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Press Release: Pace University Announces Commencement Speakers and Honorary Degree Recipients: Leaders in Law, Education, the Arts, Business and Philanthropy

05/07/2018

Press Release: Pace University Announces Commencement Speakers and Honorary Degree Recipients: Leaders in Law, Education, the Arts, Business and Philanthropy

Pace University Announces Commencement Speakers and Honorary Degree Recipients:

Leaders in Law, Education, the Arts, Business and Philanthropy

James McBride and Irene Sankoff, Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez and former Chancellor of the NYC Department of Education Carmen Fariña

This year’s commencement speakers and honorary degree recipients at Pace University are driving forces in business, law, philanthropy, education and performing arts. More than 2,000 students will walk in Pace graduation ceremonies at the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral levels this year.

In New York City, former Chancellor of the NYC Department of Education Carmen Fariña will address undergraduates and the creator of Tony-award winning musical “Come from Away,” Irene Sankoff will address graduate students. Both are at the iconic Radio City Music Hall.

In Westchester, current Kings County District Attorney, Eric Gonzalez will address law school graduates and the author of the New York Times best seller, “The Color of Water,” James McBride will address the ceremonies in White Plains.

Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University 40th Annual Commencement

WHEN:                      Monday, May 14 at 1:00 p.m.

WHERE:                   Pace Law School, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY

SPEAKER:               Eric Gonzalez, Kings County District Attorney

 Westchester Campus Undergraduate Ceremony

WHEN:                      Wednesday, May 16 at 11:00 a.m.

WHERE:                   861 Bedford Road, Ann and Alfred Goldstein Health and Fitness Center, entrance 3, Pleasantville, NY

 SPEAKER:               James McBride, Award-winning Author, Musician, Screenwriter

New York City Undergraduate Ceremony

WHEN:                      Tuesday, May 22 at 10:30 a.m.

WHERE:                   Radio City Music Hall, 1260 Sixth Avenue, New York, NY

SPEAKER:               Carmen Fariña, retired Chancellor of the NYC Department of Education

Graduate Degree Ceremony

WHEN:                      Tuesday, May 22 at 4:00 p.m.

WHERE:                   Radio City Music Hall, 1260 Sixth Avenue, New York, NY

SPEAKER:               Irene Sankoff, Actor, Writer, Lyricist, Composer (creator: “Come From Away”)

Pace Law School Speaker and Honorary Degree Recipients:

Eric Gonzalez, Kings County District Attorney

Degree: Doctor of Laws

Eric Gonzalez, JD, District Attorney for Kings County, is this year’s speaker and honorary degree recipient for Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law. This is the school’s 40th commencement ceremony. Gonzalez made history as the first Latino elected to serve as District Attorney in New York State. His efforts have helped propel the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office to the forefront of criminal justice reform efforts taking place across the nation. His many professional accomplishments, dedication to the legal profession and administration of justice, and inspiring example to others both within and outside the legal profession.

He is a graduate of the New York City public schools, Cornell­­ University, and the University of Michigan Law School. Gonzalez has made his career as a prosecutor in the Brooklyn DA’s office, Assistant District Attorney to Executive District Attorney, and Counsel. Gonzalez has pursued justice for victims of domestic violence, gang violence, assault, and homicide. The bureaus he led became some of the most successful and productive trial zones in Brooklyn. He brought together precinct commanders, police officers, and citizens, which strengthened relationships between law enforcement and communities. He guided the launch of the Conviction Review Unit, which has become the model for similar efforts around the country.

Honorable Robert G.M. Keating, Senior Advisor to the President, Pace University

Degree: Doctor of Laws

Judge Robert G.M. Keating is an honorary degree recipient for Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law commencement ceremony. Keating has served in a long and accomplished career as a member of the bar and made lasting contributions to Pace University and its Law School. Keating was New York City’s Coordinator of Criminal Justice, a cabinet-level advisor to Mayor Edward Koch. He developed and supervised the Midtown Community Court, the National Association for Court Management. He instituted the Court Health Referral Project, in which defendants received courthouse-based counseling on AIDS, drug abuse, and tuberculosis, recognizing the positive role social services can play in the justice system. Judge Keating had a notable career in the private sector as a partner in a law firm, senior executive vice president of a physician practice management company, and as chairman and CEO of a firm that provided consulting and alternative dispute resolution services. Judge Keating was chosen to lead the New York State Judicial Institute—the first judicial training and research facility in the nation built by and for a state court system, housed on Pace Law’s campus in White Plains. As Dean of the Judicial Institute, he oversaw programs that trained 14,000 judges and 50,000 non-judicial personnel across New York State. As both the Vice President for Strategic Initiatives at Pace University and an Adjunct Professor at the Law School, Judge Keating has made an important and lasting impact on thousands of Pace students.

He has served as the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the South Street Seaport Museum, as board member and treasurer of the Fund for the City of New York, and as a member of the board of Citizens Union. Judge Keating earned his JD from Duke University and then began his career as a trial attorney for the Legal Aid Society. He joined the Kings County District Attorney's Office, where he rose through the ranks to become Chief Assistant District Attorney. His initiatives in the Kings County District Attorney’s Office led to one of the nation’s first programs to offer an alternative to prison for drug offenders.

