main navigation
my pace

NYC

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

A Futuristic Spin on Aristophanes’s LYSISTRATA presented by Pace School of Performing Arts

10/16/2017

A Futuristic Spin on Aristophanes’s LYSISTRATA presented by Pace School of Performing Arts

NEW YORK October 16, 2017 – "Lysistrata" is presented with a futuristic spin by the School of Performing Arts of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.  It was developed, and will be performed, at the 3-Legged Dog Art and Technology Center in Lower Manhattan.  

Performances will take place at 3-Legged Dog Art and Technology Center, Studio A, from October 27 through November 5. Wednesday – Saturday performances will be at 8:00 PM, Sunday at 7:00 PM, and matinees on Saturday and Sunday at 3:00 PM. General admission tickets are $15 and can be purchased at lysistratapace.brownpapertickets.com

3-Legged Dog Art and Technology Center is located at 80 Greenwich St. at Rector Street, New York, NY 10006. For directions visit http://3ldnyc.org/contact.html

The year is 2069. In a country dominated by men and devastated by its leaders' obsession with an endless war, Lysistrata unites the women of Greece by persuading them not to have sex with their husbands until a peace treaty can be reached. This futuristic adaptation of Aristophanes' classical comedy about gender and politics is a visually striking re-imagination directed by Cosmin Chivu, associate professor at Pace University, with an original score by John Coyne and choreography by Maddie Rodrigue.

The cast includes: Brandon Adam, Austin Backus, Essence Brown, Zach Carter, Mazvita Chanakira, Quinn Corcoran, John Coyne, Erin DiIorio, Zane Fair, Kayland Jordan, Kelsey Leland, Michaela Marymor, Jason Marrs, Mesa Story Melton, Rob Milano, Justine Musselman, Zander Pacella, Ellie Pontecorvo, Chrizney Roth, Hannah Sikora, Miles Sullivan, Olivia Vordenberg.

The creative team includes Ryan Goff (Set Design), Sammy Mainzer (Costume Design), Griffin Proctor (Lighting Design), Steven Medina (Projection Design), Jordan Porch (Sound Design), Stephen Stanec (Production Stage Manager), Holly Wright (Associate Director), Borna Ben Barzin (Assistant Director), and Trent Soyster (Assistant Choreographer).

About the Pace School of Performing Arts

The Pace School of Performing Arts is one of the most sought-after undergraduate training destinations in the United States. Dedicated to providing the finest possible pre-professional education, our groundbreaking programs re-imagine how young artists are trained for today’s industry. In addition, Dyson College’s strong liberal arts curriculum provides students with a solid educational foundation that enriches their professional development as artists, giving students a deeper understanding of themselves and the world. The school’s mission is to prepare students for careers as performers, designers, and technicians in today’s ever-changing entertainment industry. We believe the best way to do this is with curricula that train students for both the world of theater and dance as well as film and television. At the Pace School of Performing Arts, curricula are taught by leading artist-educators from across our many disciplines. With more than 50 productions a year in New York City and internationally, intense training led by more than 125 prominent artists and teachers, and unique networking opportunities across the entertainment industry, the Pace School of Performing Arts is the place for aspiring artists to pursue their dreams. http://performingarts.pace.edu.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law). The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, N.Y., enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

About 3LD

The production company, 3-Legged Dog Media + theater group, operates 3ld art & technology center, the 1000 person capacity art space, performance venue and integrative technology lab. 3-Legged Dog is a community-oriented and artist-run production development studio for emerging and established artists and organizations that create large-scale experimental artworks of all kinds. From our home 3LD Art & Technology Center in Lower Manhattan, 3LD has built an unrivaled talent magnet, drawing artists from around the globe to New York to create large-scale, immersive and technology-driven projects in New York City. Since opening in 2006, we have hosted thousands of artists through our 3LD Residency Program, offering a unique experience with 24/7 access to specialized equipment, flexible space and expert knowledge, as well as the desperately needed time to fully realize their visions. www.3ld.org

