main navigation
my pace

NYC

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

02/16/2018

Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

Pleasantville Patch: "Pace University Hires Communications Strategists"

From Pleasantivlle Patch:

Seasoned communications strategists will support Pace President Marvin Krislov and highlight University successes.

Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications, respectively.

Ternes comes to Pace from DKC, a public relations firm consistently named one of the most influential public relations companies in the United States, where she served as executive vice president. Her client list included Fortune 50 companies, tech start-ups, biotech firms, and real estate leaders. Prior to that she worked as Chief of Staff to former Congressman Anthony Weiner in New York and Washington, D.C. As Executive Director of Media Relations, she will sharpen the University's focus on press engagement and help tell the story of the nation's most upwardly mobile private nonprofit university.

Oxfeld began his career as a journalist and has more recently worked in marketing communications. He was an editor at "New York Magazine" and the theater critic for the "New York Observer." He has been a copywriter at Ogilvy and the director of content at Vox Creative, Vox Media's content studio. He has also worked on speechwriting and editorial projects for several political communications firms. In his new role reporting to President Marvin Krislov, Oxfeld will develop presidential communications and work closely with the university's media relations and editorial staff to ensure consistent messaging that strengthens Pace's position as a leading private educational institution.

"Pace has an impressive story of student success, and more than any other private university we demonstrate the transformational impact of an education," said Krislov. "We are a well-kept secret that needs to be less well-kept. I know Marie and Jesse will use their skills and expertise to shine a bright spotlight on the important work that we do."

"With President Krislov at the helm, there has never been a more exciting time to be at Pace," said Ternes. "Every day Pace is creating transformational opportunities for its students and I couldn't be more thrilled to be a part of that."

"Pace does important, meaningful work, and not enough people know about it," said Oxfeld. "I'm excited to help President Krislov tell that story."

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace University's Schimmel Center Presents Niyaz: The Fourth Light Project featured in "Broadway World"

02/14/2018

Pace University's Schimmel Center Presents Niyaz: The Fourth Light Project featured in "Broadway World"

Broadway World: "Schimmel Center Presents Niyaz: The Fourth Light Project"

From "Broadway World:"

Persian, Middle Eastern, Indian electroacoustic supergroup Niyaz-comprised of vocalist and composer Azam Ali, and multi-instrumentalist and composer Loga Ramin Torkian-in collaboration with interactive designer and visual artist Jerome Delapierre, is featured in The Fourth Light Project on Saturday, March 10, 2018 at 7:30 p.m.at the Schimmel Center. The immersive multimedia experience combines live music and sacred whirling dance with advanced projection and body-mapping techniques that respond to sound and movement in real time. Through a seamless synthesis of sound, space, image and light, NIYAZ creates a new kind of digital scenography and live musical experience.

Through its performances, Niyaz offers audiences a bridge between the East and the West, with a synergistic combination of elements from ancient times to present day including ancient Sufi poetry and folk songs from the Middle East to India, rich acoustic instrumentation, and state of the art electronics.

The production features songs from the group's latest album, The Fourth Light, which is inspired by the first female Sufi mystic and poet Rabia Al Basri, who was born in the 8th century in Iraq.

Niyaz's music has garnered rave reviews from NPR, Huffington Post and MTV and has been featured in several major film and television scores, including True Blood, Nip/Tuck and Crossing Over.

Schimmel Center tickets are available at www.schimmelcenter.org, by calling 212-346-1715 or by visiting the box office located at 3 Spruce Street. Through February 16th, the Schimmel Center box office is open Monday through Friday from Noon to 5:00 p.m. Beginning February 20th, the Schimmel Center box office is open on Tuesday through Saturday from Noon to 5:00 p.m. and three hours prior to performances.

Schimmel Center, located in the heart of downtown Manhattan at Pace University, presents a unique and diverse array of internationally acclaimed artists, encompassing genres including dance, cabaret, music, comedy, world music, and family programming, in an intimate setting with affordable ticket prices. For more information, visit SchimmelCenter.org.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Psychologists at Pace University found that couples with similar texting styles were happier in their relationships overall than their counterparts featured in "Romper"

02/14/2018

Psychologists at Pace University found that couples with similar texting styles were happier in their relationships overall than their counterparts featured in "Romper"

Romper: "What Your Partner's Texting Style Says About Your Relationship"

From "Romper:"

The issue with texting, as we all know, is that it can be tough to figure out a person's tone. Does that lack of punctuation mean your S.O. is being curt, or are they just in a hurry? Or what if you find yourself waiting for a response longer than usual — is there trouble brewing or is your partner just stuck in meeting? In one study, psychologists at Pace University found that couples with similar texting styles were happier in their relationships overall than their counterparts, with both the content and frequency of messaging being taken into account, according to The Daily Mail. While it might seem like NBD, if your texts are constantly being misinterpreted or ignored (or the other way around), it's bound to start an argument eventually. Or a compromise: My husband, for example, knows that I interpret any text that doesn't end with an exclamation point as outright hostile. (I know, I'm a weirdo, it's just this thing I have, okay?)

