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"Broadway World" featured Pace University in "Photo Flash: Broadway Dance Lab Hosts 2018 Gala"

04/09/2018

"Broadway World" featured Pace University in "Photo Flash: Broadway Dance Lab Hosts 2018 Gala"

Broadway Dance Lab (BDL), a non-profit choreography incubator supporting new works of dance-driven theatre, commemorated its five year anniversary with a Gala celebration on Monday April 2 at Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre. The evening included cocktails and dinner, along with a performance of new works-in-process by Robert Fairchild, Brooke Wendle, Paul McGill, and artistic director Josh Prince. Broadway veteran and host of TLC's Trading Spaces, Paige Davis, served as master of ceremonies.

BDL used the event to introduce the public to its new mentorship initiative, BDL Connect, which matches exceptionally talented, rising choreographers with master Broadway choreographers. Choreographer Paul McGill was chosen to create a new work on the students of Pace University in March, under Prince's mentorship. The Pace students performed McGill's work as part of the Gala presentation.

The company also announced its plans to launch the Broadway Dance Lab Choreography Intensive later this summer. The program will give young, aspiring choreographers (ages 18-23) unparalleled access to training from Broadway professionals. Students will study and create choreography in various styles, attend a Broadway show, and participate in artist talkbacks.

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"The New York Times" featured Alumna Haoran Yang in "Finding a Place (and a Decent Kitchen) to Call Her Own"

04/09/2018

"The New York Times" featured Alumna Haoran Yang in "Finding a Place (and a Decent Kitchen) to Call Her Own"

During and after graduate school at Pace University, Haoran Yang lived in Chelsea with roommates.

Then, three years ago, she found a new roommate situation on Craigslist and moved into a one-bedroom condominium in Midtown East near Sutton Place. For $1,600 a month, she occupied the bedroom. The condominium’s owner, a retired woman who traveled often, took a curtained-off corner of the living room.

“We’ve become like a family,” said Ms. Yang, who came to New York from China to study finance. “I am a twentysomething and she is older than my mom, and she treated me like a daughter.”

Late last summer, Ms. Yang landed a new job in her field, financial services, and decided it was time for her own place. A friend referred her to Sangmi Park, a licensed salesperson at Keller Williams TriBeCa. She knew she needed help with the hunt — it would save her time, she said, and give her access to more options.

Ms. Yang, now 29, wanted a decent kitchen and a location with an easy commute to her Midtown office.

For her monthly budget, $2,000 to $2,200, she assumed she would find a studio in a doorman building, similar to the condo building. But Ms. Park told her that if she wanted more space — and didn’t mind giving up amenities like an elevator or laundry room — she could instead get a one-bedroom in a no-frills building on the Upper East Side.

“That’s perfect, because I don’t mind a walk-up,” Ms. Yang said. “I have a lot of stuff, and I feel more comfortable if I have a separate room.”

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"Broadway World" features Pace University's Schimmel Center in "Schimmel Center With The Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra Presents 'The Struggle To Forgive'"

04/09/2018

"Broadway World" features Pace University's Schimmel Center in "Schimmel Center With The Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra Presents 'The Struggle To Forgive'"

Schimmel Center with the Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra presents the world premiere of The Struggle to Forgive: Confronting Gun Violence in America on Friday, May 4, 2018 at 7:30 p.m. Led by Music Director and Conductor Gary S. Fagin, the new cantata-which has a libretto by Fagin and features soprano Mikaela Bennett, mezzo-soprano Sarah Heltzel, and baritone Jorell Williams-gives voice to those whose lives have been impacted by gun violence in the United States, including victims and their families.

The program also includes Charles Ives' The Unanswered Question; and a new orchestral version of Prayer for Mary, written by Fagin in remembrance of the life of a KCO member whose life was lost due to gun violence in 2014.

A post-show discussion will be held following the performance with Gary S. Fagin and the three soloists, focusing on the creation and inspiration of the piece, in addition to recounting the artists' personal experiences with gun violence, and how communities, cultural groups, and the nation as a whole can seek healing from the impact of gun violence through music and art.