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Backstage: "Lindsay Mendez Joins Broadway’s ‘Carousel’ + More New York Theater News"

10/13/2017

Lindsay Mendez Joins Broadway’s ‘Carousel’ + More New York Theater News (Backstage)

On Broadway and beyond, a curtain can rise as quickly as it can fall; a star can be swapped as easily as Bernie Telsey can say, “That’s enough.” Theater is the beating heart of New York show business and, if you want to make it here, it’s crucial you’re up to date on incoming projects, latest castings, and other industry news. Don’t worry, Broadway baby, Backstage has your back. Every week, we’re rounding up the can’t-miss stories no thespian should live without, so you can focus on important matters like hitting your high F. Curtain up and light those lights! 

Mendez steps in for Wolfe.
Following the somewhat shocking news that Betsy Wolfe would depart the forthcoming Broadway revival of “Carousel” after her casting was announced, the golden age tuner has found its new Carrie Pipperidge. Lindsay Mendez, who has played Elphaba in “Wicked” on Broadway and was most recently seen in last season’s play, “Significant Other,” has joined the cast along with Tony nominee John Douglas who will be playing the Starkeeper. They round out an ensemble led by Tony winner Jessie Mueller and Tony nominee Joshua Henry. Previews begin at the Imperial Theatre Feb. 28, 2018.

Casting shakeup showers “Meteor Shower.”
Another casting shakeup that’s rocked the Great White Way: Just weeks before its first preview performance on Nov. 1, Steve Martin’s “Meteor Shower” has seen previously announced cast member Alan Tudyk replaced by Tony nominee Jeremy Shamos. Tudyck leaves the production due to “creative differences,” departing a cast that includes Laura Benanti, Amy Schumer, and Keegan-Michael Key. The comedy will play a limited engagement at the Booth Theatre.

Broadway is about to get Rocked.
“Rocktopia,” a live concert event combining rock songs with classical music, is heading to Broadway. The brainchild of recording artists Rob Evan and Maestro Randall Craig Fleischer, the show will play the Broadway Theatre March 20–April 29, 2018, and will star a bevvy of vocalists from the realms of theater, rock, and classical music including Evan, Chlow Lowery, Kimberly Nichole, Alyson Cambridge, and Tony Vincent.

“Pretty Woman” adds a man.
Ahead of its out of town tryout in Chicago, the Broadway-bound stage adaptation of “Pretty Woman” has added stage veteran Jason Danieley to the cast, in the role of Philip Stuckey (played in the film by Jason Alexander). He joins a cast that includes Tony winner Steve Kazee, Samantha Barks, and Tony nominee Orfeh, leading the production that will bow on Broadway at a to-be-announced Nederlander theater in fall 2018. 

Young actors will get political.
Young actors Lilla Crawford (“Annie”) and Tony nominee Sydney Lucas (“Fun Home”) have been tapped for the forthcoming “American Scoreboard: The Trump Administration,” the latest in a series of political readings. This presentation, which will depict the confirmation hearing of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, will be held at Pace University’s Schimmel Center Oct. 23, and will see Crawford as Senator Patricia Murray, Lucas as Senator Elizabeth Warren, Sam Poon as Senator Bernie Sanders, and Nicholas Barasch as Senator Al Franken.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

My Record Journal: "Castle Craig Players in Meriden holding 25th anniversary gala this month"

10/12/2017

Castle Craig Players in Meriden holding 25th anniversary gala this month (My Record Journal)

MERIDEN — Castle Craig Players is celebrating 25 years of live theater with a two-night fundraiser gala next weekend.

The event, called “Let’s Start at the Very Beginning,” will feature the community theater group performing a medley of songs from past productions with some actors reprising their roles.

The official gala on Oct. 21 was capped at 50 people and has sold out, but the group added another event on Oct. 22, with a 5 p.m. reception, 6 p.m. performance, auction items and light snacks.

There are about 30 tickets left for the Oct. 22 event, available at www.castlecraig.org.