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Psychology Professor Leora Trub explains why texting in relationships is so complicated featured in "Business Insider"

02/14/2018

Pace Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Psychology Professor Leora Trub explains why texting in relationships is so complicated featured in "Business Insider"

Business Insider: "Psychologists explain why texting in relationships is so incredibly complicated"

From "Business Insider:"

...There's good reason to believe that we treat our texts — and the phones that contain them — like we treat our relationships in general. Leora Trub, who runs the Digital Media and Psychology Lab at Pace University, has sketched this out under the framework of attachment theory, which is perhaps psychology's best model for understanding what's really driving our relationship dynamics.

In short, people learn how to love from their primary caregivers, most often their mother, and those patterns then transfer into their romantic relationships in adulthood.

If their mom was dismissive of their emotions as a child, they're liable to become disconnected from their own (and their possible partner's) feelings in adulthood, in what's called avoidant attachment. If they needed to act up or stay close to mom to get the care they needed, they're likely to bring anxious attachment into their grown-up relationships, meaning they'll be what's tactfully called "proximity seeking" in the literature and better known as clingy with potential partners. And guess what: we treat our phones much the same way.

Read the full article.

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Audrey Hoover, Director of Pace's University Health Care in the College of Health Professions Quoted in Story on Flu Prevention

02/12/2018

Audrey Hoover, Director of Pace's University Health Care in the College of Health Professions, Quoted in Story on Flu Prevention

NY Post: "All Your Flu Questions Answered"

Audrey Hoover, Director of University Health Care, was quoted in the "NY Post" in an article by Molly Shea on preventing and treating the flu.

From the "NY Post:"

"This year’s flu season has blossomed into a full-fledged epidemic. Here’s how to handle it.

Does this year’s flu shot work?

The shot is estimated to be 10 to 30 percent effective against this season’s most common flu strain. But that doesn’t mean it’s not worth it.

'Any protection is worthwhile,' says Audrey Hoover, a family nurse practitioner and director of the University Health Care Center at Pace University. Even if you do contract the flu, the shot can shorten the flu’s duration and severity.

The flu vaccine takes roughly two weeks to begin working, so the earlier you get it, the better.

I got the flu shot this fall — should I get it again?

'That’s not recommended,' says Hoover. Getting a second shot hasn’t been studied for effectiveness and isn’t believed to increase immunity against the virus. You do need a new vaccine every year, since the shot loses efficacy over time, and the formulation is adjusted each year.

Read the full article here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Kyle Coker, adjunct professor at Pace University in Commercial Acting, joins Binder as Sr. Casting Directors featured in "Broadway World"

02/12/2018

Kyle Coker, adjunct professor at Pace University in Commercial Acting, joins Binder as Sr. Casting Directors featured in "Broadway World"

Broadway World: "RWS Entertainment Group's Binder Casting Adds Film, Commercial Hires To Lead New Divisions"

From Broadway World:

Binder Casting, a subsidiary of Emmy Award-winning RWS Entertainment Group (RWS), today announced the appointment of three new hires set to lead the newly formed commercial and film casting divisions. Anthony Pichette, Kyle Coker join Binder as Sr. Casting Directors and Chad Eric Murnane joins as a Casting Director. The announcement was made today by Ryan Stana, CEO of RWS Entertainment Group.

With over 35 years of experience in the Broadway casting world, the 12-time Artios Award-winning casting office recently opened two new divisions-commercial and film. Pichette, Coker and Murnane will spearhead these divisions and work side-by-side with Binder Casting's Mark BrandonJustin Bohon and Katie Zanca as well as RWS Casting to provide new opportunities for actors on film, television, radio, and commercials in addition to regional theater, national tours and Broadway.

