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New York Daily News: "President-elect Donald Trump's cabinet picks reflect his own personal characteristics"

12/19/2016

New York Daily News: "President-elect Donald Trump's cabinet picks reflect his own personal characteristics"

. . . "It would appear the President-elect is equating similar personal characteristics with loyalty and personal commitment," explained David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of political science at Pace University.

But the "shielding from alternative arguments" likely to arise from ensuing group think "could lead to missteps," he said, especially "in an environment where the processes and the use of power are often different from the private sector world" - where most of Trump's choices have had their careers.

Read more here.
 

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USA Today: "Travelers, beware! Hacking lurks in plugs and ports"

12/19/2016

USA Today: "Travelers, beware! Hacking lurks in plugs and ports"

. . . Tell your phone to say "no." Disable location services, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi when possible. Also, think about the permissions associated with third-party apps, which may have access to your microphone, camera and contacts. "If you need to play games on your mobile, then disable Internet access to those apps," says Darren Hayes, a digital forensics and cybersecurity expert at Pace University.

Read more here.

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TechNewsWorld: "Magic Leap Catches Flak Over Tricky Video"

12/14/2016

TechNewsWorld: "Magic Leap Catches Flak Over Tricky Video"

. . . Magic Leap has raised US$1.4 billion in funding without anyone seeing its technology. Investors include Google and Andreessen Horowitz.

Google's Sundar Pichai and Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson sit on its board, and Magic Leap has signed a deal with LucasFilm.

Why were companies with strong technical expertise attracted to Magic Leap?

"The people at the top who do the deals are often under pressure to do the deal before the required amount of due diligence can occur," said Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

"I doubt that the most senior people even personally had the time or the skills to do the due diligence needed," he told TechNewsWorld.

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Taipei Times: "Tsai-Trump call offers a window of opportunity"

12/12/2016

Taipei Times: "Tsai-Trump call offers a window of opportunity"

The trans-Pacific telephone conversation between President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) and US president-elect Donald Trump last week shocked the world as it opened a new window of opportunities and challenges for Taiwan, writes Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, Professor of History and Co-director of the B.A. program in ‎Global Asia Studies at Pace University.

Diplomatically, Trump sent a strong message to Beijing that he went beyond the “one China” policy to recognize Taiwan as a political equal and the third-largest client of US arms sales.

Bypassing the White House and the US Department of State and ignoring 35 years of US diplomatic protocol, Trump seems to be prepared to play tough with China and might want to make Taiwan a bargaining chip in negotiations with Beijing over major political, strategic and economic issues.

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Teen Vogue: "The GPA That Will Double Your Chances of Qualifying for Scholarships"

12/08/2016

Teen Vogue: "The GPA That Will Double Your Chances of Qualifying for Scholarships"

. . . If you’re lucky, your school will actually have a merit-based scholarship calculator posted online, like these calculators from Pace University in New York and Bradley University in Illinois.

Read more here.

 

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Daily Caller News Foundation: "Hackers Are Gunning For Your Personal Data By Tricking You"

12/05/2016

Daily Caller News Foundation: "Hackers Are Gunning For Your Personal Data By Tricking You"

. . . “Phishing scams are a highly effective social engineering attack – everyone clicks links and it’s easy to impersonate a person or entity’s email or link,” Pace University Prof. Darren Hayes told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “It plays on our emotions.”

And there are studies to back that up. One study conducted at a German university of 1,700 participants found that roughly half of people click on infected links from email addresses or Facebook accounts they are unfamiliar with even after knowing the risks. (RELATED: Everything Online Is Connected, Now There’s A Growing Need For Cyber Insurance)

“Cybersecurity is not terrible in the USA, but we always appear to be several steps behind the hackers,” Hayes said. “We should, however, be concerned about the brain-drain in government when government employees are leaving in droves to start up their own companies in cybersecurity. Additionally, enormous vulnerabilities exist in our critical infrastructure,” he concluded.

Read more here.

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Network World: "A year after terrorist attacks, phone privacy laws unchanged – but watch out for Trump"

12/01/2016

Network World: "A year after terrorist attacks, phone privacy laws unchanged – but watch out for Trump"

. . . . Of course, there are plenty who support the Justice Department’s assertion that strong encryption on personal devices poses a serious national security threat. Pace University professor and computer forensics expert Darren Hayes argued just that point in an editorial for the Guardian’s website at the time.

