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The Irish Times: "Inside Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago: The Winter White House"

12/18/2017

Inside Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago: The Winter White House (The Irish Times)

...Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at the Lubin School of Business in Pace University, New York, believes the Trump brand has benefitted from the presidency.

“One of the first principles in branding is to make sure that people know your name, that people are aware of you. Before he became president, a certain percentage of people knew Donald Trump; now that he’s president almost everyone is aware of who he is. Whether you like him or dislike him – and the world is split – there is no doubt that Donald Trump has a higher brand recognition than anyone on the planet.”

But while the Trump name continues to have commercial caché abroad, particularly in the Middle East and Asia, domestically there are growing signs the Trump brand may be hurting.

The Trump SoHo hotel in Lower Manhattan has recently become the latest property to demand the removal of the Trump brand. Three residential buildings in the city also voted to abolish the Trump name. Similarly, the Trump International Hotel in Toronto reached a financial agreement with the Trump Organisation to remove the Trump name and will reopen as a St Regis.

The Trump Organisation itself has also opted to omit its founder’s name on two new hotel lines that are being launched this year in Mississippi, which are being marketed under the names “Scion” and “American Idea”.

There are signs that Trump’s daughter Ivanka’s fashion brand may be feeling the heat domestically, though her stock continues to rise abroad. Earlier this year, upmarket department store Nordstrom announced it would discontinue her brand at its stores, prompting an outburst by her father on Twitter,who said Ivanka had been treated “so unfairly” by Nordstrom.

Ivanka, who works for her father in the White House and controversially took his place during a G20 meeting in Hamburg earlier this year, has argued she has taken steps to distance herself from her business interests, absenting herself from day-to-day management. Her company’s assets are now run by “independent” trustees – her sister-in-law and brother-in-law.

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The Chronicle of Higher Education: "What Is This ‘Even’?"

12/18/2017

What Is This ‘Even’? (The Chronicle of Higher Education)

When I last addressed the word even, in 2013, it had already migrated from its accustomed function as an adverb in such sentences as “I can’t even move this suitcase, much less pick it up” or “Even vegetarians sometimes have a hankering for bacon.” The Oxford English Dictionary elegantly gives this traditional meaning as:

Intimating that the sentence expresses an extreme case of a more general proposition implied (=French même). Prefixed … to the particular word, phrase, or clause, on which the extreme character of the statement or supposition depends.

By the time of my post, the word had for some time established itself — in expressions like “What does that even mean?” “I don’t even know you,” and “Is that even a thing?” — as, in Mark Liberman’s formulation, a “purely emphatic” intensifier. I noted that it had migrated “to an unexpected part of the sentence, so that is ostentatiously not ‘prefixed … to the particular word, phrase, or clause’ it has to do with.”

Four and half years on, there are some new things to say. Well, one is an old thing — in the original post, I somehow neglected the expression, “I can’t even,” which had gotten its first Urban Dictionary definition in 2010 (sic throughout):

Yes thoes three words are a sentence a full sentence, well only on tumblr. is often used when something is either too funny, scary, cute, to have a good reaction too.

girl: “it was so awkward”
girl2: “OMFG AHAHAHA I CAN’T EVEN”

Its popularity peaked in late 2013, some months after my post (which is my unconvincing excuse for whiffing on it). In October of that year, according to the Know Your Meme website,

the Tumblr blog TheBunionPaper published a satirical news article titled “Rich Girl in Dining Hall Can’t Even,” accumulating upwards of 1,900 notes in seven months. On November 20th, the feminist culture blog The Toast published an article about Internet linguistics, which described the meaning of the expression “I have lost all ability to can.” On January 26th, 2014, country music singer Kacey Musgraves repeated the phrase “I can’t even” during her acceptance speech for Best Country Album at the 2014 Grammy Awards.

Not surprisingly, Liberman and his Language Log colleagues have been all over “I can’t even.”

Know Your Meme credibly traces the expression to the earlier-emerging, “I don’t even,” which it cites first in a 2007 message board. However, three years before that, Regina used it in the movie Mean Girls: “She’s so pathetic. Let me tell you something about Janis Ian. We were best friends in middle school. I know, right? It’s so embarrassing. I don’t even … Whatever.”