Westchester Undergraduate Speaker and Honorary Degree Recipients:

James McBride, Award-winning Author, Musician, Screenwriter

Degree:  Doctor of Humane Letters

James McBride is this year’s honorary degree recipient and speaker for Pace’s Westchester undergraduate commencement ceremony. McBride is a writer, he is a musician, he is a teacher, and he is a native New Yorker. McBride was born and raised in the Red Hook housing projects in Brooklyn, and later St. Albans, Queens. He is the eighth of 12 children. He went to New York City public schools. He graduated from Oberlin College, where he studied music and communications and he also earned a master’s in journalism from Columbia University at age 22. He was a staff writer for the Boston Globe and Washington Post, and later served as a tenor saxophonist and composer for jazz luminaries. McBride is best known for his New York Times bestselling memoir, The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother. The book became a modern literary classic, read in schools across America. His novel The Good Lord Bird, about the abolitionist John Brown, won the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction. His body of work includes other novels, screenplays, musicals, and a biography of James Brown, called Kill ’Em and Leave: Searching for James Brown and the American Soul. His most recent book, published in 2017, is a short story collection called Five-Carat Soul. In 2016, President Barack Obama presented McBride with the National Humanities Medal "for humanizing the complexities of discussing race in America.” He has been a Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at New York University for more than a decade, mentoring young writers. He also created the Sister Lee music program, which teaches piano, drums, and music history to young people from the housing project where he grew up.In both his nonfiction and his fiction, he thinks and writes about the great challenges facing American society and the tensions and challenges around race, community, and humanity. McBride’s inspirational literary excellence, searching and insightful examinations of American society, and dedication to educating the next generation through his writing and teaching.

David Swope, Chairman and Founder, Club

Degree:  Doctor of Humane Letters

David Swope is an honorary degree recipient (posthumously) for Pace’s Westchester undergraduate commencement ceremony.

David Avery Swope, JD, was the third generation of his family to take a leading role in Westchester County. Swope was born in Ossining and went to school in Scarborough before graduating from Harvard and Columbia Law School. He joined the Peace Corps and served in India. He formed a legal aid society in Bombay, now Mumbai. He became a corporate lawyer in Manhattan, first at White & Case and then Davis Polk.  He then came home to Westchester to manage the family businesses, which included a tennis club and Tappan Hill Mansion. He built the tennis club into one of the first full-service gyms in the area. As a successful businessman, he also became a major Westchester philanthropist. Swope was deeply involved in Teatown, founded with his family’s donation, and supported the Westchester Land Trust. He was chairman of the Jacob Burns Film Center and served on the boards of the Ossining Children’s Center and the Phelps Memorial Hospital. For many years, he was an active board member at Westchester Community College. He funded David Swope Scholarship to help graduates of Westchester Community College transfer to Pace. His passion for the environment led to his support of the Pace University Environmental Center.

New York City Undergraduate Speaker and Honorary Degree Recipients:

Carmen Fariña, retired Chancellor of the NYC Department of Education

Degree: Doctor of Humane Letters

Carmen Fariña is this year’s honorary degree recipient and speaker for Pace’s New York City undergraduate commencement ceremony. She has devoted her life to ensuring that New York City’s schoolchildren have access to a quality education. After 50 years working in the New York City public schools as a teacher, a principal, a superintendent, a deputy chancellor, and, for the last four years, as chancellor of the nation’s largest school system, Fariña is retiring this year. Fariña has been a passionate advocate for students and teachers. As chancellor, she worked to build collaborative relationships, to address inequalities in the school system, and to help students. Fariña was born in Brooklyn to parents who fled the Franco regime in Spain in the 1930s. They spoke Spanish at home. She went to parochial school at St. Charles Borromeo Church, in Brooklyn, where she was the only student in her kindergarten class who didn’t speak English. Fariña earned a bachelor of science from New York University and then three master’s degrees from New York schools: one in bilingual education from Brooklyn College, another in gifted and arts education from Fordham University, and, finally, in 1988, one in administration and supervision from Pace University’s School of Education. She spent 22 years as a devoted upper elementary school teacher at PS 29 in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn.She introduced a revolutionary way to integrate social studies called Making Connections, would be replicated citywide. She moved into administration as curriculum director in District 15. As principal, the school rose from ranking 76th among public elementary schools on the citywide reading test to the top three. Fariña went on to be a superintendent, from 2004 to 2006, she served as deputy chancellor for teaching and learning. She retired after her long and successful career, only to be called back a decade later. She has made instruction more teacher-driven and less test-focused, while continuing to improve graduation rates and test scores.

