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The Riverdale Press: "DeWitt Clinton safe from state takeover, for now"

11/17/2017

DeWitt Clinton safe from state takeover, for now (The Riverdale Press)

The school known as the “castle on the parkway” will remain under the control of the city’s education department.

The state recently announced DeWitt Clinton High School, located at 100 W. Mosholu Parkway S., would not become the responsibility of Albany after the struggling school made headway in a number of areas that concerned state officials, including its low four-year graduation rate.

The state’s education department defines struggling schools, also known as “receivership schools,” as the lowest performing 5 percent of schools in the state academically. 

Under the receivership law, the city has the authority to make a number of changes to improve Clinton, like expanding the school day or even the school year, work with a community-based organization to provide support services, and also remove teachers or require them to reapply for their jobs. 

Or, in the most extreme circumstance, the city could phase out and close Clinton.

If Clinton fails to show “demonstrable improvement,” the state could have appointed an independent “receiver,” who would take over the management responsibility of the school from the city.

Educators and an education advocate panned the state’s decision to leave Clinton under city control.

“The message (the state is) sending is that we don’t care,” said Jennifer Pankowski, an education professor at Manhattan’s Pace University and former public school teacher. 

“I think if the demographics of the school looked differently, I don’t think so many would have turned the other cheek. The school is predominately Hispanic and African-American students with a very small population of Albanian students, and I think that does affect how quick the state is to step in and say, ‘Clearly you tried to do this, it’s not working. We need to take it a step further.’”

Clinton’s academic fortunes have been on the decline since 2009, which a blip of improvement in 2012. However, other issues have plagued the school in recent years, including one former principal allegedly changing a student’s grade, a sexual relationship between a teacher and student, and the high rates of students bringing weapons to school. 

Those issues alone, Pankowski maintained, requires the state to get involved.

 “Until the City of New York gets its act together, everybody’s got to watch them,” said Charles Moerdler, who legally represents the United Federation of Teachers and American Federation of Teachers.

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Taipei Times: "Chinese, N Korean distrust grows"

11/16/2017

Chinese, N Korean distrust grows (Taipei Times)

This article is written by Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, a professor of history at Pace University in New York City.

The six-party talks launched by former US presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama to denuclearize North Korea failed to achieve the desired objective, even though China participated in this multilateral platform and ensured that the US would not launch military actions against the North.

Worse still, a nuclear North Korea has destabilized Northeast Asia and endangered relations with neighboring countries.

China cannot draw on its experience of developing atomic bombs in the Maoist period to evaluate the danger of North Korea’s nuclear weapon programs.

A nuclear arms race among North Korea, South Korea and Japan is definitely the last thing that China wants. It has become increasingly clear to China that dealing with a power vacuum in the event of a regime change might not be as bad as preserving North Korea at all cost.

Whatever Kim is doing to antagonize Trump is not within Xi’s level of tolerance.

Like it or not, the denuclearization of North Korea has become an integral part of US-China diplomatic encounters.

The Trump administration has publicly complained that appealing to China for help has achieved little because Washington and Beijing share irreconcilable geopolitical agendas.

As Beijing’s insistence on diplomatic engagement contradicts Washington’s preference for coercive measures, the two powers will not reach a consensus over North Korea’s future.

Emphasizing denuclearization as a prerequisite to holding bilateral talks with the North, the US has yet to demonstrate its capability to mobilize allies and enforce stricter sanctions.

However, the gradual evolution of the US-Japan-South Korea triangular defense alliance, the potential risks of a nuclear conflict in Northeast Asia and the consequences of a collapse of the North Korean state are bound to dictate the pragmatic calculations of decisionmakers in Washington and Beijing.

As Trump and Kim engage in a rhetorical war, one can only hope that they know where the red line is and will not escalate the crisis into a full-scale Korean War II.

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The Journal News: "Making the Grade"

11/08/2017

Making the Grade (The Journal News)

Pace’s Learning Assistance Center was featured in Education Outlook, the education supplement of The Journal News. Brian Evans, Sue Maxam and Ross Christofferson were interviewed for the article which focuses on available services for students including tutoring, workshops and mentoring. 

Read the article here.

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Associated Press: "Story of Louis Vuitton: As travel changed, so did luggage"

11/07/2017

Story of Louis Vuitton: As travel changed, so did luggage (Associated Press)

The exhibition’s timing coincides with the holiday shopping season, and the location is in New York’s financial district. But most visitors will likely lack the means to buy Vuitton products, which can run in the thousands of dollars. Still, attention-getting temporary displays like this are becoming a standard way for brands to tell their story.