Tina Fey’s Mean Girls is linguistically astonishingly fruitful; my sense is that it reflected and created, in equal measure, loads of new ways of talking. The screenplay is a veritable symphony merely in its uses of the modern-day even, including “What does that even mean?” and these exchanges:

  • Crying Girl: “I wish we could all get along like we used to in middle school … I wish I could bake a cake filled with rainbows and smiles and everyone would eat and be happy …” [about to cry]  Damian: [shouting from back] “She doesn’t even go here!” Ms. Norbury: “Do you even go to this school?” Crying Girl: “No … I just have a lot of feelings …”
  • Regina: “Cady, do you even know who sings this?” Cady: “Um … the Spice Girls?”
  • Gretchen: [to Cady] “Two years ago she told me hoops earrings were her thing and I wasn’t allowed to wear them anymore. And then for Hanukkah my parents got this pair of really expensive white gold hoops and I had to pretend like I didn’t even like them and … it was so sad.”
  • Cady: “What do we even talk about?” Janis: [shrugs shoulders] “Hair products!”

The latest even development takes it a step beyond I can’t even. In that construction, a following verb is implied and elided: “I can’t even [begin to express how funny/scary/cute/whatever the thing I'm reacting to is].” But now that’s thrown aside and even is a pure signifier of emphasis, improbability, and disbelief. I first encountered from Jon Danziger (@jondanziger)  who tweeted on November 17, apropos of a confounding news item, “What is this even?” I asked him about it and he reported it is a favorite of his students at Pace University.

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CGTN: "Number of international students coming to U.S. drops for first time in a decade"

12/18/2017

Number of international students coming to U.S. drops for first time in a decade (CGTN)

President Krislov was interviewed by Karina Huber of CGTN America on the value of international students to American colleges and universities and to employers. 

From CGTN America:

"Pace University in New York City has students from 117 countries. It hasn’t seen its applications drop, but its president, Marvin Krislov, is concerned about the data. He said international students are a huge asset.

“I think international students really contribute to the education of our students and faculty,” he said. “Because so much of our education is focused globally, and to have those perspectives really contributes to the discussions in the classroom.”

... The three percent drop in new international students cannot be attributed to U.S. President Donald Trump – the data predates his election – but the worry in U.S. higher education is that his views on immigration hurt applications.

“We all are watching,” Krislov said, “and we all want to make sure that the message – the communication is we’re very clear – we are still welcoming for international students.”

Read the full article and watch the video here.

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Broadway World: "Pop/R&B Singer Meecah Announces Her First Headlining Concert In NYC"

12/12/2017

Pop/R&B Singer Meecah Announces Her First Headlining Concert In NYC (Broadway World)

Impressive R&B/soul singer Meecah is set to headline her first concert in New York City on December 16th at The West End Lounge in NYC. The Pace University performing arts student recently performed the national anthem at the 2017 Business Council of Westchester dinner where guest of honor Secretary of State and former First Lady Hillary Clinton spoke.

"I'm extremely excited. Secretary Hillary Clinton is one of my heroes," said Meecah after singing the national anthem for Mrs. Clinton and more than 900 business leaders at the Rye Town Hilton. The promising singer is steadily increasing her fan base with impressive live performances.

The concert is titled Meecah's New York Christmas and will be a gift for music lovers in the Tri-state area. It will feature other emerging artists such as Hamilton's Sean Zuni Green Jr. Concertgoers can expect to hear live renditions of tracks from her new EP New Moon Rising. Her latest single, "Dream" has been featured in popular music blogs Solo Vibes Music and Celeb Mix. Another single entitled, "Melanated" is a favorite among African-American women due to its empowering message.

Meecah will perform those songs and many others on December 16th. When asked about the concert Meecah said, "You've never experienced Christmas like this before!"

Tickets for Meecah's New York Christmas are $15 dollars at the door. The concert begins at 9:30 p.m. and is 18+ to enter. Listen to Meecah's latest single, "Dream" and purchase her new EP New Moon Rising now on Apple Music.

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WalletHub: "2017’s States with the Best Elder-Abuse Protections"

12/11/2017

2017’s States with the Best Elder-Abuse Protections (WalletHub)

Abuse happens every day and takes many forms. But vulnerable older Americans are among the easiest targets for this misconduct, especially those who are women, have disabilities and rely on others for care or other type of assistance. By one estimate, elder abuse affects as many as 5 million people per year, and 96 percent of all cases go unreported.

