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"News12" features "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

03/14/2018

"News12" features "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

A group of Pace University journalism students plans to head to Puerto Rico in an effort to shed light on the continuing hardships residents of the island are facing following the slow recovery after Hurricane Maria.

About a dozen students are preparing to head out next Tuesday and cover what appears to be the biggest story of their fledgling careers.

But it's also going to be educational.

"Students learn how to tell a story from start to finish," says Maria Luskey, who has overseen the school's documentary program for the past 15 years.

Past trips have sent students to Costa Rica, Brazil and Cuba. The school had planned to go to Puerto Rico earlier, but the storm forced Pace to cancel those plans.

Months later, with the recovery lagging and many on the island left isolated and ignored, the school decided to try again.

"These are 3.5 million American citizens who are in a desperate and dire situation, that months after the hurricane, they still need our help," says Gabriel Rivera, a Bronx native who has relatives in Puerto Rico.

In the next two weeks, News 12's Aime Rodriguez will be following the class to Puerto Rico for updates.

Read the full article.

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"LI Herald.com" featured Pace University in "33 New York colleges pledge prospective students will not be penalized for anti-gun violence walkout"

03/13/2018

"LI Herald.com" featured Pace University in "33 New York colleges pledge prospective students will not be penalized for anti-gun violence walkout"

With high school students on Long Island and nationwide preparing to walk out of school on Wednesday to protest gun violence, more than 200 colleges and universities have pledged students’ admission prospects will not be affected by any discipline they might face at their schools for participating.

The pledge to not hold students’ protests against their chances at admission, at press time, had been made by 33 schools in New York state, including Adelphi University in Garden City and Hofstra University in Hempstead.

According to the National Association of Admissions Counselors, other colleges in the greater metropolitan area that have made the pledge include:

• Barnard College

• City University of New York

• Columbia University

• Cornell University

• Fordham University

• Manhattan College

• New York University

• Pace University

• Sarah Lawrence College

• The New School

For a complete list of schools, including a list by state, click here

" We would not take account of school discipline in a circumstance of peaceful protest on a pressing matter of national debate,” NYU officials wrote in a statement.

The number of schools pledging their support may provide some reassurance from students on the fence about participating in the demonstration Wednesday, in which students nationwide are expected to walk out for 17 minutes in memory of the 17 people who died at the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

Students at Sanford H. Calhoun High School, in Merrick, and others across Nassau County, have indicated that they will participate in the demonstration. School districts, however, have been largely silent on how they will handle the walkouts on a policy level.

The New York State School Boards Association issued a statement on its website warning districts choosing not to discipline students who participate that they could set a precedent for other disobedience of school policies.

The NYSSBA warned districts against explicitly supporting the walkouts.

“It would be ill-advised for a school district to provide such support, based upon the established principle that school districts have no express authority to engage in political activities,” NYSSBA officials said. “Accordingly, school district sponsorship of such activities would not appear to be a viable option.”

New York State United Teachers, the statewide union, has not endorsed the March 14 walkout, but is encouraging educators to wear orange that day. Orange is the color of National Gun Violence Awareness Day. 

Read the article.

 

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"U.S.News & World Report" featured Lubin Associate Professor Walter Antognini in "Taxation Procrastination: Where to Go for Last-Minute Tax Filing Advice"

03/13/2018

"U.S.News & World Report" featured Lubin Associate Professor Walter Antognini in "Taxation Procrastination: Where to Go for Last-Minute Tax Filing Advice"

...Go to the IRS. While there's no need to call or visit the IRS headquarters, it's a wise idea to visit their website's page, "Directory of Federal Tax Return Preparers with Credentials and Selection Qualifications," says Walter Antognini, associate professor of taxation and graduate program chair at the Lubin School of Business at Pace University in New York City.

If you type in your ZIP code, you'll quickly get a list of tax preparers who are "recognized by the IRS as being qualified to practice before the IRS," Antognini says.

But remember not to panic if your tax preparer doesn't turn up in the collection of contacts the IRS provides you. There are many qualified tax return preparers who won't be on the list, Antognini says. It's just that the people on the IRS list will likely be the most qualified. Still, your tax preparer should at least have a preparer tax identification number or PTIN. If they don't have this information, that's a red flag that something is wrong.

