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Education Update: "Pace University’s Celebration of Individuals with Disabilities in Film"

11/14/2014

Education Update: "Pace University’s Celebration of Individuals with Disabilities in Film"

Film media is playing a critical role in educating the public about the lives of people with disabilities. It also plays a vital role (think: YouTube, social media) in enabling people facing disability to express their hopes and dreams. Through film they can inform the populace on what would help make a more inclusive society.

Film hasn’t always been an accurate medium for these concerns. Traditionally, Hollywood would only depict a character with a disability if a) they had an extraordinary skill (such as Rain Man, the savant) and b) only a non-disabled actor/actress would play that character. A child with Down Syndrome, for example, was generally depicted as a cute youngster, and not during the years when he/she grew into adulthood and the characteristics of Down Syndrome became more evident.

Pace University’s Celebration of Individuals with Disabilities in Film is trying to rectify this challenging situation. Organized by the Seidenberg School of Pace University and AHRC NYC, it provides an opportunity for students, faculty, community advocates and individuals with disabilities and their families, to view films, that they chose, and to participate in a thought-provoking discussion with filmmakers, city officials, and other experts (including individuals with disabilities).

Read more: http://www.educationupdate.com/archives/2014/NOV/HTML/spec-paceuniversity.html#.VGRbyslcmNE

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Westchester Magazine: "The Business Behind Westchester’s Nonprofits"

11/13/2014

Westchester Magazine: "The Business Behind Westchester’s Nonprofits"

. . . Impact investing (investments whose purpose is to generate both a financial return and a measurable social impact) is a related funding source that’s gaining popularity, notes Rebecca Tekula, executive director of Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship and an assistant professor at Pace University. “These are investments made by foundations and other institutional investors that support charitable activities but have a potential return of capital,” she explains. “Impact investing is a real game changer that goes beyond corporate responsibility.”

Tekula points out that foundations often sit on an endowment that is managed to protect or grow the principal while spending only the legally required 5 percent for charitable purposes (though Tekula notes most spend more than the required minimum). With impact investing, “we’re starting to see capital invested for social causes instead of purely monetary returns,” she says, noting that the potential is huge. “You’re talking about billions of dollars in Westchester. It’s money that lives in Westchester but doesn’t always work for Westchester,” she says. Foundations based in the county have $3 billion in assets, according to the economic impact study from Pace. The move by nonprofits to set up for-profit arms and benefit corporations will help them tap this funding.

Read more: http://www.westchestermagazine.com/914-INC/Q4-2014/The-Business-Behind-W...

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CNBC: "Next for banks: Layoffs, chat smackdown, more regs"

11/13/2014

CNBC: "Next for banks: Layoffs, chat smackdown, more regs"

For banks at the center of the recent foreign exchange investigation, paying the $3.4 billion in fines might be the easy part.

The aftermath, filled with more intense regulations and scrutiny as well as prospects of layoffs and continuing probes into their activity, make for an even murkier future, according to those familiar with the investigation and the ensuing fallout among the misbehaving institutions.

"This is really beginning to bite," said John Alan James, a professor at Pace University's School of Business and author of multiple books on corporate governance in the banking industry. "It's time for a pause."

James is an advocate of easing the pressure on banks, which have come under continued scrutiny since triggering the financial crisis of the past decade. He believes the regulatory burden not only hurts the banks themselves but also the broader economy as institutions remain reluctant to lend.

"You've got to really think about the impact that you're having through reduced loan capacity on the national economy," he said.

Read more: http://www.cnbc.com/id/102178243

 

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InsideCounsel: "Insider trading inquiries reportedly taking place regarding government employees"

11/07/2014

InsideCounsel: "Insider trading inquiries reportedly taking place regarding government employees"

. . . John James, chairman emeritus of Pace University’s Center for Global Governance, Reporting, and Regulation, told InsideCounsel, “This is an unusual move for [the] SEC to be investigating another government agency for possible ‘insider trading’ violations, unless they are talking with [the] DOJ [Department of Justice] about something else – that could be more serious.”

The investigations bring to mind how regulatory agencies have gotten “instructions” from ''above to expand their examination procedures to include what we in the governance field refer to as internal governance,” James added.

