main navigation
my pace

NYC

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

News Release: Pace University Poll Shows 69% of Americans Believe Technology-Based Terrorist Threat Likely Within 3-5 Years"

10/28/2016

News Release: Pace University Poll Shows 69% of Americans Believe Technology-Based Terrorist Threat Likely Within 3-5 Years"

Pace University Poll Shows 69% of Americans Believe Technology-Based Terrorist Threat Likely Within 3-5 Years

Poll Results Released at Pace University InsideTrack Conversation with Former NSA Senior Counsel and Inspector General  Joel F. Brenner

NEW YORK – Pace University announced today the results of a new poll showing that 69% of Americans believe a technology-based terrorist threat is likely to occur within the next 3-5 years. The poll shows that fear of these kinds of cyber-threats increases with age, reflecting a potential generational divide in how technology is understood and experienced. The results of this poll were released as part of Pace University’s InsideTrack series during a conversation between Joel F. Brenner, the former Inspector General and Senior Counsel at the National Security Agency, and Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman.

“We live in extraordinary times. Just last weekend a cyberattack cut millions of Americans off from the internet. And throughout the presidential election cycle hacked emails have been released in an attempt to influence America’s most fundamental and democratic process,” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “We are ever-more reliant on technology and our vulnerability to cyber criminals and cyber-attacks increases in tandem.”

“There is no electronic system that cannot be hacked,” said Joel F. Brenner, former Inspector General and Senior Counsel at the National Security Agency.

At this morning’s conversation, Brenner and Friedman discussed the security of federal government and state communications, the recent Distributed Denial-of-Service Attack and vulnerabilities that individuals and companies face from cyber-attacks, among other topics.

The Pace University poll surveyed 850 Americans, with results that highlight a clear generational difference in how people perceive cyber threats. Only 58% of participants under 30 believed that a technology-based terrorist threat was imminent, while 85% of participants over 60 felt the same way. Men are also more likely to fear these kinds of cyber-attacks, with 76% responding yes, compared with only 61% of women.

In addition to his years of service at the NSA, Joel F. Brenner is also the bestselling author of two books on cybercrime and espionage in America, Glass Houses and America the Vulnerable.

Complete poll results can be accessed and a comprehensive report containing poll results and analysis can be downloaded at www.pace.edu/news

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high-quality education for the professions with a firm base in liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York Metropolitan Area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, enrolling almost 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its College of Health Professions, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

To view analysis and polls click here:

Pace University Poll on Technology-Based Terrorism (PDF)
Pace University Poll on Technology-Based Terrorist Threats: Comprehensive Results (PDF)

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westchester County Business Journal: "Has the election tarnished the Trump brand?"

10/27/2016

Westchester County Business Journal: "Has the election tarnished the Trump brand?"

. . . “If he loses, the Trump brand will likely lose a substantial amount of its value,” said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York. “Hotel room bookings will drop, golf course memberships will decline and so will related fees. And all of the other ancillary branded products will either drop in price and value or be discontinued. Very importantly, in terms of branding, the value of licensing the brand will probably decline substantially and will not likely return to pre-campaign levels.”

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Deutsche Welle: "Living Planet: 'Appy' about recycling"

10/27/2016

Deutsche Welle: "Living Planet: 'Appy' about recycling"

The average person in Senegal produces about 116 kilograms of waste per year. But a group of students in the West African country is trying to change that. At a summer workshop in Dakar, they came up with an app prototype to try and get people recycling.

Listen to the story with comments from Christelle Scharff, a professor at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Paul Dampier appointed Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Pace University

10/25/2016

Paul Dampier appointed Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Pace University

NEW YORK – October 25, 2016 – Paul Dampier will join Pace University as Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer, effective January 9, 2017.

Dampier joins Pace from the University of Cambridge where he held the positions of Director, Management Information Services; Director of Business Effectiveness; and more recently Director of Digital Initiatives at the prestigious Cambridge University Library.

As Pace University’s CIO, Dampier will be in charge of the University’s Information Technology Services (ITS) Department and lead the development and implementation of a strategic technology agenda that supports Pace’s mission, strategic goals, and academic programs. The CIO reports to the Provost in a structure that recognizes the importance of technology in teaching and learning, and optimizing student learning outcomes.

In addition to his responsibility for all information technology and infrastructure support services for academic, research, and administrative computing at Pace, Dampier will also oversee all of the University’s telecommunications, networking services, and information security.