“Many of these brands pop something up, draw a big audience, get some publicity, get reporters to talk about it,” said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “You don’t need to be there 12 months a year. You just need to establish a little publicity and move on.”

Chiagouris says this type of showcase can also be far more effective than a traditional ad campaign. “Ads are very fleeting and don’t generate the kind of independent interaction with a brand the way an exhibit would,” he said. A show like this “takes something that has almost become wallpaper and suddenly puts it into your current mindset and consciousness.”

Exhibitions also give designers the space and flexibility to fine-tune their message. In this case, the subdued, museum-like atmosphere creates a “mood that reflects the brand, somewhat elegant and somewhat understated,” he said.

Pace University’s Manhattan campus is near the exhibition site, and Chiagouris said his students have been buzzing about the Vuitton show. They’re working on a competition among business schools to come up with a campaign for Ocean Spray, the cranberry brand, and the concept of telling a company’s story this way, through history, products and workmanship, resonated with them.

“It’s an interactive experience not because of electronics or pressing a button,” he said, but because “you get a sense of the identity of the brand.”

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The Journal News: "Career Change: Grill 3 pros who went back to school at 'The Spiel'"

11/07/2017

Career Change: Grill 3 pros who went back to school at 'The Spiel' (The Journal News)

Are you thinking about a career switch? Should you go back to school for it?

The next installment of The Spiel, an after-hours professional mixer, will be held at The Journal News office in White Plains on Wednesday, Nov. 15, at 7 p.m.

The mixer will be focused on how to change your career by going back to school.

Hear from three people who have been there and done that, and mingle over a glass of wine and nibbles.

Meet a former police officer who now works in business development at a college, a former event planner who is now a nurse and a fundraising expert who works as a health advocate at a hospital.

Who: Cleopatra “Cleo” Mack Scheublin

Before: Event manager, MS, Publishing

Back to School: Bachelor of Nursing, Pace University, pursuing MS, Nursing, Pace University 

Current Job Title: Unit Leader and staff nurse, White Plains Hospital Center

 

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The New York Times: "When Internships Don’t Pay, Some Colleges Will"

11/02/2017

When Internships Don’t Pay, Some Colleges Will (The New York Times)

Elizabeth Pooran teaching tech last year at the Senior Planet Exploration Center, where she held an internship subsidized by Pace University. Credit: Drew Levin

Pace was featured in the Education Life section of "The New York Times." From The Times:

"...Pace University posted more than 4,000 internships last year, about 40 percent of them unpaid, and provides grants for many internships in the nonprofit sector.

“We’re not trying to proselytize with these students, but we’d like their eyes to be open to the second and third sectors in our economy,” said Rebecca Tekula, executive director of Pace’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship.

Pace’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship pairs students with nonprofits in and around New York City, like Greyston Bakery, Housing Works and the Legal Aid Society. Elizabeth Pooran interned last year at Senior Planet Exploration Center in Chelsea, a community space designed to teach technology, including digital photography and the internet, to older adults to encourage them to lead independent, connected lives. And Latino U College Access, a fledgling nonprofit that works with first-generation college students, has used Pace interns for three of its five years. “I always say that my organization was built with the support and by the hands of Pace University interns,” said Shirley Acevedo Buontempo, the founder.

Students in the Wilson internship program receive $16 an hour, or $4,480 for eight weeks. Some 120 students have participated since 2009, with grants totaling about $500,000."

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International Business Times: "Pace is Ranked the Best Private University in the Nation for Upward Economic Mobility of Students"

11/01/2017

Pace is Ranked the Best Private University in the Nation for Upward Economic Mobility of Students (International Business Times)

Pace University was ranked number one among private, non-profit, four-year institutions nationwide in a list published last week by the Chronicle of Higher Education, “Colleges with the Highest Student-Mobility Rates, 2014.”

The list is based on data from the Equality of Opportunity Project’s study, “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility” (Chetty, Friedman, Saez, Turner, and Yagan, 2017). The study compared the median parent household income for students at colleges and universities across the country with the earnings these same students achieved after graduation.

“This list reaffirms Pace’s commitment to successful outcomes for our students and that education is the path forward,” said Pace’s President Marvin Krislov.

New York is a national leader in this arena. Six of the top 10 private four-year institutions for economic mobility are located in New York State, while seven CUNY campuses are ranked in the top 10 four-year public colleges.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, median annual earnings for Americans with less than a high school degree amounts to $25,636 while the unemployment rate for the same population is 8 percent, the highest of any of the educational categories. Workers with a high school diploma achieve a median income of $35,256 per year while experiencing an unemployment rate of 5.4 percent. Americans with a bachelor’s degree earn significantly higher with median annual income of $59,124 per year and face a much lower unemployment rate at 2.8 percent. Median annual earnings continue to rise with advanced and professional degrees. In 2012, New York residents with a bachelor's or post-graduate degree earned a median annual income of approximately $70,700, which ranks among the highest in the nation. (New York Building Congress, 2014).

