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Journal News: "Pace University names Martin Krislov as new president"

02/17/2017

Journal News: "Pace University names Martin Krislov as new president"

Pace University's board of trustees has elected the college's eighth president.

Marvin Krislov, who most recently served as president of Oberlin College in Ohio for nine years, will take over the helm of the more than 11,000-student school in August 2017, according to an announcement from Pace.

"(Krislov) is the ideal person to lead Pace into a new era of growth and build on the renewal and revitalization that Pace has experienced under Steve Friedman," said Mark Besca, Pace's board chairman. "Marvin has demonstrated throughout his career the strong, effective, enlightened, and passionate leadership to propel Pace to a new level of impact and stature.”

About a year ago, Pace's current president, Stephen Friedman, announced he would not seek a third five-year term at the private, nonprofit school.

“I thought 10 years is about the right time to accomplish major change," he said in an interview last February. "At the end of my second term, I’ll be 79 and I thought that would be an appropriate age to step down from a job so challenging.”

Friedman called his roles at Pace, both as president and three years as dean of the university's School of Law, the most “challenging and rewarding” of his career.

Krislov was chosen to take over the school, which has two campuses in New York City and Pleasantville, following a search process conducted by a 15-member committee of trustees, faculty, staff, alumni, school benefactors and students.

“I am honored to be chosen to lead Pace University during this exciting period of growth and revitalization as the University advances its position as one of the nation’s foremost institutions in fostering the leaders of tomorrow," Krislov said in a statement. "I look forward to joining a community of scholars and leaders who are dedicated to academic excellence and who have such a powerful impact on so many lives.”

Read more here.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace University names Marvin Krislov as its eighth president"

02/17/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace University names Marvin Krislov as its eighth president"

Oberlin College President Marvin Krislov has been chosen to succeed Stephen J. Friedman as president of Pace University.

The 56-year-old Krislov takes over the post on Aug. 1. Friedman, 78, announced a year ago that he would not request reappointment after the conclusion of his current term on June 30, 2017. He served 10 years as president.

In announcing the choice on Tuesday morning, Mark M. Besca, chairman of the board of trustees, said Krislov “is the ideal person to lead Pace into a new era of growth and build on the renewal and revitalization that Pace has experienced under Steve Friedman. Marvin has demonstrated throughout his career the strong, effective, enlightened, and passionate leadership to propel Pace to a new level of impact and stature.”

Krislov, who has been president of the Ohio school since 2007, said, “I am honored to be chosen to lead Pace University during this exciting period of growth and revitalization as the University advances its position as one of the nation’s foremost institutions in fostering the leaders of tomorrow. Pace’s commitment to access and pathways to success for students inspires me.”

In addition to serving as president of Oberlin, Krislov taught advanced courses every semester on aspects of law and public policy. In November 2009, he was appointed to the advisory board of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

During his leadership, Oberlin “became more inclusive, strengthened its academic programs, improved student outcomes, created new career opportunities for faculty and staff, expanded fundraising and alumni participation and improved its campus facilities” according to a press release.

Krislov also led a fundraising campaign that exceeded its $250 million target by $68 million and achieved it 18 months ahead of schedule.

The selection process for Friedman’s successor began last March and was led by a 15-member search committee representing trustees, faculty, administrators, alumni, benefactors, and students.

Read more here.

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Inside Higher Ed: "At His Own Pace"

02/17/2017

Inside Higher Ed: "At His Own Pace"

Marvin Krislov is in for a dramatic change of scenery.

Krislov, the 56-year-old president of Oberlin College, was announced on Tuesday as the next president of Pace University, effective Aug. 1. The move will have him leaving a 3,000-student liberal arts college and conservatory in northern Ohio that’s known for sharply leaning to the left in order to lead a professionally oriented 13,000-student university with campuses in Manhattan and New York’s Westchester County.

The differences don’t stop there. Oberlin’s student body is decidedly whiter, richer and more traditional than Pace’s. While Oberlin reports that 20 percent of its student body consists of students of color, Pace says its undergraduates are 49 percent white. At Oberlin, 9 percent of first-time undergraduates received Pell Grants in 2014-15, indicating they came from low-income families. The portion of first-time undergraduates receiving Pell Grants at Pace that year was 34 percent, according to federal data. Pace also has more than 3,500 graduate students and more than 500 law students.

It’s not the typical next step for a college president in Krislov’s position. He announced in September that he would be stepping down at the end of this academic year after a decade as Oberlin’s president. But one might expect his career arc to bend more toward another liberal arts college or a widely known research institution next. He was a finalist for the president’s position at the University of Iowa in 2015.

Instead, Krislov sees Pace as an opportunity to grow personally. He hears tremendous concern right now over whether higher education is providing students with enough opportunity, he said in a telephone interview Tuesday. Krislov sees Pace as a place that has traditionally helped first-generation students, students from working-class families and immigrants.

“I think higher ed is changing,” he said. “I think Pace may be the model for the kind of college or university we’re going to need more of. I’m excited about building a different model and taking this opportunity.”