Marilyn Simons, Co-Founder, Simons Foundation

Degree: Doctor of Humane Letters

Marilyn Simons, Ph.D., is this year’s honorary degree recipient for Pace’s New York City undergraduate commencement ceremony. Simons is one of the greatest supporters of basic scientific research in the United States. She is the president of the Simons Foundation, co-founded with James Simons, her husband, which is one of the nation’s leading funders of basic scientific research, focused primarily on mathematical and physical sciences, life sciences, and autism research. Founded in 1994, today the Simons Foundation awards about $230 million dollars in grants to scientists each year, and spends another $50 million on conducting research in-house. Simons earned a bachelor’s and doctoral degree in economics from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook. She and her husband created the Simons Foundation, they focused first on autism research. The foundation started a major data collection project, based on work with 12 collaborating universities. The data set they created then became a major resource to a broad community of autism researchers, jumpstarting the field. Their successes led them to expand into many other areas, including brain research, a telescope project, and much more. The Simons Foundation is able to fund basic research whether it crosses disciplines, crosses institutions, crosses geographies, or seems impractical that public sources might not.

Simons is also active in supporting other nonprofit work across New York City and Long Island. She has been involved in supporting K–12 education for underserved communities. She is vice president of the board of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, the noted 125-year-old biomedical research laboratory on Long Island. She is a board member at the Learning Spring School, a school in New York City for children on the autism spectrum, and she is a board member at the East Harlem Scholars Academy, a charter school program. Simons is listed among America’s most generous philanthropists.

Graduate Degree Speaker and Honorary Degree Recipient:

Irene Sankoff, Actor, Writer, Lyricist, Composer (creator: “Come From Away”)

Degree: Doctor of Humane Letters

New York City Ceremonies

Irene Sankoff is Pace’s graduate commencement speaker and honorary degree recipient. Irene Sankoff has always believed in the power of theater. Working both onstage and off in her home of Toronto, she has found enormous success in her second home here in New York, while telling a story about a small community in Newfoundland. Sankoff, a lifelong musical theater fan, is part of the wife-and-husband creative team that wrote the Broadway hit “Come From Away.” The musical, about a remote Canadian village that welcomed stranded international travelers on 9/11 and the warm interactions between the locals and the visitors, has become a beloved show that was nominated for seven Tony Awards in 2017, winning one. Sankoff and her husband, David Hein, both Canadian, met as undergraduates at York University in Toronto. They moved to New York together in 1999 to pursue their creative passions: Hein as a musician and Sankoff as an MFA student at The Actors Studio Drama School. In Toronto, they realized they could combine their passions by writing a musical based on their family’s true story, called My Mother’s Lesbian Jewish Wiccan Wedding. It was a huge Toronto hit and has since been produced across North America, winning many awards. Together, Sankoff and Hein crafted the script, music, and lyrics for “Come From Away.” Sankoff and Hein won Helen Hayes Awards and Drama Desk Awards. They were nominated for Tony Awards, and their show won one, for best director. “Come From Away” was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Musical Theater Album.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project finds that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennials. www.pace.edu

 

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"San Francisco Chronicle" featured Dyson Assistant Professor Anne Toomey's piece "Redefining 'impact' so research can help real people right away, even before becoming a journal article"

05/07/2018

"San Francisco Chronicle" featured Dyson Assistant Professor Anne Toomey's piece "Redefining 'impact' so research can help real people right away, even before becoming a journal article"

Scientists are increasingly expected to produce research with impact that goes beyond the confines of academia. When funding organizations such as the National Science Foundation consider grants to researchers, they ask about “broader impacts.” They want to support science that directly contributes to the “achievement of specific, desired societal outcomes.” It’s not enough for researchers to call it a day, after they publish their results in journal articles read by a handful of colleagues and few, if any, people outside the ivory tower.

Perhaps nowhere is impact of greater importance than in my own fields of ecology and conservation science. Researchers often conduct this work with the explicit goal of contributing to the restoration and long-term survival of the species or ecosystem in question. For instance, research on an endangered plant can help to address the threats facing it.

But scientific impact is a very tricky concept. Science is a process of inquiry; it’s often impossible to know what the outcomes will be at the start. Researchers are asked to imagine potential impacts of their work. And people who live and work in the places where the research is conducted may have different ideas about what impact means.

In collaboration with several Bolivian colleagues, I studied perceptions of research and its impact in a highly biodiverse area in the Bolivian Amazon. We found that researchers – both foreign-based and Bolivian – and people living and working in the area had different hopes and expectations about what ecological research could help them accomplish.

My colleagues and I focused on research conducted in Bolivia’s Madidi National Park and Natural Area for Integrated Management.

Due to its impressive size (approximately 19,000 square kilometers) and diversity of species – including endangered mammals such as the spectacled bear and the giant otter – Madidi attracts large numbers of ecologists and conservation scientists from around the world. The park is also notable for its cultural diversity. Four indigenous territories overlap Madidi, and there are 31 communities located within its boundaries.

Between 2012 and 2015, we carried out interviews and workshops with people living and working in the region, including park guards, indigenous community members and other researchers. We also surveyed scientists who had worked in the area during the previous 10 years. Our goal was to better understand whether they considered their research to have implications for conservation and ecological management, and how and with whom they shared the results of their work.

