from diverse backgrounds. The program works with family and community partnerships but also focuses on using developmentally effective approaches to build a meaningful curriculum for young children.

The Early Childhood Education program leads to a bachelor’s degree and the New York State initial teaching certificate in Early Childhood Education (birth - grade 2). The program is full-time, and students advance through the program as a cohort, with required education courses offered in specific semesters which helps support graduation in four years.

“This new undergraduate program underscores the importance of Early Childhood Education,” said Xiao-lei Wang, PhD, Acting Dean of Pace’s School of Education. "High-quality early childhood education is a powerful means to promote continued success in school and in life, and the School of Education is pleased to add it to our academic programs.”

“Our aim is to prepare teachers who will support the development of the whole child, by promoting learning, growth, and social connections,” said School of Education Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator Raquel Plotka, Ph.D.

For students with a taste for food science and health, Pace University’s College of Health Professions (CHP) is launching a new coordinated Master of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics program. The program will offer concentrations in culinary nutrition and food policy while also fully preparing students to practice nutrition in a clinical setting.

The two-year, full-time coordinated program is the only one in the area where students are matched with and complete their internship of 1,200 required dietetic hours while attending classes. This model allows students to immediately apply their skills and knowledge in real life environments, including local food and hunger organizations, restaurants, hospitals, markets and farms.

Students in the program will be trained to serve as responsible practitioners, leaders, and innovators who will make positive impacts on nutrition outcomes. Students will share CHP’s Inter-professional Center for Healthcare Simulation with other health professions disciplines. Graduates of this program will be eligible to take the Registered Dietitian exam.

Dr. Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RDN, a Registered Dietitian-Nutritionist (RDN) food and nutrition researcher is the Assistant Professor who founded the program. Dr. Cooper says: “Our aim is to educate a group of students who go into the workforce with the skills to help people to make healthful food choices, cook affordably and deliciously and lead happy, productive lives. We emphasize hands-on learning, enjoyment of food and promoting lifelong good health.”

“We are delighted to add Nutrition and Dietetics to our growing academic programs in the College of Health Professions,” said Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “This program offers great opportunities for inter-professional collaboration across our College.”

Both programs are accepting applications for Fall 2018. To learn more about the programs or to apply for fall, visit Early Childhood Education or Nutrition and Dietetics. 

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"Backstage" featured Professors Grant Kretchik and JV Mercanti in "What You Need to Know About Auditioning for College"

05/29/2018

"Backstage" featured Professors Grant Kretchik and JV Mercanti in "What You Need to Know About Auditioning for College"

If college acting programs are meant to prepare you for the real world of professional acting, then it only makes sense that they, too, require an audition process. And as any working actor will tell you, it’s best to accept the auditioning-as-way-of-life mentality sooner rather than later. Below, industry and Backstage Experts share their most useful audition tips as they pertain specifically to college.

Your monologue interpretation will be evaluated.
“I would be lying if I said there are not monologues that make me roll my eyes. There are also monologues that are difficult for me because I’ve been in, directed, or love the play—but that does not mean you should not do them. Honestly? Very often, I’m not only listening to the words, but also trying to deeply evaluate how aware you are of what you are doing with the material.” —Grant Kretchik, associate director of Pace University’s School of Performing Arts and Backstage Expert

The interview is as important as the audition.
“Schools can tell a lot about you from the interview. Work on your interview skills, be yourself and be ready to give thoughtful answers to questions asked. Research the school so you can speak about why you chose their program. Whether it’s the faculty, alumni, philosophy, or networking opportunities, have specifics.” —Denise Simon, New York-based acting coach and Backstage Expert

Do your very best to relax.
“[Students] need to relax and not let [nervousness] overwhelm them. Just come in and give us your best you. We’re looking for students to be themselves, show us who they are as performers. They don’t have to be perfect in their singing or acting because that’s why they’re going to school—to get that training!” —Ashley Avola, assistant director of fine and performing arts admission at Marymount Manhattan College

The audition should help answer your questions, too.
“FIRST: Make a list of questions.