Unless states take action to prevent further abuse, the problem will grow as America becomes an increasingly aging nation. The U.S. Census Bureau expects the population aged 65 and older to nearly double from 43.1 million in 2012 to 83.7 million in 2050, much to the credit of aging Baby Boomers who began turning 65 in 2011.

Fortunately, states recognize that elder abuse is a real and growing issue. But sadly, only some are fighting hard enough to stop it. WalletHub compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia based on 11 key indicators of elder-abuse protection in 3 overall categories. Our data set ranges from “share of elder-abuse, gross-neglect and exploitation complaints” to “financial elder-abuse laws.” Continue reading below for our findings, expert commentary and a full description of our methodology.

Read what Professor Sheyin Chen, Professor of Public Andministration and Social Policy in The Dyson College of Arts and Sciences says about the most common types of elder abuse, how policymakers protect the elderly from abuse and what families can do to protect elderly family members.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace team wins fed challenge"

12/08/2017

Pace team wins fed challenge (Westchester County Business Journal)

A team of students from Pace University has won the 14th annual national College Federal Reserve Challenge. The Federal Reserve runs the competition that tests whether students understand the U.S. economy, monetary policymaking and the role of the Federal Reserve System.

This is the third time in four years that Pace has won the competition.

The finals were held in Washington, D.C. following five district competitions held around the country. The Pace team faced competition from Harvard University, Princeton University, University of Virginia-Old Dominion and University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. Teams competing in the finals gave presentations and answered questions posed by a panel of senior Federal Reserve officials.

Pace University President Marvin Krislov said, “This team’s dedication and success as well as that of their professors is a great example of the experiential learning and meaningful mentorship that is the hallmark of the Pace Path.”

The students attend Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences and are Klejdja Qosjdja, Marina Testani, Salil Ahuja, Carly Aznavorian, Scarlett Bekus, Aleksandra Bruno, and Argenys Morban. Professors Greg Colman and Mark Weinstock served as the team’s advisers. 

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The Jewish Voice: "International Students: A Boon to New York and the Nation"

12/07/2017

International Students: A Boon to New York and the Nation (The Jewish Voice)

President Krislov published an op-ed on the benefits of international students to institutions and the country in "The Jewish Voice." 

"International Students: A Boon to New York and the Nation"

While the United States continues to talk about building walls and deporting Dreamers, Canada is opening its doors to young people from around the world, actively recruiting greater numbers of international students as part of its strategy to stimulate economic growth. Recent reports indicate some 353,000 international students currently attend Canadian colleges and universities and the country’s goal is to welcome another 100,000 by 2022.

The United States would be wise to emulate such an approach. Our system of higher education is recognized as the best in the world and has been a magnet for many talented, hardworking people. But while most elite colleges and universities are holding steady with international student recruitment, other institutions have reported drops of as much as 50 percent. Students cite compelling concerns, including the ever-changing travel ban and cuts to the H-1B visa program that make it more difficult to secure employment after graduation.

Our neighbors to the north are capitalizing on something America’s colleges and universities have long understood: international students are a major boon to the economy. The latest analysis from the National Association of Foreign Student Advisors found that the 1,043,839 international students studying in the U.S. during the 2015-2016 academic year contributed $32.8 billion to the economy and either created or supported more than 400,000 jobs. And this prosperity was shared across the country.

In New York, where I am the president of Pace University, international students contributed nearly $4 billion to the state economy and supported more than 46,000 jobs. In Texas, those numbers are nearly $2 billion and 24,000 jobs; Indiana, $956 million and more than 12,000 jobs; and in California, our largest state, they contributed more than $5 billion and supported nearly 60,000 jobs. The loss of that kind of revenue would have a serious impact on local, state, and federal coffers. The U.S. is not alone in facing such economic fallout. The Higher Education Policy Institute projects that a Brexit-related cap on foreign student visas may cost the U.K. as much as two billion pounds per year.

Further, while international students contribute significant revenue to our economy, they receive far less in financial aid than American peers and approximately 75 percent receive most of their funding from sources outside of the United States. Many international students pay full tuition here and if they attend state institutions, they often pay double what in-state students pay.

