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Huffington Post: "WATCH: How Two People From Different Worlds Found Love"

01/19/2016

Huffington Post: "WATCH: How Two People From Different Worlds Found Love"

. . . The video was produced by Yumeng Ji and shot/edited by Charlene Chen, students from Pace University's Media & Communications Arts Graduate School program. They are both graduate students at Pace, majoring in Communication. Yumeng decided to make a video for this romantic love story because it encourages many single people and/or long-distance couples in real life. By sharing the same passion of photography and producing videos, Yumeng and Charlene worked together to bring the real story to the screen.

Watch the video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hooplaha/watch-how-two-people-from_b_8979844.html

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E-Commerce Times: "Google Sharpens Its Virtual Reality Focus"

01/19/2016

E-Commerce Times: "Google Sharpens Its Virtual Reality Focus"

. . . Clay Bavor's appointment gives some indications about the company's VR aspirations, but there are still big questions that have yet to be answered, said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University's Lubin School of Business.

"On the surface, Google might appear to have the greatest consumer reach among tech giants due to the cumulative impact of its services," he told the E-Commerce Times, including its "browser, search engine, Play store, Gmail service and YouTube channel."

However, Google hasn't created a community that can compare favorably to rivals such as Facebook, Chiagouris noted. It's yet to be determined just how big a role social and shared experiences will play in VR, but it's hard to envision a world in which everyone enjoys it individually.

"It's challenge," according to Chiagouris, "will be to link applications of VR that are tightly linked to its service offerings."

Google will need to find ways to make synergies between its VR properties and other services, according to Chiagouris.

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Diverse: "Nursing, Health Care in Recovery Mode in Haiti"

01/14/2016

Diverse: "Nursing, Health Care in Recovery Mode in Haiti"

 ... “When I heard that the public school of nursing in Port-au-Prince collapsed on top of the faculty and students, killing many of them, I [thought], ‘We can educate nurses, we can go help,’” says Dr. Carol Roye, a former professor of nursing at Hunter College and current associate dean for faculty scholarship at the College of Health Professions at Pace University. Read more: http://diverseeducation.com/article/79686/

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The Hill’s Congress Blog: "Can mass trauma actually promote psychological adjustment?"

01/11/2016

The Hill’s Congress Blog: "Can mass trauma actually promote psychological adjustment?"

Anthony Mancini, Ph.D., is an associate professor of Psychology at Pace University and co-author (with Heather Littleton of East Carolina University and Amie Grills of Boston University) of the study, ‘Can People Benefit From Acute Stress? Social Support, Psychological Improvement, and Resilience After the Virginia Tech Campus Shootings.’

“The terror attacks in San Bernardino and Paris have ratcheted upward—once again—our collective anxieties,” Professor Mancini wrote on The Hill’s Congress Blog. “And for the survivors of these tragedies, they have raised the specter of collateral psychological damage, such as posttraumatic stress disorder. Although the risks to survivors are indeed real, the psychological impact of these tragedies is more complicated than we realize. Most survivors of traumatic events will suffer no enduring psychological harm. More startlingly, some may actually experience direct psychological benefits from it.

“How do we know this? In a study just published in Clinical Psychological Science, my colleagues, Heather Littleton and Amie Grills, and I studied 368 female survivors of the Virginia Tech campus shootings, the most deadly civilian massacre in U.S. history. These students’ anxiety and depression had been measured before the shootings as part of a separate study and again at two, six, and 12 months after them. As a result, we had a rare window into their psychological reaction to the tragedy. 

“Not surprisingly, about 20 percent of survivors saw substantial increases in anxiety or depression that continued to increase for 12 months, a reaction consistent with posttraumatic stress disorder. On the other hand, almost 60 percent had low levels of depression and anxiety and no statistically discernible uptick after the shootings, a result that confirms the human capacity for resilience. Most remarkable, though, was a group of survivors whose psychological health actually improved. About 15 percent of the sample, in fact, reported substantial reductions in anxiety or depression (or both) in the year after the shooting.” [The Hill’s Congress Blog, January 11, 2016]

 

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Guardian: "The problem with science journalism: we’ve forgotten that reality matters most"

01/06/2016

Guardian: "The problem with science journalism: we’ve forgotten that reality matters most"

There is a continued misunderstanding of what science journalism is, and how it differs from other forms of science communication. Photograph: Alamy

. . . "My opinion remains that reality matters no matter how complicated it may be," says Andrew Revkin, a writer whose blog, Dot Earth, shifted from news to the opinion section at the New York Times in 2010 and who teaches environmental communications at Pace University. "To me, it's all about transparency. If you have an agenda, state your agenda," he adds. "And if you're claiming to be objective, then demonstrate the objectivity."

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/media/2015/dec/30/problem-with-science-journa...

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Alert Investor: "The Birth of a Hedge Fund"

01/05/2016

Alert Investor: "The Birth of a Hedge Fund"

. . . Fraud occurs more frequently at small hedge funds, but the world of larger funds is also not immune. Perhaps the most infamous examples of the latter were the hedge funds that invested with disgraced investment manager Bernie Madoff, who in 2009 was convicted of running a $50 billion Ponzi scheme. (Learn the warning signs of hedge fund fraud at the FBI’s Hedge Fund Information for Investors page.)

Given the risk of fraud, it also takes a certain personality to win the trust of wary investors. Aron Gottesman, chair of the department of finance and economics at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business said hedge fund entrepreneurs can come from any background – as seen with Zweig’s foray into the field – but they share some common traits.