"The Struggle To Forgive is personal for the Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra, as we lost one of our own musicians to gun violence in 2014," said Mr. Fagin. "This world premiere is part of the KCO's 10th Anniversary Season, and reflects our commitment over the last decade to programming that is challenging yet accessible, as well as ambitious and innovative. We are thrilled to return to the Schimmel Center for to present this music, and to be part of an important community conversation about gun violence."

Event Information

Schimmel Center with The Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra
Presents
The Struggle to Forgive
Music and Libretto by Gary S. Fagin

Friday, May 4, 2018 at 7:30 p.m.

Featuring:
Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra
Gary S. Fagin, Founder and Music Director
Mikaela Bennett, soprano
Sarah Heltzel, mezzo-soprano
Jorell Williams, baritoneTickets are available at www.schimmelcenter.org, by calling 212-346-1715 or by visiting the box office located at 3 Spruce Street. The Schimmel Center box office is open Tuesdays through Saturday from Noon to 5:00 p.m. and three hours prior to performances.

About Schimmel Center
Schimmel Center, located in the heart of downtown Manhattan at Pace University, presents a unique and diverse array of internationally acclaimed artists, encompassing genres including dance, cabaret, music, comedy, world music, and family programming, in an intimate setting with affordable ticket prices. For more information, visit SchimmelCenter.org.

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"Westchester County Business Journal" featured School of Education Professor Janet Mulvey's piece "Pace University offers an OASIS for students on the autism spectrum"

04/09/2018

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured School of Education Professor Janet Mulvey's piece "Pace University offers an OASIS for students on the autism spectrum"

Janet D. Mulvey is director of the OASIS program at Pace University for the past three years and a professor in the school of education.

Michael is nervous about attending college as a freshman in the fall. And his parents are even more anxious. Michael has been accepted to a private university in New York and this will be his first time away from home and his parents.

Typical college freshman scenario, right? Except Michael is a student on the autism spectrum. Successfully completing a college degree can be a challenge for any individual, but especially for those on the spectrum.

Autism is a developmental disorder that affects one in 68 people. It impairs the ability of individuals to communicate and interact with others. This can make college life challenging for students with autism.

Living in college residence halls, participating in classes and study groups and eating meals at the cafeteria are all part of college life and all a bit more challenging when on the spectrum.

So what solutions are available for students on the spectrum? Research has shown that these students thrive when they received increased support to assist them with navigating the college experience.

April is autism awareness month and in the past decade an increase in awareness has led to earlier diagnosis, which has resulted in children who are better prepared as they enter adulthood. As a result, many students with high-functioning autism are seeking postsecondary education at colleges and universities nationwide.

Current statistics indicate that each year applications of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to post-secondary education will increase by approximately 20,000. It is therefore, imperative that institutions of higher learning prepare to accept, support and include students with ASD into their courses and classrooms.

More and more colleges and universities are offering support for students with disabilities, including those with ASD. It is important to note that the amount of support differs greatly and parents, high school counselors and students should research each to make sure that the supports offered meet the individual needs of the prospective student.

At Pace University, OASIS (ongoing academic, social, instructional, and support) is a comprehensive college support program for students on the autism spectrum. Located in the TARA Center (Teach and Research in Autism), the program is founded on researched findings focused on essential supports necessary for success in postsecondary education and independence.

Students entering the program are required to submit recent neuropsychological assessments to assure that their individual strengths are recognized and their needs met. To guarantee that all accommodations — from extended time for testing to note-taking services — be afforded, the assessment is shared with the office of disability services responsible for implementation of all accommodations.

All students in the program are admitted by university standards, but receive the tools they need for success. That includes individual coaching, social skills training and inclusion with college students, instructional assistance, enhanced communication with professors, emotional support through individual and group sessions with a trained licensed social worker, housing support, weekly social activities, employment readiness workshops, and assistance with finding internships and employment following graduation.

