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Downtown Express: "A cyber-seal from Uncle Sam"

04/07/2017

Downtown Express: "A cyber-seal from Uncle Sam"

Photo: Dr. Jonathan Hill, dean of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems will be training America’s next generation of cyberwarriors.

The federal government has certified Pace University as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education for a second time, and will continue offering scholarships to budding cyberwarriors through 2022 in exchange for a few years in service to their country.

The students who can expect to be awarded the federal scholarships are interested in more than just making a tidy profit off their cutting-edge skills, but also in waging cyberwar on behalf of their fellow Americans in the front line of the burgeoning digital battlescape, according to school’s primo code slinger.

“These kids are motivated not because it’s a lucrative career field, but because they want to give something back,” said Dr. Jonathan Hill, dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace. “The government is also a great proving ground, and they’re very much on the front lines of this battle.”

Through the federally sponsored cyber security program, Pace will be accepting 12 to 15 students into its Seidenberg School, where they’ll not only receive a firm grounding in computer science, but will also get hands-on experience combating cyber threats, and work hand-in-hand with government agencies such as the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.

“We give them a really strong foundation, coupled with specialized training in the latest cyber security technology, encryption, cyber-forensic techniques, and so on, and they will do internships with government agencies to get experience,” said Hill.

The scholarship will pay for tuition, room, and board for between two and three years, and graduates will owe Uncle Sam an equal amount of time in service to the country, either on the city, state, or federal level.

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Pace University’s $190 Million Repositioning Plan for Lower Manhattan Approved by NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission

04/06/2017

Pace University’s $190 Million Repositioning Plan for Lower Manhattan Approved by NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission

New York, NY – April 6, 2017 – Pace University today announced that the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission approved work to allow the repositioning of its building at 41 Park Row. Approval of the exterior design completes city-mandated review of the proposal, clearing the way for launch of the University’s $190 million plan to modernize and expand its Lower Manhattan campus.

“I am pleased to announce that the University has received approval from the NYC Landmarks Commission to move forward with the renovations to historic 41 Park Row,” said Jean Gallagher, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives. “This is a significant milestone that allows us to begin the transformation of the NYC Campus and the implementation of Phase I of the NYC Master Plan.”

Unveiled in February, the New York City Master Plan will be advanced in three phases and represents a signature statement for Pace—the culmination of the evolution the University has undergone in the century since its founding and its ongoing commitment to innovation in the future.

Phase I includes a full redesign of One Pace Plaza’s first floor, lower level and courtyard entrance, and will directly address the need for additional student space. The redesigned first floor will include a new welcome center, a new student center for hosting events, new student commons, collaborative learning spaces, and quiet study area. The new lower level will feature a branded entrance for the Lubin School of Business with dedicated student lounges, a student meeting room and a Lubin Learning Lab which will house innovative teaching and learning technologies.

Phase I will also involve a modernization of the lower levels of the landmarked 41 Park Row, which served as the home of The New York Times from 1889 to 1903. The original entrance along Spruce Street, facing One Pace Plaza, will also be restored. The first floor will house a new art gallery and new student commons. The second floor will include an advising center, and new collaboration space for faculty and students. Construction on both buildings’ lower levels is scheduled to begin this summer, with completion projected for fall 2018.

Pace University is shaped by its enduring traditions of opportunity and innovation. More than 100 years after its founding, Pace continues its commitment to providing access to a diverse population while innovating to meet the needs of the global economy. A January 2017 study ranked Pace first in New York—and second in the nation—at catapulting students from the bottom fifth of income distribution into the top fifth. The Equality of Opportunity Project study also found that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennials.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in New York—and second in the nation—for Economic Mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu.

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Associated Press: "Pepsi pulls widely mocked ad"

04/06/2017

Associated Press: "Pepsi pulls widely mocked ad"

. . . Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University, said that the backlash was in part because Pepsi was a couple years "late to the party" with its message about unity, making its ad seem exploitive.