He explained that internal governance is the realm of the Board of Directors, and involves policies and procedures affecting non-regulated aspects of enterprises.

“Many of us have been unpleasantly surprised to see regulators dig into the ‘cultures’ of financial institutions,” James added. “As a long-time strategic planning advisor I am super-sensitive to the availability to anyone outside our board room knowing our own evaluations of our strengths and especially our weaknesses. As they say in New York City, ‘Does Macy’s tell Gimbles?’”

Read more: http://www.insidecounsel.com/2014/11/06/insider-trading-inquiries-reportedly-taking-place

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Newsday: "Benjamin Tucker tapped as Philip Banks' replacement for NYPD first deputy commissioner, Bratton says"

11/05/2014

Newsday: "Benjamin Tucker tapped as Philip Banks' replacement for NYPD first deputy commissioner, Bratton says"

NYPD Commissioner William Bratton announced Wednesday afternoon that Benjamin Tucker, the department's official in charge of its training program, will take over as first deputy commissioner, the second-highest-ranked person.

Tucker, along with Chief Gerald Nelson, were the two names most prominently mentioned for the post after the sudden retirement last week of Phillip Banks III, who had been Bratton's first choice.

"I love this department," Tucker said. "This department gave me opportunities I would never have had as a kid from Bedford Stuyvesant."

Tucker, a lawyer, had been an NYPD officer from 1972 until 1991 when he retired. Tucker had a number of posts in government, including jobs with the Clinton administration and under Mayor Ed Koch. After retiring from the NYPD, Tucker took a teaching job at Pace University.

"He has an intimate understanding of crime, drug abuse, youth and the law," Bratton said.

Bratton has relied on Tucker to institute a new training regime at the NYPD, including the retraining of the entire department after the alleged chokehold death of Eric Garner in July.

In a prepared statement, PBA president Patrick J. Lynch said: "We salute the appointment of Benjamin Tucker as 1st Deputy Commissioner. He grew up in Brooklyn and has long been a part of the NYPD family. We wish him great success in the real challenges that lie ahead."

http://www.newsday.com/news/new-york/benjamin-tucker-named-philip-banks-...

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Forbes: "Accounting For The Glass Ceiling"

11/05/2014

Forbes: "Accounting For The Glass Ceiling"

Along with Pace University, IMA recently sponsored the first-ever Women’s Accounting Leadership Series (WALS), which gathered high-profile accounting and finance leaders to explore trends and topics important to the profession. One of the event’s creators was Leslie Seidman, the executive director of the Center for Excellence in Financial Reporting at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and former FASB Chairman.

Read more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffthomson/2014/11/04/accounting-for-the-glass-ceiling/

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Forbes: "Encore U: It's Never Too Late To Go To College"

11/05/2014

Forbes: "Encore U: It's Never Too Late To Go To College"

Photo: Encore movement leaders at their conference in Arizona.

. . . The Encore Transition Program at Pace University aids professionals make the transition from midlife careers to new careers. It helps participants define their interests, understand transitions, and meet local leaders. Its training helps participants navigate the next chapter of their lives.

Read more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/ehrlichfu/2014/11/03/encore-u-its-never-too-late-to-go-to-college/

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Bloomberg BNA: "White House to Reveal Policy Goals For Lame-Duck Session in Days Ahead"

11/04/2014

Bloomberg BNA: "White House to Reveal Policy Goals For Lame-Duck Session in Days Ahead"

. . . David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of political science at Pace University in New York, told Bloomberg BNA that, assuming Republicans gain control of the Senate, there will be no major policy changes in the next two years.

“And even if they do not—even if we have a Biden majority, 50-50 where the Democrats retain full control—I think there's very little possibility that we'll get major policy decisions out of Congress,” Caputo said.

The vice president also is president of the Senate. In cases of a tie vote in the Senate, Vice President Joe Biden would cast the tie-breaking vote.

Caputo predicted Republicans will have a difficult time on getting any changes on several issues—such as immigration, health care, the economy and budget—because of the conservative base in the House, which will be difficult to move.