The OASIS program provides a quiet place on campus for individual coaching, study cubicles, lounges for social interaction and support for individual needs. Each student is assigned a coach and works one-on-one with that coach at least four hours weekly. Executive functioning skills are focused on to help the student with time management, organization, planning and communication to adhere to the standard of course work expected from all Pace students.

The OASIS program at Pace was started in 2008 with four students. There are currently 40 students participating and the program has helped more than 100 students.

Recognizing the statistics for noncompletion and/or graduation for students on the spectrum (80 percent), the OASIS program boasts a 77 percent completion and graduation rate. Following the same pattern for employment following postsecondary completion, the program has focused upon those skills necessary for success in
the workplace.

All junior and senior students receiving support from OASIS attend weekly employment ready workshops focused on skills necessary for success after employment. Résumé and cover letters are perfected and mock interviews provide practice and feedback to build better potential for employment. All attendees in the workshops acquire paid summer internships, preparing them for independence after graduation.

While this is a new initiative of the program, we are already seeing results and are determined to prove how students with ASD and other learning differences contribute to the community and society.

It is becoming increasingly gratifying to see program graduates achieve success in their personal and professional lives. Many have been able to gradually transition from dependence to independence and are succeeding in the workplace. Some have become spokespeople for the program and role models on the possibilities of what can be accomplished.

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"Study Breaks" featured Pace University Student Douglas Dillon in "From the Stage to the Sea, Douglas Dillon Is Reeling Them In"

04/06/2018

"Study Breaks" featured Pace University Student Douglas Dillon in "From the Stage to the Sea, Douglas Dillon Is Reeling Them In"

Pace University’s Douglas Dillon is a young businessman that has found success in both his Hanta Rods and Reels business and the theatre.

Douglas Dillon is a freshman undergraduate student at Pace University in New York City and is a B.A. IPE (International Performance Ensembles) acting major. He’s a creative and ambitious student, especially when it comes to theatre. What started as a passion of his during his sophomore year of high school at Ravenscroft School in Raleigh, North Carolina, has progressed and morphed into a possible career path.

Dillon enjoys interacting with others that share a similar devotion to the dramatic arts and even takes personal time to work on scripts with fellow classmates at Pace that he hopes to one day pitch to Netflix as possible series.

While he wants to avoid a career in Broadway and focus more on a potential career in film and television, Dillon knows that every hand he shakes and connection he makes during his time at Pace and beyond can be beneficial to his career.

Although networking is not a skill that many master at the age of 19, Dillon is beyond his years and peers when it comes to creating connections and establishing business relationships. He has been able to cultivate this skill through managing his own business, Hanta.

Hanta Rods and Reels is a business that sells saltwater rods to big-game fisherman at affordable prices. Dillon founded Hanta Rods and Reels in 2014 and the success of the company speaks for itself. What started out as a smaller company that sold Japanese blanks to regular fisherman has grown into an accomplished business that now outlets to major saltwater-fishing retailers.

Last year Hanta made $100,000 in sales and the projection for this year is in the ballpark of $300,000. The accomplishments of Hanta stem from what Dillon noticed as a major flaw in the saltwater-fishing industry: affordable saltwater rods for a greater market of fishermen.

Most “high-quality” saltwater-fishing rods for big-game fishing generally cost about $800 per rod. Dillon and his father have been avid, life-long big-game fisherman. Yet they always had skepticisms about the market for these saltwater-fishing rods.

Dillion and his father noticed that rods from popular brands, such as Shimano and Penn, were still prone to breaking despite their high costs and self-proclaimed durability.

The duo decided to find a solution to this problem and after a trip to Japan to see how factories made these products during the summer leading into his sophomore year of high school, Hanta became a reality. After his junior year of high school, Hanta made a value line with powerful rods that shot the company into popularity.

With the help of his father, Dillon has managed to run Hanta out of his home in Raleigh. All products are designed in Raleigh and then made overseas in Japan, and then shipped to retailers around the world that target big-game fisherman. The fishing lures are painted by Dillon himself.