Valuable for far more than financial assets, international students also transform the educational experience. For all students and faculty, whether in the classroom or in everyday interactions, they share diverse skills, perspectives, and customs, which helps all students prepare for careers in this global world. They also infuse our campuses with the spirit of innovation and willingness to take measured risks. After all, it takes courage to travel thousands of miles from family and all that is familiar to seek higher learning in another country. The benefits of their presence continue to unfold after graduation, when relationships formed between international and American students can lead to longer-term associations in the worlds of business, medicine, government, and more.

In more ways than one, the loss of so many bright, hardworking young people is something the United States simply cannot afford. Indeed, this country has and should continue to thrive as the world’s leader in higher education.

By Marvin Krislov

Marvin Krislov is the President of Pace University in New York.

Read the article on "The Jewish Voice" here.

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The Daily Telescope: "Pace University Wins National Economics Competition for Third Time in Four Years"

12/07/2017

Pace University Wins National Economics Competition for Third Time in Four Years (The Daily Telescope)

Pace University College Fed Challenge Team

This team’s dedication and success as well as that of their professors is a great example of the experiential learning and meaningful mentorship that is the hallmark of the Pace Path. — President Marvin Krislov, Pace University

Pace University today won the 14th annual national College Federal Reserve Challenge, marking the third time in four years that Pace has won the prestigious competition that tests students’ understanding of the U.S. economy, monetary policymaking and the role of the Federal Reserve System.

The finals were held in Washington D.C. as the capstone to five district competitions held around the country. Undergraduate teams from across the country first competed in their local Reserve Bank Districts, and top teams moved on to the finals. Last month, the Pace University team won New York’s regional competition. The Pace team faced competition at the national level from Harvard University, Princeton University, University of Virginia-Old Dominion, and University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.

“I am deeply proud of the Pace University team,” said Pace University President Marvin Krislov. “This team’s dedication and success as well as that of their professors is a great example of the experiential learning and meaningful mentorship that is the hallmark of the Pace Path. The team members are exemplary students and their drive and determination has paid off with this great victory.”

All seven members of this year’s Pace team are Economics/Business Economics students in Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. The team members are Klejdja Qosjdja, Marina Testani, Salil Ahuja, Carly Aznavorian, Scarlett Bekus, Aleksandra Bruno, and Argenys Morban; Professors Greg Colman and Mark Weinstock served as the team’s advisors. The Economics Department, guided by Joseph Morreale and the Deputy Chair, Anna Shostya, provided enormous support to the team throughout their journey to the finals.

Participating teams analyze economic and financial conditions and formulate a monetary policy recommendation, modeled on the work of the Federal Open Market Committee. Teams competing in the finals gave presentations and answered questions for a panel of senior Federal Reserve officials.

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Backstage: "The College Audition, Part V: Your Mental Health"

12/06/2017

The College Audition, Part V: Your Mental Health (Backstage)

So you’ve applied, auditioned and now, you wait. This article will explore some of the ways to protect your mental health in the time during the audition and between auditioning and notification. 

It bears repeating that there is no “perfect” school for you. There may be a school you have your heart set on, one that many of your older friends are attending or one in a dream city. But there’s no one answer. Every school has its pluses and minuses. Your initial research and campus visits will prove that. Wherever you end up, you will learn: The college experience is what you make of it. Here’s a day-by-day way to make sure you don’t get too swept up in the process.

The day of auditions...

What do you need and what don’t you need? For example: Does coffee add to your anxiety? Avoid it. Are you comparing yourself to or judging others Avoid it; it only exposes your insecurities and will make you overly vulnerable or defensive. Instead, focus on preparation and what makes you feel good. Bring music or something to read to help take your mind of the event of the day. 

Don’t lie to yourself. You are going to be nervous so why pretend you’re not? Accept this fact and you’ll be less surprised by the nerves when they appear. It’s ok to be nervous—it means you care. When the nerves show up, avoid wasting energy trying to make them go away. Acknowledge they’re there and instead, put that energy into focus rather than trying to dismiss what’s a real. You’re likely to work yourself into a frenzy trying to “shake off” the nervous feeling.

Talk to other students. Make friends. If someone talks to you, be kind and remember there’s a chance you’ll be spending the next four years with them. Talking to others can take your mind off the pressure you’re experiencing and help you feel like you are not alone. These people aren’t your competition.

Don’t give us your power. The people behind the table aren’t so important that you should surrender all your power to us. Remember, we need you. Without you, we can’t continue to do what we love and soon, we’ll want you to pick us! Then who has the power?

