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International Business Times: "Pace is Ranked the Best Private University in the Nation for Upward Economic Mobility of Students"

11/01/2017

Pace is Ranked the Best Private University in the Nation for Upward Economic Mobility of Students (International Business Times)

Pace University was ranked number one among private, non-profit, four-year institutions nationwide in a list published last week by the Chronicle of Higher Education, “Colleges with the Highest Student-Mobility Rates, 2014.”

The list is based on data from the Equality of Opportunity Project’s study, “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility” (Chetty, Friedman, Saez, Turner, and Yagan, 2017). The study compared the median parent household income for students at colleges and universities across the country with the earnings these same students achieved after graduation.

“This list reaffirms Pace’s commitment to successful outcomes for our students and that education is the path forward,” said Pace’s President Marvin Krislov.

New York is a national leader in this arena. Six of the top 10 private four-year institutions for economic mobility are located in New York State, while seven CUNY campuses are ranked in the top 10 four-year public colleges.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, median annual earnings for Americans with less than a high school degree amounts to $25,636 while the unemployment rate for the same population is 8 percent, the highest of any of the educational categories. Workers with a high school diploma achieve a median income of $35,256 per year while experiencing an unemployment rate of 5.4 percent. Americans with a bachelor’s degree earn significantly higher with median annual income of $59,124 per year and face a much lower unemployment rate at 2.8 percent. Median annual earnings continue to rise with advanced and professional degrees. In 2012, New York residents with a bachelor's or post-graduate degree earned a median annual income of approximately $70,700, which ranks among the highest in the nation. (New York Building Congress, 2014).

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Battery Park City Broadsheet:"Setting the Pace: Local University Ranked Tops in Nation for Propelling Students Up Economic Ladder"

10/31/2017

Setting the Pace: Local University Ranked Tops in Nation for Propelling Students Up Economic Ladder (Battery Park City Broadsheet)

A study that appeared this month in the Chronicle of Higher Education ranks Pace University, in Lower Manhattan, as first in the nation among private four-year institutions for moving students who come from households in the bottom 20 percent of income into the top 20 percent.

The study compared the median parent household income for students at colleges and universities across the country with the earnings these same students achieved after graduation. More specifically, the team of economists at the Equality of Opportunity Project who conducted the research aimed to quantify, "the percentage of all students in a birth cohort at a particular college whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent for household income, and who reached the top 20 percent for individual earnings."

The analysis found that at Pace University, where the median parent household income was $68,000, fully 15 percent of students came from households in the bottom fifth of earnings, and only slightly more than one percent came from households in the top one percent of earnings. But for students who graduated in recent years, the study noted, more than 55 percent were earning in the top 20 percent of income for their age group. When combined with other demographically relevant factors, this tabulates to what the team of the statisticians at the Equality of Opportunity Project call an overall "mobility rate" of 8.43 percent -- the highest in the nation for any private four-year college.

This compares favorably to other, better-known local private institutions: Columbia University and New York University, where only 6.9 and 5.1 percent of students came from households in the bottom 20 percent of earnings, respectively. At these institutions, the mobility rates are 3.63 percent (for New York University, earning it 14th place on the national list), and 3.07 percent (for Columbia University, which translates into 29th place in the nationwide rankings).

These data follow a similar study conducted in 2016, in which Pace University placed second in terms of national upward mobility for students from the bottom 20 percent of household income. In that ranking, the New Jersey Institute of Technology was the only institution that scored higher. In this year's tabulation, six of the top ten private four-year institutions for economic mobility are located in New York State, while seven City University of New York campuses are ranked in the top ten four-year public colleges.

Additionally, Princeton Review ranks Pace as one of the best colleges in the Northeast, while U.S. News & World Report rates its environmental law program as third in the nation, and the Hollywood Reporter lists Pace's undergraduate and graduate performing arts programs among the 25 best in the world.

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Cheatsheet: "These Insane Conspiracy Theories About the Vegas Shooting Will Blow Your Mind"

10/31/2017

These Insane Conspiracy Theories About the Vegas Shooting Will Blow Your Mind (Cheatsheet)

...Pace University propaganda teacher Adam Klein told Mother Jones he sees three main factors creating the theories. First, Paddock’s absence of a clear motive invites speculation.