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"The Associated Press" featured Dyson Professor Anne Toomey's piece in "Redefining ‘impact’ so research can help real people right away, even before becoming a journal article"

05/07/2018

"The Associated Press" featured Dyson Professor Anne Toomey's piece in "Redefining ‘impact’ so research can help real people right away, even before becoming a journal article"

Scientists are increasingly expected to produce research with impact that goes beyond the confines of academia. When funding organizations such as the National Science Foundation consider grants to researchers, they ask about “broader impacts.” They want to support science that directly contributes to the “achievement of specific, desired societal outcomes.” It’s not enough for researchers to call it a day, after they publish their results in journal articles read by a handful of colleagues and few, if any, people outside the ivory tower.

Perhaps nowhere is impact of greater importance than in my own fields of ecology and conservation science. Researchers often conduct this work with the explicit goal of contributing to the restoration and long-term survival of the species or ecosystem in question. For instance, research on an endangered plant can help to address the threats facing it.

But scientific impact is a very tricky concept. Science is a process of inquiry; it’s often impossible to know what the outcomes will be at the start. Researchers are asked to imagine potential impacts of their work. And people who live and work in the places where the research is conducted may have different ideas about what impact means.

In collaboration with several Bolivian colleagues, I studied perceptions of research and its impact in a highly biodiverse area in the Bolivian Amazon. We found that researchers – both foreign-based and Bolivian – and people living and working in the area had different hopes and expectations about what ecological research could help them accomplish.

My colleagues and I focused on research conducted in Bolivia’s Madidi National Park and Natural Area for Integrated Management.

Due to its impressive size (approximately 19,000 square kilometers) and diversity of species – including endangered mammals such as the spectacled bear and the giant otter – Madidi attracts large numbers of ecologists and conservation scientists from around the world. The park is also notable for its cultural diversity. Four indigenous territories overlap Madidi, and there are 31 communities located within its boundaries.

Between 2012 and 2015, we carried out interviews and workshops with people living and working in the region, including park guards, indigenous community members and other researchers. We also surveyed scientists who had worked in the area during the previous 10 years. Our goal was to better understand whether they considered their research to have implications for conservation and ecological management, and how and with whom they shared the results of their work.

Eighty-three percent of researchers queried told us their work had implications for management at community, regional and national levels rather than at the international level. For example, knowing the approximate populations of local primate species can be important for communities who rely on the animals for food and ecotourism.

But the scale of relevance didn’t necessarily dictate how researchers actually disseminated the results of their work. Rather, we found that the strongest predictor of how and with whom a researcher shared their work was whether they were based at a foreign or national institution. Foreign-based researchers had extremely low levels of local, regional or even national dissemination. However, they were more likely than national researchers to publish their findings in the international literature.

This disparity raises concerns about whether foreign-led research in tropical nations such as Bolivia is perpetuating colonial-era legacies of scientific extractivism.

Along with its South American neighbors, Bolivia was subject to centuries of European explorations, during which collectors gathered interesting specimens of flora and fauna to ship back to the country financing the expedition. As late as the 1990s, more than 90 percent of 37,000 zoological specimens from Bolivia were in collections beyond its borders. The expatriation of biological samples has become increasingly restricted under a national political climate of “decolonization.”

But many locals in the Madidi region still expressed to us perceptions that “research is only for the researcher” and “researchers leave nothing behind.” In interviews and workshops, they lamented opportunities missed because they didn’t know about the results of research conducted on their lands. For example, when the park staff learned about previous research done on mercury levels in the Tuichi river that runs through the park, they talked about the importance of sharing this information with local communities for whom fish is a main sources of protein.

Our results suggest that foreign researchers should be wary of a modern form of scientific colonialism – conducting fieldwork in a far-off land and then taking their data and knowledge home with them.

Our study also revealed that in some cases, the question of whether or not research had been disseminated was a matter of perspective. Park offices, indigenous council headquarters and government institutions all held dusty libraries full of articles and books that were in many cases the final products of scientific studies. But very few people had actually read these reports, in part because many were written in English. Also, people in the Madidi region are more accustomed to obtaining knowledge orally rather than through written texts. So finding new ways to communicate across cultural and language barriers is key.

Perhaps one way forward is to think differently about what is meant by impact and when it takes place. Although it’s typically understood to occur after the results have been written up, our research found that the most meaningful forms of impact often took place prior to that.

In ecological and conservation science research, locals are hired as guides or porters, and researchers often stay for days or weeks in communities while they are collecting data. This fieldwork period is filled with potential for knowledge exchange, where both parties can learn from one another. Indigenous communities in the Madidi region are directly dependent on local biodiversity. Not only does it provide food and other resources, but it’s vital for the continuation of their cultures. They possess unique knowledge about the place, and they have a vested interest in ensuring that the local biodiversity will continue to exist for many generations to come.

Rather than impact being addressed at the end of research, societal impacts can be part of the first stages of a study. For example, people living in the region where data is to be collected might have insight into the research questions being investigated; scientists need to build in time and plan ways to ask them. Ecological fieldwork presents many opportunities for knowledge exchange, new ideas and even friendships between different groups. Researchers can take steps to engage more directly with community life, such as by taking a few hours to teach local school kids about their research.

