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Business Insider: "Target boycott has reached a boiling point — and sales may suffer as a result"

05/16/2016

Business Insider: "Target boycott has reached a boiling point — and sales may suffer as a result"

. . . Ultimately, access to goods will outweigh moral outrage for many consumers, says Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York.

"The boycott is not going to last very long," Chiagouris told Business Insider. "There is a big difference between signing a petition compared to not taking advantage of a big sale at Target. People will always take advantage of the sale."

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/target-boycott-impact-on-sales-2016-5

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E-Commerce Times: "Walmart Tests 2-Day Subscription Shipping"

05/16/2016

E-Commerce Times: "Walmart Tests 2-Day Subscription Shipping"

Walmart on Thursday began testing a two-day unlimited shipping service priced at US$49 a year.

Subscribers will get more than a million items, including the most commonly purchased items on Walmart.com, delivered to their door in two days or fewer, Walmart spokesperson Bao Nguyen said.

"Customers will continue to enjoy their two favorite features -- no minimum order requirements and free returns online and in stores," he told the E-Commerce Times.

The service, called "ShippingPass," launched last year as a three-day shipping pilot program with a $50 annual subscription fee.

Interested consumers can join the waiting list.

Consumer Acceptance

Consumer reaction to the three-day ShippingPass pilot likely was not been favorable "because Amazon has already trained consumers to expect to receive many goods in two days or less," said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/83505.html

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NY1: "Students Discuss How College is a Transformative Experience"

05/12/2016

NY1: "Students Discuss How College is a Transformative Experience"

Starting a new chapter in life, like going to college, can be a stressful but transformative experience. In this Parenting report, NY1’s Shelley Goldberg talks to students at Pace University about what college taught them about themselves.

NY1 VIDEO: http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/parenting/2016/05/11/students-discuss-how-college-is-a-transformative-experience.html

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O'Dwyer's PR News: "FDA Examines Definition of 'Healthy'"

05/12/2016

O'Dwyer's PR News: "FDA Examines Definition of 'Healthy'"

The Food and Drug Administration plans to re-evaluate its official definition of what constitutes "healthy" food. An update to that agency's meaning of the term could have a direct effect on how food companies today market their products.

The decision to revisit the definition, which has not been updated since the 1990s, comes as the FDA is expected to issue its final revised updates to the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages later this year.

The agency seeks to update the Nutrition Facts label to make it more consistent with new scientific information, as well as the updated dietary guidelines released by the USDA in January. That government policy statement scaled back previous recommendations on dietary cholesterol and accounted for an updated scientific distinction between healthy fats — such as nuts — from regular fats.  The updated dietary guidelines also shifted its focus to account for overall eating patterns, emphasizing food choices in the context of the patterns in which they are consumed, versus simply listing foods that Americans should avoid or eat more of.

Discrepancies between the FDA’s current definition of “healthy,” compared to recent scientific findings and the USDA's newest dietary guidelines, have become a source of confusion. One example is the avocado, which is now considered a super food, though it remains considered “unhealthy” according to the FDA’s definition, due solely to its total fat content.

Currently, the FDA allows food brands to market their product as "healthy" only if it meets the agency’s nutrient content criteria requirements, which largely places an emphasis on fats, cholesterol and sodium. That strict — and arguably, dated — criteria made headlines last year, when popular granola bar maker Kind was served with an FDA warning letter for labeling its snacks as "healthy," a term the agency said didn’t meet the FDA’s requirements that govern the use of that claim.  The company responded, stating its use of the word "healthy" was apt, as the product’s fat content is derived from nuts, a food now recommended in the latest USDA dietary guidelines. The FDA later agreed to allow Kind to continue use of the word “healthy” as a sort of broad, philosophical claim about the company, if not its food products.

Kind in February hired public affairs powerhouse Glover Park Group for lobbying help on FDA issues.

“I think [the FDA] realized they were caught out by this, and they needed to rethink their standards and do something about the facts that the Kind case brought out,” said E. Melanie DuPuis, a professor and chair of environmental studies and science at Pace University.

DuPuis, who is also author of Dangerous Digestion: The Politics of American Dietary Advice, told O’Dwyer’s that the notion of a new definition for "healthy" opens a potential Pandora’s box for food marketers, because like all industries, they rely on processes they want to keep stable, and when the definition of a term they use starts changing, companies have to change those processes.

Read more: http://www.odwyerpr.com/story/public/6887/2016-05-11/fda-examines-definition-healthy.html

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Strategic Finance: "Women on Business Performance"

05/11/2016

Strategic Finance: "Women on Business Performance"

From glass ceilings and work-life balance to communicating with confidence and creating the right relationships, the issues facing women in the workplace continue to be hot topics of conversation. On October 9, 2015, nearly 80 IMA® (Institute of Management Accountants) members and Pace University alumnae gathered to carry forward that discussion and to explore their potential in today’s business environment. Attendees represented a wide range of industries and experience from accounting professors to CFOs, from the New York City Department of Finance to IBM.

This biannual event covered a technical topic—“Upcoming Changes in Lease Accounting”—presented by Sue Cosper, technical director of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and chairman of the Emerging Issues Task Force. It also explored women’s issues in “The Role Women Play in Driving Business Performance,” presented by Sandra Richtermeyer, professor of accountancy and associate dean at the Williams College of Business at Xavier University and former IMA Chair.

