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New York Business Journal: "This Indian restaurateur owns 5 eateries, including 3 in Curry Hill"

02/13/2017

New York Business Journal: "This Indian restaurateur owns 5 eateries, including 3 in Curry Hill"

. . . Many independent retail stores including Chinese restaurants, barber shops and nail salons haven’t “effectively developed a business model to consolidate these fragmented industries,” explained Bruce Bachenheimer, executive director of the Entrepreneurship Lab at Pace University in New York. “The most common reason behind consolidation is economies of scale,” he said.

Moreover, he noted the restaurant business is challenging for individual entrepreneurs to expand. “The restaurant business is extremely competitive and subject to numerous trends and fads. It’s hard enough to manage one, much more complex to keep five thriving,” pointed out Bachenheimer.

Sustaining a loyal staff is another hurdle. “Aside from external factors such as competition and changing trends, high employee turnover is a challenge, attracting, retaining and motivating staff is difficult,” he asserted.

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Kiplinger's Retirement Report: "Join a Nonprofit as An Encore Career"

02/13/2017

Kiplinger's Retirement Report: "Join a Nonprofit as An Encore Career"

SUZANNE ARMSTRONG THRIVED IN THE CORPORATE world, working for American Express and later consulting for Citibank, Deloitte and other behemoths. Her expertise: helping leaders build support for major change in a company’s vision or systems.

Several years ago, Armstrong went through her own transformation. She left big business and now taps her “change leadership” know-how as a consultant for non-profits, splitting her time between Miami and Toronto.

When the Miami Art Museum was planning to move to a new location and expand its mission in 2012, the museum’s director asked Armstrong, who was a donor, to work with the leadership team to ensure a smooth transition for employees. (The museum changed its name to Pérez Art Museum Miami after the move.) Armstrong also found work at United Way, where she coaches executives at the organization. “I am tremendously fulfilled,” says Armstrong, 69. “It’s great to continue to do the same kind of work—and make a difference.”

For someone at Armstrong’s level of experience, the pay is nominal—about $20 an hour for about 15 to 20 hoursa week. She is paid through the South Florida affiliate of ReServe, which places professionals ages 55 andolder in part-time positions with nonprofit organizations and government agencies.

Like Armstrong, many baby boomers with long careers in the business world are now eyeing work in the nonprofit sector. About 21 million adults between the ages of 50 and 70 report that they would like to seek jobs that address social needs, particularly in education, health care, human services and the environment, according to a 2014 study by Encore.org and market research firm Penn Schoen Berland.

These second-act, social-impact jobs are known as encore careers, and the survey found that most who seek these jobs want work that will help them feel worthwhile. Facing perhaps decades in retirement, “it’s so incredibly important to make these extra years meaningful, useful and productive,” says Joan Tucker, director of the Encore Transition Program at Pace University, in New York City. The program’s continuing education workshops help boomers figure out how to create a purposeful retirement.

 

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Daily News: "Pace University launches $190M plan to upgrade lower Manhattan campus"

02/10/2017

Daily News: "Pace University launches $190M plan to upgrade lower Manhattan campus"

The Daily News covered news of the New York City Master Plan for Pace. The news appears online and on page 2 in print.

From the Daily News:

"Pace University kicked off a $190 million renovation and expansion of its lower Manhattan campus on Thursday, joining a number of other city colleges already in the midst of expensive projects.

In the first phase of Pace’s multiyear, three-phase plan, the 111-year-old private college will spend $45 million to upgrade its two main campus buildings adjacent to the Brooklyn Bridge and on Park Row.

Pace, which enrolls nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs, will renovate more than 55,000 square feet of space in the two buildings under the first phase of the project.

The construction will create a variety of new spaces, including an art gallery and shared offices for students and staffers. The buildings also will get new entryways and lobbies.

Pace President Stephen Friedman said the massive renovation reflects Pace’s commitment to its students and lower Manhattan neighborhood.

“We are advancing an exciting plan that invests in our future by re-creating our campus,” he said. “Our new plan embodies our enduring commitment.”

Construction on the first phase is scheduled to begin this summer and projected to finish in fall 2018.

New York University, Columbia and Cornell are also in the midst of their own campus expansions in the five boroughs."

Read the original story here.