Of course, such activities do not make disseminating the results of research at multiple levels less important. But engaging additional stakeholders earlier in the process could make for a more interested audience when findings are available.

Whether studying hive decline with beekeepers in the United Kingdom or evaluating human-elephant conflicts in India, those affected have the right to know about the results of research. If “broader impacts” are to become more than an afterthought in the research process, non-academics need a bigger voice in the process of determining what those impacts may be.

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"The Evolllution" featured Assistant Vice President of Continuing and Professional Education Christine Shakespeare's piece "Managing Siloes: How Non-Traditional Divisions Can Innovate from the Fringes"

05/04/2018

"The Evolllution" featured Assistant Vice President of Continuing and Professional Education Christine Shakespeare's piece "Managing Siloes: How Non-Traditional Divisions Can Innovate from the Fringes"

Non-traditional divisions of colleges and universities across the United States and Canada have a critical role to play in creating access to postsecondary programming to audiences that fall outside the mold of the traditional 18- to 22-year-old residential learner. Innovative, fast-moving and responsive to market shifts, these divisions have the characteristics and DNA required to succeed in uncertain conditions. Today, non-traditional learners vastly outnumber the traditional—a trend expected to continue—and conditions are anything but predictable for institutional leaders. In this interview, Christine Shakespeare reflects on the impact siloes between non-traditional divisions and the main institutional campus can have and shares her thoughts on how these siloes can be minimized or avoided altogether.

The EvoLLLution (Evo): How do siloes between divisions, units and teams come to be formed and solidified?

Christine Shakespeare (CS): My experience demonstrates that siloes come to be formed in a variety of ways. But I want to take a step back and tell my story which is that my father, a Venezuelan, ended up a professor and special program administrator of a quasi-remedial program from the 1970s-1990s. Being that I am the daughter of an immigrant, education was considered the most important tool to success. My father was passionate and devoted to providing an opportunity to students who would otherwise not have access to higher education without his program. My premise, continuing the tradition I was inculcated with, is that my primary goal is provide higher education opportunity to those who otherwise would not have access to a higher education.

Even in the 70s, 80s and 90s, many institutions were willing to have a unit created to support marginalized students. However, the units were marginalized themselves often with little support, little buy-in and eventual neglect because the units did not “fit in” to the institution. Most of us in the business of providing opportunity to marginalized students (who also may be non-traditional/post-traditional/contemporary), continue to operate at the fringe of the institution because higher education institutions believe students and programs should fit into the mainstream organization.

There is disdain for students who see higher education as an opportunity for a job/career. This is my premise when I tell you that that siloes between divisions, units and teams as well as within divisions, units and teams, occur because higher education is about production of knowledge and not about operating efficiently, especially for marginalized populations.

My experience as the marginalized unit devoted to the non-traditional student has been that siloes have come about because:

  1. 1. The entrepreneurial unit that created all its functions for serving unique student audiences always operated under the radar because no one really wanted them at the institution. Therefore, they sit OUTSIDE the siloes that have developed to support traditional students.
  2. 2. The functional units that support the analog and legacy degree programs and credentials exist purely to reproduce the institution’s raison d’etre which is not to serve students but to produce knowledge and churn the students through a degree program. The focus of the faculty and schools and their concomitant units is to reproduce knowledge, not prepare students for jobs/careers or to generate revenue.
  3. 3. The analog, legacy enterprise systems were designed for one type of student and are not nimble enough to enable entrepreneurial units to leverage them as tools to support the non-traditional student.

I note that this is my experience. There are other experiences within an institution that involve siloes but I am not addressing those.

Evo: What impact can these siloes have on the management of an innovative or quickly moving unit?

CS: In order for innovation to occur within an institution with siloes, the innovator must take one of two paths.

The first path is to work within the institution across the siloes. Many of us work across the institution’s siloes and it takes a significant amount of time and energy and can be discouraging because the siloes may feel like walls. And, it continues the marginalization effect not only of the students, but also of the instructors, the staff, and the families of the students and staff. The institution is turning to the innovative/quickly moving unit asking it to generate more revenue and “be innovative” but it does not have the capacity internally nor does it have the ability to work with and across the siloes that support the rest of the institution.

The other path an innovator can take is to create her own “silo” to serve her unique audience(s). Others of us have created our own silo to include all the major functional areas of a larger institution but operated solely for this audience, such as in a school of professional studies, for example. Some of these single-audience siloes of their own can be more nimble for their audience and they limit their interaction with the dominant institution because the dominant institution is not truly able to assist this side-silo.

Evo: How can leaders work across these siloes to bring numerous otherwise disparate individuals together to work towards a common goal?

CS: Leaders do not see these siloes because they work within the institution, often for many years. They do not know the back-end operations. They do not know what it means to be a user (student).

My experience is that generally speaking, leaders want to help the non-traditional unit be successful but they do not know how. They (including board members) have experienced a meaningful education of their own in a dominant institution as “traditional” students both at the undergraduate and at the graduate level. They don’t represent the marginalized student in age, race, ethnicity, immigration status, veteran status, or disability/ability.