  1. What do I want out of an arts training program?

  2. Do I want an urban or suburban campus?

  3. Do I want conservatory or liberal arts training? What’s the difference between the two?

  4. What are the top schools in my field? (i.e. acting, musical theater, playwriting, etc.)

  5. How many students does the program admit?

  6. Who’s teaching within the program?

  7. What industry connections do they have?

  8. Is there a New York showcase? A Los Angeles showcase?

  9. Am I guaranteed a place in the showcase or is it by admission?

  10. Does the program support internships, independent studies, etc.?

  11. Are there performance opportunities?

  12. When am I allowed to audition?

  13. Does the program have a “must-cast” policy or could I go through four years not guaranteed an opportunity?

  14. What theaters are around the school? Do I have the ability to see other shows while there?

  15. And any other question you may have.

“You don’t have to provide definitive answers to the more subjective questions but these are things you really should consider.” —Grant Kretchik and JV Mercanti, head of acting for the musical theater program at Pace University’s School of the Arts and Backstage Expert

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"The Atlantic" featured Pace University's President Marvin Krislov in "The Schools That Are Bringing Poor Kids Into the Middle Class"

05/29/2018

"The Atlantic" featured Pace University's President Marvin Krislov in "The Schools That Are Bringing Poor Kids Into the Middle Class"

The evidence is clear: A college degree is, in most cases, the key to more money and a more comfortable standard of living. But that pathway to higher earnings is more available to some than others: A lot of elite colleges do not enroll a lot of low-income students, and as a result they’re not boosting very many students from low-income households into the middle and upper classes.

Dozens of top colleges and universities have more students from the top 1 percent of the income scale than the bottom 60 percent, as The New York Times pointed out last year. And that’s a problem if colleges hope to escape the common critique that they are little more than a finishing school for the elite.

But there are institutions—a lot of them—that have strong track records of improving the socioeconomic fortunes of students. If higher education is supposed to be the great equalizer, these institutions—from community colleges to public regional four-year colleges like Cal State and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County—are the ones that are doing the most work.

Last week in Los Angeles, at the Education Writers Association’s annual seminar, I moderated a panel featuring a handful of people who are thinking a lot about the socioeconomic mobility of students, and more fundamentally, the purpose of higher education. The panel, which included Marvin Krislov, the president of Pace University; Dianne Harrison, the president of California State University, Northridge; and Allan Golston, of the Gates Foundation, had a few recommendations. Colleges should be actively recruiting and enrolling low-income students—and that means more than targeting ads to prospective students on social media. It means a commitment to going where they are—areas that a lot of schools do not typically recruit—and demystifying the process of going to college. Then they should be supporting students with resources when the students get to campus—whether it’s writing centers, generous financial aid packages, or simply empathetic academic advisors who perhaps came from low-income backgrounds themselves. And it is also preparing students for jobs after college and building relationships with businesses that ease the process of finding post-graduation employment for students, especially for those whose parents don’t have their own professional networks.

Pace ranks first among private colleges in catapulting its students from the lowest rungs of the income scale and into the middle and upper class, according to data from the Equality of Opportunity Project, a massive research undertaking on social mobility led by the economist Raj Chetty. “We know that there are a lot of ways in which people of privilege benefit from their college years or having unpaid internships or having the social capital to get certain jobs,” Krislov said. But colleges can fill those gaps, particularly for low-income students, helping students get jobs, or buoying them with programs that help them land paid internships with top companies. “We provide strong networks, not only through alumni, but through faculty and staff as well. And that way we help a new generation, a new, socioeconomically diverse generation, achieve the American dream.”

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"The Hill" featured Lubin Professor Philip G. Cohen's opinion piece in "Tax reform postmortem reveals lethal dose of crony capitalism"

05/22/2018

"The Hill" featured Lubin Professor Philip G. Cohen's opinion piece in "Tax reform postmortem reveals lethal dose of crony capitalism"

Philip G. Cohen is an associate professor of taxation at Pace University Lubin School of Business and a retired vice president – tax and general tax counsel at Unilever United States, Inc. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of any organization to which the author is or was associated with.

On Wednesday, the House Ways and Means Committee held a hearing regarding the impact of P.L. 115-97, informally referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) enacted in December 2017.

While Chairman Kevin Brady (R-Texas) undoubtedly viewed this as an opportunity for a curtain call, TCJA is a poster child for poorly conceived, incredibly complex (even for a tax act) partisan legislation enacted without due deliberation, that will exacerbate the deficit and undoubtedly further drive good jobs and income off-shore.

It also punished blue states like New York, New Jersey and California by capping the itemized deduction for all state taxes at a mere $10,000, but managed to reduce the top individual tax rate from 39.6 percent to 37 percent.

