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Miami Herald: "In Charlottesville’s wake, notorious Florida-born racist forum sees traffic spike"

08/16/2017

Miami Herald: "In Charlottesville’s wake, notorious Florida-born racist forum sees traffic spike"

...Posts on Stormfront and another racist site, The Daily Stormer, have been highlighted on national newscasts and even the Jon Oliver show, elevating the status of a site that had already grown into a digital gathering space for racists across the nation, said Adam Klein, an assistant professor of communications study at Pace University in New York who’s written extensively about the white supremacist movement online.

“Stormfront was, in its own way, really revolutionary,” said Klein.

Unlike other hate sites, which functioned basically as brochures for their hateful ideologies, Stormfront, which bills itself "the voice of the new, embattled White minority,’’ was the first to function as an open forum. It gave racists a place to chat and radicalize from the comfort of their own home.

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The Ladders: "Why we should get rid of generational labels in the workplace"

08/15/2017

The Ladders: "Why we should get rid of generational labels in the workplace"

They isolate employees

Helene Cruz, Director of Career Counseling at Pace University Career Services, said she is proud that her team is multi-generational.

“We have established a culture that cultivates learning from one another across seven generations,” she said. “We appreciate our millennial colleagues and rely on the fact that they are technically-savvy and creative, ready to bring new ideas to the table and not afraid to embark on new initiatives.”

All employees, no matter their age, contribute to the organization, Cruz said. 

“We glean a tremendous amount of insight from our millennial teammates because they are closer in age to the students and can more fully express the student perspective/experience,” she said. “In turn, because employer representatives are also our clients, many Baby Boomers and Gen X staff have previously worked in various industries, have hired employees, and therefore can speak to the needs of the employers, which we share with our millennial teammates.”   

The focus should not be on how generations differ, but on how they can work together, Cruz said.

“Establish environments where they interact with multiple generations,” she said. “Highlight the strengths of people at different ages in life, and how each person adds value. Find or create situations where different generations can interact meaningfully.”

 

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Statement on Racism and Violence in Charlottesville, Virginia

08/14/2017

Statement on Racism and Violence in Charlottesville, Virginia

What occurred in Charlottesville, VA, is tragic and I condemn the bigotry and hatred exhibited. The Pace Community mourns the loss of life and the injuries inflicted on those who were defending what we hold dear in our country—equality and respect for one another no matter our race, creed, or ethnic background.

As we observe Constitution Day this September 18 and the document that created our government and laws, and guaranteed basic rights for every citizen, we will thoughtfully and respectfully discuss our current cultural climate and different perspectives. It is our common bond and a reminder of what is right and just, and wrong and indefensible, of who we are as a people, and of who we must always strive to be. It is proof that bigotry, violence, and hatred can never prevail.

Ours is a diverse, inclusive, and welcoming community and we can show by example our openness to learn from one another. There is no better place for this to occur than at an institution devoted to education. I look forward to these discussions.

Marvin Krislov
President
Pace University

 

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El Paso Times: "UTEP among nation's best at lifting students from poorest backgrounds, study finds"

08/14/2017

El Paso Times: "UTEP among nation's best at lifting students from poorest backgrounds, study finds"

The University of Texas at El Paso is one of several of the nation’s schools that is helping generate large returns for students from the poorest backgrounds, according to a working paper released recently week by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

The report lists UTEP among 10 schools that are strong engines of upward mobility for the nation’s poorest children. But, the report contends, those engines are slowing down.

The study, which was drafted in part by Raj Chetty and Emmanuel Saez, pioneering economists of socioeconomic inequality and mobility, focuses on each university’s “mobility rate,” the share of its students who come from the lowest fifth of the U.S. income distribution and end up in the top 20 percent. This metric is measured by multiplying the fraction of students from the lowest income bracket, or “access,” by the share who end up with incomes in the top fifth, or “success rate.” Researchers used data for more than 30 million college students from 1999 to 2013 for the study.

 

For UTEP, the findings indicate that just less than 25 percent of its students from the poorest backgrounds reach the uppermost income quintile. That is well behind the 58 percent of students who reach the highest quintile from “Ivy Plus” schools, the report’s listing of Ivy League universities and other elite schools such as Stanford and Duke. But only 3.8 percent of Ivy Plus students are from the lowest income bracket, compared with UTEP’s 28 percent. That gives UTEP a mobility rate (6.8 percent) that is more than three times higher than the Ivy Plus schools’ 2.18 percent.