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"News12" featured "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

03/13/2018

"News12" featured "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

A group of Pace University journalism students plans to head to Puerto Rico in an effort to shed light on the continuing hardships residents of the island are facing following the slow recovery after Hurricane Maria.

About a dozen students are preparing to head out next Tuesday and cover what appears to be the biggest story of their fledgling careers.

But it's also going to be educational.

"Students learn how to tell a story from start to finish," says Maria Luskey, who has overseen the school's documentary program for the past 15 years.

Past trips have sent students to Costa Rica, Brazil and Cuba. The school had planned to go to Puerto Rico earlier, but the storm forced Pace to cancel those plans.

Months later, with the recovery lagging and many on the island left isolated and ignored, the school decided to try again.

"These are 3.5 million American citizens who are in a desperate and dire situation, that months after the hurricane, they still need our help," says Gabriel Rivera, a Bronx native who has relatives in Puerto Rico.

In the next two weeks, News 12's Aime Rodriguez will be following the class to Puerto Rico for updates.

Watch News12.

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Statement from President Marvin Krislov on the passing of Erivan Haub

03/12/2018

Statement from President Marvin Krislov on the passing of Erivan Haub

“On behalf of the trustees, students, faculty, and staff of Pace University, I mourn the passing of Erivan Haub, a longtime friend and philanthropic supporter of Pace and especially our law school,” said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “Erivan’s passion for the United States and for the environment, inspired by his mother, Elisabeth, led to the Haub family’s long and successful partnership with Pace. We present the annual Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy, and in 2016 we were honored to name our law school the Elisabeth Haub School of Law, in recognition of our long partnership and a generous gift from the Haub family. We send our deepest condolences to the Haub family, and most of all to Liliane Haub, Erivan’s daughter-in-law, who serves as a Pace trustee. Erivan’s leadership, friendship, and generosity will not be forgotten.”

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"Pleasantville Patch" featured "Pace University Students Learn 1st Lesson: New York is Our Campus"

03/12/2018

"Pleasantville Patch" featured "Pace University Students Learn 1st Lesson: New York is Our Campus"

More than 300 admitted Pace University students from 25 states slept at the American Museum of Natural History last week, highlighting that Pace students have the greatest campus – New York City. Typically admitted students stay in residence halls but this year they experienced their own "Night at the Museum."

"Pace students get much more than what's learned in the classroom, said Robina Schepp, Vice President of Enrollment Management and Placement at Pace. "Students graduate from Pace with the skills and training that prepare them for the real world. Here, the City is our campus, and what better way to experience the City then spending a night at one of the most iconic institutions in New York—The American Museum of Natural History."

The overnight experience at the Museum of Natural History included dinner, orientation, exploration of the museum rooms, tours, animal presentations, and a space show. The group arrived back at Pace after breakfast at the Museum. As part of the admitted student experience, Pace also showcases college life at the university, including offering students a chance to attend classes for a day.

Participants in the admitted student event learned more about Pace and its academic programs, toured the campus, met future classmates, students, alumni, and deans, as well as enjoyed panel discussions and presentations. The future Pace students had the option of attending a university activities fair with representatives from various academic programs, student clubs and organizations, housing, financial aid, residence life, career services, study abroad, counseling, the center for academic excellence and more.

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Press Release: Inaugural Dean’s Distinguished Lecture Series at Pace University Brought Together Thinkers and Leaders to Discuss Diversity and Inclusion

03/09/2018

Press Release: Inaugural Dean’s Distinguished Lecture Series at Pace University Brought Together Thinkers and Leaders to Discuss Diversity and Inclusion

NEW YORK, March 9 – The inaugural College of Health Professions Dean’s Distinguished Lecture Series at Pace University, a discussion of diversity and inclusion, was held March 5 at Pace’s lower Manhattan campus.

 “I believe diversity is one of the most pressing issues facing all of us today – in healthcare, in higher education, and across society,” said Harriet R. Feldman, dean and professor of the College of Health Professions. “We have in common a need to ensure diversity and inclusion in our workplaces, our schools, and our lives.”