Therefore, my experience would suggest that leaders can work across siloes if:

  1. 1.They try to be a student and see what the experience is like (secret shop) and do it themselves—not hire a consultant to tell the story. Try applying to a graduate program! Try applying to an online program! Try to register for a summer course as a visiting student! Try to pay a bill or speak to a professor while working full time! Try to get a contract signed or a marketing initiative launched! Try to get a new idea implemented! Then tell your story as the leader.
  2. 2. They ask the innovators at the institution what their experience and point of view is and empower them to solve the problems across siloes. It may mean rethinking who sits at the table. Taking an honest inventory of the leadership profile will open the eyes of leaders.
  3. 3. They look at what innovative institutions are doing and see those institutions as inspirational, recognizing that their institution could be innovative and should be innovative.
  4. 4. They make it a priority from their bully pulpit to create a vision that everyone at the institution is working towards change to eliminate the siloes or create cross-functional matrices—including within siloes (yes, there are some siloes within siloes)

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Press Release: Pace Student Awarded Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grant

05/02/2018

Press Release: Pace Student Awarded Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grant

Dyson Honors College senior Kelsey Parker awarded a Fulbright to conduct research on the effect of mine sites on soil health in Zambia

Pace University announced that honors student Kelsey Parker has been selected to receive a Fulbright award to conduct research in Zambia. Parker is a senior majoring in Environmental Science in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace. Her proposed research, “The Effects of Copper Mining on Soil Health in Zambia,” will involve a comparative study of the soil ecology of active and restored mine sites in Zambia to determine what is necessary to treat them.

“I’m so happy for and proud of Kelsey,” said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “She’s an amazing example of the smart, ambitious students we educate at Pace, and this Fulbright award is yet another great opportunity for her to learn and explore. We’re excited to see the research she brings back from her studies of soil ecology in Zambia.”

While at Pace, Parker has been a part of the Student-Faculty Undergraduate Research Program conducting research with Marcy Kelly, Ph.D., professor and assistant chair of the Department of Biology. “I have watched Kelsey grow from a reserved first-year student living in New York City for the first time to one of the most talented, engaging and courageous students that I have ever worked with,” said Professor Kelly. “Kelsey is passionate about what she believes in and puts all of her energies into each endeavor in which she engages. It is not at all surprising that Kelsey was awarded the Fulbright.”

“I’m overjoyed and still surprised that I got a Fulbright,” said Parker. “I came to Pace from a tiny town in West Virginia, a state with the lowest education attainment levels in the United States, so even graduating was a huge accomplishment. I have to thank Theresa Frey, the Fulbright advisor for Pace for meeting with me and encouraging me so much along the way. I’m looking forward to an exciting year ahead and once I complete my Fulbright I hope to pursue a Ph.D. in environmental science.”

After completing her Fulbright, Parker hopes to write her findings in a manuscript, earn a doctorate in conservation biology, and pursue her career goal to combine the above and below ground aspects of plant growth to restore ecosystems.

About The Fulbright Program:  The Fulbright Program is an international educational exchange program sponsored and managed by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries under policy guidelines established by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board (FSB) and in cooperation with a number of private organizations. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement as well as record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields. The Fulbright Program awards approximately 8,000 grants annually to undertake graduate study, advanced research, university lecturing, and classroom teaching.. Roughly 1,600 U.S. students, 4,000 foreign students, 1,200 U.S. scholars, and 900 visiting scholars receive awards, in addition to several hundred teachers and professionals’ year to approximately 130 countries, where they lecture and/or conduct research in a wide variety of academic and professional fields. Approximately 370,000 "Fulbrighters" have participated in the Program since its inception in 1946. Select Pace University students have been receiving the Fulbright award for the past 17 consecutive years.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law). The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

Follow us on Twitter at @PaceUnews or on our website: http://www.pace.edu/news

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"New York Business Journal" featured Lubin Professor Bruce Bachenheimer in "Jopwell helps track down minority talent "

05/01/2018

"New York Business Journal" featured Lubin Professor Bruce Bachenheimer in "Jopwell helps track down minority talent "

...Bruce Bachenheimer, executive director of the Entrepreneurship Lab at Pace University in New York, said companies are paying increasing attention to hiring minorities with good reason.  

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"Associated Press" featured Lubin Professor Larry Chiagouris in "Royal wedding mania: $50,000 hotel package, Union Jack condoms and more"

05/01/2018

"Associated Press" featured Lubin Professor Larry Chiagouris in "Royal wedding mania: $50,000 hotel package, Union Jack condoms and more"

...“Royal weddings occur on only a few occasions during a lifetime,” said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University in New York. “They are therefore a rare opportunity for brands to reach large global audiences and for consumers to be a part of a rare event. So, to do so, the price of participation will always be very, very high.”

The Drake hotel in Chicago will host a royal-themed luncheon on May 19 with the same menu served in 1996 when Harry’s mother, Princess Diana, stayed there. Guests can even book the suite Diana stayed in, which has been decorated with photos of her. The Drake is also offering special royal teas, cocktails and a series of screenings of royal-themed movies like “Victoria & Abdul.”