“The authors here are lighting fuses and they’re supposed to lead back to some secret, explosive connection,” he explained. “‘Oh, this is all about gun control at the end of the day.’ Or, ‘This is all about the anti-fascists.’ Or the other narrative, that the FBI is trying to hide proof that ISIS is spreading and Paddock is the next example of that. That can all fall under the category of political score-keeping and people trying to prove that this is part of a left wing conspiracy.”

But how do these things spread so fast?

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Backstage: "The College Audition, Part III: Headshot, Resume + Style"

10/31/2017

The College Audition, Part III: Headshot, Resume + Style (Backstage)

Over the past few weeks, we’ve talked about the steps any high school student should take before applying to a drama or musical theater college program, and how to prep for auditions once you’ve applied. Now, it’s time to talk about your material. 

The physical materials you bring into the room (headshot and resume) and the way you present yourself (personal style) are just as important as your performance in the room. We will look to your headshot to remember you as we go through all the candidates, and your resume will give us an idea of how you’ve been cast so far. We’ll also make notes on your clothing to remember what you looked like in the room.

HEADSHOT
If you have a professional headshot, that’s great. If you don’t, we don’t expect one—you don’t have to rush out to get them. Your headshot isn’t getting you into a university but we do need a photo. Here are some things to keep in mind:

  • The photo should be in color.
  • It should be of nice/decent/clear quality.
  • It should look exactly like you at this moment in your life.
  • It should be between 5x7 and 8x10.
  • It should be a photo you’ve posed for, not a screen grab of you at a party someone posted on Facebook.
  • If it’s a professional photo, please make sure your name is printed on the front either within a white border or on the actual photo.

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Broadway World: "All-Star Lineup Takes Part in 'AMERICAN SCOREBOARD' Reading of Betsy DeVos Hearing at Pace"

10/31/2017

All-Star Lineup Takes Part in 'AMERICAN SCOREBOARD' Reading of Betsy DeVos Hearing at Pace (Broadway World)

An all-star line-up of actors presented a live dramatic political reading last week through American Scoreboard's most recent installment at Pace University. The event was a reenactment of the confirmation hearing of U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

"It was an honor and privilege to be at Pace University," said conceiver and producer Fran Kirmserof American Scoreboard. "As a leading educational and cultural institution, Pace provides the perfect platform for American Scoreboard to present, as conceived, verbatim readings of US Senate hearings welcoming Republicans and Democrats to come together in the theater and simply listen to the language of our government leaders in the spirit of education."

"The Office of Government and Community Relations routinely encourages faculty, students and staff to engage in the political process in whatever way they feel most comfortable, especially when issues taking place at the National level directly impact their daily lives here at Pace," said Pace's Associate Vice President of Government and Community Relations. "When the opportunity presented itself we were delighted to work with the American Scoreboard team to provide an experiential learning opportunity for our Performing Arts students that went hand-in-hand with a comprehensive look at the inner-workings of a Congressional hearing that is so relevant to higher education."

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The Chronicle of Higher Education: "Making Disability Less Abstract"

10/31/2017

Making Disability Less Abstract (The Chronicle of Higher Education)

The “Chronicle of Higher Education” highlighted the work of Professor James Lawler who enriches the lives of Pace students and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities through the use of technology in his Community Empowerment through Information Systems Course (CIS 102W).

From “The Chronicle of Higher Education:”

“Allan B. Goldstein spent more than 20 years as an actor in New York City, but he switched gears when his parents died and he became guardian to his intellectually disabled brother, Fred. Mr. Goldstein began writing essays about Fred and his family, and that put him on a new path that ultimately led to a career in academe.

Now, Mr. Goldstein, a senior lecturer at NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering, holds center stage every semester in a course that pairs engineering students with adults who have disabilities. They work in small groups throughout the semester to create short films that highlight some aspect of the life of a person with disabilities.

Mr. Goldstein teaches the course twice every semester — in one section, people with cerebral palsy participate; in the second, adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities join students. The course requires extensive interaction, including visits to the agencies where those with disabilities attend day programs. The goal is to get the engineering students — some of whom will eventually design buildings that must accommodate the needs of the disabled — to see that people with disabilities have the same needs and wants as anyone else.