“We are barraged daily with headlines and controversies, policy proposals and angry protests, on so many issues that relate directly to diversity and inclusion issues,” said Feldman. “I have had a longstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion, both personally and professionally. I could not be more proud of the progress we have made during my 25 years at Pace, both within our College and the University as a whole, to educate so many dedicated and diverse students, faculty, and professionals.”

The event was attended by more than 120 community members and brought together an expert panel of thinkers and leaders in the health professions to discuss diversity and inclusion. The Dean’s Distinguished Lecture Series at Pace will be an annual event bringing important topics forward for discussion.

Pace President Marvin Krislov quoted statistics that demonstrate Pace’s commitment to diversity. “We’re fully committed to diversity and inclusion at Pace,” said Krislov. “We’re proud of our diverse student body, and we’re actively working to further diversify our faculty and staff. Diversity and inclusion are keys to the best education, preparing students to succeed in the workplace.”

Dr. Rumay Alexander led the panel. Alexander is chief diversity officer and associate vice chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and president of the National League for Nursing.

Alexander was joined by four panelists:

*Pace President Marvin Krislov.

*Professor Randolph McLaughlin, a civil rights attorney and professor at Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law. 

*Pace College of Health Professions Professor Joanne Singleton, an accomplished clinician, educator and researcher.

*Cornell Craig, Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion and Director of Multicultural Affairs at Pace.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

Follow us on Twitter at @PaceUnews or on our website: http://www.pace.edu/news

 

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Press Release: No Bathing Suits or Tan Lines for Pace University Students Selecting a Spring Break of Service to Victims of Superstorm Sandy

03/07/2018

Press Release: No Bathing Suits or Tan Lines for Pace University Students Selecting a Spring Break of Service to Victims of Superstorm Sandy

Rockaway families still displaced by Superstorm Sandy to receive help from Pace students

NEW YORK, MARCH 7 – Superstorm Sandy struck more than five years ago. Those hardest hit are still struggling to rebuild, and many families have yet to return home. Pace University’s Center for Community Action and Research (CCAR) and 16 Pace student volunteers will travel to Rockaway Beach, Queens, to spend their Alternative Spring Break helping those still displaced by that historic storm.

From March 13 to 16, Pace student volunteers will help rebuild houses still damaged by Superstorm Sandy in Rockaway Beach, N.Y. The immersive learning experience will include guest lectures about how race, class, disaster relief policy, cultural attitudes, and political attitudes shape the ways communities have recovered from natural disasters from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 to Hurricanes Harvey and Maria in 2017.

“Pace students are doers and strivers,” said Marvin Krislov, president of Pace University. “We believe in learning by doing, and there’s no better way to do that than by giving back to our community. I’m pleased that these students will have this experiential education, and I’m even more pleased that they’re doing good for their fellow New Yorkers.”

“Pace students are helping families who still have not been able to return to their primary homes after the devastation of Hurricane Sandy,” said Dan Botting, associate director of the Center for Community Action and Research at Pace University. “After the headlines die down, people forget about natural disasters and do not realize the long-lasting effects on families in affected areas. Pace has made a long-lasting commitment to help people in our home city who are still trying to resume normalcy in their lives nearly six years later.”

This year, Pace continues to build upon its partnership with SBP, established over the last four

Alternative Spring Break trips. For four days and three nights, students will be volunteering and living in the communities that are still feeling the impact of this disaster. They will also be meeting with local organizations and community members to learn what the future holds for these areas and what needs to be done moving forward.  Students participating in the trip will bring back their experience through blog posts, articles for the student newspapers on both Pace’s New York City and Westchester County campuses, a petition signing, and more.

Since the spring of 2005, CCAR, housed in Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, has sponsored an Alternative Spring Break experience, providing Pace students an opportunity to learn and explore the world through service.  Pace students have also traveled to New Orleans where they helped people rebuild in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In New York City, they have served the homeless and hungry as well as those recovering from Superstorm Sandy. Community organizations Pace has worked with include Friends of Rockaway, Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation, All Hands Volunteers, Housing Works, Ready, Willing, and Able, Metropolitan Council, Coalition for the Homeless, Homes for the Homeless, Greyston Bakery, and more.

