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USA Today: "Trump is keeping too much of Obamacare"

11/29/2016

USA Today: "Trump is keeping too much of Obamacare"

. . . Under the Affordable Care Act, health plans must allow “children” up to the age of 26 years old to remain on their parents’ plan. Ostensibly, this provision of Obamacare was meant to cover more healthy young people between 19 and 26, 30% of whom did not have health care before 2010.

And here in 2016, the dependent coverage mandate still appears to be completely non-controversial. After his election on Nov. 8, President-elect Donald Trump immediately laid out the provisions of Obamacare he would keep; among them was the so-called “slacker mandate” to allow kids to stay on their parents’ plans until 26. (Before implementation of Obamacare, 37 states already had some form of extended parental coverage law.)

But the ridiculous notion that full-grown adults up to age 26 are somehow still wards of their parents appears to be a modern convention.  By age 26, Napoleon had conquered Italy. Isaac Newton created calculus at 23. Benjamin Franklin had published the first edition of Poor Richard’s Almanac by 26. The Beatles disbanded when Paul McCartney was still 27. And yet, somehow, we can’t expect a 25-year-old to calculate a copay?

One of the primary arguments in favor of the dependent coverage mandate was the same argument Oscar Wilde made in favor of socialism: That freeing individuals from the burden of work would allow them to find more productive uses of their time.

According to a study by Gregory Colman of Pace University and Dhaval Dave of Bentley University, the law has been somewhat effective on the former point, with the effect on the latter being a bit more debatable. Their study shows that employment of Americans between ages 19 and 25 is down, but that adults in that group self-report higher degrees of “satisfaction” and “well-being.”

Read more here.

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MarketWatch: "6 things not to buy at an outlet store"

11/28/2016

MarketWatch: "6 things not to buy at an outlet store"

. . . Small accessories such as key chains also probably aren’t heavily discounted, says Charles Aaron Lawry, assistant professor of marketing at Pace University in New York. For some consumers, “if they can walk away with a keychain with a logo on it, they’re happy,” he says. These are known in the business as “open your wallet” items: Consumers get to buy into a brand and open their purse psychologically so they keep spending.

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Indian Express: "26/11 stories of strength: When a professor played translator for a terrorist"

11/28/2016

Indian Express: "26/11 stories of strength: When a professor played translator for a terrorist"

When Professor P V Viswanath was requested by the Jewish Chabad movement in New York to monitor the Indian media’s coverage of the 26/11 terror attack while it was still underway — Nariman House, where the Mumbai Chabad centre was located, was one of the sites of the attack — he didn’t imagine he would end up talking to a terrorist over the phone.

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Screening of the documentary ‘GENERATION STARTUP’ and a live panel discussion at Pace University on Thursday evening, December 1st

11/28/2016

Screening of the documentary ‘GENERATION STARTUP’ and a live panel discussion at Pace University on Thursday evening, December 1st

New York, NY – November 28, 2016 -- The Entrepreneurship Lab (eLab) at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business is hosting a screening of GENERATION STARTUP, a documentary that takes us to the front lines of entrepreneurship in America, capturing an in-the-trenches look at the struggles and triumphs of six recent college graduates who put everything on the line to launch startups. The event takes place on Thursday, December 1 in the Bianco Room at One Pace Plaza on the downtown New York City campus from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

WHO and WHAT: The screening will be followed by a live panel discussion with Cheryl Miller Houser, Co-Director and Producer; Andrew Yang, CEO of Venture for America and an expert character in the film; and Labib Rahman, one of the six entrepreneurs featured in the film. Moderator: Bruce Bachenheimer, Executive Director, Entrepreneurship Lab at Pace.

Shot over 17 months, GENERATION STARTUP is an honest, in-the-trenches look at what it takes to launch a startup. Directed by Academy Award winner Cynthia Wade and award-winning filmmaker Cheryl Miller Houser, the film celebrates risk-taking, urban revitalization, and diversity while delivering a vital call-to-action—with entrepreneurship at a record low, the country’s economic future is at stake.

WHEN and WHERE: Thursday, December 1 in the Bianco Room at One Pace Plaza on the downtown New York City Campus from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Agenda:

5:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.   Registration

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.   Screening

7:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.   Discussion

8:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.   Networking

The event is free and open to the public. Food and beverage will be served. Prior registration is required.

To RSVP, visit http://elab.nyc/events/ScreeningofGenerationStartup

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

# # #

 

 

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E-Commerce Times: "Apple Celebrates Itself in $300 Coffee Table Tome"

11/18/2016

E-Commerce Times: "Apple Celebrates Itself in $300 Coffee Table Tome"

. . . "Companies will occasionally publish books about their history," explained Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University.