But the real showstopper of the Women’s Accounting Leadership Series event was the “Strategies for Professional Success” panel discussion with Susan Hohenleitner, vice president of finance and CFO of Johnson & Johnson Customer and Logistics Services (CLS), and Ann Dennison, a senior vice president with NASDAQ. Former FASB Chairman Leslie Seidman, an executive director at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, facilitated the discussion in which panelists shared their insights, experiences, and advice on workplace challenges women face. This is a condensed version of that discussion that includes the highlights of their journeys and the unusual twists and turns that make each of their stories unique.

Read more:  http://sfmagazine.com/post-entry/may-2016-women-on-business-performance/

 

 

 

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New York Daily News: "Bernie Sanders poised for another primary win in West Virginia — but it’s still almost impossible for him to secure Democratic nomination"

05/10/2016

New York Daily News: "Bernie Sanders poised for another primary win in West Virginia — but it’s still almost impossible for him to secure Democratic nomination"

. . . "Secretary Clinton and her supporters still have not figured out a way for Sanders to gracefully leave and to transfer support to her," David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of Political Science at Pace University, told The News. "And Sanders is doing little to assist in this."

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/bernie-sanders-poised-primary-win-west-virginia-article-1.2630672

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Inc.: "Why Some Companies--No Matter How Successful--Should Stay Private"

05/10/2016

Inc.: "Why Some Companies--No Matter How Successful--Should Stay Private"

CREDIT: Getty Images

It could be that some businesses are much better off being private, even after years as public companies.

Just ask Krispy Kreme, the iconic doughnut maker that will go private by early summer, following a buy-out from JAB Beech, a private equity firm that announced it will acquire the brand for $1.35 billion.

Freed from the demands of public market investors who tend to focus on short-term returns, some companies may find renewed life that harks back to when they were small and privately held, business experts say. They can strengthen their brands, double down in the communities in which they operate, and get back to their roots as innovators.

"[Krispy Kreme] could take an approach to the business that is more family-friendly and more small-business friendly when you don't have the pressure of quarterly returns," says Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical professor of management at Pace University in New York.

Read more: http://www.inc.com/jeremy-quittner/krispy-kreme-goes-private-to-rebuild-brand-cachet.html

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NY1: "Parenting: Students Share Best Advice They Received When They Made Their Transition to College"

05/09/2016

NY1: "Parenting: Students Share Best Advice They Received When They Made Their Transition to College"

NY1 VIDEO: What do you wish you knew before college? In her latest parenting report, NY1's Shelley Goldberg hears what some students think is the best advice they received and advice they have for incoming freshmen.

Watch the video: http://www.ny1.com/nyc/manhattan/parenting/2016/05/4/parenting--students-share-best-advice-they-received-when-they-made-their-transition-to-college.html

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Bloomberg: "Trump-Clinton Contest Could Feature New York Fight"

05/09/2016

Bloomberg: "Trump-Clinton Contest Could Feature New York Fight"

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton campaigns outside of Yankee Stadium on April 7, 2016, in the Bronx borough of New York City. Photographer: Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

It may be completely unrealistic, but Donald Trump wants his fellow New Yorkers to think that he can do something that hasn't been done in 32 years: turn their state red in a presidential election.

Another New Yorker, Hillary Clinton, is almost certain to have something to say about that, if she becomes the Democratic nominee as expected and sets up the first presidential face-off between two Empire State residents in 72 years.

No Republican has won New York since Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984. Still, local observers don't completely rule out the possibility that Trump -- and his trademark unpredictability -- could force Clinton to spend precious resources defending the state.

"There is a chance that he could put the state in play," said David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of political science at Pace University in New York. "If he continues to strike a chord with his anti-trade policy and his arguments that he can create more jobs, I could see him running reasonably well in Upstate New York and I think he would draw some vote in Long Island."

Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2016-05-06/trump-clinton-contest-could-feature-new-york-fight

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PIX11 partners with the Veterans Education Challenge

05/09/2016

PIX11 partners with the Veterans Education Challenge

Watch the video: http://pix11.com/2016/05/05/for-pace-student-and-veteran-bills-pile-up-e...

VEC founders, Avis and Bruce Richards, started the “Veterans Education $1 Million Matching Challenge” to help fund higher education for returning veterans.  Every dollar donated between Veterans Day 2015 and Veterans Day 2016 will be matched dollar-for-dollar by the Richards up to one million dollars.

We share the story of Air Force veteran and reservist Joe Bodd, who is taking advantage of the educational opportunity given to him through the bill, federal and state grants, and a school scholarship.

Joe Bodd followed in his grandfather’s footsteps.  In December 2009, after a year of college, he joined the Air Force.

“My grandfather was in the Air Force, so I said ‘I might as well carry on the tradition.’  There are so many outlets for you to do great things in the Air Force.  That’s why I like it,”  Bodd said.  “It’s more about camaraderie, like people aren’t trying to jump over each other to make the next rank or do the next greatest job.  We all work together.”

In 2011, Bodd was deployed to Iraq, where he was assigned to the protect Balad Air Base.  During his 2 years of active duty, he married fellow Air Force veteran, Frances Escorcia.   After completing their tours, they headed home to Staten Island.

“I remember coming over the Goethals Bridge, and feeling like this is it, new opportunities,” Bodd reflected.  “and the real world hits you in the face.  My wife was pregnant.”

Their adorable daughter Jayda is now 4-years-old.

“I just want to be that model for my daughter.  I’m proud of what my dad did, what he does,” said the 26-year-old father.

And little Jayda has lots to be proud of.  Bodd is now a reservist out of McGuire Air Force Base.  Plus, he’s become a member of the FDNY.

On top of fighting fires, Bodd has been going to school full time.  He’s finishing up his bachelor of arts in economics and criminal justice at Pace University in Manhattan.

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