Take pride and show gratitude. When it’s all over, be proud of you. Auditioning is brave and takes courage, so acknowledge that. No matter the outcome, be grateful for the people in your lives who encourage, support and inspire you to follow this passion and help you to find this courage in yourself. 

Grant Kretchik is the associate director of Pace University’s School of Performing Arts, the head of its BFA acting program, and a Backstage Expert. For more information, check out Kretchik’s full bio

JV Mercanti is the head of acting for the musical theater program at Pace University’s School of the Arts, author of the monologue book series, “In Performance,” and a Backstage Expert. For more information, check out Mercanti’s full bio!

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Crain's New York Business: "Is college worth it? The numbers say yes—especially in New York"

12/01/2017

Is college worth it? The numbers say yes—especially in New York (Crain's New York Business)

President Krislov published an op-ed in "Crain's New York Business" on higher education as the best path forward and New York as the best place to earn a college degree. 

"Is college worth it? The numbers say yes—especially in New York"

At a time when some leading voices are questioning the very purpose of college, and a recent Gallup poll found that nearly 60% of American adults have little confidence in higher education, it is more important than ever to look at the data—which prove that education is the best path forward.

A recent list of top colleges in the Chronicle of Higher Education provides vivid evidence that higher education is the ticket to economic mobility and that New York could easily be dubbed the higher education capital of the nation, as it is clearly the place to be for a college education that catapults one to a better life. The list is based on data from the Equality of Opportunity Project’s study “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility” (Chetty, Friedman, Saez, Turner, and Yagan, 2017). The study compared the median parent household income for students at colleges and universities across the country with the earnings these same students achieved years after graduation.

New York is a national leader in this arena. An impressive six of the top 10 private four-year institutions for economic mobility are located in the state, while seven CUNY campuses rank in the top 10 four-year public colleges. All New Yorkers can be proud of living in an area that delivers high-quality education that results in lucrative jobs after graduation, creating real economic opportunity. And I am deeply proud that among four-year private institutions, Pace University ranked first in the nation for creating upward economic mobility—and thus a brighter future— for its students, many of whom hail from underrepresented communities or are the first in their families to go to college.

The study’s findings did not come as a surprise to those of us who know the New York institutions on the list, where core values include keeping the doors of opportunity open for all and preparing graduates to succeed in their careers and make a difference in their communities.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, median annual earnings for Americans lacking a high-school degree amounts to $25,636 while the unemployment rate for the same population is 8%, the highest of any of the educational categories. Workers with a high-school diploma achieve a median income of $35,256 per year and an unemployment rate of 5.4%. Americans with a bachelor’s degree have a median annual income of $59,124 and 2.8% unemployment.

Median annual earnings continue to rise with advanced and professional degrees. In 2012, New York residents with a bachelor's or post-graduate degree earned a median annual income of approximately $70,700, which ranks among the highest in the nation, the New York Building Congress reported in 2014.

While these statistics paint a clear picture of the economic benefits of a college education, the full value of that education goes well beyond dollars and cents. College prepares students to succeed with not only the vocational skills to earn a good living but with the curiosity, adaptability and inclination to respond effectively to the changes and challenges they will face throughout their lives.

The economy of New York is driven by natives and newcomers alike. Many have come here to realize the American Dream and found much success. Many of those who come to New York to set themselves on a path to success are college students. With close to 600,000 university students in the five boroughs attending 105 colleges and universities, New York is a college town.

Higher education in New York is a driving force—an economic engine of opportunity for businesses, students, employers and graduates who stay and work in the city. New York's higher education institutions contributed an estimated $7.5 billion to gross city product in 2012. Investments of colleges and universities in New York have greatly contributed to the city's ability to attract, develop and retain a more educated population and workforce than the nation as a whole. And few states do more to support students seeking college degrees than New York, the Building Congress also found.

But more can be done to solidify New York's lofty status. The city and state should promote and leverage New York City’s strength in this area to attract more students and future leaders to New York. There also needs to be robust dialogue between leaders in higher education and employers so that colleges and universities consistently meet the changing needs of today’s workforce. And we need to reshape the conversation around higher education, starting with key voices in government and business, recognizing the proven transformative power of education and of a college degree.

The Chronicle study is a vital reminder that a college degree remains the most powerful means of achieving the American Dream and that New York is the best place to do so.

Marvin Krislov is president of Pace University.

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