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Wall Street Journal: "Pace University Plans $190 Million Update of Lower Manhattan Campus"

02/10/2017

Wall Street Journal: "Pace University Plans $190 Million Update of Lower Manhattan Campus"

Wall Street Journal writer Leslie Brody reported on Pace's plans for the New York City campus.

"Construction is expected to start this summer and finish in fall 2018, school officials said"

 

Pace University, a century-old private institution with growing enrollment, announced a $190 million plan Thursday to renovate and expand its lower Manhattan campus.

The first phase will update One Pace Plaza, the school’s flagship academic building next to City Hall, and 41 Park Row, the home of the New York Times from 1889 to 1903. The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission must review some changes to the latter.

Pace University, which has about 13,000 students in undergraduate and graduate programs, has seen a rapid rise in those who are attending full time and living on campus.

 

School officials said the first phase will redesign the lower levels of the two buildings to add more space for students to meet outside of class with peers and faculty.

New spaces will include an art gallery, student commons, advising center and lounges. Construction is expected to start this summer and finish in fall of 2018, school officials said, and the process will allow classes to continue during that time.

Universities nationwide have faced criticism in recent years for adding luxury dorms or gyms while students shoulder mounting tuition. President Stephen J. Friedman said the renovations were sorely needed. 

“This isn’t climbing walls we’re building,” he said. “This is all academic space and student gathering space.”

The university has about $100 million in donations for construction and a campaign will seek to raise another $90 million, he said.

 

The first phase will cost $45 million. Later phases will add two floors to a six-story section of One Pace Plaza and update technology in classrooms.

Pace has been an engine of upward mobility, according to data released in January by researchers at the Equality of Opportunity Project, who studied students from 1999 to 2013. Pace came in second nationwide in a ranking of colleges by mobility rate: 15% of its students came from poor families and 56% of those students reached the top fifth of incomes in their early 30s.

SUNY’s Stony Brook University and City University of New York made the top 10 as well.

Read the original article here.

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Crain's New York Business: "Pace University will spend nearly $200 million to keep pace with lower Manhattan"

02/09/2017

Crain's New York Business: "Pace University will spend nearly $200 million to keep pace with lower Manhattan"

News broke on the Master Plan for Pace's Lower Manhattan campus with a story by Daniel Geiger in Crain's New York Business.

The school's fortresslike campus was designed in the 1960s to shield the student body from a turbulent urban environment

Pace University plans to spend $190 million to transform its fortresslike campus to better connect students with the surrounding city and draw attention to the school's streak of growth.

School officials say Pace plans to renovate 1 Pace Plaza, its flagship campus complex just south of the entrance to the Brooklyn Bridge. Clad with an imposing concrete façade, the building hearkens back to a time when institutions sought to wall themselves off from the city's gritty streets.

"When 1 Pace Plaza was built in the 1960s, it was a turbulent time, and the architecture was designed to screen out the city and make it a haven inside a shell," said Stephen Friedman, Pace's president. "What has happened since then is lower Manhattan has become this incredible area."

The project also highlights the rapid growth of the university, which has had a streak of academic success in recent years. The student body at its lower Manhattan campus has grown by more than 500% since 2000, and the school recently placed second nationally in a survey that measured the upward mobility of its grads.

The project will start with about $45 million of improvements to the lower floors of 1 Pace Plaza and a neighboring property, 41 Park Row. Because the 13-story office building at 41 Park Row is a landmark, Pace must first receive permission from the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission for what it says will be modest changes to the exterior at the base of the property, such as relocating its main entrance from Park Row to Spruce Street. The school plans to file its application with the commission on Thursday, Friedman said.

In a second, more-expensive phase, Pace plans to add two floors of academic space on top of the western half of 1 Pace Plaza, creating 67,000 square feet that will be used in part by its Lubin School of Business. The school has hired architecture firm FXFowle to design the upgrades and expects to begin the project by the end of the year.

The initial phase of the work will reorganize student life at the buildings and better connect it to the surrounding streetscape. For instance, a cluster of administrative offices near the front entrance of 1 Pace Plaza will be replaced with a welcome center and a student union. New glass walls will be installed facing Frankfort and Spruce streets on the perimeter of the block-sized building—replacing tinted panes with clear glass panels that offer a glimpse inside to passers-by.