These retailers are as close to Raleigh as Wrightsville Beach in North Carolina and are also as far away as KBE Anglers in Dubai, and everywhere in between, such as the coasts of California. The popularity of Hanta came about from its recognition from major sources within the world of big-game fishing and its affordability.

Hanta saltwater rods generally cost a fisherman $300 – 400 per rod, which is approximately half the cost of the major brands’ products. Hanta has been recognized nationally, too — the company currently sponsors the Raleigh Saltwater Sports Association and is also showcasing later this year at an event in Orlando, Florida called the Eye-Cast Fishing Show.

Although Dillon is physically away from the company’s home-base in Raleigh as he studies at Pace University, he is still involved in the day-to-day operations of Hanta.

While Hanta has brought Dillion tremendous financial success and has equipped him with business skills that could be valuable for life, his main love remains with the theatre. High school economic classes never curbed his interest and the more time he spent in the school’s theatre, the more attached he became.

However, he still maintains to have significant input in Hanta’s operations as he pursues his college degree. His father is home in Raleigh to help Dillon manage the company, but all sales are still passed by Dillon before being finalized.

Dillon’s priorities are set on theatre, but that does not mean he’d shy away from a potential career in furthering his business. But just as Hanta took flight with hard work and the formation of important connections, the possibilities are endless for Dillion’s acting career.

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"Engadget" featured Dyson's Dr. Martina Blackwood in "What educators think about Apple’s new iPad"

04/05/2018

"Engadget" featured Dyson's Dr. Martina Blackwood in "What educators think about Apple’s new iPad"

On Chromebooks as an alternative, or a companion, to the iPad

Dr. Martina Blackwood, director of Instructional Technology at Pace University: "With so many competing interests, finding the funding to support the purchase of both laptops and tablets for all may be unrealistic for some institutions. It may be best to purchase a smaller number of tablets that can be housed in a computing lab or library, where users can borrow the devices for a limited time. Laptops or desktop computers may continue to account for the majority of the tech purchases. Some courses call for the use of software that has not been made available for tablets, so having access to more robust machines will be crucial in keeping up with software needs. Chromebooks and tablets are not always equipped to meet the ever growing software needs for select disciplines.

"In addition to the prohibitively high cost of purchasing tablets for all students and instructors, we need to discuss BYOD (bring your own device) as a factor in what may appear to be the declining interest in purchasing tablets. Students and faculty often have their own devices that they prefer, and when they arrive on campus they just expect it to work seamlessly with the infrastructure of the institution. When users have selected a device that meets their needs functionally and financially, it may cause administrators to think twice about supporting a specific tablet, especially considering the rate at which these devices are upgraded. The increased size and functionality of cellular phones could also be a contributing factor in the dwindling desire to own the latest tablet."

On whether Schoolwork, educational apps and digital curricula can make a difference

Blackwood: "The inherent mobility of tablets can allow instructors the flexibility to share content and engage their students in ways that might be more challenging with traditional computers ... As the number of available apps continues to grow, those in education have more tools at their disposal to bring content to life in the classroom. If the classroom is equipped with the appropriate connectors for projection, in many cases instructors can make use of tablets as they would a typical computer.

"Both Schoolwork and ClassKit have my attention. I like the idea of providing users with their own profiles and Apple IDs, which will come with increased cloud-based storage. Allowing students to work on specific assignments in select apps, or checking in on students to see how they're progressing, mark major improvements over the current capabilities. I am looking forward to an opportunity to personally work with these new features."

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"American Theatre" featured Dyson Professor Amy Rogers and Pace University in "Want to Develop a New Musical? Take It To School"

04/05/2018

"American Theatre" featured Dyson Professor Amy Rogers and Pace University in "Want to Develop a New Musical? Take It To School"

How Penn State and Pace University are helping professional composers create new work, with the help of its acting students.

When Amy Rogers founded Pace University’s undergraduate musical theatre program in 2002, she knew that one of her responsibilities would be to keep the program relevant. “One of the ways I thought would be a good way to connect the professional world with us was by developing new work,” she says. So Pace New Musicals was born and has been developing musicals since 2007; each process culminates in a staged reading.