“The amount of important data about the operation of the University continues to grow and it is critical that our ability to generate value from the data grow at a similar rate,” said University President Stephen J. Friedman. “Paul Dampier’s expertise will help us use that data to deepen our understanding of how to provide the best possible student experience and education.”

“Paul’s experience, leadership, and knowledge make him ideally suited to lead Pace University's Information Technology Services,” said Uday Sukhatme, ScD, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at Pace. “He is a strategic visionary with a proven track record of success in positioning technology as a service, aligned with strategic initiatives and goals.”

Dampier has an extensive career specializing in technology management, consulting, research and development, and driving service and business effectiveness through the use of IT. His experience covers a wide spectrum of industries including higher education, pharmaceuticals, telecom, consulting, central government, and software services. 

Starting with the adoption of mid-range computing for designing and developing silicon chips in the ‘80s, through managing today’s complex computing environments for research and development, Dampier has been involved in the changing world of technology throughout his career. He has served as a consultant director for a US technology firm where he advised many leading CIOs in the US and Europe on technical architecture, sourcing, development, and management of information technology.

During his nine years at Cambridge, Dampier shaped the future of university technology systems and capabilities, introducing modern capabilities to enhance and manage student learning and administration, HR and research administration, web and document management, new library services, and a variety of agile service development methods.

“I am both excited and honored to have been selected to join Pace University as it continues to grow and build upon its long-term commitment to excellence in teaching from both the practical and theoretical perspectives,” said Dampier. “During my interviews for the role I said that ‘the past we reference, the present is on-line, the future is in our minds.’ The role of the modern CIO must adapt to bring these together as the focus on technology naturally gives way to the era of information and communication demands in the global economy. I am looking forward to joining a community that provides students, faculty, and staff the opportunity to be part of this.”

Dampier’s experience with leading research and development of information technology will assist Pace in promoting innovation in an ever-changing environment. Pace is nationally recognized as a leader in online education and ranks among the very first institutions in higher education to offer an online degree program.

About Pace University: Pace University is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, Lubin School of Business, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, and College of Health Professions. www.pace.edu

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

###

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Scientist: "Double Take: Science-Inspired Art"

10/25/2016

The Scientist: "Double Take: Science-Inspired Art"

Nothing is exactly what it seems in “Visual Inquiries: Artists Inspired By Science,” an exhibition on view at Pace University’s Peter Fingesten Gallery in New York City.

Some of the works on display appear to represent everyday things (Julia Buntaine’s sculptural hedgehog and serpent, for example) but are meant to portray scientific data (in this case, the shapes of typical brainwaves bent into steel wire and stacked atop one another). With other works, it is clear that the subjects relate to science, but the details of those connections may be difficult to guess.

Take two rectangular paintings whose yellowed, resinous surfaces vaguely resemble agar plates hosting microbial colonies. To artist Angie Drakopoulos, these works represent the emergence of order from chaos and depict biomorphic forms from the image of a root cross-section combined with garland-like, symmetrical representations of how sound affects matter. More than meets the eye.

In selecting the 11 visual artists to feature in the exhibition, curator Daniel Hill sought those “whose work has a strong aesthetic presence but is rooted in the conceptual foundation of the sciences in some way.”

“Every artist in the show has a different connection to science,” Hill told The Scientist. Math, physics, biology, ecology—all are represented in the paintings and sculptures on view, even if those connections are not immediately apparent.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Journal News: "Clinton beats Trump in last debate"

10/21/2016

Journal News: "Clinton beats Trump in last debate"

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump debate during the third presidential debate at UNLV in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016. (Photo: Mark Ralston, AP)

DAVID A. CAPUTO, president emeritus and professor of political science at Pace University

Clinton: Grade B-plus.

Trump: Grade D

Summary: Major mistake by Trump for refusing to accept the election results. His grade could go lower, depending on how the public reacts.

“Bad hombres” reference to Mexican drug dealers was weak. But he scored when he pointed to Clinton’s supposed 30 years of failure.

Clinton was weak on Clinton Foundation pay-to-play accusations. Comments during the debate about providing leadership for all Americans were strong. Her performance was better than the second debate, but not as good as first.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace University holds panel discussion on “The Trump Foundation, The Clinton Foundation, and the 2016 Election: What Does it All Mean for Philanthropy?”

