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Daily Voice: "Pace Professor To Present At World Health Summit In Geneva"

11/11/2015

Daily Voice: Pace Professor To Present At World Health Summit In Geneva

The Daily Voice published a story on Melanie DuPuis, head of Dyson's Environmental Studies and Science program.Melanie DuPuis, chair of the Environmental Studies and Sciences department at Pace Universty has been selected to speak at a World Health Organization summit on Nov. 20 in Geneva, Switzerland. DuPuis plans present her talk From Clean Eating to Clean Air: When Large-Scale Behavioral Change is (Part of) the Answer. The talk aims to highlight the impact of the environment on our dietary habits. DuPuis will examine what the history of people's diets tells us about solving environmental problems, how to deal with environmental issues that require large-scale changes in personal behavior, and how democracies can reconcile individual freedom and environmentally problematic behavior.

Read more: http://armonk.dailyvoice.com/schools/pace-professor-to-present-at-world-health-summit-in-geneva/603253/

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Pace University Receives $1.1 Million from the US Department of Education to Provide Support for First-Generation and Low Income College Students

11/10/2015

Pace University Receives $1.1 Million from the US Department of Education to Provide Support for First-Generation and Low Income College Students

Pace University Receives $1.1 Million from the US Department of Education to Provide Support for First-Generation and Low Income College Students

Student Support Services Grant will Help 160 Pace Students Succeed in College

NEW YORK, NY, November 10, 2015 – Pace University has long been committed to helping first-generation college students succeed as exemplified by the university’s motto, “Opportunitas.” In keeping with this, Pace received a five-year, $1.1 million grant from the US Department of Education to provide support services for low-income, first-generation, and disabled undergraduate students at its New York City campus in Lower Manhattan.

With assistance that goes well beyond tutoring, Pace’s Student Support Services (SSS) program is designed to help eligible students achieve academic success. With its robust array of services, the program’s support network will assist these students with a variety of challenges they face, including transitioning to college, becoming socially engaged in the college community, and ultimately, persisting to graduation.

 “We are extremely pleased to have received this funding,” said Nira Herrmann, PhD, dean, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. “It will enable Pace to increase efforts already in place by extending intense and sustained support services to our low-income, first-generation and disabled students to help them remain in college, advance steadily in their academic work, graduate in four to six years and pursue professional or graduate study. All of us at Pace are committed to helping students attain their educational goals, and this grant will help us to reach out to an even greater number of students with the guidance and services they need to graduate.”

Research shows that students from low-income families whose parents did not attend college are more likely than those whose parents attended college to be less academically prepared, to have less knowledge of how to apply for college and for financial assistance, and to have more difficulty becoming part of the social and intellectual collegiate community.

However, studies also indicate that targeted intervention beginning with enrollment and continuing throughout the undergraduate years – with special emphasis on the transition to college during freshman year – can enhance the success of these students. The SSS program will provide a variety of support services geared to this specific population and their needs.

With guidance from their mentors and coaches, students in the SSS program develop educational assessments and action plans, as well as receive regular monitoring of academic progress, and access to study skills workshops, panel discussions, tutoring, school supplies and computer resources. The support network includes peer mentors and graduate coaches, who, along with faculty members and advisers, offer career counseling, graduate school information, financial counseling, financial aid information, and money management skills. Cultural enrichment activities include field trips to shows, museums and events.

Building upon the 19-year success of the Pace federally funded TRIO–Upward Bound Program that provides support for high school students transitioning to college, the SSS program will further assist Pace’s efforts to extend sustained support services to 160 students who are from low-income backgrounds, from families where the parents do not have a college degree, or who have a disability. It provides academic, financial, career and personal support to help participants acclimate, thrive and succeed at Pace. In order to participate, students must apply and be accepted into the program. Veterans may also apply.

The program provides a significant increase in university resources dedicated to retention and timely graduation rates through an annual budget of $220,000 for the total of $1.1 million for the five–year award cycle. The funding will allow Pace to hire two new full-time university staff members, a project director, an assistant director/counselor, student peer mentors and graduate student coaches. These peer teams will provide one-on-one and small-group mentoring, tutoring and discussion sessions.

The SSS program will be administered by Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, through its Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences (CURE) led by Assistant Dean of Graduate Studies Maria Iacullo-Bird who is the Student Support Services Grant Principal Investigator.

