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WABC: "Tallest dorm in the world -- right here in New York at Pace University"

11/13/2015

WABC: "Tallest dorm in the world -- right here in New York at Pace University"

NEW YORK (WABC) -- Pace University has opened the self-described tallest college or university residential building in the world. The dorm opened at the end of October.

It offers students private bathrooms, lounges and rec space -- not to mention some serious views. And it's in one of the city's hottest neighborhoods.

See the video: http://abc7ny.com/education/visit-the-tallest-dorm-in-the-world/1079381/

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Computerworld: "Apple's P2P mobile payment service would 'create a shockwave' in the industry"

11/13/2015

Computerworld: "Apple's P2P mobile payment service would 'create a shockwave' in the industry"

Apple Pay being used in the UK. The company is reportedly exploring a mobile payment service where individuals could send each other money through their iPhones. Credit: Apple

. . . An Apple P2P mobile payment service "could be a viable model in other countries," said Darren Hayes, an assistant professor and director of cybersecurity at Pace University.

"P2P payments have been around for many years in certain countries where credit cards aren't trusted," Hayes said. Also, PayPal isn't available in every country, which could give Apple a potential advantage.

Apple's iPhones are highly secure and users are likely to trust them for P2P as they have for Android Pay, Hayes said.

Hayes said he is often called as an expert witness in courtrooms where he provides smartphone forensics testimony, after working with law enforcement agencies to break down confiscated smartphones to find critical data needed for investigations. He said iPhones are the most difficult smartphones to break into.

Given Apple's high level of security with the iPhone and Apple Pay, it would likely "engender trust for people who are looking for alternatives to pay, as well as for using something other than a credit card," Hayes said. "It's just a logical step for Apple to move to P2P."

Read more: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3005212/mobile-payments/apples-p2p-mobile-payment-service-would-create-a-shockwave-in-the-industry.html

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Die Welt / Welt am Sonntag (Germany): "Nichts als leere Drohungen"

11/13/2015

Die Welt / Welt am Sonntag (Germany): "Nichts als leere Drohungen"

A Volkswagen dealer in Berlin. (Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images)

John Alan James, a professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and chairman emeritus of its Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation, is quoted in an article about Volkswagen in Die Welt / Welt am Sonntag (Germany). James is a former consultant for automakers such as Fiat, General Motors and Volvo. 

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New York Observer: "The Rise of Low Residency Programs"

11/12/2015

New York Observer: "The Rise of Low Residency Programs"

. . . Low-residency programs tend to attract different students from residential ones. John Valentini, for instance, who is about halfway through Pace’s low-residency MBA program, works full-time at Altfest Personal Wealth Management in Manhattan (which is funding his tuition). He grabs time before and after his job to complete coursework. “I put in good hours in the office, come early and stay late, and I felt this was the right fit for me,” he said. He also likes the fact that most “classmates” are not newly-minted grads, but people with real-world experience, which they’re eager to share.

The cohort meets in person every 10 or 11 weeks, Mr. Valentini explained, but students connect informally much more often. For one module on operations management, he said, most of his cohort—except a student based in the Dominican Republic—met weekly at Pace or in someone’s office. (They “remoted in” the student in the DR by phone.)

“It’s not as easy as being in a classroom setting, where you can raise your hand and get the answer to a question,” Mr. Valentini said. “It’s not a super-interactive environment. You have to find a way to make it work for yourself. When you’re remote, you have to figure it out—go online, do research, find an explanation on YouTube. But the good part is that you learn how to piece things together on your own.”

Read more: http://observer.com/2015/11/the-rise-of-low-residency-programs/

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TechNewsWorld: "Instagram Shows Off Collections in New Curated Video Channel"

11/12/2015

TechNewsWorld: "Instagram Shows Off Collections in New Curated Video Channel"

. . . "It's all about increasing the number of users that you have," said Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

"The way you increase the number of users is to target content at individuals and make that content as interesting as possible," he told TechNewsWorld.

Read more: http://www.ectnews.com/story/82701.html

 

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Forbes: "Why `Off The Radar' Colleges Can Be A Great Deal"

11/12/2015

Forbes: "Why `Off The Radar' Colleges Can Be A Great Deal"

. . . Here are the top five schools on the Business Insider list, noting “median Mid-career salary,” that is, what grads were earning two decades from graduation.

1. Pace University/New York City $95,200

2. Missouri U. Of Science/Tech $102,000

3. New Jersey Inst. of Tech. $101,000

4. U. of Mass./Lowell $94,700

5. Hofstra U. $102,000

Read more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnwasik/2015/11/06/why-off-the-radar-colleges-can-be-a-great-deal/

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Daily Voice: "Pace Professor To Present At World Health Summit In Geneva"

11/11/2015

Daily Voice: Pace Professor To Present At World Health Summit In Geneva

The Daily Voice published a story on Melanie DuPuis, head of Dyson's Environmental Studies and Science program.Melanie DuPuis, chair of the Environmental Studies and Sciences department at Pace Universty has been selected to speak at a World Health Organization summit on Nov. 20 in Geneva, Switzerland. DuPuis plans present her talk From Clean Eating to Clean Air: When Large-Scale Behavioral Change is (Part of) the Answer. The talk aims to highlight the impact of the environment on our dietary habits. DuPuis will examine what the history of people's diets tells us about solving environmental problems, how to deal with environmental issues that require large-scale changes in personal behavior, and how democracies can reconcile individual freedom and environmentally problematic behavior.