Melanie Del Sole, Castle Craig Players board president, said money raised will help fund upcoming productions and improvements to the Almira F. Memorial Playhouse at 59 W. Main St., including the goal of buying a new HVAC system.

Del Sole’s father, Warren Stephan, founded Castle Craig Players in 1992.

Del Sole said her father, who died in 2013, was a renowned singer, who performed with Del Sole and her three sisters around New England.

Almira Stephan, Del Sole’s mother, died in 1996. Warren Stephan, with the board’s approval, named the Castle Craig Players’ theater after her to “honor the support she gave,” Del Sole said.

“They were both born and raised in Meriden and had a strong belief in bringing theater back,” she said.

The city of Meriden donated the approximately 1,625-square-foot building to Castle Craig Players in 1997. The group’s first show produced in the theater was the musical “Guys and Dolls,” which will be the first show featured in their gala performance.

Castle Craig Players had been active for five years before moving their performances downtown.

“We did a lot of musical reviews at community organizations, local churches,” Del Sole said.

The group’s first official show was Christmas 1992 at the YWCA annex building, “which they let us use as our first home theater space,” Del Sole said.

The group had used their future home as rehearsal space for several years.

“Then we decided, why couldn’t we perform here?” Del Sole said.

After a lot of hard work, they cleaned up the bathrooms and basement. Maurice Poirier, board member at large, built dressing rooms and, along with Warren Stephan, the 450-square-foot stage where the group still performs.

“Over the years we’ve tried to constantly upgrade,” Del Sole said. “It’s an intimate space but has a lot more flexibility.”

Today, the theater is equipped with stage lights, a soundboard, lighting board and projector. The first stage lights were floodlights inside coffee cans.

“We still have some to remind us where we came from,” Del Sole said.

Ian Galligan, board vice president, grew up in the Castle Craig Players.

He played Tiny Tim in “A Christmas Carol” at age 8 in 1996, under director Warren Stephan.

“I was in almost every musical they did there” during his school years, he said. “It was such a big part of my life; I grew up on that stage. More importantly, I grew up as part of the Castle Craig family.”

He attended Pace University in New York City, majoring in theater and graduating in 2009.

After working professionally in the industry, “I found myself back in Meriden, with a creative urge, and I transitioned to directing,” he said.

He currently works at the Shubert Theatre, and continues to perform in and direct Castle Craig Players productions.

“Castle Craig was there and they welcomed me back like any family would,” he said. “It really has come full circle for me and shaped my career.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Daily Voice: "Work By Pace To Abolish Nuclear Weapons Awarded Nobel Peace Prize"

10/12/2017

Work By Pace To Abolish Nuclear Weapons Awarded Nobel Peace Prize (Daily Voice)

Pace University students found their efforts to abolish nuclear weapons rewarded Tuesday with the ultimate prize.

The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to establish a nuclear weapons ban treaty. Pace students and professors Matthew Bolton and Emily Welton, who are married to each other, had been working for three years on the negotiations.

Welty is the Vice Moderator of the World Council of Churches Commission on International Affairs which is a member of ICAN and main representative to the United Nations for the International Peace Research Association. Her focus has been primarily been on mobilizing communities of faith to speak out on nuclear disarmament.

Bolton was part of a specific ICAN team that advocated successfully for the treaty to include victim assistance and environmental remediation provisions, as well as obligations on states to provide international cooperation and assistance to countries affected by nuclear weapons use and testing.

"The nuclear weapon prohibition treaty is the most significant shift in nuclear politics since the end of the Cold War," Bolton said. "It is wonderful that the Nobel Peace Prize recognized the thousands of people around the world who made it happen.

Two Pace juniors, Terrie Soule and Sydney Tisch, have made advocacy calls to all of the diplomatic missions who had voted in favor of the treaty at the negotiating conference this summer and urged states to sign and ratify the treaty.

“Nuclear disarmament is an important issue to me because I believe that long-lasting peace cannot be achieved through threats to destroy one another,” said Tisch. However, I believe it can be achieved through meaningful dialogue and cooperation, for which a ban on nuclear weapons sets an amazing precedent."