Krislov sees himself as a longtime advocate of opportunity for those who are disadvantaged and for civil rights. At Oberlin, he created an access initiative that eliminated loan requirements for Pell-eligible students. Before that, he was among the leaders of the University of Michigan’s successful legal defense of affirmative action in front of the U.S. Supreme Court when he was that university’s vice president and general counsel.

Pace’s institutional values fit with Krislov’s, he said. He also pointed out that Pace has a liberal arts core, arguing that there are similarities with Oberlin.

Read more here.

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Associated Press: "Oberlin's president to take over at Pace University in NYC"

02/17/2017

Associated Press: "Oberlin's president to take over at Pace University in NYC"

NEW YORK (AP) - The head of Oberlin College in Ohio will become the next president of New York's Pace University.

Pace's board of trustees announced the selection of Marvin Krislov as the university's eighth president on Tuesday.

Krislov is a lawyer and former Rhodes scholar who has been president of Oberlin since 2007. He announced his plan to leave the liberal arts college in September.

At Oberlin, Krislov presided over a selective college known for its long history of liberal activism. Controversies have erupted there in recent years over issues including free speech and inauthentic ethnic food in the dining hall.

Pace is a different type of institution, with many students who are the first in their family to attend college. It has campuses in lower Manhattan and in New York City's suburbs.

http://www.usnews.com/news/new-york/articles/2017-02-14/oberlins-president-to-take-over-at-pace-university-in-nyc

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Wall Street Journal: "Oberlin’s Krislov Named President of Pace University"

02/17/2017

Wall Street Journal: "Oberlin’s Krislov Named President of Pace University"

Marvin Krislov at the ceremony inaugurating him as the 14th president of Oberlin College in 2007. Photo: Gus Chan/The Plain Dealer/Associated Press

Marvin Krislov, president of Oberlin College since 2007, has been tapped to be the eighth president of Pace University as the New York City school prepares a major expansion.

In August he will succeed Stephen Friedman, 78 years old, who has been in the post for a decade, and said last year that he would step down.

The board of trustees at Pace announced Mr. Krislov’s appointment Tuesday morning, noting his efforts to make Oberlin more diverse and enroll more high-qualified, low-income students. During his tenure, Oberlin established a fundraising campaign that raised $318 million, attracted more science grants and built a new jazz studies building and stadium.

Mr. Krislov, 56, will steer Pace at a time when it has ambitious expansion plans. Last week, university officials announced a $190 million plan to renovate and expand its lower Manhattan campus. The century-old private institution has about 13,000 students in undergraduate and graduate programs.

“I am honored to be chosen to lead Pace University during this exciting period of growth and revitalization,” Mr. Krislov said in a news release. “Pace’s commitment to access and pathways to success for students inspires me.”

Read more here.

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Pacesetters in Financial Reporting: Key takeaways from the conference hosted by Pace University, FEI and EY

02/15/2017

Pacesetters in Financial Reporting: Key takeaways from the conference hosted by Pace University, FEI and EY

In late 2016, Lubin School of Business at Pace University, Financial Executives International (FEI) and Ernst & Young LLP jointly hosted the Pacesetters in Financial Reporting conference. The conference was designed to stimulate discussion about how to enhance financial reports and to acknowledge, and learn from, companies that are striving to better meet the information needs of today’s investors.

“...Officials from the SEC and FASB have been urging companies not to wait for official guidance from them but rather to take the initiative and find ways to make their financial reports more effective under the existing standards and regulations.”

—Leslie Seidman

Lubin School of Business

Pace University

Read more here

Please email Leslie Seidman at LSeidman@pace.edu if you would like to receive information about the next Pacesetters in Financial Reporting Conference scheduled for September 19, 2017. 

 

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The Hill's Pundits Blog: "The world is safer because of the Iran deal. We must not abandon it."

02/13/2017

The Hill's Pundits Blog: "The world is safer because of the Iran deal. We must not abandon it."

“The 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), commonly known as the ‘Iran deal,’ represents one of the most significant recent diplomatic victories in curbing the spread of nuclear weapons,” writes Professor Matthew Bolton, Associate Chair of the Department of Political Science at Pace University. “It resulted from complex technical negotiations that do not lend themselves to snappy slogans. Nevertheless, at its heart, the agreement’s simple bargain has made the world safer.

“The JCPOA, which is often depicted as a deal between America and Iran, is actually the result of a multi-sided conversation, including Russia, China, Britain, France, Germany and a representative of the European Union. Keeping all these countries on board presented Iran with a united international front, preventing it from playing into great power proxy conflicts.

“The agreement cuts off all possible pathways to an Iranian nuclear weapon. It prohibits Iran from acquiring or stockpiling weapons grade uranium and scraps the excess centrifuge capacity Iran would need to do enrichment itself. The deal commits Iran to redesign its Arak nuclear reactor, preventing the production of weapons grade plutonium or tritium. It halts the development of further facilities that could do so.

“But what if Iran only pretends to comply and moves forward with developing the Bomb anyway? The agreement foresaw this possibility and established the most robust ever international inspections regime. To start up its nuclear weapons program again, Iran would have to expel or block the work of the inspectors, which would raise immediate red flags. This would give the world at least a year to respond before Iran would have sufficient material to build a bomb.