Even Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), who voted for TCJA, has expressed regrets when faced with a Congressional Budget Office estimate that TCJA will increase the federal budget deficit by $1.85 trillion in 2018-2028. Sen. Corker stated, "If it ends up costing what has been laid out here, it could well be one of the worst votes I've made."

Another TCJA supporter, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), also articulated remorse over TCJA, albeit for a different reason: "They [big corporations with the tax cuts] bought back shares; a few gave out bonuses; there's no evidence whatsoever that the money's been massively poured back into the American worker." 

This latter comment was reinforced by a survey of economists by the National Association for Business Economics, which found that "two-thirds of business economists [indicated that] the 2017 tax law isn't changing their firms' and industries hiring or investment plans."

While there was somewhat widespread belief that the pre-TCJA top corporate statutory rate of 35 percent needed to be reduced, what was the rationale for slashing the rate to 21 percent?

Furthermore, why was untaxed pre-TCJA offshore earnings of U.S. multinationals only taxed at rates of 15.5 percent for cash and cash equivalents and 8 percent for other assets, coupled with the tax being spread over eight years and heavily back-loaded? 

In addition, why has the nation's tax laws moved in the direction of quasi-territoriality, wherein most foreign-sourced dividends received by 10 percent or more domestic corporate shareholders will get 100 percent dividends received deduction, i.e., they pay no federal income tax.

The answer to all three questions is that this was a pay-off to major campaign contributors, where their interests prevailed over those of the nation.

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"El Diario" featured Pace University's President Marvin Krislov's piece in "Deberíamos encontrar un camino que sea incluyente, justo y beneficioso para los Dreamers y el país"

05/21/2018

"El Diario" featured Pace University's President Marvin Krislov's piece in "Deberíamos encontrar un camino que sea incluyente, justo y beneficioso para los Dreamers y el país"

El día de la decisión acaba de pasar. El primero de mayo es la época del año en el que la mayoría de los estudiantes del último año de la escuela secundaria deben decidir dónde planean inscribirse en el otoño. Para la mayoría de los estudiantes, es un momento para relajarse después de todas las tensiones del proceso de solicitud de la universidad. Pero para un grupo – los 700,000 jóvenes traídos a Estados Unidos cuando eran niños y protegidos por el programa de Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia o DACA, llamados Dreamers – la angustia no tiene fin.

Tres cortes federales han impedido que la administración de Trump detenga el programa, y ​​a principios de este año la Corte Suprema permitió que esas sentencias fueran válidas. Pero el Congreso y la Administración no han podido llegar a un acuerdo sobre su futuro, y un nuevo caso en Texas amenaza con llevar a DACA a la Corte Suprema. Mientras tanto, estos estudiantes están atascados en el limbo, protegidos por el momento, pero sin sentirse seguros de cuánto durará y, lo que es peor, no serán elegibles para los programas federales de ayuda financiera. Los programas de ayuda estatales y universitarios varían.

En Pace, estamos, como siempre lo hemos estado, dedicados a proporcionar acceso al poder de la educación para estudiantes de todos los orígenes. Valoramos a los estudiantes inmigrantes y les proporcionamos ayuda financiera, que incluye ayuda basada en méritos para Dreamers.

En un momento en que otros países están incrementando su gasto en I+D e invirtiendo cada vez más en estudiantes de STEM, los inmigrantes proveen algunos jóvenes altamente educados y ambiciosos que necesitamos para cubrir los empleos de hoy. Inyectan talento y emprendedor. Ayudan a expandir nuestra economía; en general, los inmigrantes no quitan empleos, porque no es una pregunta de suma cero. Mantienen a los Estados Unidos competitivo a nivel internacional. Y aunque los estudiantes internacionales obtienen casi la mitad de los títulos de ingeniería y ciencias de la computación de los Estados Unidos, esos números se están reduciendo. Necesitamos hacer que estos estudiantes sean más bienvenidos, no menos.

Más allá de eso, en un momento en que los negocios son globales, un cuerpo estudiantil compuesto por muchas culturas y nacionalidades ayuda a todos los estudiantes a aprender cómo operar en una economía global. Este tipo de exposición y comprensión es una parte central de la educación actual. Incluso si un estudiante que se gradúa en la fuerza de trabajo esta primavera no sale de los Estados Unidos por el resto de su vida, todavía tendrá que tratar con clientes internacionales, proveedores internacionales o la cadena de suministro global en algún momento de su vida profesional. Los inmigrantes ayudan a preparar a sus compañeros estudiantes para el lugar de trabajo de hoy en día.