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Battery Park City Broadsheet:"Setting the Pace: Local University Ranked Tops in Nation for Propelling Students Up Economic Ladder"

10/31/2017

Setting the Pace: Local University Ranked Tops in Nation for Propelling Students Up Economic Ladder (Battery Park City Broadsheet)

A study that appeared this month in the Chronicle of Higher Education ranks Pace University, in Lower Manhattan, as first in the nation among private four-year institutions for moving students who come from households in the bottom 20 percent of income into the top 20 percent.

The study compared the median parent household income for students at colleges and universities across the country with the earnings these same students achieved after graduation. More specifically, the team of economists at the Equality of Opportunity Project who conducted the research aimed to quantify, "the percentage of all students in a birth cohort at a particular college whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent for household income, and who reached the top 20 percent for individual earnings."

The analysis found that at Pace University, where the median parent household income was $68,000, fully 15 percent of students came from households in the bottom fifth of earnings, and only slightly more than one percent came from households in the top one percent of earnings. But for students who graduated in recent years, the study noted, more than 55 percent were earning in the top 20 percent of income for their age group. When combined with other demographically relevant factors, this tabulates to what the team of the statisticians at the Equality of Opportunity Project call an overall "mobility rate" of 8.43 percent -- the highest in the nation for any private four-year college.

This compares favorably to other, better-known local private institutions: Columbia University and New York University, where only 6.9 and 5.1 percent of students came from households in the bottom 20 percent of earnings, respectively. At these institutions, the mobility rates are 3.63 percent (for New York University, earning it 14th place on the national list), and 3.07 percent (for Columbia University, which translates into 29th place in the nationwide rankings).

These data follow a similar study conducted in 2016, in which Pace University placed second in terms of national upward mobility for students from the bottom 20 percent of household income. In that ranking, the New Jersey Institute of Technology was the only institution that scored higher. In this year's tabulation, six of the top ten private four-year institutions for economic mobility are located in New York State, while seven City University of New York campuses are ranked in the top ten four-year public colleges.

Additionally, Princeton Review ranks Pace as one of the best colleges in the Northeast, while U.S. News & World Report rates its environmental law program as third in the nation, and the Hollywood Reporter lists Pace's undergraduate and graduate performing arts programs among the 25 best in the world.

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Cheatsheet: "These Insane Conspiracy Theories About the Vegas Shooting Will Blow Your Mind"

10/31/2017

These Insane Conspiracy Theories About the Vegas Shooting Will Blow Your Mind (Cheatsheet)

...Pace University propaganda teacher Adam Klein told Mother Jones he sees three main factors creating the theories. First, Paddock’s absence of a clear motive invites speculation.

“The authors here are lighting fuses and they’re supposed to lead back to some secret, explosive connection,” he explained. “‘Oh, this is all about gun control at the end of the day.’ Or, ‘This is all about the anti-fascists.’ Or the other narrative, that the FBI is trying to hide proof that ISIS is spreading and Paddock is the next example of that. That can all fall under the category of political score-keeping and people trying to prove that this is part of a left wing conspiracy.”

But how do these things spread so fast?

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Backstage: "The College Audition, Part III: Headshot, Resume + Style"

10/31/2017

The College Audition, Part III: Headshot, Resume + Style (Backstage)

Over the past few weeks, we’ve talked about the steps any high school student should take before applying to a drama or musical theater college program, and how to prep for auditions once you’ve applied. Now, it’s time to talk about your material. 

The physical materials you bring into the room (headshot and resume) and the way you present yourself (personal style) are just as important as your performance in the room. We will look to your headshot to remember you as we go through all the candidates, and your resume will give us an idea of how you’ve been cast so far. We’ll also make notes on your clothing to remember what you looked like in the room.

HEADSHOT
If you have a professional headshot, that’s great. If you don’t, we don’t expect one—you don’t have to rush out to get them. Your headshot isn’t getting you into a university but we do need a photo. Here are some things to keep in mind:

  • The photo should be in color.
  • It should be of nice/decent/clear quality.
  • It should look exactly like you at this moment in your life.
  • It should be between 5x7 and 8x10.
  • It should be a photo you’ve posed for, not a screen grab of you at a party someone posted on Facebook.
  • If it’s a professional photo, please make sure your name is printed on the front either within a white border or on the actual photo.

Read the full article.

 

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