Read more: http://armonk.dailyvoice.com/schools/pace-professor-to-present-at-world-health-summit-in-geneva/603253/

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Pace University Receives $1.1 Million from the US Department of Education to Provide Support for First-Generation and Low Income College Students

11/10/2015

Pace University Receives $1.1 Million from the US Department of Education to Provide Support for First-Generation and Low Income College Students

Pace University Receives $1.1 Million from the US Department of Education to Provide Support for First-Generation and Low Income College Students

Student Support Services Grant will Help 160 Pace Students Succeed in College

NEW YORK, NY, November 10, 2015 – Pace University has long been committed to helping first-generation college students succeed as exemplified by the university’s motto, “Opportunitas.” In keeping with this, Pace received a five-year, $1.1 million grant from the US Department of Education to provide support services for low-income, first-generation, and disabled undergraduate students at its New York City campus in Lower Manhattan.

With assistance that goes well beyond tutoring, Pace’s Student Support Services (SSS) program is designed to help eligible students achieve academic success. With its robust array of services, the program’s support network will assist these students with a variety of challenges they face, including transitioning to college, becoming socially engaged in the college community, and ultimately, persisting to graduation.

 “We are extremely pleased to have received this funding,” said Nira Herrmann, PhD, dean, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. “It will enable Pace to increase efforts already in place by extending intense and sustained support services to our low-income, first-generation and disabled students to help them remain in college, advance steadily in their academic work, graduate in four to six years and pursue professional or graduate study. All of us at Pace are committed to helping students attain their educational goals, and this grant will help us to reach out to an even greater number of students with the guidance and services they need to graduate.”

Research shows that students from low-income families whose parents did not attend college are more likely than those whose parents attended college to be less academically prepared, to have less knowledge of how to apply for college and for financial assistance, and to have more difficulty becoming part of the social and intellectual collegiate community.

However, studies also indicate that targeted intervention beginning with enrollment and continuing throughout the undergraduate years – with special emphasis on the transition to college during freshman year – can enhance the success of these students. The SSS program will provide a variety of support services geared to this specific population and their needs.

With guidance from their mentors and coaches, students in the SSS program develop educational assessments and action plans, as well as receive regular monitoring of academic progress, and access to study skills workshops, panel discussions, tutoring, school supplies and computer resources. The support network includes peer mentors and graduate coaches, who, along with faculty members and advisers, offer career counseling, graduate school information, financial counseling, financial aid information, and money management skills. Cultural enrichment activities include field trips to shows, museums and events.

Building upon the 19-year success of the Pace federally funded TRIO–Upward Bound Program that provides support for high school students transitioning to college, the SSS program will further assist Pace’s efforts to extend sustained support services to 160 students who are from low-income backgrounds, from families where the parents do not have a college degree, or who have a disability. It provides academic, financial, career and personal support to help participants acclimate, thrive and succeed at Pace. In order to participate, students must apply and be accepted into the program. Veterans may also apply.

The program provides a significant increase in university resources dedicated to retention and timely graduation rates through an annual budget of $220,000 for the total of $1.1 million for the five–year award cycle. The funding will allow Pace to hire two new full-time university staff members, a project director, an assistant director/counselor, student peer mentors and graduate student coaches. These peer teams will provide one-on-one and small-group mentoring, tutoring and discussion sessions.

The SSS program will be administered by Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, through its Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences (CURE) led by Assistant Dean of Graduate Studies Maria Iacullo-Bird who is the Student Support Services Grant Principal Investigator.

For more information on the program visit: www.pace.edu/dyson/current-undergraduate-students/student-support-services-sss.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to many opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About the Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences: The Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences (CURE) in Dyson College of Arts and Sciences provides leadership, coordination and support to student-faculty research collaborations, faculty grant-funded research projects and programs, and opportunities for service learning. CURE is part of Dyson College’s long-standing and ongoing commitment to build a research culture at Pace University. CURE is one component of Dyson’s efforts to innovatively enhance the quality of both the academic experience and overall student life. CURE also evolved from Pace University’s membership in the Council for Undergraduate Research (CUR), a national organization of more than 900 colleges and universities whose mission is to “support and promote high-quality undergraduate student-faculty collaborative research and scholarship.”

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Media contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

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SC Magazine UK: "Surveillance bill – judicial oversight, no encryption ban, archiving browsing data"

11/04/2015

SC Magazine UK: "Surveillance bill – judicial oversight, no encryption ban, archiving browsing data"

Theresa May (photo: BBC)

. . . In an email to SCMagazineUK.com prior to May's announcement, Dr Darren Hayes, assistant professor and director of cyber-security at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York, suggested that the Investigatory Powers Bill will facilitate more bulk data collection and retention of data, adding that it “will be warmly welcomed by law enforcement and the intelligence community while simultaneously drawing consternation from consumer rights activists."

Read more: http://www.scmagazineuk.com/2nd-update-surveillance-bill--judicial-overs...

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China Daily: "Exploring China through essays"

11/04/2015

China Daily: "Exploring China through essays"

Members of the Pace University Confucius Institute and the New York Chinese Opera Society (NYCOS) award four students with cash prizes on Monday at Pace University in New York for their submissions to the Fifth Annual NYCOS Essay Competition. Jack Freifelder / China Daily

For Pace University in New York, an essay contest is one way to encourage cross-cultural exchange between the US and China.

Pace's Confucius Institute (CI) on Monday announced the winners of the fifth annual New York Chinese Opera Society (NYCOS) Essay Competition.

Joseph Lee, CI director at Pace, said the school and its constituents have been a "champion of cross-cultural dialogue" between the two countries.

Read more: http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/epaper/2015-11/03/content_22356162.htm

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