For more information on the program visit: www.pace.edu/dyson/current-undergraduate-students/student-support-services-sss.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to many opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About the Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences: The Center for Undergraduate Research Experiences (CURE) in Dyson College of Arts and Sciences provides leadership, coordination and support to student-faculty research collaborations, faculty grant-funded research projects and programs, and opportunities for service learning. CURE is part of Dyson College’s long-standing and ongoing commitment to build a research culture at Pace University. CURE is one component of Dyson’s efforts to innovatively enhance the quality of both the academic experience and overall student life. CURE also evolved from Pace University’s membership in the Council for Undergraduate Research (CUR), a national organization of more than 900 colleges and universities whose mission is to “support and promote high-quality undergraduate student-faculty collaborative research and scholarship.”

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Media contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

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SC Magazine UK: "Surveillance bill – judicial oversight, no encryption ban, archiving browsing data"

11/04/2015

SC Magazine UK: "Surveillance bill – judicial oversight, no encryption ban, archiving browsing data"

Theresa May (photo: BBC)

. . . In an email to SCMagazineUK.com prior to May's announcement, Dr Darren Hayes, assistant professor and director of cyber-security at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York, suggested that the Investigatory Powers Bill will facilitate more bulk data collection and retention of data, adding that it “will be warmly welcomed by law enforcement and the intelligence community while simultaneously drawing consternation from consumer rights activists."

Read more: http://www.scmagazineuk.com/2nd-update-surveillance-bill--judicial-overs...

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China Daily: "Exploring China through essays"

11/04/2015

China Daily: "Exploring China through essays"

Members of the Pace University Confucius Institute and the New York Chinese Opera Society (NYCOS) award four students with cash prizes on Monday at Pace University in New York for their submissions to the Fifth Annual NYCOS Essay Competition. Jack Freifelder / China Daily

For Pace University in New York, an essay contest is one way to encourage cross-cultural exchange between the US and China.

Pace's Confucius Institute (CI) on Monday announced the winners of the fifth annual New York Chinese Opera Society (NYCOS) Essay Competition.

Joseph Lee, CI director at Pace, said the school and its constituents have been a "champion of cross-cultural dialogue" between the two countries.

Read more: http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/epaper/2015-11/03/content_22356162.htm

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PACE UNIVERSITY RANKED MOST UNDERRATED COLLEGE IN AMERICA

11/03/2015

PACE UNIVERSITY RANKED MOST UNDERRATED COLLEGE IN AMERICA

Experiential Learning and Future Earning Potential Cited as Strengths of Pace Education

NEW YORK -- November 3, 2015 – Pace University has been ranked the nation’s most underrated college on Business Insider’s just-released ranking of the 50 Most Underrated Colleges in America. The report highlighted the strength of Pace’s experiential learning program and its median mid-career salary.

“Pace University offers a world-class education that combines classroom instruction with real-world experiences,” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “We have an entrepreneurial approach to our programs, and we evolve as the needs of employers change with a strong focus on outcomes. As the value proposition of higher education is debated on a national level, we are uniquely preparing our students to succeed – and as the salary data shows, it’s working.”

In determining the rankings, Business Insider considered two factors: reputation and future earnings. The survey noted that Pace students “gain hands-on experience in their fields through internships, practicums and fieldwork.” Students’ academic experiences are enhanced by the opportunity to apply classroom learning in a pre-professional work environment, leveraging the University’s strong relationships with national and local employers in business, government, healthcare, nonprofit, technology and other sectors.

The median mid-career salary of Pace students, $95,200, was another factor in determining its ranking. Through individual counseling, seminars, career development workshops, career fairs and collaborative programs with faculty, alumni and employers, Pace students gain the tools to make career decisions, connect with employment opportunities and build their future earning potential.

About Pace University: Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and College of Health Professions. http://www.pace.edu.

Bill Caldwell / 212-346-1597

wcaldwell@pace.edu

# # #

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Business Insider: "The 50 most underrated colleges in America"

11/03/2015

Business Insider: "The 50 most underrated colleges in America"

. . . To discover the most underrated colleges in America, Business Insider compared US News and World Report's rankings of the best universities and the best liberal-arts colleges in the country with PayScale's 2015-16 College Salary Report, which ranked more than 1,000 colleges and universities based on their graduates' mid-career salaries.

Pace University topped the list.