"We want people to know that there are exciting things happening here, and we want to bring student life here into view," said Jean Gallagher, a vice president at the university, who is helping to oversee the renovation project.

The school plans to relocate a Barnes & Noble campus bookstore on the ground floor of 41 Park Row into 1 Pace Plaza, replacing the old space with an art gallery that will feature work from students and faculty from its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences.

"The gallery is a great opportunity to activate the space and showcase our creativity to a neighborhood that has become more diverse," Gallagher said.

Friedman, who plans to retire from his post as president in May after a decade in the position, said work on the first phase will begin by the end of the year and take about a year to complete. Afterward, the school will begin planning the second phase. Friedman said Pace has raised about $100 million from the sales of the Briarcliff Manor campus in Westchester it previously operated and a dormitory building at 106 Fulton St., as well as having funds given years ago by Joseph Lubin, for whom its business school is named.

"We're planning to raise the additional money needed for the work," Friedman said.

Read the original article here: http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20170209/REAL_ESTATE/170209880/pace-university-plans-200-million-renovation-of-its-lower-manhattan

Read more about this in:

Real Estate Weekly - http://rew-online.com/2017/02/09/pace-university-unveils-190m-campus-modernization-plan/

The Real Deal - https://therealdeal.com/2017/02/09/pace-plans-190m-upgrade-to-lower-manhattan-campus/

Patch - http://patch.com/new-york/downtown-nyc/pace-university-begin-construction-lower-manhattan-campus

Curbed NY - http://ny.curbed.com/2017/2/9/14559338/pace-university-expansion-lower-manhattan-fidi

POLITICO New York Real Estate: http://www.politico.com/states/new-york/tipsheets/politico-new-york-real-estate-pro/2017/02/hudson-yards-tenants-006473

Read the press release here - http://www.pace.edu/sites/default/files/FINAL_RELEASE_NYC_MasterPlan.pdf

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Daily Beast: "Inside ‘Inside the Actors Studio’: Backstage With James Lipton and the ‘Girls’ Cast"

02/09/2017

Daily Beast: "Inside ‘Inside the Actors Studio’: Backstage With James Lipton and the ‘Girls’ Cast"

Inside the Actors Studio at Pace UNiversity was featured in an article in The Daily Beast by Kevin Fallon:

"For the first time in 22 seasons, James Lipton let a journalist backstage at an ‘Inside the Actors Studio’ taping. With the Girls cast milling about, we talk about… everything.

James Lipton is a man of ritual.

There is a whirl of chaos that surrounds him on this frigid December night, roughly an hour before he’ll hit the stage to film the next Season 22 episode of Inside the Actors Studio. Lena Dunham, toting several bags and a respectable entourage, breezes by, chirping a giddy, “Hi! Hi! Hi!” to everyone as she passes.

People in headsets are shuttling Girls cast members into green rooms scattered in the hallway of Pace University—Dunham, along with co-stars Allison Williams, Jemima Kirke, and Zosia Mamet, will be the episode’s guests—while production assistants direct audience traffic and bustle around backstage in final preparations for the taping.

But standing calm in the middle of the storm is James Lipton. This is the 266th time he’s done this since 1994, after all, and he has his rituals.

“Rule number one: Turn off the cellphone,” he whispers to me in that regal articulation that, turns out, isn’t just for TV but Lipton’s everyday speech.

In a makeshift dressing room teeming with publicists, assistants, and sound guys manipulating his suit jacket to mic him up, he manages to lock eye contact with me, as if we’re the only people in the room and not surrounded by utter pandemonium.

“Rule number two: Tape down the mic,” he continues, his serenity suddenly interrupted by panic. His eyes dart around until he sees them: the roughly 10-inch stack of large blue index cards. His Bible, marked up with post-it tabs and highlighters and five hours of research for questions he plans to ask the Girls cast.

“My nightmare,” he sighs, once he locates them on a desk just a few feet away. “Somebody steals my cards.”

He takes the long walk to the studio to shoot pre-tapes—past the Pace classrooms, onto the catwalk in the rafters of the set, and down a long and rickety spiral staircase—like a man who is 90-years-old, which is to say slowly, deliberately, and self-conscious about holding everyone up. “You’ll probably want to go ahead of me,” he says.