"RWS and Binder Casting are deeply committed to giving actors and performers around the world access to the best opportunities while providing our clients with a massive, unparalleled casting pool," said Ryan Stana, CEO of RWS Entertainment Group. "RWS acquired Binder Casting in 2016 in order to help the company become a one-stop-shop for clients, actors, producers, and performers. As RWS continues to expand, we look forward to seeing our commercial and film casting divisions grow. We couldn't ask for a better team than Anthony, Kyle and Chad to head up those efforts."

Pichette brings 20 years of commercial casting to Binder. He has cast top level talent for network campaigns, regional commercials, industrials, promos, print and digital media. Pichette has cast notable commercial campaigns for clients including Golden Corral, Garmin, Olive Garden and Six Flags. Additionally, he's worked with in-house casting departments at networks such as Nickelodeon (Blue's Clues), Sci-Fi, Food Network, Spike and MTV. 

Pichette teaches at studios throughout the city including One on One, Actor's Connection, AGR, The Network, The Performing Option, NYU Stone Street, BIH Studios. He has worked with major colleges and universities across the country including the University of Miami, College of William and Mary, Rutgers University and College of Charleston

Coker brings more than 13 years of commercial casting experience having cast over 1,000 commercials, voice overs, print projects, industrials, video games, and new media projects. He has worked on projects for clients including Target, Apple, IBM, Kiehl's, State Farm, Exxon Mobil, Crayola, Pebbles, L'Oreal, Chase, and more. Additionally, he provided additional casting for Beyoncé's Lemonade performance at the 2016 VMAs, various projects as a NY associate for 20th Century Fox, and has worked for acclaimed directors such as Joe Pytka and Mark Romanek.

Prior to Binder Casting, Coker was a partner in the commercial department at Donna DeSeta Casting. He's also an adjunct professor at Pace University in Commercial Acting and has taught many master classes at acting schools and universities throughout the country. He recently completed the book: "Commercial Acting: A No Nonsense Guide to the Business, Working with Commercial Copy, and Becoming a Smarty On-Camera Principal Performer."

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Jonathan Ohadi and fellow researchers at Pace University explored the use of text messaging for ongoing maintenance in romantic relationships featured in "The Vindicator"

02/12/2018

Jonathan Ohadi and fellow researchers at Pace University explored the use of text messaging for ongoing maintenance in romantic relationships featured in "The Vindicator"

The Vindicator: "Managing marriage by text message"

From the Vindicator:

...Jonathan Ohadi and fellow researchers at Pace University explored the use of text messaging for ongoing maintenance in romantic relationships. In the January issue of Computers In Human Behavior, Ohadi’s group explained that something as simple as perceiving similarity in how we text may lead to greater levels of satisfaction.

Using a sample of 205 adults in romantic relationships, they also found that we tend to feel more satisfied if we think our partner is initiating contact with us more frequently (“I miss you”). Sending a quick, unexpected text to a partner has the potential to set off similar kinds of endorphins we feel when someone likes something we’ve posted online.

Of course, initiating this contact is only a start. When all else fails, talk about how you text each other and set communication expectations for building a fulfilling relationship.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace University sponsored a gala celebrating Black activism in "Workers World" featuring Monica Moorehead and Karina Ross, vice-president of Pace University’s BSU, Feb. 1

02/12/2018

Pace University sponsored a gala celebrating Black activism in "Workers World" featuring Monica Moorehead and Karina Ross, vice-president of Pace University’s BSU, Feb. 1

Workers World: "Monica Moorehead to Black students: “Become an activist”

From Workers World:

Edited from a talk given by Monica Moorehead, WWP secretariat member, at “A gala celebrating Black activism,” sponsored by the Pace University Black Student Union in New York City on Feb. 1.

When Karina told me that this program was a tribute to Black activism, I thought what might be of interest is to let you know some of my personal background. Because, as the old saying goes, in order to know where you are headed, you have to know where you come from, right?

And my personal journey has been very much influenced by political events, large and small. There is a Marxist saying that your being determines your consciousness or how you think.

My journey began with being born under racist segregation in Tuscaloosa, Ala.  My mother, Consuela Lee, a jazz pianist and composer, was raised in Snow Hill, Ala., located between Selma and Montgomery, important battlegrounds during the Civil Rights movement, and my father, Isaac Thomas Moorehead, a college basketball coach, was born in Suffolk, Va., not far from the heroic slave rebellion led by Nat Turner. My mother’s grandfather, William James Edwards, founded a school in Snow Hill for former slaves in 1893, predicated on the philosophy of Booker T. Washington.