Pace se fundó hace más de un siglo como una escuela de contabilidad, para ayudar a aspirantes estudiantes de negocios a abrirse paso en la clase media. Nuestros campos de instrucción se han expandido; hoy estamos desarrollando enfermeras y asistentes de médicos, desarrolladores de aplicaciones y expertos en ciberseguridad, educadores y abogados, actores y escritores, y, sí, aún muchos contadores, pero nuestra misión sigue siendo la misma. Brindamos acceso a una educación de calidad para jóvenes ambiciosos, independientemente de su origen. Pace no pregunta sobre el estado de inmigración de los posibles estudiantes o sus padres, pero sabemos que casi la mitad de los estudiantes de primer año de este 2018 dicen que son los primeros en sus familias en asistir a la universidad.

Un estudio del Departamento de Educación de Estados Unidos encontró que los estudiantes inmigrantes de primera generación representan el 13.5 por ciento de los estudiantes universitarios en el estado de Nueva York, y los inmigrantes de segunda generación representan otro 22 por ciento. Eso significa que más de un tercio de los estudiantes de pregrado del estado son estudiantes inmigrantes, y eso no incluye a los inmigrantes indocumentados. Además, el Departamento de Seguridad Nacional dice que más de 43,000 Dreamers han solicitado y han sido aprobados para DACA en el estado de Nueva York. El Instituto de Políticas de Migración calcula que el 25 por ciento de ellos cursó estudios superiores, lo que significa que hay alrededor de 11,000 Dreamers en las facultades y universidades de Nueva York.

Veo lo que los estudiantes y ex alumnos inmigrantes de Pace pueden lograr. Veo lo que Dreamers at Pace puede lograr. Pienso en Lisdy Contreras-Giron, una estudiante de Pace que “salió” como Dreamer luego de que el presidente Trump anunció su decisión de finalizar el programa en septiembre del año pasado. “Cuando elijo salir, es porque estoy orgullosa”, dijo en un evento universitario. “Ser una Dreamer, como somos identificados, no es solo ser un soñador. Somos tus vecinos, somos iguales, somos tus compañeros de clase, somos niñeras de tus hijos, tus enfermeras”.

Al igual que los mejores estudiantes de Pace, Lisdy es inteligente, esforzada y ambiciosa. Ella es una valiosa incorporación a la comunidad de Pace, y es una valiosa incorporación a este país. Necesitamos estudiantes como ella, tanto Dreamers como inmigrantes, y el país también los necesita. Esperemos que el Congreso y el Presidente puedan usar el tiempo otorgado por la decisión de la Corte Suprema esta semana de encontrar un camino que sea incluyente, justo y beneficioso, no solo para los Dreamers sino también para el país.

-Marvin Krislov es el presidente de Pace University

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"Hit 107" featured Dyson Professor K. Mark Sossin in "A Baby Spa Has Opened Up & Mums Swear It Helps Their Babies Sleep Better!"

05/17/2018

"Hit 107" featured Dyson Professor K. Mark Sossin in "A Baby Spa Has Opened Up & Mums Swear It Helps Their Babies Sleep Better!"

Any parent knows how hard it is to try and get their baby to just calm down and relax.

Being a parent is a stressful job and trying to get babies to sleep is one of the most common issues new parents have, but now there's a cure for that!

A new day spa for babies has opened on the Gold Coast and new mums swear by it!

The spa is called My Baby Bubble Spa and it offers hydrotherapy and full body massages for babies to help them sleep!

7 News went in and interviewed a few mums who are regulars at the new spa and one mum said that she actually had to wake her child up for a feeding session because they were sleeping so soundly!

Apparently, "movement through the water has a positive effect on the digestive and circulatory systems, which can reduce meconium levels and lowers the risk of jaundice three or four days after birth.

"Subtle water pressure on the chest can increase lung capacity by strengthening intercostal muscles and the respiratory system."

K. Mark Sossin, PhD, director of the Parent-Infant Research Nursery at Pace University, in New York City says that giving babies regular massages actually "help you learn how to read your baby's signals and respond better to his unique needs."

Would you send your baby to a baby day spa?

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