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

WNYC: "Celebrating Bottom Line"

10/12/2017

Celebrating Bottom Line (WNYC)

The Bottom Line was an iconic NYC music venue that featured a range of talented and high-profile artists during its run from 1974 to 2004. Artists like Eric Clapton, Neil Young and Dolly Parton all played there, and its contributions to the NYC music scene have not been forgotten. A two-night, multimedia event “If These Walls Could Talk" is being held at the Schimmel Center to celebrate the venue's legacy. The venue's co-owner Allan Pepper and Paul Shaffer, David Letterman's longtime musical director and a Bottom Line regular, explain what we can expect from the event.

"If These Walls Could Talk" will be take place on Oct. 13 and 14 at 7:30 p.m. at the Schimmel Center at Pace University (3 Spruce St.).

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Playbill: "Sydney Lucas and Lilla Crawford to Play U.S. Senators for American Scoreboard Readings"

10/12/2017

Sydney Lucas and Lilla Crawford to Play U.S. Senators for American Scoreboard Readings (Playbill)

Fun Home Tony nominee Lucas will be Senator Elizabeth Warren, while Annie star Crawford is cast as Senator Patricia Murray.

A handful of young Broadway stars have been tapped for the next installment of American Scoreboard: The Trump Administration, a series of dramatic political readings.

The upcoming reading, chronicling the confirmation hearing of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, will be presented October 23 at 7 PM at Pace University’s Schimmel Center.

The cast will include Lilla Crawford (Annie) as Senator Patricia Murray, Tony nominee Sydney Lucas(Fun Home) as Senator Elizabeth Warren, Sam Poon (The King and I) as Senator Bernie Sanders, Nicholas Barasch (She Loves Me) as Senator Al Franken, Edward O’Blenis (Law & Order SVU) as Senator Lamar Alexander, and Tracy Shayne (Chicago) as Betsy DeVos.

Conceived and produced by Fran Kirmser and Christopher Burney, American Scoreboard presents free, verbatim readings of Congressional hearing transcripts.

Read the full article.

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westfair: "Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance Jr. addresses growing cyberthreat"

10/12/2017

Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance Jr. addresses growing cyberthreat (Westfair)

Speaking at Pace University on Oct. 6, Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. said that when he first arrived in the Manhattan office as an assistant DA in the 1980s, computer crime was as simple as “when someone went into an office building and took a computer.”

Vance was addressing a room full of students and business executives at Wilcox Hall on Pace’s Pleasantville campus as the keynote speaker for “Cyberstorm: Cybersecurity in Business.”

As the title of the all-day conference suggests, computer and cybercrime has grown in both complexity and frequency well beyond Vance’s initial understanding. He said cybercrime now represents about a third of the cases his office prosecutes.

To illustrate the issue, he listed a series of high-profile hacks and cybercrimes just in the last three years. The “staggeringly large crimes” included attacks on Target and Sony Pictures, both hacked in 2014, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management in 2015, the Democratic National Committee in 2016 and Equifax in 2017.

The hacks are evidence of a cyberthreat that Vance said represents a “clear and present danger.” He stressed the need for companies and agencies to work together to address cybersecurity issues.

“More than ever, cyber should bring us all together,” Vance said. “Because we are either going to get together and figure out how we share solutions on cyber, or, if we don’t, we are going to be picked off company by company, agency by agency.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Good Call: "Should You Work for the Family Business to Gain Experience?"

10/10/2017

Should You Work for the Family Business to Gain Experience?m (Good Call)

For college students looking for experience, working for the family business might seem like a no brainer. But, is it a good idea? Can family members be objective enough to provide honest feedback? And will recruiters or hiring managers view working for your family as “real” experience?

Less than half of college seniors feel very prepared for a career, and if you’re considering this type of work arrangement to bolster your resume, consider the following factors:

When The Goal Is To Gain Experience

According to Helen Cruz, director of career counseling at Pace University, there’s no one-size-fits-all answer, so the school advises students on a case-by-case basis.

