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Mother Jones: "The United States Just Dropped a 21,600-Pound Bomb In Afghanistan"

04/14/2017

Mother Jones: "The United States Just Dropped a 21,600-Pound Bomb In Afghanistan"

The "Mother of All Bombs" was used for the first time in eastern Afghanistan on April 13, 2017.

. . . Matthew Bolton, director of the International Disarmament Institute at Pace University, is worried that the military's decision could encourage other countries to develop or deploy similar weapons. Bolton also says it is unlikely that this sort of weapon could spare civilians. "It is difficult to imagine how it might be used in the kind of wars the US now fights—often in urban areas—without posing serious dangers to civilians," he says, "both as a result of its immediate wide area effect and the impact on vital infrastructure like electricity, water, sewers, schools, and health services."

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Yahoo Finance: "How to trade stocks for a living: Mike Bellafiore"

04/13/2017

Yahoo Finance: "How to trade stocks for a living: Mike Bellafiore"

Photo: Professional trader at SMB Capital analyzes stocks and other markets. (Source: SMB Capital, SMB|U)

"Recently I visited Pace University’s investment club to talk about the life of a proprietary trader," said Mike Bellafiore, co-founder of SMB Capital and SMB|U. "Our firm makes an effort to reach out to college trading and investment clubs to meet their members. Some of our best traders have come from these clubs. Plus, college students rarely get to interact with a professional trader so sharing our experience is helpful.

"At my presentation for Pace, a sharp member asked, 'How do you recommend we get started trading?'

Watch the video.

 

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Private schools sound warnings as free state tuition plan becomes law in NY"

04/13/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Private schools sound warnings as free state tuition plan becomes law in NY"

...Robina C. Schepp, Pace University’s vice president for enrollment and placement, criticized the state’s program in an op-ed for Crain’s New York Business, saying it shuts out private universities with proven records of maximizing graduate earning power.

“When free tuition comes at the expense of attending a school that may offer a better fit and superior career opportunities that lead to decades of higher earnings, it erases the very appeal of the Excelsior Scholarship,” Schepp wrote.

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Politico: New York water experts debate diminished role of EPA

04/13/2017

Politico: New York water experts debate diminished role of EPA

By David Giambusso

04/13/2017 05:40 PM EDT

A panel of former New York regulators and water academics could not agree Thursday on the federal government's role in managing clean water, but they did generally see danger ahead for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under President Donald Trump.

New York State recently allocated $2.5 billion to address water infrastructure issues. The money is directed toward contaminant cleanup, wastewater treatment, sewage overflow and flooding, among other issues. At the same time the EPA is rolling back and reviewing rules it sees as hampering industry, such as one this week limiting toxic discharge form coal plants.

"Water is not very high on the national political agenda. Water is often a very local issue," said Peter Gleick, president emeritus and chief scientist of the Pacific Institute, as part of a conference at Pace University on water issues in a changing climate. "Most of our water problems and challenges are local and should be managed locally."

Judith Enck, former EPA Region 2 administrator under former President Barack Obama, said while local action is crucial, the federal government can hamper progress if it willingly chooses not to enforce fundamental laws, such as the Clean Water Act and the Clean Air Act.

"We're not going to get to the goal of fishable, swimmable waters if the federal government is on the sidelines, and not only that but affirmatively doing bad things for water," she said.

The goal of fishable, swimmable waters was built into the Clean Water Act. Former New York City Department of Environmental Protection commissioner Christopher Ward questioned whether the billions in spending to reach that goal was realistic.

"We're never going to be in a position to buy all the things we want," he said.

But panelists said the "swimmable, fishable" provision was meant to foster marine life, which has iterative benefits for local ecosystems. Moreover, they said, shortchanging water cleanup now will result in more expensive solutions in the future.

"We don't have a real understanding of the cost of not doing things ... and who bears those costs," Gleick said. "If we had a better understanding here, we'd realize that it's cheaper to do a lot of these things than not do them."

Despite the "back to basics" rhetoric coming from the White House, though, clean water is a basic necessity for public health, panelists said. A recent Reuters poll showed 60 percent of Americans favor keeping EPA as strong or stronger than it currently is.

Enck used cleanup of the Gowanus Canal, a federal Superfund site, as an example of the bipartisan support for clean water.

"The interest in restoring the Gowanus canal is incredible. It's not just the Riverkeepers. It's the neighborhood folks. It's a guy called Jared Kushner," she said. "I'm a big believer in that when the people lead, the leaders will follow, and the people of Brooklyn and Queens are getting it."

To view online:
http://www.politico.com/states/new-york/city-hall/story/2017/04/new-york-water-experts-debate-diminished-role-of-epa-111241

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Pace University student Taslim Tavarez Garcia named a 2017 Truman Scholar, one of 62 outstanding young people selected nationwide

04/12/2017

Pace University student Taslim Tavarez Garcia named a 2017 Truman Scholar, one of 62 outstanding young people selected nationwide

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Taslim Tavarez Garcia receives a $30,000 scholarship toward graduate school and the opportunity to participate in professional development programming to help prepare for a career in public service leadership

NEW YORK, NY, April 12, 2017– Taslim Tavarez Garcia, a junior at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, has just been selected as a 2017 Truman Scholar. She is one of just 62 students selected to receive the award this year.

