main navigation
my pace

NYC

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Screening of the documentary ‘GENERATION STARTUP’ and a live panel discussion at Pace University on Thursday evening, December 1st

11/28/2016

Screening of the documentary ‘GENERATION STARTUP’ and a live panel discussion at Pace University on Thursday evening, December 1st

New York, NY – November 28, 2016 -- The Entrepreneurship Lab (eLab) at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business is hosting a screening of GENERATION STARTUP, a documentary that takes us to the front lines of entrepreneurship in America, capturing an in-the-trenches look at the struggles and triumphs of six recent college graduates who put everything on the line to launch startups. The event takes place on Thursday, December 1 in the Bianco Room at One Pace Plaza on the downtown New York City campus from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

WHO and WHAT: The screening will be followed by a live panel discussion with Cheryl Miller Houser, Co-Director and Producer; Andrew Yang, CEO of Venture for America and an expert character in the film; and Labib Rahman, one of the six entrepreneurs featured in the film. Moderator: Bruce Bachenheimer, Executive Director, Entrepreneurship Lab at Pace.

Shot over 17 months, GENERATION STARTUP is an honest, in-the-trenches look at what it takes to launch a startup. Directed by Academy Award winner Cynthia Wade and award-winning filmmaker Cheryl Miller Houser, the film celebrates risk-taking, urban revitalization, and diversity while delivering a vital call-to-action—with entrepreneurship at a record low, the country’s economic future is at stake.

WHEN and WHERE: Thursday, December 1 in the Bianco Room at One Pace Plaza on the downtown New York City Campus from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Agenda:

5:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.   Registration

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.   Screening

7:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.   Discussion

8:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.   Networking

The event is free and open to the public. Food and beverage will be served. Prior registration is required.

To RSVP, visit http://elab.nyc/events/ScreeningofGenerationStartup

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

# # #

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

E-Commerce Times: "Apple Celebrates Itself in $300 Coffee Table Tome"

11/18/2016

E-Commerce Times: "Apple Celebrates Itself in $300 Coffee Table Tome"

. . . "Companies will occasionally publish books about their history," explained Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University.

"Those kinds of books are meant for employees and, to some degree, investors. They're meant to put an exclamation mark by the substantial nature and viability of a company," he noted.

"Apple's book is about its products, which from a design perspective have had an advantage in aesthetics in the competitive fray," Chiagouris told the E-Commerce Times.

Nevertheless, at $300, the audience will be limited.

"When companies do expensive books like this, they will either lower the price in the future and keep the $300 price point on the book so people will think they're getting a great deal," Chiagouris said, "or they'll offer the book as a premium when someone makes a major Apple purchase."

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Legaltech News: "Privacy, Cybersecurity Steady Spots in Trump Policy Uncertainty"

11/18/2016

Legaltech News: "Privacy, Cybersecurity Steady Spots in Trump Policy Uncertainty"

. . . "My perception is that Trump is very pro-law enforcement, which is also seen in some of his [advisers] like Rudy Giuliani," said Darren Hayes, director of cybersecurity and an assistant professor at Pace University in New York.

Hayes sees Trump as "supporting the government in its discussion with securing help from Apple to get access to iPhones and [from] other companies like Google in getting access to Android devices to help with law enforcement investigations."

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Wall Street Journal: "Shared Shop Makes for Crazy Roomies"

11/15/2016

Wall Street Journal: "Shared Shop Makes for Crazy Roomies"

At a store in Brooklyn, four businesses peacefully coexist. Up front are the framers and the insurance brokers. Photo: Ryan Christopher Jones for The Wall Street Journal

. . . Andrew Flamm, director of the Pace University Small Business Development Center, says a shared space is a great solution for many small businesses. While the combinations sometimes look funny, “it’s an opportunity to generate cross-referrals and sales,” he says.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Associated Press: "After Election Rupture, CEOs Seek Unity for Staff, Customers"

11/15/2016

Associated Press: "After Election Rupture, CEOs Seek Unity for Staff, Customers"

. . . CEOs and companies that try to bring people together are "going to be the winners," says Dr. Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University's Lubin School of Business. "That always works better from a brand perspective," he says.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Hill's Congress Blog: "Trade equilibrium to revive small business in America"

11/15/2016

The Hill's Congress Blog: "Trade equilibrium to revive small business in America"

According to the SBA, a small business is an independent business having fewer than 500 employees, writes Narendra C. Bhandari, Ph.D., professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. It plays a very important role in America by making significant contributions in the areas of production, services, and employment.