Somewhere between makeup room and the pre-tape, there’s another jolt of panic. “Brad!” he shouts, frantically. “Brad!” Brad is Lipton’s assistant, and the keeper of his cards. That is to say, Brad is his lifeline. He has them. “My nightmare…” he says again.

Heaving a bit from the trek back up the steps—honestly I’m winded, too—and satisfied with how the pre-tape went, we finally have our own moment.

For the first time in the show’s 22-year history, Lipton has allowed a journalist backstage before a taping, to observe his rituals and have a down-to-the-wire chat about his life, the show, and how the sausage is made. With the Girls episode airing Thursday night, we take you inside Inside the Actors Studio, if you will.

***

Inside the Actors Studio began in 1994 as a televised master class for the students of the Actors Studio Drama School. Paul Newman, the school’s former president, was the first guest, and the series, years before any housewife dared label herself “real,” quickly became Bravo’s flagship program.

As its network evolved from independent film showcase to flashy haven for boozy spectacle and table flipping, and as the reality-and-talk series formula married itself to whiplash editing and viral-ready bits, the show has lasted stalwart in its simplicity. The classy cockroach outlasting culture’s nuclear holocaust.

It’s persisted 22 seasons on a premise so basic it might now be considered audacious: talking with celebrities about their backgrounds and their craft. Two decades later, we have the opportunity to do the same with Lipton.

“I’ve been working on these cards since July,” he tells me, patting the stack of his work proudly. Each cast member’s interview was prepped as if she was the only one on the show. Filming will take over four hours.

He’ll do four shows in December, a huge undertaking given the research involved. The fastest he can turn around an interview is with three weeks of preparation per individual—multiplied if it’s a cast interview.

“When I say three weeks, I mean 12 hours a day. I mean seven days a week,” he says. “Some years I’ve only had two days off in the year, Thanksgiving and Christmas. This year I’m barely making Christmas.”

The process starts when Jeremy Kareken, the program’s chief and only researcher outside of Lipton, who happens to also be a graduate of the school, sends him a dump of raw material.

Lipton goes through it, beginning to end, and every time he sees something of interest he makes a new card. That’s what takes so long. That’s why there are so many cards. And that’s how he startles the hell out of his guests with obscure details.

(Billy Crystal, after a question about an obscure role in a high school theater production—a favorite topic of Lipton’s—once gasped, “You know you’re scary, don’t you?” Presented with the exact address where he had been born and raised in Wales, Anthony Hopkins remarked to the audience, “He’s a detective, you know.”)

“I’m telling a story as if I’m writing a screenplay, which I’ve done!” Lipton says. (He wrote for several soap operas, including Another World and Guiding Light.) “Or as if I’m writing a musical, which I’ve done!” (He was the librettist and lyricist for the 1967 Broadway musical Sherry!) “Or creating a ballet, which I’ve done!” (He choreographed a ballet for the American Ballet Theatre.)

A meticulous researcher and fetishist of facts, it should come as no surprise that no one is more well-versed on—and happy to recite—his bona fides and successes than Lipton himself.

His show is in 94 million homes in 125 countries, he casually mentions. It’s earned 19 Emmy nominations, and one win. Last year, he won the Critics Choice Award for Best Reality Show Host, indicating, as he says, with emphasis, that the show is “flourishing.”

“If you’d have asked me to predict any of the things I just described to you or you’d shoot me in the head, I’d say pull the trigger,” he says, his eyes widening with glee at the punchline, a charming tick so perfectly lampooned on Saturday Night Live by, as Lipton playfully calls him, “a fellow named Will Ferrell…”

He’s developed a reputation for doing cast shows—popular past ones featured Everybody Loves Raymond, Arrested Development, How I Met Your Mother, and Family Guy—“but I’m not too happy about that because they’re difficult to do and they require so much of my time.”

That booking the Girls cast amuses people certainly isn’t lost on this 90-year-old man, with audiences presumably tickled at the notion of what his reaction might be to watching Dunham play ping-pong topless, or Williams be on the receiving end of anilingus.

“I think that will provide some of our most interesting moments,” he says. “And, by the way, being of a different generation I do still understand the sexual implications of this show. I have a memory.”

Watching Lipton hold court with the four actresses is witnessing a triumph of stamina, 300 minutes later—a marathon edited down to 42 minutes for Thursday’s airing.