Still, he also noted that the fallout wouldn't necessarily be that damaging, since a lot of the negative sentiment expressed on social media is "easily washed away overnight."

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Associated Press: "Advertisers flee Bill O'Reilly's show but impact unclear"

04/06/2017

Associated Press: "Advertisers flee Bill O'Reilly's show but impact unclear"

. . . "Advertisers are very risk averse," said Larry Chiagouris, a Pace University marketing professor. "When advertisers see the possibility of scandal, they take the easy way out — which can be spun as the 'high road.' It's easy for them to move their money somewhere else."

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Network World: "Privacy rollback can cause headaches for corporate security pros"

04/04/2017

Network World: "Privacy rollback can cause headaches for corporate security pros"

. . . Use of Tor and other means to obfuscate who’s using the internet are likely to increase now that President Donald Trump has signed the rollback into law.

The law nullifies regulations set by the Federal Communications Commission in December that made ISPs get customer approval before they could sell information about their browsing habits. Now ISPs can sell it by default and customers have to opt out, a more involved process, says Ernesto Falcon, legislative counsel for the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

The legislation also bars the FCC from addressing this issue in the future. Enforcing privacy is now shifted to the Federal Trade Commission.

Falcon predicts that at some point ISPs will push the envelope on selling this data and there will be pushback. “The day will come when the FCC will have to act because something so egregious happens,” he says.

Jonathan Hill, dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University, is similarly concerned. “The Pandora’s box is now open, and we don’t know what’s going to fly out,” he says.

Businesses have other reasons to worry about the new law, Hill says. Most businesses have contracts with their providers that spell out limits on what they can do with browsing histories, but there are cracks that these restrictions could fall through. For example, telecommuters likely use their home internet service, so that consumer account would not be subject to the contract, Hill says.

He recommends that businesses review those contracts to be sure they restrict use of these histories.

ISPs are not allowed to sell information that is directly linked to an individual’s name, he says, but that data is stored by ISPs. The fear is that the data and the personal identification could somehow be hacked, he says.

Training of employees on safe browsing is important in general, he says. Traveling workers should avoid using airport Wi-Fi, he says, because glimpses of browsing and hence what the employee is interested in, can be hacked. Knowing that could be valuable to competitors, he says. “Don’t connect to airport Wi-Fi except with a VPN,” he says.

Omer Tene, vice president of research at the International Association of Privacy Professionals, is less concerned that ISPs will actually violate corporate privacy agreements, but he does recommend use of encryption or a VPN when connecting to corporate resources. “There are bigger threats out there than Verizon,” he says.

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TechRepublic: "The real reason behind the new law for ISPs and what it means for internet users"

04/04/2017

TechRepublic: "The real reason behind the new law for ISPs and what it means for internet users"

. . . Jonathan Hill, dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University in New York, said, "With a green light to collect this information, this law puts business users at greater risk of having their search histories sold or made public in embarrassing or potentially litigious ways."

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National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security designate Pace University as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education (CAE-CDE) through academic year 2022

03/28/2017

Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems recognized for its role in cybersecurity education and research

New York, NY – March 28, 2017 – Pace University, through the efforts of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, has been designated by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education (CAE-CDE) through academic year 2022. An evening reception during the National Cyber Security Summit in June will recognize Pace and the other schools that have received this distinction.

"This recognition by the NSA and the DHS is a tribute to the faculty and students of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University and the excellence that they have brought to the study and practice of cybersecurity for more than a decade," said Dr. Jonathan Hill, Dean of the Seidenberg School. "The Seidenberg School faculty have developed a stream of well educated, highly trained students who are now on the front lines of the cybersecurity fight on behalf of our government. We could not be more proud of our designation as a Center of Academic Excellence, but we understand that our work in preparing the next generation of cybersecurity specialists is just beginning."