“They usually have some type of experience within the hedge fund industry already, they have to be well connected and extremely confident in their own ability to generate returns for their clients,” Gottesman said.

For a hedge fund getting off the ground, industry reputation is currency in attracting capital. Institutional investors such as pension funds will often base their decisions on the investment track record of the managers and their real-world experience in the industry.

They also look for a potentially innovative strategy, something that sets the newbie fund apart. But again, even that doesn’t guarantee success.

“There are risks involved,” Gottesman said. “Hedge funds can take risks in the amount of leverage they use. Setting aside any fraudsters that are able to fool the market into giving them money, even those that are experienced and well-meaning can lose a lot in this market.”

Read more: https://www.thealertinvestor.com/the-birth-of-a-hedge-fund/

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MarketWatch: "Beware of viral Facebook posts that vow to protect your privacy"

01/04/2016

MarketWatch: "Beware of viral Facebook posts that vow to protect your privacy"

. . . When Facebook members have become embroiled in a public news story their photos have appeared in newspapers and online, for instance, media outlets typically credit Facebook, not the Facebook account holder or the person who took the actual photograph. And while Facebook members own copyright on their photos, the company may have to pass on photographs to the authorities, if ordered to by a subpoena in a criminal investigation, a court order or a search warrant. “There’s a lot of value associated with these pictures,” says Darren Hayes, director of the cyber security division and assistant professor at Pace University in New York. “Facebook must have photos that are worth billions of dollars.”

You may not have complete control over how your Facebook photos are used, in certain circumstances at least. You can, however, control what photos and adverts you see. Did you search for a sofa online or a wedding venue, and are you now being inundated with ads for sofas and wedding venues? Although you cannot block ads entirely without using ad-blocking software like Social Fixer or AdBlock, you can opt out of these targeted ads: Go to “Settings,” click on ads and edit settings to opt out of ads. For social networkers who value their privacy, Hayes says, these are instructions worth re-posting.

Read more: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/beware-of-viral-facebook-posts-that-vow-to-protect-your-privacy-2015-09-30

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The Examiner: "Pace Economics Team Captures Second Fed Reserve College Title"

12/23/2015

The Examiner: "Pace Economics Team Captures Second Fed Reserve College Title"

. . . All seven members of this year’s Pace team are economics majors in Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. Team members are Katherine Craig, Daniella Gambino, Omar Habib, Jozef Lampa, Melissa Navas, Jonathan Okane and Yuliya Palianok. Mark Weinstock and fellow economics professor Greg Colman serve as advisers, training the team during the year and helping them prepare their presentation.

“We go through, literally, hundreds and hundreds of questions and responses to make sure they are prepared with all the different nuances of what they need to know,” Weinstock said.

Students are also expected to read The Wall Street Journal and The Economist as well as speeches and research papers by economists, bank presidents and governors.

Pace Economics Department Chairman Joseph Morreale said creativity and teamwork are crucial.

“Many of the teams that compete don’t operate in such a teamwork fashion,” he said. “I think that’s a benefit of having two faculty working with them for so long. They usually spend five or six months preparing them. It’s a long haul that starts in the summer.”

The Pace Economics Department has grown in popularity in recent years and now has about 200 economics majors, Morreale said. Students can specialize in business economics, public economic policy and Chinese Economic Studies, which includes travel courses to China. Students are required to prepare a senior thesis.

Economics majors often seek jobs in financial institutions, healthcare organizations or the nonprofit sector, while some have accepted positions in the Federal Reserve itself, Morreale said. Starting salaries for graduates range from $60,000 to $80,000 a year, he added.

Students looking to major in economics should take a math sequence, including pre-calculus and calculus, and the Advanced Placement macroeconomics and microeconomics half-year classes. Students who achieve at least a 3 of 5 on the AP test earn college-level credit, Morreale said.

“I’ve always argued that they should also take world history because they have to understand the new economy of the world. It’s not just being a national economy anymore,” he said.

Read more: http://www.theexaminernews.com/pace-economics-team-captures-second-fed-reserve-college-title/

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Computerworld: "To break terrorist encryption, pay off Apple and Google, expert urges"

12/18/2015

Computerworld: "To break terrorist encryption, pay off Apple and Google, expert urges"

To break encrypted smartphone messages used by terrorists, tech companies such as Apple and Google need to be paid by law enforcement, an expert urged Thursday.

"If there were a financial incentive for Google and Apple to assist law enforcement, then they would be more willing to change their encryption technology to facilitate law enforcement in possession of a warrant," said Professor Darren Hayes, director of cybersecurity at Pace University, in an interview.

Tech companies and wireless carriers currently get reimbursed "quite nicely," he said, for their time and help when faced with a court warrant under the 1994 Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), a wiretap law that allows the FBI and others access to some communications, but not encrypted data.

Apple and others "are in the business to make money, so you have to make a business case for them to cooperate," Hayes added.

Read more: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3016665/security/to-break-terrorist...

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace’s SWAG participants showcase water robots"

12/15/2015

Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace’s SWAG participants showcase water robots"

A fall semester of designing, engineering, constructing and hack-proofing water robots concluded with a showcase this weekend featuring presentations from 30 high school girls who participated in the workshop at Pace University.

Called STEM Women Achieve Greatness, or SWAG, the nine-week program enlisted girls interested in science, technology, engineering and math from high schools in Westchester and Fairfield counties to work with faculty from Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Read more: http://westfaironline.com/76363/paces-swag-participants-showcase-water-robots/

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