My dad grew up under extreme poverty. It was rumored that his father, who migrated from the Virgin Islands, was lynched before my dad was born. So my grandmother was a single parent who was forced to become a domestic worker for whites all her adult life, starting at the age of 12.

When I was three years old in 1955, my parents joined the Montgomery Bus Boycott, four months after the lynching of 14-year-old Emmett Till in Mississippi.  The boycott was sparked by Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat to a white man. My parents, professors at Alabama State University, a historically Black college, were part of a tiny minority of Black people who owned cars, so they volunteered their time to drive boycotters to and from work. My parents also attended Dr. King’s church.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

MSNBC: "Pace University's Law Professor Mimi Rocah talks with Brian Williams about possible interview of President Trump"

02/07/2018

Pace University's Law Professor Mimi Rocah talks with Brian Williams on MSNBC about possible interview of President Trump by the Special Counsel and how prosecutors plan for interviews by knowing their facts & witnesses

Mimi Rocah, a distinguished fellow and criminal justice at Pace University School of Law is a former assistant US attorny for the Southern District of NY.  Professor Mimi Rocah talks with Brian Williams on MSNBC about possible interview of President Trump by the Special Counsel and how prosecutors plan for interviews by knowing their facts & witnesses.

Watch the MSNBC

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Daily Voice: "Neurobiologist Picked As New Provost At Pace University"

02/06/2018

Pace University President Marvin Krislov has announced that Vanya Quiñones, Ph.D., a neurobiologist and biopsychologist will assume the role of Provost of Pace, effective July 1 featured in Daily Voice

Pace University President Marvin Krislov has announced that Vanya Quiñones, Ph.D., a neurobiologist and biopsychologist who serves as Associate Provost for Student Success and Retention at CUNY’s Hunter College, will assume the role of Provost of Pace, effective July 1.

Quiñones brings to Pace decades of experience in scientific research, academic administration, program- and research-focused fundraising, and a long record of working to improve diversity in science and the arts.

As a young researcher at The Rockefeller University, Quiñones realized that she saw few who looked like her. This led to her career-long focus on creating opportunities for underrepresented students across scientific disciplines and within the arts. Quiñones holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and master’s in cell biology from the University of Puerto Rico and a doctorate in neurobiology and physiology from Rutgers University.

“We were looking for a creative and inspiring provost,” Krislov said. “We found one in Dr. Quiñones. She has a compelling vision for our academic program, and she shares our commitment to diversity and inclusion. She’s an impressive academic, an inspirational leader and a champion of student success. Most important, she is a tireless advocate for the transformative impact of an education.”

“Pace University routinely demonstrates how higher education can change lives,” Quiñones said. “I have dedicated my career to improving minority representation in STEM and the arts, and Pace is the perfect place for me to build on that work. I’m honored to have been selected as provost and will work tirelessly to help faculty and students maximize their potential.”

Pace Board of Trustees Chairman Mark Besca added, “There has never been a more exciting time at Pace University. . . . I’m confident that with Dr. Quiñones serving as our new provost, Pace will build on its strong foundation of academic excellence and student achievement.”

Quiñones will succeed Interim Provost Nira Herrmann, Ph.D., who will reassume her role as dean of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace. Herrmann has served as interim provost since July 2017, and will continue in that role for the remainder of this academic year.

This appointment follows an exhaustive national search that included exceptional candidates from across the country.

Quiñones joined Hunter College in 1997 as an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology. As a tenured professor, she went on to lead its biopsychology and neuroscience doctoral graduate sub-program before assuming the role of department chair. During her 20 years at Hunter she has held numerous positions culminating in her current role as associate provost for student success and retention. A few highlights from her distinguished career include:

● Published more than 70 peer-reviewed articles and given over 200 presentations, monographs or invited papers.

● Brought more than $25 million in funding for Hunter from the NIH, private foundations, the Department of Education, among others grants. Many of the grants were to support underrepresented minorities, including the NIH’s Career Opportunities in Research and Enhancing Neuroscience Diversity through Undergraduate Education Experiences (ENDURE) programs.

● Supported cross-departmental infrastructure projects at Hunter, including renovating the Baker Theater Building and Library Learning Centers, developing a STEM flex laboratory, and design/renovation of the Online Technology Center.

● Increased department funding by $3.4 million during her six years as chair of Psychology (Hunter’s largest and highest extramurally funded department).

Read the article.

 

Pages