In the beginning, Rogers simply picked a new musical she thought would be a good fit for her students. Now the school takes submissions; established writers had the option to submit new work for the possibility of being chosen by a committee made up of both students and faculty. This year, the committee sifted through more than 100 submissions.

Leana Concepcion, a junior musical theatre major, served on the committee and recently performed in the 2018 work, Mary and Max—an adaptation of the 2009 claymation film about a friendship between an 8-year-old girl and a 40-year-old man—by Bobby Cronin and Crystal Skillman.

“There’s a lot of new voices coming, which is really exciting for me, especially being an actor of color,” says Concepcion. “Because there are these people who are writing for me.”

Mary and Max received a staged reading this past winter. The submission deadline is currently open for the 2019 season and the only requirement is the musical has had at least one stage of development. The creators receive a two-week rehearsal period, culminating in multiple performances of the work, in front of an audience, with acting, stage management, and design resources provided by Pace.

“Our mission really is to take something that is just about ready to be launched and put it on its feet,” says Rogers.

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"Inside Higher Ed" featured Pace University's new provost Vanya Quiñones in "New Presidents or Provosts: Bentley U, Cape Breton U, Copiah-Lincoln CC, Duquesne U, Iona College, Linfield College, Northwest State CC, Pace U, San Diego State U"

03/29/2018

"Inside Higher Ed" featured Pace University's new provost Vanya Quiñones in "New Presidents or Provosts: Bentley U, Cape Breton U, Copiah-Lincoln CC, Duquesne U, Iona College, Linfield College, Northwest State CC, Pace U, San Diego State U"

Vanya Quiñones, associate provost for student success and retention at Hunter College of the City University of New York, has been selected as provost of Pace University, also in New York.

David Dausey, provost and executive vice president at Mercyhurst University, in Pennsylvania, has been appointed provost and vice president for academic affairs at Duquesne University, also in Pennsylvania.

Miles K. Davis, dean of the Harry F. Byrd Jr. School of Business at Shenandoah University, in Virginia, has been chosen as president of Linfield College, in Oregon.

Alison Davis-Blake, former dean of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, has been selected as president of Bentley University, in Massachusetts.

Adela de la Torre, vice chancellor for student affairs and campus diversity at the University of California, Davis, has been named president of San Diego State University, in California.

David C. Dingwall, a lawyer and politician, has been selected as president and vice chancellor of Cape Breton University, in Nova Scotia.

Jane Hulon, vice president of the Wesson Campus of Copiah-Lincoln Community College, in Missouri, has been appointed president of the college.

Michael Thomson, president of Cuyahoga Community College’s Eastern Campus, in Ohio, has been chosen as president of Northwest State Community College, also in Ohio.

Darrell P. Wheeler, dean of the School of Social Welfare, vice provost for public engagement and professor at the State University of New York at Albany, has been named provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Iona College, also in New York.

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"Maritime Logistics Professional" featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins in "The Cruise Industry Business Model Evolves"

03/28/2018

"Maritime Logistics Professional" featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins in "The Cruise Industry Business Model Evolves"

Cruise Economics

The cruise companies’ efforts to squeeze out the most dollars result in logistical contortions. In early 2016, NCL shifted its Norwegian Star (then sailing out of Tampa) to Australia, substituting it with Norwegian Jade (pulled out of Houston). Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings’ President and CEO, Frank del Rio, described the move in a 2015 investor call, saying: “Norwegian Star’s seasonal deployment will satisfy both contingents and mark the brand’s return to the region after a 15-year absence.” He added, in an oblique reference to Houston, “This new deployment also coincides with the ramping up of our sales and marketing operations in Australia … and replaces our lowest yielding seven-day product.” 