The school with the highest mobility rate, according to the study, is California State University, Los Angeles with 9.9 percent. The school with the highest number of students from poor backgrounds who reached the uppermost income quintile was Pace University in New York, which boasts a success rate of 55.6 percent. Pace’s mobility rate, according to the study, is 8.4 percent.

 

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Q&A: Former Oberlin president Marvin Krislov takes over at Pace"

08/14/2017

Q&A: Former Oberlin president Marvin Krislov takes over at Pace

While he won’t be officially inaugurated until the end of October, Marvin Krislov is already busy with the new job at Pace University. After serving for 10 years as president of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Ohio, Krislov was appointed president at Pace earlier this year.

He officially took over the role Aug. 1, succeeding Stephen Friedman, who retired this year after 10 years at the helm of the Pleasantville and Manhattan-based private college. In taking over the role, Krislov moves from a liberal arts college of just under 3,000 students in rural Ohio to a university that enrolls close to 13,000 undergraduate and graduate students across campuses in Pleasantville and Manhattan, plus a law school in White Plains.

He spoke with the Business Journal about making the transition to Pace.

What drew you to the job at Pace?

“I really was compelled by the mission and the people that I met during the course of the process. The mission being to provide a wide range of students, including a number from first generation or from more working class backgrounds, and give them an excellent education, and really help them think about careers and opportunities beyond their undergraduate education. And of course there’s some wonderful master’s and professional programs, but the combination of a very strong liberal arts education with professional opportunities is really, I think, a very exciting model and it meets a lot of the needs of people today.”

Oberlin and Pace are certainly different universities in a number of ways, particularly in size. What are the similarities between the two schools?

“In both Oberlin and Pace there’s a strong focus on liberal arts education, exposing people to different perspectives and different disciplines. I also think that one of the things I’ve seen at both places is a commitment to providing students with entrepreneurial opportunities and experiences in the community. In particular in Pace’s case, you have the whole New York metropolitan area, which is just so rich in opportunities, though there were activities at Oberlin as well. They are different institutions, but there are similarities as well.”

What will be the biggest adjustment shifting from Oberlin to Pace?

“Just the geography. In Oberlin, it was five minutes from my house to the office. Here, we have multiple campuses and it can be a little more complicated getting from one place to another. Dealing with that and figuring out how to adjust my schedule has been interesting. But I’m getting there (laughs).”

Pace ranked recently as a top school in the country for upward mobility. What does the university do well in that regard and how can you build on it?

“In fact, we were number two in the study The New York Times did based on data from the Equality of Opportunity project. And I think one of the ways we have done this is the Pace Path, which is a combination of strong academics, mentors and advisers, internships and a four-year plan that tries to really help launch students on a path. The placement and salary rates reflect the success here.”

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s free in-state tuition program was approved this year. In the process leading up to that, private colleges throughout the state expressed concern that it could draw students away from the state’s private colleges. Do you share those concerns and what do you think Pace can do in response to the new program?

“I think what’s really helpful is to demonstrate the contribution of private institutions to the economic growth and development in the state. The state of New York does support private institutions, and I hope that we can have further discussion about ways in which the state can do perhaps even more for institutions like Pace. Because a majority of our students do stay in the state and contribute. For instance, the number of Pace alumni living in Westchester County is 20,000 people. Those are taxpayers and they make a big difference.”

How can you work with the business community in Westchester to help students at Pace?

“I think we do a lot already in working to connect students to employers both in the for-profit and the nonprofit sector. I talk to the career services people and I think there’s a lot of excitement about that. But one of my goals is to meet people in Westchester and I’ll be doing that soon to try to find more ways to collaborate.

I think there’s a real commitment to build even greater bridges to the community, but a lot exists already. I’m told we have 650 employers in the area that hire Pace students and a lot of students that work in Westchester, whether it is during the school year or afterwards.”

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The New York Times: “Google Gender Debacle Speaks to Tech Culture Wars, Politics”

08/10/2017

The New York Times: “Google Gender Debacle Speaks to Tech Culture Wars, Politics”

The Associated Press interviewed communications professor Jennifer Lee Magas about the firing of a Google engineer over a controversial memo on gender in the workplace. The story has appeared in media outlets across the country including “The New York Times,” “U.S. News and World Report,” "ABC News" and the “Houston Chronicle.”