In England, the Conrad London St. James has a “Propose Like A Prince” package with a horse carriage ride, Champagne and a room decorated with rose petals. And Mercure Hotels invited couples who share Harry and Meghan’s first names to apply for a free stay at one of Mercure’s London properties, and two couples won.

Royal-watchers heading to England will find it nearly impossible to book a room in Windsor, though hotels in London and elsewhere are still available. London’s Hotel Cafe Royal has a package that includes a luxury limo trip to Windsor Castle with a picnic hamper. Just don’t try to picnic there on May 19.

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"Our Town" featured Assistant Vice President of Cultural Affairs at the Schimmel Center for the Arts Martin Kagan in "The man behind the scenes"

05/01/2018

"Our Town" featured Assistant Vice President of Cultural Affairs at the Schimmel Center for the Arts Martin Kagan in "The man behind the scenes"

You might not know the name Martin Kagan, but you’re probably familiar with the performing artists he brings to the stage.

“I’ve always felt a kindred spirit to what I see onstage,” says Kagan, the Assistant Vice President of Cultural Affairs at the Schimmel Center for the Arts. “Not being an artist, where I get true satisfaction is knowing that when I sit in the audience — and I see every performance — I’ve been responsible to make that happen.”

This year, Kagan has a lot to take pride in. He’s the driving force behind bringing internationally acclaimed artists to the Schimmel Center, an intimate performing arts venue at Pace University. Upcoming highlights this spring include a performance by Kayhan Kalhor and Erdal Erzincan, Persian and Turkish improvisationalists with devoted fans across the globe, and a new musical about confronting gun violence in America performed by the acclaimed Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra.

Manhattan’s cultural offerings are an embarrassment of riches any given night of the week, and Kagan’s vision has helped position the Schimmel Center and Pace University, where Kagan teaches a class in arts and entertainment management, as a growing cultural force in Lower Manhattan. But ultimately, says Kagan, his job is not about him.

“Our goal is to make the artists look the best possible they can. It’s all about the artist,” he says.

From dance, cabaret and music to lectures and comedy, Kagan approaches the process of creating the perfect performing arts season with precision and insight. He begins planning over a year out, and sees artists live or on YouTube before making any decisions.

“I try to find attractions that are unique each season, ones that have artistic integrity,” says Kagan. “You feel very close to the artists [at the Schimmel] and it’s one of the things that both the audience and the artists love about the space. It’s warm, it’s welcoming, it’s intimate.”

When asked to pick his favorite performance, Kagan pulls no punches: “Everything we do I think is spectacular,” he says. “I try not to have favorites. They’re like children, they’re all my favorites.”

The most important part of the job? Building trust with the audience.

“I’ve had many years working in different venues, but that has been key. Not only that I provide an environment for the artist, but that I also provide an audience to feel comfortable, and to want to come back and have the confidence to see things they may not be interested in because I’m presenting,” he says.

Kagan finds excitement in the diversity of experiences his position offers, and it’s a path he encourages others to follow.

Says Kagan, “It’s a full life. No day is ever the same.”

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"Autism Support Network" featured student David Sharif's piece "I have autism, and I'm in college"

05/01/2018

"Autism Support Network" featured student David Sharif's piece "I have autism, and I'm in college"

David Sharif is a junior at Pace University majoring in political science and minoring in peace and justice studies.

I knew I wanted to go to college at a medium-sized private institution on the East Coast. I knew I wanted to study political science, I wanted opportunities to make change in my community, and I wanted to be able to work with the United Nations, which I think does more to make change than any other organization. I also knew I needed a school that provides support for students with learning differences. I am on the autism spectrum, and I knew I could succeed—but I also knew I’d need help.

I wanted to be a college student in New York to shock the world. I wanted to show that I can do something many people would say an autistic person can’t. I’m attending a prominent university, I’m studying abroad in the countries of my choice, and I’m staying on track to graduate with honors. I’m lucky to be loved by so many people surrounding me, who help me on this path.

That’s why I came to Pace University. And I’m proud to say that it’s one of the best decisions I’ve made. So far, it is all working. I’m maintaining a GPA above 3.5, I’ve made dean’s list multiple times, and I’ve been inducted into the Pi Gamma Mu Honor Society of Social Sciences.

But being at Pace has allowed me to experience so much beyond the classroom, as well. I care about social justice, and I’ve collaborated with groups that strive to protect human rights and create safe environments for people around the world. I am a member of the LGBTQ Center, a volunteer for the Center for Community Action and Research, and a former democracy coach for Generation Citizen, a civic engagement group. Through activism, I’ve developed my teaching skills, discovered the hardships and challenges people are fighting to overcome, and volunteered in several places in the area.

My biggest passion is international diplomacy and world travel. As a delegate for Pace’s Model United Nations team, I’ve attended two conferences in New York City. As a world traveler, I’ve joined two study abroad programs. In January 2017, I studied geological and environmental relations in Ecuador—where I touched the equator, hiked steep cliffs, and observed the behaviors of animals and humans in an archipelago. Then, that fall, I studied global politics and Euro-Mediterranean relations at Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain. I toured Europe during that semester, both on excursions provided by my program and on independent weekend trips to explore European history. My ambition for 2017 was to set a new personal record of 30 countries visited, and I’m proud to say that, yes, I reached my mark.