…Mr. Goldstein decided to create a new humanities course for NYU’s engineering students. He had spent time shadowing James Lawler, a professor of information technology at Pace University, who started a program in 2007 in which IT students helped local residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

 

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Backstage: "The College Audition, Part II: Preparation"

10/25/2017

The College Audition, Part II: Preparation (Backstage)

Earlier this month, we talked about the steps any high school student should take before applying to a drama or musical theater college program. This week, we’re exploring how to prep for auditions once you’ve applied.

First things first: You are in control of every aspect of this process, including your performance in the room. We need to say that again: You are in control of every aspect of this process, including your performance in the room. Got it?

Take the research you have acquired and use it to take charge of your audition. As we mentioned previously, each program has different requirements. Here’s what to consider: 

Know the style, length, and cut requirements for your songs and monologues.

Find your material. Read plays, watch movies, listen to your favorite scores and let ones that excite you lead to another. You might find a certain playwright who writes in your voice but doesn’t have a monologue that fits you in that play. Read more by them! Of course, you can start at monologue books, but you have to branch out from there. This process takes time.

When you find your favorite monologues and songs, read the entire source material. It is necessary for you to understand the sequence of events that have lead to the moment of the monologue. If you don’t read the script, how will you understand the world of the play, the circumstances and the character’s wants/needs? Additionally, the audition committee might ask you questions about the play and you will want to demonstrate that you not only read it but, also, understand it. There is nothing more disappointing to us then when we discover that the applicant didn’t read the play.

Cut and edit your material to fit the requirements. Just because you have 90 seconds doesn’t mean you need to use them all. More isn’t better, better is better.

Run the edits by friends or family who don’t know the piece to make sure it still makes sense and has a clear story arc (beginning, middle, end). If you find yourself cutting so much that the piece loses its integrity, it’s not a good audition piece. Move on and find something else. Try not to cut a scene of dialogue into a monologue. You’re destroying the author’s intent.

And a few more notes on preparing for a college audition...

Contrasting Material
When a university asks for contrasting material, it often means choose material that is different in style, content, and tone. But that’s not enough: you also need to contrast in the material. If you choose a contemporary piece where you’re the romantic lead, avoid choosing the same type of character in your classical piece. The same goes with your choice of songs; find songs of contrasting time periods, tempos, writer, character, etc.

Objectives/Actions/Beats (Units)
You need to break down the material in an actable way. This means doing all of the basic foundational acting work on the monologues and songs. Nothing is more upsetting than watching a young actor come in the room and not have an actable objective attached to their material. Your job is not to simply memorize and recite. You’re an interpretive storyteller and understanding the structure of the piece and then creating an objective for your performance aids in bringing it to life.

Prepare your material with honesty and strong choices but remember that we may ask for an adjustment, so you need to be prepared for that. Try to avoid being overly committed to “your way” and leave room for us to play with you. Being prepared is different than being over-rehearsed—the latter can make you ridged and locked, and you run the risk of not being able to make an adjustment.

Sometimes you’ll find material you love on the first read or listen, then work on it and not love it as much. Sometimes you won’t be certain how you feel about a piece until you work on it. The point is, you have to work on it to truly find out. And if in the end, you don’t love it, throw it away. If you’re not bringing joy and excitement into the room, we’ll sense it and you won’t enjoy telling the story.

Some of you may choose to work with a coach. This is understandable. Check references, make sure you feel comfortable with them, don’t let them force material on you that doesn’t feel right. And above all, trust your instincts.

Grant Kretchik is the associate director of Pace University’s School of Performing Arts, the head of its BFA acting program, and a Backstage Expert. For more information, check out Kretchik’s full bio

JV Mercanti is the head of acting for the musical theater program at Pace University’s School of the Arts, author of the monologue book series, “In Performance,” and a Backstage Expert. For more information, check out Mercanti’s full bio!