The National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security jointly sponsor the National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense (CAE-CD) program. The goal of the program is to reduce vulnerability in our national information infrastructure by promoting higher education and research in cyber defense and producing professionals with cyber defense expertise for the Nation.

“Your ability to meet the increasing demands of the program criteria will serve the nation well in contributing to the protection of the National Information Infrastructure,” noted Karen Leuschner, National CAE Program Manager, NSA, in a letter to Pace about the designation. “The Presidents’ National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace, 14 February 2003 and the International Strategy for Cyberspace, May 2011, addresses the critical shortage of professionals with these skills and highlights the importance of higher education as a solution to defending America’s cyberspace.”

Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems actively promotes education, research and outreach in information security, with faculty members working to explore the challenges of securing information in areas ranging from software to networks to ethics.

There is an acute shortage of information assurance professionals in an industry challenged with an evolving threat to digital security. Pace’s Cybersecurity Education and Research Lab is committed to address that shortage and contribute to building a strong workforce in a field that is crucial to keeping cyberspace secure.

The Lab focuses on education, research, and partnerships with academia, industry, and government. Pace’s academic programs empower students with the knowledge they need to make a difference. Pace faculty members work in innovative research projects that help discover new ways to combat cyberattacks. Through partnerships, Pace strives to maintain a shared knowledge base that benefits the industry as a whole.

The Cybersecurity Education and Research Lab at Pace is directed by Dr. Li-Chiou Chen and Andreea Cotoranu. Dr. Chen is the Chair of the Information Technology department and has secured a wealth of grants for the Seidenberg School’s continued research and activities in cybersecurity. Andreea Cotoranu is the Assistant Dean for Academic Innovation and has similarly obtained many grants that have enabled Pace to offer excellent academic opportunities, as well as workshops and events, to students and the community.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

 

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Herald-Tribune: "Do you have what it takes to be a successful leader?"

03/28/2017

Herald-Tribune: "Do you have what it takes to be a successful leader?"

Being a good leader will have a lot to do with your success. But how do you measure it?

As Bruce Bachenheimer of Pace University says, "A definition of a leader is someone with followers. The top quality of a leader is the ability to attract top-quality followers."

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Los Angeles Times: "The strange journey of a Chinese Internet addict"

03/27/2017

Los Angeles Times: "The strange journey of a Chinese Internet addict"

Photo: People play at a net bar in Zhengzhou, China. (VCG / VCG via Getty Images)

. . . According to the Center for Net Addiction in New York, problematic Internet use — when a preoccupation with being online interferes with work and personal life — is common in China, where rigid educational structure and pressure to succeed academically can push adolescents to seek escape online, said Marcella Szablewicz, an assistant professor at Pace University who studies Chinese Internet culture.

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Huffington Post: "What’s Really Missing In The D.C. Missing Girls Case"

03/27/2017

Huffington Post: "What’s Really Missing In The D.C. Missing Girls Case"

The media and D.C. police and city officials were hammered for allegedly ignoring the plight of more than a dozen missing black and Latina girls in Washington D.C. Community activists chalked the seeming indifference up to racism. The outcry triggered a spate of news stories on the missing girls, angry denials from the police that they were asleep on the job in trying to find the girls, and lots of stats that purported to show that there’s been no major uptick in the number of missing persons in the District, and certainly nothing that points to any conspiracy to nab, traffic in, or murder young black females. The push back against the charges of murder and conspiracy is almost certainly right. However, it doesn’t answer the perennial question about how black female lives versus the lives of white females in distress are viewed and treated.

The gaping disparity in the number of black kids missing, and how their disappearance is treated, is glaring. According to FBI figures, African-American children make up 42 percent of non-family abduction. Yet, one would be hard pressed to find amber alert tweets and their pictures plastered on freeway alert signs. The media is no better. A 2010 Pace University study compared reporting by race and gender on several major news stations between 2005 and 2007. Predictably, it found that black kids were almost invisible in news coverage.

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