main navigation
my pace

NYC

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Associated Press: "Fighting Fake News Isn't Just Up to Facebook and Google"

02/07/2017

Associated Press: "Fighting Fake News Isn't Just Up to Facebook and Google"

. . . While fake news has been in the real news a lot, many people simply aren't that aware of it.

"A lot of consumers are not savvy about it," says Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University who follows the fake news phenomenon. "And of those that are — and it's a small number— not a lot of them add plug-ins to browsers."

Chiagouris believes we are at the "beginning of the beginning" when it comes to defining just what fake news is and how to combat it. But he and other experts say technological solutions like apps and plug-ins are unlikely to get to the root of the problem.

The real solution, he says, will start in school: "not college, grammar school."

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

New York Post: "How to stand out in a group interview"

02/06/2017

New York Post: "How to stand out in a group interview"

When Sherman Julmis interviewed at Goldman Sachs in Jersey City last October for an internship, he was outnumbered three to one.

Although the Pace University Lubin School of Business finance major wasn’t aware of the arrangement ahead of time, the 21-year-old kept his cool, maintaining eye contact with each of his interviewers.

“What was going through my head mostly was answering everyone’s question,” says the Rockland County, NY, native, “and trying to win over everyone in the room.”

Win he did. As a junior, he landed that internship in the legal entity controller’s group.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Advertising Age: "What GNC's Feud With Fox Means for Future of Super Bowl Advertisers"

02/06/2017

Advertising Age: "What GNC's Feud With Fox Means for Future of Super Bowl Advertisers"

Photo: A still from GNC's intended Super Bowl LI spot.

Millions tuned in to the Super Bowl to watch the New England Patriots battle the Atlanta Falcons on Sunday, but the fight brewing off the field between GNC and Fox is just getting started.

GNC, the vitamin and supplement retailer, is preparing to pursue legal action against Fox Broadcasting, claiming that it suffered "significant economic and reputational damages, lost opportunities, and consequential damages" because the network rejected the brand's first-ever Super Bowl ad after initially clearing it.

Experts say the move is unprecedented in the industry and could have a lasting impact on Super Bowls to come.

According to the letter of intent to sue that GNC sent to Fox, the network sold the chain a 30-second spot during the game and "induced GNC to spend millions" on producing and developing the ad. The National Football League made Fox nix the spot days before the Super Bowl because GNC sells some products containing two substances that are banned by the NFL, although neither product appears in the commercial, GNC said.

Fox sold 30-second slots in the Super Bowl for an estimated $5 million, more than a quarter of what Kantar Media said GNC spent on measured media in the U.S. in all of 2015. But the cost was far higher for GNC because the struggling company had centered its long-planned brand relaunch around its half-minute of ad time in the Super Bowl.

"They can't do much that would offset the loss of sales and attention they would have gotten for the Super Bowl," said Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University's Lubin School of Business.

Read more here.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

USA Today: "Laughter is the name of the game for majority of Super Bowl ads"

02/06/2017

USA Today: "Laughter is the name of the game for majority of Super Bowl ads"

Melissa McCarthy's funny spot for Kia was one of many Super Bowl commercials that went for humor. (Photo: Kia)

. . . "People like to laugh,” says Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “But the thing about humor is you either hit it out of the park or you die a slow death. There is not a lot of in between. Humor is the hardest thing to do.”

Read more here.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Agence France-Presse: "Advertisers eye winning Super Bowl strategy"

02/03/2017

Agence France-Presse: "Advertisers eye winning Super Bowl strategy"

The Super Bowl is expected to draw more than 110 million US viewers, and a 30-second advertising spot on the Fox network will cost an estimated $5 million ©Tim Warner (Getty/AFP)

. . . "The key has always been to have something that is not expected, not typical of the category," said Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

The ads are worth it, "if you put the creative effort into it," he said. "If it's not creative, if it's been seen before, it's a waste of money."

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

AARP: "6 Questions to Ask Before You Go Back to School"

02/03/2017

AARP: "6 Questions to Ask Before You Go Back to School"

Assistant Principal Sheelah Brown, 83 (with students at Miller-Driscoll School in Wilton, CT) got her Ph.D. in edcuation at 64. — Robyn Twomey

...Claire Keyles, 61, used the Pace University Encore Transition Program in New York to switch from a successful career as a corporate lawyer into a part-time position as a deputy compliance officer at a nonprofit that helps those who were previously incarcerated.

The Pace program costs about $800 and consists of three evening workshops designed to help older adults transition into working for nonprofits. "Not only can people not afford to retire, but a good many don't want to retire, so people are looking for ways to stay active and engaged," says Joan Tucker, director of the program.

There are many similar programs around the country. The Encore Hartford Program at the University of Connecticut, for one, prepares seasoned corporate professionals and managers to transition to the nonprofit sector, offering coursework and an eight-week fellowship at a host nonprofit for about $3,000. According to program statistics, 9 in 10 graduates from the classes of 2010 to 2014 are employed, and 70 percent hold full-time positions. (AARP is among the program's sponsors.)

Read more: http://www.aarp.org/work/job-hunting/info-2016/should-you-go-back-to-school-after-50.html#slide1

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

New York Daily News: "Private colleges need state help too: A local university president urges Gov. Cuomo to help students at more schools"

02/02/2017

New York Daily News: "Private colleges need state help too: A local university president urges Gov. Cuomo to help students at more schools"

This month, Gov. Cuomo pledged that New York State would cover tuition costs at state and city universities for students whose families earn less than $125,000 per year, writes Pace University president Stephen J. Friedman. I applaud the governor for this initiative.

At a time when people around the country are questioning the value of higher education and student debt continues to climb, this will offer many more New Yorkers the chance to access a college education and unlock new career opportunities.

The program, though, should go further. To have a greater impact for New York families, aid should be available not just for students of public universities but also for students at private nonprofits, which have a proven track record of elevating graduates’ earning power, irrespective of their socioeconomic status.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Swiss TV: "Trump versus Mexico" - «Wall Street Insights»

02/01/2017

Swiss TV: "Trump versus Mexico" - «Wall Street Insights»

Narendra C. Bhandari, Ph.D., professor of management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, appeared on Swiss TV in an interview about "Trump versus Mexico"

Watch the video.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

USA Today College: "N.Y. college students share why they protested Trump's travel order in Battery Park"

01/31/2017

USA Today College: "N.Y. college students share why they protested Trump's travel order in Battery Park"

Photo: Sheinberg, a Pace University student, wants people to come together. (Photo: Amanda Florian)

USA Today College interviewed college students who were protesting President Trump's recently signed executive order on immigration.

From USA Today:

Carly Sheinberg, a student at Pace University, echoed [another student] in colorful language. Though she isn’t personally affected by the policy, she’s choosing to support those who are.

“If you’re oppressing Muslims, we’re (all) not free,” she says. “People are so divided over this issue, but we have to combat this together.”

Read the full article here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Wall Street Journal: "Nikki Haley Arrives at U.N., Vowing to Take Names of Opposing Nations"

01/30/2017

Wall Street Journal: "Nikki Haley Arrives at U.N., Vowing to Take Names of Opposing Nations"

Photograph: Mike Segar/Reuters

. . . “The U.N. is an institution that is often a difficult one to work with for the U.S. but overall it serves U.S. interest, it’s a place where American values of democracy and human rights are voiced,” said Matthew Bolton, an associate professor at Pace University familiar with U.N. matters.

Read more here.

Pages