NEW YORK — The Google engineer who blamed biological differences for the paucity of women in tech had every right to express his views. And workplace experts and lawyers say Google likely had every right to fire him.

Special circumstances have contributed to the outrage and subsequent firing. These include the country's divisive political climate and Silicon Valley's broader problem with gender equity.

But the fallout should still serve as a warning to anyone in any industry expressing unpopular, fiery viewpoints.

Though engineer James Damore has filed a labor complaint against Google over his firing, experts say he's not likely to prevail.

Jennifer Lee Magas, public relations professor at Pace University, says Damore "forfeited his job" by making the remarks.

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NBC New York: "Prison Dog Training Programs Rehabilitate Canines and Cons"

08/08/2017

NBC New York: "Prison Dog Training Programs Rehabilitate Canines and Cons"

Kimberly Collica-Cox, associate professor of criminal justice at Pace University in New York, has studied how the symbiotic relationship between humans and dogs can be useful in prisons. Collica-Cox helped develop a program through Pace that uses animal assisted therapy to teach incarcerated mothers better parenting skills.

“What we find is that dogs can trigger feelings of safety in humans, which will allow them to sort of open up and communicate more, which can be very helpful in a correctional setting,” she said, adding that there’s a great deal of research to support these findings.

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GoodCall: "Should Recent Grads Take Any Job They Can Get to Avoid Living at Home?"

08/08/2017

GoodCall: "Should Recent Grads Take Any Job They Can Get to Avoid Living at Home?"

SHOULD RECENT COLLEGE GRADS TAKE THE SUMMER OFF TO REST?

Jim Davis, assistant director of the Lubin School of Business Programs and Services at Pace University Career Services, tells GoodCall®, “I don’t think it’s a good idea to take a summer off after graduating.” Davis believes students lose momentum when they do. “Also, most employers are expecting students to be ready to go when they graduate – I don’t think it sends the right message to employers who want motivated workers.”

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GoodCall: "How Important Is Your College Major?"

08/08/2017

GoodCall: "How Important Is Your College Major?"

COLLEGE MAJOR CHOICE: PASSION VERSUS PAYCHECK?

The popularity of STEM and business majors has led many to pursue degrees in these disciplines, but Jennifer Lee Magas, MA, JD, clinical associate professor of public relations at Pace University, tells GoodCall®, “I’ve seen students miserable in classes they either dislike or struggle with because they feel pigeonholed into a certain major.”

Magas has spent more than 20 years helping students choose a college major, and she thinks making the decision based solely on job demand is a recipe for disaster. “Students who don’t base their choice of major on the job market may find that they’re struggling to get a job in that field, but the extra effort it takes is worth the outcome.”

She believes it’s important for students to pursue their passions. “As they say, choose a job you love and you’ll never work a day in your life; while a bit contrived, the message is true.”

Magas admits it may take time for liberal arts majors to find a well-paying job – and be promoted to the position they want. “Eventually, you’ll have a career that you’ve worked hard for and that gives you satisfaction at the end of each day, and that is worth more than any ‘secure’ job you hate.”

However, she also stresses the importance of aligning a college major with your skillset. “If you’re no good at math, don’t go to school for actuarial science because you hear it has good pay and job security.” In the long run, she says it’s more important to choose a career that accentuates your strengths. “Having polished and excellent skills at something makes you invaluable – it just may take a little longer to get the job that requires those skills.”

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NPR: "The Brian Lehrer Show: Affirmative Action and the Value of Diversity"

08/04/2017

NPR: "The Brian Lehrer Show: Affirmative Action and the Value of Diversity"

The New York Times reported that the Trump administration plans to investigate and then sue "suing universities over affirmative action admissions policies deemed to discriminate against white applicants." Marvin Krislov is the new president of Pace University after 10 years at Oberlin College. He was general counsel at the University of Michigan at the time of the Grutter v. Bollinger case concerning affirmative action. Krislov shares his thoughts on the college admissions process and the criteria for evaluating prospective students.          

Listen to the podcast of the interview on NPR or on Pace Media Space

 

 

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