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Associated Press: "FBI Official: Time Needed to Know If Phone Can Be Unlocked"

03/23/2016

Associated Press: "FBI Official: Time Needed to Know If Phone Can Be Unlocked"

. . . Speculation about the source of the new method has centered on a little-known but thriving industry of computer forensics in which firms work with the FBI and other police agencies around the world.

While it could be an independent hacker, several experts said the proposed solution most likely came from one of those firms, possibly one that already works for the government.

"The FBI contracts out a lot of work, like every other government agency, and a lot of stuff gets shipped off to data-recovery contractors," said Jonathan Zdziarski, an independent iPhone forensics researcher.

He said the most straightforward possibility is that the FBI described the problem to a variety of contractors and one of them came forward with a proposed solution.

Other experts mentioned an Israeli company, Cellebrite Inc., that's a leader among several firms selling smartphone forensics services and software tools to U.S. police agencies. The programs can extract data from iPhones running older versions of Apple's operating system, but they have been stymied by the latest version, known as iOS 9. That's the version running on the San Bernardino iPhone.

Cellebrite hasn't announced any new product that works with iOS 9, but it's likely working on developing one, said Darren Hayes, a computer scientist and cybersecurity expert at Pace University in New York.

Cellebrite representatives couldn't be reached for comment Tuesday. The company did not respond to an email and phone message left at its U.S. offices in New Jersey.

Read more: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/fbi-attackers-phone-possibly-accessible-apple-37831413

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Agence France-Presse: "Apple-FBI encryption showdown postponed, for now"

03/22/2016

Agence France-Presse: "Apple-FBI encryption showdown postponed, for now"

- Paris, Brussels and encryption -

Darren Hayes, a Pace University professor specializing in computer forensics, said the issues will be seen as more urgent in the wake of attacks last year in Paris and on Tuesday in Brussels.

"If we hear more about iPhones used in terrorist attacks, people may side with the government a little more," he said.

The question of access to encrypted devices will probably be dealt with in the legislative arena in the United States and elsewhere, Hayes added.

"This is not just a struggle in the US," he said. "It's a toss-up on whether the US or EU implements legislation first."

Read more: http://www.afp.com/en/news/apple-fbi-encryption-showdown-postponed-now

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Bankrate.com: "Watch a thief install a skimmer in 3 seconds"

03/18/2016

Bankrate.com: "Watch a thief install a skimmer in 3 seconds"

. . . Sophisticated skimming operations like this have become more common in recent years, says Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at Pace University who specializes in cybersecurity.

"It's big business," says Hayes. "For the organized criminal gangs that have traditionally been involved in burglary, car theft, sometimes even human trafficking or narcotics, skimming is one part of their portfolio of criminal activities."

Overlays make skimming easy

Part of the reason the man in the video is able to install the skimming device so quickly is that it's likely custom-made to fit that terminal, says Hayes.

"They can create them very easily," Hayes says. "Sometimes what they'll do is go to a machine that they want to target -- say it's a particular type of ATM -- they'll hack off the card reader and they'll make a mold of them."

Some thieves go so far as to use paint swatches to match the paint color exactly, he says.

The advent of 3-D printing has made the process of overlay manufacturing even easier, Hayes says. And those without the skills to manufacture the devices can also easily find them for sale online.

However they get them, a high-quality overlay on a debit-card point-of-sale terminal can be almost impossible for a victim to spot, he says.


 

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Schools Chancellor Discusses Challenges of Educating 1.1 Million Students During Appearance at Pace University’s InsideTrack

03/17/2016

Schools Chancellor Discusses Challenges of Educating 1.1 Million Students During Appearance at Pace University’s InsideTrack

Pace alumna talks with President Stephen J. Friedman about innovation, teaching as a growth industry, and the future of New York City’s schools

New York, NY – March 17, 2016 -- As part of the university's InsideTrack speaker series, President Stephen J. Friedman and Pace University’s School of Education hosted Carmen Fariña, New York City Schools Chancellor for a discussion on the state of education. The event was held in Pace’s Schimmel Center at the University’s Lower Manhattan campus.

The evening offered a behind-the-scenes look at running the nation’s largest and most diverse school system. Chancellor Fariña discussed the ever changing state of education in New York and beyond, and examined what she feels some of the most important issues facing parents, students, and educators are today.

“There are probably very few people with more opportunity to shape the long-term future of New York City than Chancellor Fariña,” said Pace President Stephen J. Friedman. “That is because in today’s world, a great city is a platform for testing new ideas and new ways of doing things. And the critical players in that process are the men and women whom that city attracts and educates.”

“I feel that people have to be treated with dignity so they can do the best work possible,” Carmen Fariña said when asked about her most important objectives upon being appointed Chancellor. “First and foremost was to bring dignity back into the profession.” 

In her InsideTrack conversation, Fariña discussed her priorities and decisions related to key issues such as charter schools, Common Core, class size, teacher evaluations, and technology that will impact the City for years to come. She shared her experience for inspiring others and advocating for change in the New York City school system.