"Those kinds of books are meant for employees and, to some degree, investors. They're meant to put an exclamation mark by the substantial nature and viability of a company," he noted.

"Apple's book is about its products, which from a design perspective have had an advantage in aesthetics in the competitive fray," Chiagouris told the E-Commerce Times.

Nevertheless, at $300, the audience will be limited.

"When companies do expensive books like this, they will either lower the price in the future and keep the $300 price point on the book so people will think they're getting a great deal," Chiagouris said, "or they'll offer the book as a premium when someone makes a major Apple purchase."

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Legaltech News: "Privacy, Cybersecurity Steady Spots in Trump Policy Uncertainty"

11/18/2016

Legaltech News: "Privacy, Cybersecurity Steady Spots in Trump Policy Uncertainty"

. . . "My perception is that Trump is very pro-law enforcement, which is also seen in some of his [advisers] like Rudy Giuliani," said Darren Hayes, director of cybersecurity and an assistant professor at Pace University in New York.

Hayes sees Trump as "supporting the government in its discussion with securing help from Apple to get access to iPhones and [from] other companies like Google in getting access to Android devices to help with law enforcement investigations."

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Wall Street Journal: "Shared Shop Makes for Crazy Roomies"

11/15/2016

Wall Street Journal: "Shared Shop Makes for Crazy Roomies"

At a store in Brooklyn, four businesses peacefully coexist. Up front are the framers and the insurance brokers. Photo: Ryan Christopher Jones for The Wall Street Journal

. . . Andrew Flamm, director of the Pace University Small Business Development Center, says a shared space is a great solution for many small businesses. While the combinations sometimes look funny, “it’s an opportunity to generate cross-referrals and sales,” he says.

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Associated Press: "After Election Rupture, CEOs Seek Unity for Staff, Customers"

11/15/2016

Associated Press: "After Election Rupture, CEOs Seek Unity for Staff, Customers"

. . . CEOs and companies that try to bring people together are "going to be the winners," says Dr. Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University's Lubin School of Business. "That always works better from a brand perspective," he says.

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The Hill's Congress Blog: "Trade equilibrium to revive small business in America"

11/15/2016

The Hill's Congress Blog: "Trade equilibrium to revive small business in America"

According to the SBA, a small business is an independent business having fewer than 500 employees, writes Narendra C. Bhandari, Ph.D., professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. It plays a very important role in America by making significant contributions in the areas of production, services, and employment.

However, its role in the American economy is declining. It is evident from its population’s declining share in the total population (a very critical factor): from 57.44% in 1995, to 55.69% in 2005, and to 53.42% in 2015. Conversely, share of large businesses for these time periods has increased from 42.51% in 1995, to 44.29% in 2005, and to 46.54% in 2015. (U.S. Census.)

Several reasons are responsible for small business decline. These include difficulties in raising finances; higher interest rates; expensive healthcare; and complex laws and regulations. There are two other important reasons. One, both large and small businesses continue to offshore their manufacturing and service jobs overseas to save costs. Consequently, small businesses and people who are dependent on them lose their business and jobs. This deprives America of innovation and entrepreneurship in terms of products, processes, and technology.

Two, large businesses, under the H-1B program, import foreign workers to do the jobs originally done by the Americans. It often happens in the IT area. Sadly, often the outgoing Americans have to first train the incoming foreigners how to do their jobs. Americans’ extensive job experience and advanced education cannot help them save their jobs.

Often these employees, out of work, have no other reasonable jobs available. Some of them start their own business. They follow what James Adams described as the American dream in his 1931 book, ‘Epic of America.’ Fortunately, a very small number of them do make their life better and richer through hard work. Sadly, many of them soon realize that the American dream is like a rainbow: beautiful and beyond their reach. Painfully, they accept a low paying job or stop looking for one altogether.

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Christian Science Monitor: "How teachers calm, educate students amid swirl of election emotions"

11/14/2016

Christian Science Monitor: "How teachers calm, educate students amid swirl of election emotions"

. . . no matter who adults voted for, they can agree – and tell their children – that the ability to vote is part of what makes the country great, says Jennifer Powell-Lunder, an adjunct psychology professor at Pace University in New York.

“Our kids have seen the first African-American president; they’ve seen a woman be a real contender for the presidency,” she says. “That’s wonderful. Just because she didn’t win doesn’t mean those ideals aren’t out there anymore.”

Read more here.

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