“The JCPOA was welcomed unanimously by the United Nations Security Council. Should Iran step out of line—or any other country help it to do so—they could face the array of punitive measures available to the Security Council, from sanctions to military action.

“In short, the deal closed off all routes to an Iranian bomb, posted checkpoints on all roads leading toward it, and committed the entire world to making sure no traffic moves that way. Since the JCPOA went into effect January of last year, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has verified Iran’s compliance six times. When the IAEA has spotted minor technical violations, Iran has made rapid corrections.

“Given how comprehensively the JCPOA has shut down Iran’s nuclear weapons program, what was in it for them? It eased nuclear-related sanctions on Iran that were having a debilitating effect on its economy and improved relations with the rest of the world.

Read more here.

 

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New York Business Journal: "This Indian restaurateur owns 5 eateries, including 3 in Curry Hill"

02/13/2017

New York Business Journal: "This Indian restaurateur owns 5 eateries, including 3 in Curry Hill"

. . . Many independent retail stores including Chinese restaurants, barber shops and nail salons haven’t “effectively developed a business model to consolidate these fragmented industries,” explained Bruce Bachenheimer, executive director of the Entrepreneurship Lab at Pace University in New York. “The most common reason behind consolidation is economies of scale,” he said.

Moreover, he noted the restaurant business is challenging for individual entrepreneurs to expand. “The restaurant business is extremely competitive and subject to numerous trends and fads. It’s hard enough to manage one, much more complex to keep five thriving,” pointed out Bachenheimer.

Sustaining a loyal staff is another hurdle. “Aside from external factors such as competition and changing trends, high employee turnover is a challenge, attracting, retaining and motivating staff is difficult,” he asserted.

Read more here.

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Kiplinger's Retirement Report: "Join a Nonprofit as An Encore Career"

02/13/2017

Kiplinger's Retirement Report: "Join a Nonprofit as An Encore Career"

SUZANNE ARMSTRONG THRIVED IN THE CORPORATE world, working for American Express and later consulting for Citibank, Deloitte and other behemoths. Her expertise: helping leaders build support for major change in a company’s vision or systems.

Several years ago, Armstrong went through her own transformation. She left big business and now taps her “change leadership” know-how as a consultant for non-profits, splitting her time between Miami and Toronto.

When the Miami Art Museum was planning to move to a new location and expand its mission in 2012, the museum’s director asked Armstrong, who was a donor, to work with the leadership team to ensure a smooth transition for employees. (The museum changed its name to Pérez Art Museum Miami after the move.) Armstrong also found work at United Way, where she coaches executives at the organization. “I am tremendously fulfilled,” says Armstrong, 69. “It’s great to continue to do the same kind of work—and make a difference.”

For someone at Armstrong’s level of experience, the pay is nominal—about $20 an hour for about 15 to 20 hoursa week. She is paid through the South Florida affiliate of ReServe, which places professionals ages 55 andolder in part-time positions with nonprofit organizations and government agencies.

Like Armstrong, many baby boomers with long careers in the business world are now eyeing work in the nonprofit sector. About 21 million adults between the ages of 50 and 70 report that they would like to seek jobs that address social needs, particularly in education, health care, human services and the environment, according to a 2014 study by Encore.org and market research firm Penn Schoen Berland.

These second-act, social-impact jobs are known as encore careers, and the survey found that most who seek these jobs want work that will help them feel worthwhile. Facing perhaps decades in retirement, “it’s so incredibly important to make these extra years meaningful, useful and productive,” says Joan Tucker, director of the Encore Transition Program at Pace University, in New York City. The program’s continuing education workshops help boomers figure out how to create a purposeful retirement.

 

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Daily News: "Pace University launches $190M plan to upgrade lower Manhattan campus"

02/10/2017

Daily News: "Pace University launches $190M plan to upgrade lower Manhattan campus"

The Daily News covered news of the New York City Master Plan for Pace. The news appears online and on page 2 in print.

From the Daily News:

"Pace University kicked off a $190 million renovation and expansion of its lower Manhattan campus on Thursday, joining a number of other city colleges already in the midst of expensive projects.

In the first phase of Pace’s multiyear, three-phase plan, the 111-year-old private college will spend $45 million to upgrade its two main campus buildings adjacent to the Brooklyn Bridge and on Park Row.

Pace, which enrolls nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs, will renovate more than 55,000 square feet of space in the two buildings under the first phase of the project.

The construction will create a variety of new spaces, including an art gallery and shared offices for students and staffers. The buildings also will get new entryways and lobbies.

Pace President Stephen Friedman said the massive renovation reflects Pace’s commitment to its students and lower Manhattan neighborhood.

“We are advancing an exciting plan that invests in our future by re-creating our campus,” he said. “Our new plan embodies our enduring commitment.”

Construction on the first phase is scheduled to begin this summer and projected to finish in fall 2018.

New York University, Columbia and Cornell are also in the midst of their own campus expansions in the five boroughs."

Read the original story here.

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