However, its role in the American economy is declining. It is evident from its population’s declining share in the total population (a very critical factor): from 57.44% in 1995, to 55.69% in 2005, and to 53.42% in 2015. Conversely, share of large businesses for these time periods has increased from 42.51% in 1995, to 44.29% in 2005, and to 46.54% in 2015. (U.S. Census.)

Several reasons are responsible for small business decline. These include difficulties in raising finances; higher interest rates; expensive healthcare; and complex laws and regulations. There are two other important reasons. One, both large and small businesses continue to offshore their manufacturing and service jobs overseas to save costs. Consequently, small businesses and people who are dependent on them lose their business and jobs. This deprives America of innovation and entrepreneurship in terms of products, processes, and technology.

Two, large businesses, under the H-1B program, import foreign workers to do the jobs originally done by the Americans. It often happens in the IT area. Sadly, often the outgoing Americans have to first train the incoming foreigners how to do their jobs. Americans’ extensive job experience and advanced education cannot help them save their jobs.

Often these employees, out of work, have no other reasonable jobs available. Some of them start their own business. They follow what James Adams described as the American dream in his 1931 book, ‘Epic of America.’ Fortunately, a very small number of them do make their life better and richer through hard work. Sadly, many of them soon realize that the American dream is like a rainbow: beautiful and beyond their reach. Painfully, they accept a low paying job or stop looking for one altogether.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Christian Science Monitor: "How teachers calm, educate students amid swirl of election emotions"

11/14/2016

Christian Science Monitor: "How teachers calm, educate students amid swirl of election emotions"

. . . no matter who adults voted for, they can agree – and tell their children – that the ability to vote is part of what makes the country great, says Jennifer Powell-Lunder, an adjunct psychology professor at Pace University in New York.

“Our kids have seen the first African-American president; they’ve seen a woman be a real contender for the presidency,” she says. “That’s wonderful. Just because she didn’t win doesn’t mean those ideals aren’t out there anymore.”

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Parallax: "What to keep an eye on from Trump’s cybersecurity policy"

11/14/2016

The Parallax: "What to keep an eye on from Trump’s cybersecurity policy"

. . . Statements by Trump expressing admiration for Russia and President Vladimir Putin may have an unexpected benefit to cybersecurity, says Darren Hayes, assistant professor and director of cybersecurity at Pace University in New York.

“Russian cybercrime is a huge problem,” Hayes says. “If Trump does have better relations with Putin, will he be able to put the brakes on cybercrime coming from Russia?”

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

WINS-AM: "The Bottom Line For Small Business"

11/14/2016

WINS-AM: "The Bottom Line For Small Business"

The Veterans Entrepreneurship Boot Camp at Pace University was mentioned on 1010 WINS.

Listen to the audio here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace University Scholars: the “Environmental Voice of Youth” will Save NY Harbor

11/14/2016

Pace University Scholars: the “Environmental Voice of Youth” will Save NY Harbor

From Digital Platforms to Mock Hearings, University-Level Education Comes to New York City Schools

NEW YORK CITY — Environmental abuse long ago obscured New York Harbor’s bragging rights as the world’s oyster capital, but middle and high school students are the force that can return that ecological luster back to New York City, according to scholars at Pace University in Manhattan.

With funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Pace University has launched the next phase of its Smart and Connected Communities program where “university faculty will bring to underserved city schools the research tools and field training to design a new future for New York Harbor,” according to Dr. Lauren Birney, a professor in the Pace School of Education, and principal investigator under the NSF grant.

“Our goal for city students is an educational experience usually confined to universities,” Birney said. “If the future of the harbor and the national urban environment are in the hands of the experts and decision makers of tomorrow, that means the environmental voice of youth today is essential. The time to begin their training is now.”

The new Pace initiative uses STEM-C – a cutting-edge curriculum of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math combined with Computing – as the organizing principle for a program of citizen science, ecological restoration and civic engagement. “New York Harbor is an excellent living classroom, but not accessible to every student,” said Birney. “With our online tools and our CCERS Digital Platform, students will conduct field monitoring expeditions, gather data using analog and digital instruments, develop independent research proposals, and broadcast and share their results in real-time – not only with other city students, but with students anywhere in the world.”

Transforming this technical information into a policy model for restoring the Harbor is another hallmark of the Pace program. “Students will also receive training at the hands of our best legal and policy experts,” said John Cronin, Pace’s senior fellow for environmental affairs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. “And through innovative techniques such as virtual town halls and mock public hearings they will develop and present a student-generated vision and plan for restoring the Harbor.”