“At Pace, we have many students whose families own businesses both in the U.S. and overseas.”

Cruz believes that working in the family business can help students develop and practice the types of skills needed to succeed in a career.

Monique Frost, associate director of career and professional development at the Farmer School of Business at Miami University, believes that it can be beneficial to work for the family, but she also thinks it would be helpful to work for someone who might fire them.

“It is best if a student interns or volunteers with their family business early in their career exploration journey if possible.” She explains, “This will allow students to gain insight and knowledge about that particular industry, as well as the dynamics surrounding working with family members.”

However, Frost also thinks students can benefit from interning/working at other companies.

“Learning from others can add tremendous value to a student’s or new grad’s ability to collaborate with constituents outside of their current network, receive open and honest feedback – without family bias – and gain insights and perspectives from a diverse range of people.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Backstage: "The College Audition: Part I"

10/10/2017

The College Audition: Part I (Backstage)

If you’re a high school junior, senior, or the parent of either, it’s officially the time of year to begin the task of researching, applying to, and preparing for the college audition process. It can sometimes (most times) feel like a daunting task. You have so many questions. There is so much pressure. There are so many schools. There are very few slots.

Our first question is: Are you (as either young artist or parent of one) ready to make the commitment to pursuing a life in the creative arts? Are you prepared to study for a field in which there is no guarantee of financial success or stability? Ever? Scary, huh?

If you’re serious about this, there are five steps to take when starting the process.

FIRST: Make a list of questions.

  1. What do I want out of an arts training program?
  2. Do I want an urban or suburban campus?
  3. Do I want conservatory or liberal arts training? What’s the difference between the two?
  4. What are the top schools in my field? (i.e. acting, musical theater, playwriting, etc.)
  5. How many students does the program admit?
  6. Who’s teaching within the program?
  7. What industry connections do they have?
  8. Is there a New York showcase? A Los Angeles showcase?
  9. Am I guaranteed a place in the showcase or is it by admission?
  10. Does the program support internships, independent studies, etc.?
  11. Are there performance opportunities?
  12. When am I allowed to audition?
  13. Does the program have a “must-cast” policy or could I go through four years not guaranteed an opportunity?
  14. What theaters are around the school? Do I have the ability to see other shows while there?
  15. And any other question you may have.

You don’t have to provide definitive answers to the more subjective questions but these are things you really should consider.

SECOND: Visit the website for each school. 
Narrow down your choices. Do you like the vibe? Do the production photos excite you? Is the philosophy of the school one you can adhere to for four years?

Not every school is right for every student, especially when you’re studying something as vulnerable as creative arts.

READ: 25 Amazing Acting Colleges You Should Know

THIRD: Visit the school.
It’s very easy to imagine yourself getting into a top program, but that doesn’t always mean you’ll feel connected to the faculty, other students, and location. Every school has a cultural identity that attracts students who feel inspired by the environment, so it’s important that you see yourself at assimilating and thriving within the culture.

All schools offer tours. Some will allow you to observe classes or, at a minimum, talk with other students and faculty. Take advantage of those opportunities.

Additionally, do you respond positively to the environment around the campus?

FOURTH: Create a folder and master Excel document.
Start with a timeline of deadlines and audition dates. Each program will have its own audition requirements and you want to make certain you’re preparing the correct material for each school. Some will want two contemporary monologues; or a contemporary and a classical; or two contrasting songs and a contemporary monologue. See: confusing. Write it all down.

If there’s content on a website that confuses you, make a list of questions and follow up with a call if necessary. While you might have friends who have gone through this process, avoid hearsay and get the information directly from the school. Being armed with research can make a huge difference not only for your own anxiety but also in the overall quality of your audition.

Example: At Pace Performing Arts, we specifically ask for one contemporary monologue for the acting program. The musical theater program requires one monologue, contemporary or classical, and two contrasting songs.