Around the same time, Princess Cruises pulled its Houston based Caribbean Princess out, moving it into the Australia trades. Unlike cargo, the cruise business requires sensitivity to consumer views which, in turn, drive the yield calculations of utmost importance to executives such as Mr. Donald and Mr. del Rio. On Cruisecritic.com, an online community for the sector, one commentator offered that: “The Port of Houston terminal is located in a dump. The Galveston terminal is beside the Strand. ‘Nuff said.” Ultimately, though, part of Galveston’s advantage proved to be its closeness to the open water, with Cruisecritic.com noting: “Galveston is also just 30 minutes from the open sea, so shops and the casino open fairly quickly after sail away.” Professor Andrew Coggins, Professor in the Lubin School of Business at Pace University, told MLPro, “Where cruising and cargo operations are in the same port, it can be tricky especially if they are not geographically separated. In Houston, for example, there were instances of disruptions and delays when the Ship Channel was closed after accidents and oil spills. Even on normal days, attention to scheduling of vessels coming inbound and outward is critical.”

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"Broadway World" featured Pace University's acting teacher Donna Drake in "Westchester Broadway Theatre Presents SISTER ACT"

03/28/2018

"Broadway World" featured Pace University's acting teacher Donna Drake in "Westchester Broadway Theatre Presents SISTER ACT"

Donna Drake (Director/Choreographer: Broadway: Original production of A Chorus Line, Sophisticated Ladies, Woman of the Year, The Wind in the Willows, 5678-Dance, It's so nice to be Civilized and the original production of The 1940s Radio Hour. She directed 4 Broadway Concerts of Nothing Like A Dame for BC/EFA and Addy & Uno, currently running off Broadway at Theatre Row. Awards include an Emmy nomination, 4 Drama Desk Nominations, A Mac Award Nomination, A Theatre World Award and an Off Broadway Alliance Nomination. She choreographed Catherine Zeta Jones for the American Film Institute Awards, 2009 and The AFI 2011 honoring Morgan Freeman and starring Betty White. She directed the children's show; John Tartaglia's Imaginocean off Broadway & National & International tours. TV: Julie's Greenroom, starring Julie Andrews, Monica's Mixing Bowl, Disney's Johnny & the Sprites, and ABC TV's Dear Alex & Annie. She is currently teaching acting at Pace University.

SISTER ACT, based on the Touchstone Motion Picture, tells the hilarious story of Deloris Van Cartier, a disco diva, whose life takes a surprising turn when she witnesses a murder. Under protective custody she is hidden in the one place she won't be found - a Convent! Disguised as a nun and under the suspicious watch of the Mother Superior, Deloris helps her fellow sisters find their voices as she unexpectedly rediscovers her own. A sparkling tribute to the universal power of friendship, sisterhood and music.

Featuring original music by Tony and 8-time Oscar winner Alan Menken (Disney's Aladdin and Beauty and The Beast, Newsies, Enchanted), dazzling dance routines and songs inspired by Motown, Soul, and Disco, SISTER ACT is the funniest and funkiest musical around.

The Cast features: Zuri Washington (as Deloris Van Cartier), Mary Jo McConnell (Mother Superior), Lani Corson (Sister Mary Robert) Ken Jennings (Monsignor O'Hara), Philip Michael Baskerville (Curtis Shank), Danny Wilford (Eddie Souther), Corben Williams (TJ), Jayson Elliott (Joey), Mike D'Amico (Pablo), Sandy Rosenberg (Sister Mary Lazarus), Katelyn Lauria (Sister Mary Patrick).

The multi-talented Ensemble: Melanie Burg, Joanna Caruso, Sincee Daniels, Hannah Eakin, Hector Flores Jr., Keyonna Knight, Jose Plaza, T. Shyvonne Stewart, Jessi St. George, Stephanie Sable, Karen Webb.

Directed & Choreographed by Donna Drake. The Musical Director is Bob Bray; Associate Choreographer is Rhonda Miller. Set Design by Steve Loftus, Lighting Design by Andrew Gmoser, Sound Design by Mark Zuckerman. The Costume Coordinator is Heather Carey, Wig/Hair Design by Gerard Kelly, the Production Stage Manager is Victor Lukas, the Assistant Stage Manager is Duane McDevitt and Properties are by Grumpy's Props. Lisa Tiso is the Associate Producer.

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