“All the marine waters of the city are held in a public trust belonging to the people, and that includes students,” said Jason Czarnezki, Associate Dean of Environmental Law Programs at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University. “This well-founded, ancient principle of law is the centerpiece of a legal education that will empower students to claim the ecological inheritance that is the birthright of their community. This principle, combined with scientific, technical and computing skills, will make our students a potent force for the future of the urban environment.”

BACKGROUND

“A networked city is not just a grid of communications and sensors. It is a vision of city governments “engaging with citizens in acts of co-creation.” –Peter Hirshberg (Bollier, 2016 from the Aspen Institute, 2016).

This thought and overall vision continues to serve as our motto in creating opportunities for underserved students that may have never existed. We look to engage our youth in environmentally meaningful activities that are pertinent to their education. New York City middle school students are in desperate need of exposure to STEM industry fields, research and data collection at the Harbor’s edge and training on the use various technological innovations. This grant will create these opportunities for students, citizen scientists, STEM Industry professionals, research faculty and community members to work in unison on achieving a “smarter and more connected community”!

“Expanding Access and Deepening Engagement: Building an Open Source Digital Platform for Restoration-Based STEM Education in the Largest Public School System in the United States” NSF DRL 1643016/PI Lauren Birney, Director of the STEM Collaboratory NYC, Pace University

Principals

The CCERS leadership team consists of Samuel Janis, Program Manager Billion Oyster Project Schools and Citizen Science, Jonathan Hill, Dean of Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Robert Newton, Research Scientist at Columbia Lamont Doherty Observatory, Meghan Groome, Senior Vice President of Education at the New York Academy of Sciences, Nancy Woods, Director of Technology and Engineering at the NYCDOE, Peter Malinowski, President Billion Oyster Project and Murray Fisher, President of the New York Harbor Foundation and is led by Principal Investigator Dr. Lauren Birney, Assistant Professor and Director of the STEM Collaboratory NYC Pace University.

Project Goal

The foundational goal of the Curriculum and Community Enterprise for Restoration Science (CCERS) model is to build a “Smart and Connected Community” of students, educators, scientists, and engaged community members all working to restore New York Harbor and improve the quality of STEM-C education and long-term outcomes in low-income urban public schools. To do this, we are building an open source educational-scientific web platform which can be replicated anywhere. The connectivity provided by this technology allows communication, education, business, STEM industry professional to work seamlessly together while expanding their research on a global scale.

The CCERS Digital Platform

The CCERS Digital Platform, co-developed with Fearless Solutions, is more than just a website for student-led citizen science, citizen policymaking, and teacher-to-teacher curriculum sharing. The CCERS supported Billion Oyster Project schools web platform is a digital space for students to conduct field monitoring expeditions, gather data using both analog and digital instruments, analyze results using multivariate statistics and GIS, develop independent research proposals, broadcast, and share results in real-time with the broader NY Harbor/CCERS community of scientists, STEM professionals, and volunteers. The digital platform is also a replicable model of restoration based science education for other settings and other species, with its underlying technology and source code freely available through standard open source licensing agreements.https://platform.bop.nyc/

CCERS – Curriculum and Community Enterprise for Restoration Science

This proposal focuses upon the expansion of the existing “Curriculum and Community Enterprise for the Restoration of New York Harbor in New York City Public Schools” NSF DRL 1440869. This project is recognized locally as “Curriculum and Community Enterprise for Restoration Science,” or CCERS. CCERS is a comprehensive model of ecological restoration based STEM education for urban public school students. Following an accelerated rollout, CCERS is now being implemented in 23 Title 1 funded NYC Department of Education middle schools, led by two cohorts of 33 teachers, serving more than 3000 students in total. Initial results and baseline data suggest that the CCERS model, with the Billion Oyster Project (BOP) as its local restoration ecology-based STEM curriculum, is having profound impacts on students, teachers, school leaders, and the broader community of CCERS participants and stakeholders. Students and teachers report being receptive to the CCERS model and deeply engaged in the initial phase of curriculum development, citizen science data collection, and student-centered STEM learning.

References:

http://csreports.aspeninstitute.org/documents/CityAsPlatform.pdf

Funding for these Projects has been provided by the National Science Foundation Education and Human Resources (EHR) DRL 1440869 and DRL 1643016.

Pages