Program itinerary provided on request.Link to upcoming ASB 18 student blog posts (not yet live):

http://ccar.blogs.pace.edu/tag/asb18/

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law). The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

Follow us on Twitter at @PaceUnews or on our website: http://www.pace.edu/news

 

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"Hartford Courant" featured Seidenberg Alumna Dr. Elizabeth Teracino in "Elizabeth Teracino earns doctorate in economics in the Netherlands"

03/06/2018

"Hartford Courant" featured Seidenberg Alumna Dr. Elizabeth Teracino in "Elizabeth Teracino earns doctorate in economics in the Netherlands"

Dr. Elizabeth Teracino, an alumni of New Canaan High School (Class of 2000), earned her doctorate in the field of economics from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. She publicly defended her Ph.D. dissertation on November 6, 2017 in the Academiegebouw in Groningen, Netherlands. Prior academic degrees include a B.S. in Business Administration from the Tepper Business School at Carnegie Mellon University, and a M.S. in Computer Science and Security from the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University.

Dr. Teracino's dissertation is entitled "Value Co-creation in the Cloud: Understanding Software-as-a-Service-Driven Convergence of the Enterprise Systems and Financial Services Industries." The dissertation addresses innovation management and strategy in emerging technology markets, more specifically due to companies moving into the Cloud and adopting a "Software as a Service" business model.

The physical book is available locally at the New Canaan Library and at the New York Public Library. The digital version of the book can be found online via rug.nl.

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"Bizz Times" featured Pace Alumni U.S. Marine Corps veteran Matthew Mainzer in "Heiman helps veterans transition to civilian careers"

03/05/2018

"Bizz Times" featured Pace Alumni U.S. Marine Corps veteran Matthew Mainzer in "Heiman helps veterans transition to civilian careers"

Featured in the photo Matthew Heiman

Vice president and assistant general counsel

Johnson Controls International plc

Nonprofit served: American Corporate Partners

Service: Career mentorship for veterans

From: "Bizz Times:"

In the fall of 2016, U.S. Marine Corps veteran Matthew Mainzer was in his final year at Pace University in New York City and, like many undergraduates with graduation on the horizon, wasn’t sure what his next professional step should be.

“I had ideas of what I wanted to do, but it was a blank space between now and then,” Mainzer said. “I mainly wanted help bouncing ideas and having someone to help me focus my plans.”

Around that time, Mainzer was paired with a mentor, Matthew Heiman, vice president and assistant general counsel at Johnson Controls International plc, to help him with the transition.

The two met through American Corporate Partners, a national nonprofit organization that pairs post-9/11 veterans with corporate professionals for year-long mentorships. Mentors help their protégés with resume building, interview preparation, career exploration, networking and leadership development.

Heiman has been mentoring veterans through the program for four years, initially while working for Tyco International PLC and now with Johnson Controls, following the companies’ merger.

Heiman, who is now in his fourth mentor partnership, said he’s motivated by an appreciation for veterans’ service and for the mentoring he received early on in his own career.

For a year, Heiman and Mainzer spoke for about an hour on the phone every two weeks, discussing Mainzer’s goals and plans. Mainzer, whose five years of military service included two deployments to Afghanistan, had his eye on graduate school, but also the possibility of a full-time job.

“We would talk about how do you manage competing priorities,” Heiman said. “It was a really easy assignment for me. Matt’s a bright guy who has a ton of options.”

Mainzer, meanwhile, found it helpful to have a sounding board while navigating post-college decisions.

“(The mentorship) was a short time commitment and I got an immense value out of our conversations,” Mainzer said. “I can say that there are some things I wouldn’t have been as successful with if not for our conversations and without advice from Matthew.”

In the fall of 2017, Mainzer moved to Novi Pazar, Serbia to begin a nine-month stint of teaching English through the Fulbright Program. This fall, he will begin studying at Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.

After that, he plans to join the U.S. Foreign Service.

Read the full article.

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