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Publishers Weekly: "WNBA Marks 100 Years of Championing Books"

10/24/2017

WNBA Marks 100 Years of Championing Books (Publishers Weekly)

In 1917, the United States and the world were undergoing profound transformations. America entered into World War I that year, and the campaign to give women the right to vote was in full swing. The sense that it was a time when new ideas could gain a hearing prompted a group of women in New York City to create an organization composed of women involved with “the circulation of ideas in books” whose aim was to promote the power of the book and its ability to foment change. Convinced of the importance of the cause, 35 women met on Nov. 13, 1917, at Sherwood’s Bookstore to officially form the Women’s National Book Association.

As it celebrates its centennial, the WNBA has much the same mission it did 100 years ago: to help lead the discussion of literature in America and to promote the achievements of women in both the bookselling and publishing industries.

The WNBA quickly rose to fill a void in the book business. According to the association’s archives, it had become such an important factor in the book industry that, within three years of its launch, it was invited to merge with the all-male American Booksellers Association. While heartened by the offer, the WNBA declined to join the ABA “at this present time,” but it did get assurances that its members would have more representation on various ABA committees.

Despite the ABA’s overture, WNBA remains an independent nonprofit whose roughly 1,000 members (who include a few men) are divided into 12 chapters across the country. And although there have been discussions about hiring an executive director, the WNBA remains an all-volunteer organization

The association’s president during the centennial year is Jane Kinney-Denning, executive director of internships and corporate outreach at Pace University and a professor in its publishing program. With the help of Valerie Tomaselli, president of MTM Publishing and the chair of the association’s centennial celebration, Kinney-Denning has presided over a yearlong series of events that will culminate October 28 in New York with a reception recognizing the recipients of awards that were announced during the year.

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Thrive Global: "How Texting is Linked to Better—or Worse—Relationship Satisfaction"

10/24/2017

How Texting is Linked to Better—or Worse—Relationship Satisfaction (Thrive Global)

For better, or possibly worse, texting is perhaps the central way that people keep in touch with their partners (both would-be and actual). It's especially the case for the younger set: Some 42 percent of young adults have used texting to “to communicate sexual intent,” as researchers have clinically put it, while a little under a third of teensreport having broken up with someone via text message. And as new research in the journal Computers in Human Behavior has found, the way you text—and how you feel about how your partner texts—has huge implications for how satisfied you are with your relationship.

Psychologist Leora Trub, PhD, who leads Pace University’s Digital Media and Psychology Lab, and her team recruited 205 young Americans to participate in an online survey. They were all between 18 and 29 years old, and about three quarters of them were women. All of them were in relationships: 83 percent were dating exclusively, 11 percent were married and 13 percent were dating openly.

The respondents took standard surveys measuring attachment style, or how much they tend to crave or fear intimacy, and relationship satisfaction. They also took a new assessment developed for the study about the perceived similarity between one’s own and one’s partner’s texting habits. They rated how frequently they initiated text conversations, and also the emotional quality of their texts—whether to express affection, to just say hey, to bring up an issue that’s hard to do in person, and the like. In each case, participants evaluated their own habits and also answered on their partner’s behalf.

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Bustle: "How To Build Your Personal Brand On Twitter, According To Experts"

10/24/2017

How To Build Your Personal Brand On Twitter, According To Experts (Bustle)

For the third year in a row, Bustle's Upstart Awards are honoring young women who are doing incredible things in the realms of business, STEM, fashion and beauty, the arts, philanthropy, and beyond. Want to be an Upstarts honoree one day? Read on for career tips, insights, and inspiration to help get you there.

You might think of Twitter as a place to rant about politics or the latest celebrity scandal. But it can also be a great professional platform. And the good news is, building your personal brand on Twitter can be a lot of fun — because you still get to rant about politics and celebrity gossip in the process.

“The internet is so pervasive that you are your brand on every platform you’re a part of, so it’s important to maintain your brand management in the most effective way for your career,” Jennifer Lee Magas, MA, JD, VP of Magas Media Consultants, LLC and a clinical associate professor of public relations at Pace University, tells Bustle. “Your Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest are parts of your digital presence that will be factored into evaluations of you as a whole.”

Building a brand is the interesting part, but a lot of Twitter use is also very tactical. To get more followers, you'll need to follow people, use hashtags so people can find you, and try to tweet regularly. You can also up your chances of finding job opportunities through Twitter by creating Twitter lists of the people you want to work with and following accounts that post jobs.

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