10/21/2016

Pace University holds panel discussion on “The Trump Foundation, The Clinton Foundation, and the 2016 Election: What Does it All Mean for Philanthropy?”

New York, NY – October 21, 2016 --  The intersection of politics and philanthropy, and a constellation of issues around public engagement with philanthropy were covered during a panel discussion organized by Pace University’s Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship on Wednesday, October 19.

“The Trump Foundation, The Clinton Foundation, and the 2016 Election: What Does it All Mean for Philanthropy?” was the topic of discussion with panelists including Benjamin Soskis, a fellow at the Center for Nonprofit Management, Philanthropy and Policy at George Mason University; Stacy Palmer, editor of The Chronicle of Philanthropy; James J. Fishman, Professor Emeritus of Law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University; and Rebecca Tekula (Moderator), Assistant Professor of Public Administration in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences and Executive Director of Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace.

“A key objective of the Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship is to foster an environment that encourages interdisciplinary thinking on social innovation and philanthropy, and provide opportunities like this to bring leading scholars to campus to foster collaboration and conversation.  The 2016 election, in particular, has sparked great interest in questions around philanthropy and foundations,” said Professor Tekula.  “Questions surrounding the Trump Foundation and the Clinton Foundation present an important learning opportunity for our students and the community.  Essentially we, the public, are the owners of both of these organizations. I believe it is our civic duty to understand on a basic level what is usual, what is legal, and how these organizations are regulated.”

Panelists discussed common misconceptions about foundations, including what funds can and can’t be used for, and explored questions and criticisms that have swirled around both organizations and how each might have avoided some of the problems they’ve encountered.

The event was co-sponsored by the Master of Public Administration Program, Nonprofit Studies Minor, Peace and Justice Studies Program, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women's and Gender Studies at Pace.

The presentation can be viewed in its entirety at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8Ju_aFoQMg

About The Helene and Grant Wilson Center: The Helene & Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship was created in 2005 to serve the nonprofit and social enterprise community and Pace University. Devoted to honing the risk-taking spirit and managerial skills of nonprofit organizations and social ventures, the Center was launched with a pledge from Helene and Grant Wilson, Boston-area entrepreneurs and philanthropists whose philanthropic endeavors convinced them that entrepreneurial management can help social ventures increase their impact.

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

# # #

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Fort Worth Star-Telegram: "Texas voter fraud concerns prompt hotline offering $5,000 reward for tips"

10/19/2016

Fort Worth Star-Telegram: "Texas voter fraud concerns prompt hotline offering $5,000 reward for tips"

. . . “The fact is, … voter fraud is very rare, voter impersonation is nearly non-existent, and much of the problems associated with alleged fraud in elections relates to unintentional mistakes by voters or election administrators,” said Jessica Lavariega-Monforti, a political science professor at Pace University in New York City.

“Most allegations of fraud turn out to be baseless — and that of the few allegations remaining, most reveal election irregularities and other forms of election misconduct,” she said research shows.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Fast Company: "Ivanka Trump Doesn't Flinch"

10/18/2016

Fast Company: "Ivanka Trump Doesn't Flinch"

[Photo: Celine Grouard for Fast Company]

. . . calls on Twitter for boycotts of Ivanka's brand don't seem to hurt her business. "Not only can her brand transcend it, but the more people say they're going to boycott her brand, the more they're going to drive [those] who are either middle of the road or pro-Republican to choose the brand," says Pace University professor of marketing Larry Chiagouris. Ivanka Trump's major retail partners, including Bloomingdales, Zappos, Amazon, Dillard's, Nieman Marcus, Macy's, Lord & Taylor, and Nordstrom show no signs of discontinuing their affiliation.

"If everyone who votes for Trump buys her products, she'd be the wealthiest, most important fashion brand in the world," adds Chiagouris. "Think about that...Those Twitter people? She doesn't need their business."

Read the full article here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

CNNPolitics: "Why Trump's talk of a rigged vote is so dangerous"

10/18/2016

CNNPolitics: "Why Trump's talk of a rigged vote is so dangerous"

. . . Given that Trump has branded himself in politics, business and life as the ultimate winner, the prospect of a crushing defeat in November on the grandest stage must be a bitter one. So pre-spinning a possible defeat may represent a face-saving way out.
 
"He is hedging himself against a loss: If he does lose, he can say that is a fraud," said Jessica Lavariega-Monforti, chair of the Department of Politics at Pace University, New York.
 
Read the full article here.

Pages