"We congratulate Taslim Tavarez Garcia on this extraordinary honor and achievement.” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “A former recipient of the Jeanette K. Watson Fellowship and the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship, Taslim has distinguished herself as a striver who consistently embraces challenge. Her energy, enthusiasm, and record of success are an inspiration to all and Pace is proud to have her as a student.”

The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation was created by Congress in 1975 to be the nation’s living memorial to President Harry S. Truman. The Foundation has a mission to select and support the next generation of public service leaders. The Truman award has become one of the most prestigious national scholarships in the United States.

Recipients of the Truman Scholarship receive a $30,000 scholarship toward graduate school and the opportunity to participate in professional development programming to help prepare them for careers in public service leadership.

Annually, candidates for the Truman Scholarship go through a rigorous, multi-stage selection process. In 2017, there were 768 candidates for the award nominated by 315 colleges and universities, a record number of institutions. The 199 finalists for the award were interviewed in March and early April at one of sixteen regional selection panels. Sixty-two new Truman Scholars were selected in 2017. They will receive their awards in a ceremony at the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum on Sunday, May 28, 2017.

“I would like to go to law school and become an immigration attorney and return to south Florida to start my own non-profit and provide affordable legal services to help undocumented immigrants,” Taslim Tavarez Garcia said of her ultimate goal. “It’s about really trying to help them overcome the barriers that prevent them from becoming residents or citizens.”

A first-generation immigrant from the Dominican Republic, Taslim studies political science and peace and justice studies at Pace University. She has established a student organization called ABRIR (which means “to open” in Spanish; Advocates Bring Resources to Immigrant & Refugees) that hosts college application workshops to undocumented students. She interns at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, and she volunteers and recruits Pace students to volunteer for the office’s “We Are New York” program, which helps immigrant New Yorkers practice English through volunteer-led conversation groups. Through the help of the Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship, Taslim has also interned at the Institute of International Education and 100 Resilient Cities. She hopes to continue to advocate for immigrant rights and reform through non-profit work.

Pace University is shaped by its enduring traditions of opportunity and innovation. More than 100 years after its founding, Pace continues its commitment to providing access to a diverse population while innovating to meet the needs of the global economy. A January 2017 study ranked Pace first in New York—and second in the nation—at catapulting students from the bottom fifth of income distribution into the top fifth. The Equality of Opportunity Project study also found that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennials.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in New York—and second in the nation—for Economic Mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu.

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

# # #

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Taipei Times: "Pressure on China after Trump-Xi meeting"

04/12/2017

Taipei Times: "Pressure on China after Trump-Xi meeting"

"There are many ways of interpreting the outcome of the meeting between US President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping (習近平) in Florida last week," writes Joseph Tse-hei Lee, a professor of history at Pace University.

"There was no joint press conference about bilateral relations like the one Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe held in February.

"The US and China clearly failed to resolve their disagreement on geopolitical, diplomatic and economic issues.

"As a confluence of crises in Syria and North Korea has escalated and destabilized global politics, the US has found little common ground with China.

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Wall Street Journal: "Nikki Haley’s Role at U.N. in the Spotlight"

04/11/2017

Wall Street Journal: "Nikki Haley’s Role at U.N. in the Spotlight"

U.S. ambassador Nikki Haley has pledged to overhaul the U.N. Photo: Luiz Rampelotto/EuropaNewswire/DPA/ZUMA Press

. . . “I think that Haley is having to step into the gap coming from a lack of coherent strategy out of the White House,” said Matthew Bolton, an expert of the U.N. at Pace University.

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Crain's New York Business: "The problem 
with free tuition"

04/10/2017

Crain's New York Business: "The problem 
with free tuition"

"Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s pro
posal to create a tuition-free degree program, the Excelsior Scholarship, scores points for good intentions," writes Robina C. Schepp, vice president 
of enrollment management at 
Pace University. "But its one-size-fits-all approach carries hidden costs with lifelong implications and ignores critical student needs.

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Register Citizen: "Pace University partners with Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities"

04/10/2017

Register Citizen: "Pace University partners with Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities"

NEW YORK >> Pace University’s College of Health Professions has launched the first college curriculum on service and therapy dogs in health care, according to a press release from Pace and Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities (ECAD), which is based in Torrington.

Inspired by the advocacy work of Iraq War veteran and author, Luis Carlos Montalván along with his service dog Tuesday, Pace faculty members Joanne K. Singleton, PhD, RN, and Lucille Ferrara, EdD, RN, joined forces with them and Lu Picard, co-founder and director of programs for ECAD, to develop the curriculum.

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