“Many mobile forensics examiners, including myself, know that what is at stake is not just the San Bernardino case but a growing backlog of criminal cases – some involving suspected child abusers or terrorists – that cannot proceed because of Apple’s defiance in assisting law enforcement,” he said.

Read more here.

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Washington Times: "Battle stations: Democrats say they’re ready for ‘one hell of a fight’ with Trump"

12/01/2016

Washington Times: "Battle stations: Democrats say they’re ready for ‘one hell of a fight’ with Trump"

Photo: Troubled Democrats watch results during presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center in New York. (Associated Press)

. . . YEAH, ABOUT THAT RECOUNT

Former Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein garnered considerable press coverage after she demanded a recount of the final election results in some states. It proved a convenient vehicle for Hillary Clinton’s campaign as well; they too joined the fray — deemed a “delusional melodrama” by Edward Morrissey, a columnist for The Week. Indeed, it could be all for naught.

“The Wisconsin and other possible recounts are very unlikely to change the results,” says David A. Caputo, a political science professor at Pace University. “The number of votes which change in a recount are usually far less than the margin of victory here for Donald Trump. There is no credible evidence of fraud in Wisconsin or elsewhere. I would expect the Wisconsin recount and any others to have no impact on the final results unless the Green Party knows something that others do not. I doubt if that is the case.”

Read more here.

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The Hill's Pundits Blog: "Trump's best option for North American trade"

12/01/2016

The Hill's Pundits Blog: "Trump's best option for North American trade"

“The 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between Canada, Mexico, and America abolished most tariffs on goods and services that are traded between these countries,” writes Narendra C. Bhandari, Ph.D., professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “The trade and investment between these countries have exploded.

“Their economies have become highly interdependent. Some of the major products traded between these countries include, agricultural products, chemicals, technologies, medical equipment, motor vehicles, pharmaceuticals, services and textiles.

“Unfortunately, the agreement has also caused America to lose about 700,000 jobs. During his campaign for the presidency, Donald Trump repeatedly promised to repeal or renegotiate NAFTA to help grow American jobs.

“America has the following options: cancel NAFTA, renegotiate NAFTA or legislate trade equilibrium.

“A country may withdraw from the agreement six months after providing a written notice of withdrawal to the other two parties, according to Article 2205 of NAFTA. The agreement would then continue to remain in force for the remaining two parties.

“Other things remaining same, canceling NAFTA could force America to impose or increase tariffs on imports of products from Mexico and Canada. The latter two countries would do the same. It would reduce imports from, and exports to, each other.

“The net effect of this trade war on their production and jobs may actually be negative. Mexican immigration to America would increase. China would take advantage of the trade and diplomatic vacuum so created. It would defeat Trump’s main goals.

“Renegotiating the terms of the agreement would have its own challenges. Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is willing to do so. But according to Mexico’s Economy Secretary Ildefonso Guajardo Villareal, his country is not.

“And don’t forget, President Obama also found renegotiating the terms challenging. It won’t be easy for Trump to renegotiate or nullify the agreement either.

“If and when legislated, the trade equilibrium law would provide Trump with a trump card to create jobs and bring back home, even if he cannot renegotiate or nullify NAFTA.

“Trade equilibrium can be defined as a situation when trading among different countries is such that the trading partners remain generally deficit-free from one another over a cycle of every two to three years. This theory has two major goals: to stop exporting of additional American jobs and to regain the American jobs already exported by legally requiring the dollar-trade surplus countries to eliminate their surplus over a 10-year period by buying American products.

“The absence of new trade deficit would save three American jobs per $1 million of such absence. The emergence of new trade surplus would create three American jobs per $1 million of such surplus.

“From 2000 to 2015, the U.S. accumulated a trade deficit of $767 billion with Mexico and that of $843 billion with Canada. Once the trade equilibrium law is in place, Mexico and Canada would have to use their surplus dollars to buy American products. Dollars coming back home from Mexico would create 2.3 million new jobs in America. Those coming back home from Canada would create 2.5 million new jobs in America. Thus, $1.610 trillion returning home would create 4.8 million new jobs in America. This is much, much more than the 700,000 jobs America has lost due to NAFTA.”

Read more here.

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SC Magazine (Video): Dr. Darren Hayes, Pace University

11/30/2016

SC Magazine (Video): Dr. Darren Hayes, Pace University

Photo: U.S. President-elect Donald Trump is shown at his election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Darren Hayes, Assistant Professor and Director of Cybersecurity at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, was featured in a video produced by SC Magazine about Trump’s cybersecurity policy.

Watch the interview here.

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