1. Pace University

Location: New York City, New York

Median mid-career salary: $95,200

Located in the heart of NYC, with a second campus in Westchester County, Pace University focuses on sciences and liberal arts, offering degrees in everything from physics to digital journalism to specialized management programs. While at Pace, more than 4,000 students gain hands-on experience in their fields through internships, practicums, and fieldwork.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/most-underrated-colleges-in-america-2015-10

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Variety: "TV Networks Likely To Push Back Against Republican Debate Demands"

11/03/2015

Variety: "TV Networks Likely To Push Back Against Republican Debate Demands"

. . . One of the reasons why Republicans might be angered by current debates is the nature of trying to pin down a candidate early in the campaign process, said David A. Caputo, president emeritus and professor of political science at Pace University in New York. The moderator of a debate is trying to pin a candidate down on a particular issue or provoke an interesting response, the academic said, but candidates want distance from issues so they aren’t pigeonholed as the field narrows. In early debate, “if you notice, nine times out of ten, the question is not answered or it’s answered in such a way that it is critical of the question and the person who asks the question,” said Caputo. “It’s to be expected.”

Read more: http://variety.com/2015/tv/news/republican-debate-demands-tv-news-1201631633/

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Fast Company: "Three ways to get the most out of your group sessions"

10/28/2015

Fast Company: "Three ways to get the most out of your group sessions"

1. Make a plan

Many meetings don’t have a particular agenda, but it’s important to know what you want to accomplish going in. "Keep meetings short by limiting the agenda to three items or less," says Alan Eisner, professor of management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. "Afterward, send out minutes using your agenda so everyone knows what to work on."

2. Banish distractions

Put nonagenda thoughts into an "idea parking lot." "People bring up ideas that are important to them but not on-topic," says Cary Greene, coauthor of Simple Sabotage: A Modern Field Manual for Detecting & Rooting Out Everyday Behaviors That Undermine Your Workplace. "Instead of losing them, write them down." Don’t let the parking lot be a black hole: Assign follow-up steps right at the end of the meeting.

3. Play musical chairs

Walking meetings are gaining popularity, but you can get a similar benefit without hitting the hallway. Set a timer for 30 to 45 minutes. When it goes off, have everyone get up and move. "You can stand and shake it out a bit as a group, which lightens everyone up," says workplace psychologist Karissa Thacker. "Moving regularly is good for us in all kinds of ways, including improving our ability to focus."

Read more: http://www.fastcompany.com/3051540/secrets-of-the-most-productive-people/15-habits-that-will-totally-transform-your-productivit#1

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Huffington Post: "S.T.E.M.+ O = Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Oysters"

10/27/2015

Huffington Post: "S.T.E.M.+ O = Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Oysters"

The Billion Oyster Project serves students, community and New York Harbor. Be part of the conversation at Pace University (more below).

"How does a city of this magnitude bring young students to the water, and have them feel a sense of ownership and community?" asks Professor Lauren Birney from her lower Manhattan office at Pace University's School of Education.

"Oysters."

A century ago, the oyster was New York's pearl. Oystering was as integral to New York Harbor's identity as the Statue of Liberty. The waters of the city and New Jersey boasted more than 260,000 acres of oyster beds spread throughout the harbor, its bays and estuaries, the lower Hudson and East rivers. New Yorkers ate more oyster meat than beef. The original New York "foot-longs" were Gowanus oysters, gathered from Gowanus Bay and Creek in Brooklyn and exported to Europe as a delicacy.

In present day New York, oysters are better associated with the Oyster Bar in the cellar of New York's Grand Central Terminal, where oysters from Apalachicola Bay in Florida and Chincoteague Bay in Maryland are now the delicacy. Generations of pollution drove out New York oystering, and the name "Gowanus" is identified less with the bay and more with the canal, a toxic, Federal Superfund site (hopefully on its way to a major cleanup).

But the Billion Oyster Project aims to change all that by enlisting hundreds of thousands of city school children to restore a billion oysters to city waters. "In short, students are driving the restoration of New York Harbor," said Birney.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/johncronin2/stemo-science-technology-_b_8373904.html

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Tribeca Trib: "The Billion Oyster Project: A Look at a Collaboration"

10/26/2015

Tribeca Trib: "The Billion Oyster Project: A Look at a Collaboration"

Pace University Professor Lauren Birney and Mr. Jon Forrest Dohlin of the NY Aquarium, will discuss their partnership and the Billion Oyster Project, a unique effort to restore the ecology of New York Harbor through education and engagement of our city’s public school students. 

Read more: http://www.tribecatrib.com/content/billion-oyster-project-look-collabora...

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