He goes one by one through each of the stars’ lives, surfacing tidbits that even Dunham, whose life didn’t seem like it could have been parsed any further, was shocked by: “How’d you find that out? That’s not on public record!”

There was her time as a stand-up comic in high school—her opening line: “Hi, I’m Lena, and I’m an alcoholic. No, I’m kidding. My dad is.”—and her surprisingly pro-life abortion play that she wrote in high school, two hilarious anecdotes that, for time, are on the cutting room floor.

You’ll miss Jemima Kirke’s discernible skepticism about the whole process—“Do you do this with everyone?” she asks—give way to pure and utter James Lipton adoration.

And while it’s unlikely that Lipton’s questioning of each girl’s relationship to the show’s nudity and sex surfaced anything novel, Zosia Mamet’s interview proved to be revelatory, covering her tortured relationship with her divorced parents, her troubled childhood, and uncovering the fact that, after all the talk of her famous father, playwright David Mamet, it’s often ignored that her maternal grandfather, Richard Strouse, wrote The Sound of Music.

“WHAT?!” Dunham gasped, stunned. You have not been flashing that around.” “Guys, I saved that for right now,” Mamet laughed. Williams almost started crying.

Lipton, watching the hullabaloo at his desk, keeps his finger on his place in his notecards and looks out at the audience, the beaming smile of a pleased man on his face. He did the work, now we’re all having a moment.

Later, that same facial expression returns when he interrupts Williams’s story about Pilates to reveal that he was trained by the inventor of the workout, Joseph Pilates, himself. In fact, Lipton was the eulogist at Pilates’s 1967 funeral.

Almost unbelievable personal anecdotes like this are as much a hallmark of Lipton’s method as the Proust questionnaire—“What’s your favorite curse word?” for example—featured in each episode.

He pursued a law degree after serving in the Air Force, taking acting classes in order to earn a living and eventually turning it into a profession. In the 1950s, he was a pimp in Paris. He claims to have once helped fly the Concorde in a dense fog.

As it were, he loves his life: “Sometimes I wake up in the morning, and you know who I envy? Me, if the day looks particularly promising.”

He swears that he’s never happier than when bogged down with work. His study faces a garden through stained glass windows. “It’s a very peaceful place,” he says of the townhouse he shares with his wife of 46 years, Kedakai Turner Lipton.

“When people have asked me what is your greatest achievement, my answer is very simple and very quick: my marriage,” he says. When he accepted the show’s Emmy in 2013, he ended his speech: “I share this moment with my wife, Kedakai Lipton, who did me the small service of redefining the universe.”

Kedakai Lipton is a real-estate executive. She’s half-Irish and half-Japanese. “She’s famously beautiful,” he says. She was the original Miss Scarlett on the card and cover box of the game Clue. “You know when it turns out to be your wife who killed Mr. So-and-So in the library with the candlestick, it can unnerve you.”

As we continue talking about his life, the show, and his successes, the only person who doesn’t seem surprised by Inside the Actors Studio’s longevity and relevance is Lipton himself.

His series remains in stark contrast to the rest of the fare on his network. Does he even watch Real Housewives? “No, no, no!” he cries. “It’s not the kind of show I customarily watch. Do other people watch? Many more than watch my show? You bet! Does that help pay the bills that finance the show? You bet. So I’m all for them.”

Plus, he sees every day the reach his series still manages to get.

Just the other night he and Kedakai were walking toward their house, and the street was lined with fire trucks, which had just finished responding to an alarm. Someone from the first truck saw him and shouted, “What’s your favorite curse word?” Seconds later, he was posing for selfies.

“The only time I get depressed is when someone says, ‘I’ve been watching you all my life,” he says, laughing. “But it astounds me, the young people who watch this show. And all of it, the credit for all of it goes to those people who I’m about to go talk to on stage. The fact that they would come. They’re hot. They turn everybody down. But they come here.”

As he’s whisked away to film, one last ritual: gratitude. “God I appreciate that. I’m so grateful.”"