Pace is dedicated to helping all its students succeed, and it offers two programs that have helped me thrive here. Most important is the OASIS Program, a comprehensive environment for college students with high-functioning autism and other learning differences. Through OASIS, I participate in workshops about employment, practice interviews and apply for jobs with an internship coordinator, work on class assignments with an academic coach, and select my courses with an educational coordinator. It gives me the ongoing support I need to succeed.

That builds on the help I received from the Challenge to Achievement Program (CAP), which helps first-year students who need extra help transitioning to a college environment. CAP helped me develop useful study habits, learn to complete assignments in a timely manner, build strong relationships with classmates and professors, manage my time, register for courses, keep track of my credits, and overall create the success I want for the rest of my college experience.

When I graduate next year, I’ll enter the working world as a capable, productive member of society. After that, I want to give back, by making quality education accessible and safe for people around the world with autism spectrum disorders. I say that individuals with autism can be mysterious, but you must discover what they are using to succeed. Pace has discovered that I use world travel to succeed. My biggest goal is to visit all 193 U.N. member states before I’m 50. But even if I don’t make it, I know I’m succeeding.

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"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Dean Johathan Hill's piece "Jonathan H. Hill: A workable cybersecurity solution for Westchester"

05/01/2018

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Dean Johathan Hill's piece "Jonathan H. Hill: A workable cybersecurity solution for Westchester"

Jonathan Hill is the dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University.

It is hard not to feel helpless in the face of the latest news from the war on our digital privacy. Facebook, the place where we share our vacation photos and receive reminders about our best friends’ birthdays, has been “mined” for personal data on millions of individuals, some of which was used to send “fake news” to vulnerable users.

The list of attacks on major consumer sites and major businesses continues to grow unabated. 2018 is not even halfway through and we have already learned of major attacks on the likes of travel search site Orbitz. Attacks are not limited to corporate victims: hospitals, like St. Peter’s Surgery and Endoscopy Center in Albany, which was hit with a major malware attack, are also under threat. Even the Department of Homeland Security was breached by an insider who lifted Personally Identifiable Information (PII) on more than 240,000 staffers and contractors.

Westchester County, one of the nation’s wealthiest counties with its concentration of major corporate headquarters, is seen as a particularly rich target by cyber hackers around the world. The county was the target of a high-profile cyberattack on an industrial control system (ICS) — the Bowman Avenue Dam in Rye Brook — by Iranian hackers, and was also the scene of a sophisticated identity theft ring that allegedly defrauded ride-sharing drivers of millions of dollars.

New technologies, despite being developed in this era when the risk of cyber vulnerability is well known, are under just as much pressure and are, likewise, in danger of being overwhelmed by cyberattacks. Cryptocurrency platforms like Ethereum have suffered ongoing attacks and substantial financial losses. The threats to software-controlled technologies like driverless cars and drones is a significant concern. In addition, the emergence of a variety of “internet of things” devices like home security systems, many of which run on outdated and therefore more vulnerable, software, represents a new opportunity for cyberhackers to attack individuals directly. IBM predicts that more than 11 billion devices will be connected to the internet this year.

While the first generation of cyberhackers were often “script kiddies”’ whose motivations were often just the thrill of breaking in to a closed system, today we grapple with much more sophisticated professional hackers whose motivations are either financial, or destructive in the military offensive context. As such, they are either employed by organized crime rings, or are part of an official or quasi-official national security apparatus from a government that is competing with, or hostile to, the United States. These people are motivated and they are good technologists operating in a world where the stakes for the theft of personal information, the opportunity to take control of an industrial controlling device, or to influence the outcome of an election are the highest that they have ever been. We know that these attacks will continue and that they will increase in number and in sophistication.

Short of turning off our computers and leaving our cellphones in a basket by the door, what solutions do we have? The most powerful tool that we have at our disposal is education. We must teach people both the tools to defend their businesses and homes from cyberattacks, and the open sharing of information, because in that way we can learn from each other and be resilient in the face of ongoing attacks.

At Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, a National Security Agency-certified Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education, we bring government, law enforcement, industry and academic leaders together on a regular basis to share their tools, tactics, successes and failures to ensure that the community is fully aware of the current state of the cybersecurity threat. In this way, we also learn from one another and can build a substantial database of the techniques that have worked in cybersecurity, as well as those that have not worked.

It is unfortunate that, as with any crime, those who have been victimized are often reticent to share their experiences and to admit to their peers that they were attacked. The growing movement to hold corporate officers, including the board of directors and executives, liable for cybersecurity break-ins can make them even less willing to share. This needs to change: the need for open sharing of vulnerabilities, attacks, responses and successful recovery plans is a way to get actionable information into the hands of the chief information security officers, law enforcement professionals and technologists who can employ them as part of a broader national strategy to make the internet safe for business transactions — as well as safe place to wish your best friends an enthusiastic
happy birthday.

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