FIFTH: Consider summer programs.
Many of these departments run summer programs. Find out if that’s the case for schools you’re interested in and whether they’re taught by the actual faculty. If so, apply and audition!This will give you a glimpse as to what your life would be like on campus.

This process will at times be daunting but take charge of what you can control and it’ll lead to much less anxiety. It might even become enjoyable or fun!

Grant Kretchik is the associate director of Pace University’s School of Performing Arts, the head of its BFA acting program, and a Backstage Expert. For more information, check out Kretchik’s full bio

JV Mercanti is the head of acting for the musical theater program at Pace University’s School of the Arts, author of the monologue book series, “In Performance,” and a Backstage Expert. For more information, check out Mercanti’s full bio!

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Huffington Post: "Puerto Rico After Maria: When Resiliencia Humana Is The Only Resilience That Remains"

10/10/2017

Puerto Rico After Maria: When Resiliencia Humana Is The Only Resilience That Remains (Huffington Post)

In the days leading up to and after Hurricane Maria, Sarah Gabriella Pereira lived by her cell phone. She had learned the hard way that a even a moment’s hesitation might disconnect her from home, thanks to Puerto Rico’s now frail cellular system. She abruptly left her Pace University classes without warning to talk to her mother. “Sometimes, I’d see I had a missed call, and I would start crying. On my birthday, the day before Maria landed, I received none of my usual family calls.” They were anxiety-filled days.

“Resiliencia” is hand-engraved into the silver ring that every day adorns the left hand of the international management major at the university’s Lubin School of Business. She was unfamiliar with the word when she found the ring a year and a half ago in a display of homemade jewelry back home in the city of Caguas. “It captured my attention,” she said. “When I learned what it meant, I understood. I identify with it.”

Caguas, in the central eastern part of Puerto Rico, endured more than three feet of rain during the historic storm that began hammering the island on Sept. 20 with 155-mph wind gusts. Shortages and ruined services made living conditions dire. Power outages are the norm. Like the rest of the island, the local supply chain was crippled by fuel shortages, damaged highways and logistical confusion.

Keeping up with the purchase of everyday necessities is a challenge. In the aftermath, Sarah’s mother, named Sarah as well, could only withdraw $100 at a time from the local bank teller or the ATM, if it were operational. Bank lines were long and she had to make money last. Food is still dear and neighbors take turns preparing meals for each other. “It is economical. They never know when the money is going to run out. My mom said she has been eating cereal. They can’t even eat ham and cheese sandwiches because there is no place to store ham or cheese ― ice is necessary. They have to stand in line for ice.

Sarah says resiliencia is integral to Puerto Rican culture and her upbringing, the reason the island and its people will survive and thrive. “We are literally a hopeful and happy people. Obviously, many back home are desperate now and they have reason to be. But we will do the impossible and have a Puerto Rico that is even better.”

Resilience is also a favored word among climate and security experts, but cold and technical in its application. It is discussed at a distance from disasters ― in conferences, meeting rooms, and agency strategy sessions. Resilience is about models that theoretically assure systems are securely in place, responders are prepared to mobilize, and resources are at the ready. That is, until a weather bomb like Hurricane Maria explodes in people’s lives, leaving only human resilience to stand and fight.

The Department of Homeland Security says resilience requires “the shared responsibility of all levels of government, the private and nonprofit sectors, and individual citizens.” But what happens when government and the private and nonprofit sectors fail in their shared responsibility, are rendered as helpless as the family short on food because it hasn’t access to its own money?

“No matter how much we plan, without human resilience we don’t survive,” said Professor Joseph Ryan, chair of Pace University’s masters program in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals. “When Tom Ridge [Secretary of Homeland Security under President George W. Bush] spoke at Pace University’s first resiliency conference about the 2010 National Security Strategy, he said we will achieve resilience through public private partnerships. The private sector has 90% of the resources and no authority. Government has few resources and all the authority. They have no idea what a public private partnership is. And if we are really going to achieve resilience, we need to work together.”

Read the full article.

Pages