Read the original article here: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2017/02/09/inside-inside-the-actors-studio-backstage-with-james-lipton-and-the-girls-cast.html

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The Hill's Pundits Blog: "Trump's UN attacks are dangerous to American foreign policy"

02/07/2017

The Hill's Pundits Blog: "Trump's UN attacks are dangerous to American foreign policy"

Bashing the United Nations is a popular sport for politicians, presenting a quick way to appear tough, writes Matthew Bolton, Ph.D., associate chairman of political science at Pace University in New York City. Many American leaders—on both the left and right—dabble in nationalist rhetoric, posing as unconstrained by global norms and institutions. Usually, however, the bipartisan consensus holds firm, as policymakers understand how crucial the U.N. is to American national security and foreign policy priorities.

The Trump administration has escalated the bombastic anti-U.N. fringe to new levels. As president-elect, Trump tweeted that the U.N. “is just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time.” New U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley introduced herself to the diplomatic community by vowing to “show our strength” by “taking names” of those “that don’t have our back.” Leaked draft executive orders—though currently on hold—seek to slash U.S. funding to the U.N., marginalize other international organizations, and withdraw the United States from certain multilateral treaties.

If the Trump regime follows through on these threats, it will seriously damage American credibility and capacity. The U.N. is crucial for resolving complex transnational problems, ranging from the refugee crisis to nuclear proliferation and global pandemics like Zika. The U.N. enables international peace and security by providing a forum for communication between states. It helps the United States stabilize insecure regions through the legitimating and cost-sharing systems of peacekeeping, conflict resolution and counter-terrorism cooperation.

Read more here.

 

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Associated Press: "Fighting Fake News Isn't Just Up to Facebook and Google"

02/07/2017

Associated Press: "Fighting Fake News Isn't Just Up to Facebook and Google"

. . . While fake news has been in the real news a lot, many people simply aren't that aware of it.

"A lot of consumers are not savvy about it," says Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University who follows the fake news phenomenon. "And of those that are — and it's a small number— not a lot of them add plug-ins to browsers."

Chiagouris believes we are at the "beginning of the beginning" when it comes to defining just what fake news is and how to combat it. But he and other experts say technological solutions like apps and plug-ins are unlikely to get to the root of the problem.

The real solution, he says, will start in school: "not college, grammar school."

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New York Post: "How to stand out in a group interview"

02/06/2017

New York Post: "How to stand out in a group interview"

When Sherman Julmis interviewed at Goldman Sachs in Jersey City last October for an internship, he was outnumbered three to one.

Although the Pace University Lubin School of Business finance major wasn’t aware of the arrangement ahead of time, the 21-year-old kept his cool, maintaining eye contact with each of his interviewers.

“What was going through my head mostly was answering everyone’s question,” says the Rockland County, NY, native, “and trying to win over everyone in the room.”

Win he did. As a junior, he landed that internship in the legal entity controller’s group.

Read more here.

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Advertising Age: "What GNC's Feud With Fox Means for Future of Super Bowl Advertisers"

02/06/2017

Advertising Age: "What GNC's Feud With Fox Means for Future of Super Bowl Advertisers"

Photo: A still from GNC's intended Super Bowl LI spot.

Millions tuned in to the Super Bowl to watch the New England Patriots battle the Atlanta Falcons on Sunday, but the fight brewing off the field between GNC and Fox is just getting started.

GNC, the vitamin and supplement retailer, is preparing to pursue legal action against Fox Broadcasting, claiming that it suffered "significant economic and reputational damages, lost opportunities, and consequential damages" because the network rejected the brand's first-ever Super Bowl ad after initially clearing it.

Experts say the move is unprecedented in the industry and could have a lasting impact on Super Bowls to come.

According to the letter of intent to sue that GNC sent to Fox, the network sold the chain a 30-second spot during the game and "induced GNC to spend millions" on producing and developing the ad. The National Football League made Fox nix the spot days before the Super Bowl because GNC sells some products containing two substances that are banned by the NFL, although neither product appears in the commercial, GNC said.

Fox sold 30-second slots in the Super Bowl for an estimated $5 million, more than a quarter of what Kantar Media said GNC spent on measured media in the U.S. in all of 2015. But the cost was far higher for GNC because the struggling company had centered its long-planned brand relaunch around its half-minute of ad time in the Super Bowl.

"They can't do much that would offset the loss of sales and attention they would have gotten for the Super Bowl," said Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University's Lubin School of Business.

Read more here.

 

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