If the Republican majority in both chambers decided to eliminate the Affordable Care Act, for instance, either head-on or though budget cuts, they would run into difficulties, Caputo said.

If they tried to repeal it head on, the president would veto it, Caputo said.

“I don't think the Republicans will have two-thirds majority in either the House or the Senate to override that veto,” he said.

“And if they do it in the budget, then we're headed for a showdown and I don't think the president will blink,” Caputo said. “And I think the Republicans will get blamed for shutting the government down again,” he said.

Ability to Govern

There could be major policy changes, depending on what the president decides to do in terms of executive orders, Caputo said.

This would put Congress on the defensive in terms of arguing that the president has exceeded his powers, Caputo said.

“So that would also be very interesting to watch,” he said.

Budget issues also will be significant, Caputo said. Republicans in the House and Senate will use their majority status, assuming Republicans take control of the Senate, to push for a number of budget reforms, including a decline in domestic spending and an increase in defense spending, he said.

At that point, the president will be forced to either accept the changes or not, Caputo said.

“If he doesn't accept, if there's not agreement, then he won't sign the legislation and we'll go off the fiscal cliff—or we'll come close to going off the fiscal cliff,” he said.

Republicans do not want to be seen at this point, after having gained control of the government, as not being able to govern, Caputo said.

“So I think this is going to be a very interesting tap dance for them, in terms of trying to promote a policy agenda, which is seen as clearly Republican, [but] which remains acceptable to the president,” he said.

The president has an equal problem in that, if he wants to get anything through, he is going to have to make a series of compromises, which so far he has been unwilling to do, Caputo said.

“So I think what's going to happen is deadlock will continue, and I think it sets the stage for 2016 on these issues,” Caputo said.

Read more: http://dailyreport.bna.com/drpt/7010/split_display.adp?fedfid=58518415&v...

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Direct Marketing News: "Publicis to Buy Sapient, Create 'Transformational' Digital Platform"

11/04/2014

Direct Marketing News: "Publicis to Buy Sapient, Create 'Transformational' Digital Platform"

. . . Publicis immediately announced plans to introduce Publicis.Sapient, a platform merging communications, marketing, commerce, and technology components. A combined effort of Sapient and current Publicis units DigitasLBi, Razorfish, and Rosetta, Publicis.Sapient aims to deliver “transformational services to clients through a model that has unmatched reach and capabilities,”the company boasted in a press release.

But that remains to be seen, says Larry Chiagouris, former chairman of the Advertising Research Foundation. “It has the potential to enhance the already well-established digital portfolio continuing to be developed at Publicis; however, there will be many major obstacles in making a Publicis-Sapient entity work,” said Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University. “These are companies that have operated in very different sectors and it remains to be seen whether any hoped-for synergy can ever grow to become a substantial source of new revenue for either Publicis or Sapient."

Read more: http://www.dmnews.com/publicis-to-buy-sapient-create-transformational-digital-platform/article/380732/

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National Journal: "One Millennial's Answer to Political Apathy: Put College Students in Classrooms"

11/03/2014

National Journal: "One Millennial's Answer to Political Apathy: Put College Students in Classrooms"

Failure is a powerful icebreaker, so Pace University sophomore Nelli Agbulos opens her presentation to a group of high school seniors by telling them about an unsuccessful protest that she recently planned for her campus. Six people came.

"I told all my friends to come, and nobody showed up," she says.

"Then you've got messed-up friends," one of the seniors retorts.

Sure enough, the anecdote gets the class talking. How do you make sure people know about an event? How do you communicate to them that their presence is important? One student suggests getting the football team to sponsor it. Another says teachers should give extra credit for attendance. Posters. Twitter. P.A. announcements. The class is buzzing.

Agbulos isn't much older than the kids in the government class she teaches twice a week at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt High School in Brooklyn. She isn't paid and doesn't get school credit for her time. She has no teacher training. What she does have is these students' attention. They identify with her and sympathize with her plight in a way that they don't with their teacher, Eric Cortes, who hangs out in the back and keeps order.

Read more: http://www.nationaljournal.com/next-economy/solutions-bank/one-millennial-s-answer-to-political-apathy-put-college-students-in-classrooms-20141031

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