As Chancellor, Carmen Fariña has extended pre-kindergarten education to more than 68,000 four-year olds. She has also expanded the Community School model to provide more wrap-around services to students and families, and launched the Framework for Great Schools, a holistic, research-based approach to school improvement.

Under her leadership, the number of struggling city schools being reviewed for state takeover fell from 91 in 2015 to 27 in 2016.

Chancellor Fariña also discussed the challenges posed by a looming teacher shortage, but noted a silver lining for aspiring educators. With accelerated changes taking place in technology, how children are educated and other areas, the Chancellor sees teaching as a growth industry with an increasing demand for those specializing in pre-K, math, science, tech, language/ESL, the arts, and special needs education.

Fariña, who holds a master's degree in Administration and Supervision from Pace, has spent half a century in the field of education -- dedicating her life to providing quality education to all children. The Chancellor oversees the education of more than one million students in New York City, the nation’s largest school district.

Carmen Fariña grew up in Brooklyn, raised by parents who left Spain during the Spanish Civil War. As the first person in her family to attend college, she earned multiple degrees from New York area schools, including Pace University.

InsideTrack with President Stephen J. Friedman brings renowned thought leaders and policymakers to Pace for captivating discussions on topics that affect the greater New York community.

About Pace University: Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and College of Health Professions. http://www.pace.edu

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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New York Times: "After Rough Campaign, Many Rubio Backers Will Stay Home"

03/16/2016

New York Times: "After Rough Campaign, Many Rubio Backers Will Stay Home"

“What Marco Rubio's supporters will do now that he has exited the Republican primary, is a complicated question,” writes Jessica Lavariega-Monforti, Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Political Science at Pace University, in the New York Times Room for Debate. “Some will move to support Donald Trump, as many people want to back a winner and many see his nomination as inevitable. But the majority will not."

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2016/03/15/can-rubios-exit-stop-trump/after-rough-campaign-many-rubio-backers-will-stay-home

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La Opinión: "La base republicana no quiso nada con 'el nuevo siglo' de Rubio"

03/16/2016

La Opinión: "La base republicana no quiso nada con 'el nuevo siglo' de Rubio"

Su familia abraza y consuela a Rubio tras su discurso en el que anunció esta noche que suspendía su campaña por la presidencia. Foto: Angel Valentin / Getty Images

. . . La profesora Jessica Lavariega-Monforti, directora del departamento de ciencias políticas de Pace University en NY, estuvo de acuerdo con Rubio en esto: su mensaje era más optimista que la mayoría de los votantes republicanos y ese mensaje no conectó co n ellos. “Pero aún es joven, aún puede tener un futuro político”, agregó.

Otro observador, sin embargo, indicó que Rubio “siempre fue sobreestimado por todos y por sí mismo”.

Read more: http://www.laopinion.com/2016/03/15/la-base-republicana-no-quiso-nada-con-rubio/

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Bloomberg: "How Apple Helped Me Crack iPhones Like Clockwork"

03/16/2016

Bloomberg: "How Apple Helped Me Crack iPhones Like Clockwork"

File photo taken in 2015 shows an illustration of an iPhone held up in front of the Apple logo.(Photo: Philippe Huguen, AFP/Getty Images)

. . . In Riverside, Apple is arguing it would take weeks of programmer time to figure out how to unlock the San Bernardino iPhone, which runs the iOS 9 operating system, and could weaken security for all phones. Meanwhile, in a Brooklyn case against a drug dealer, it is arguing that it faces an undue burden in cracking phones with older operating systems, too -- even though prosecutors say it has opened such phones “dozens” of times. Of 12 other devices for which the company said it is opposing federal search warrants, seven run iOS 7 or older operating systems.

“I don’t see any reason why Apple wouldn’t comply” with the Brooklyn warrant, said Darren Hayes, a professor of cyber security and digital forensics at Pace University, in New York. “They’ve gotten into those phones many times.”

Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-16/how-apple-helped-me-crack-iphones-like-clockwork

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Computerworld: "Defense Dept. wants your help in imagining the worst"

03/15/2016

Computerworld: "Defense Dept. wants your help in imagining the worst"

. . . The U.S. government is concerned about the use of new technologies, which may threaten the safety and security of our citizens," said Darren Hayes, an assistant professor and director of cybersecurity at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York.

Examples include the release of blueprints for manufacturing a gun using a 3D printer, said Hayes. A drone has been used to transport drugs across the border, and hacking Internet of Things technologies such as medical devices and thermostats is now commonplace, said Hayes.

Websites such as a Shodan, which can expose IoT connections, "clearly demonstrate how vulnerable many of these devices" are, said Hayes.

"It's important to encourage young, tech-savvy people to identify how the latest technologies may be misused," said Hayes.

Read more: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3043984/security/defense-dept-wants-your-help-in-imagining-the-worst.html

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TechNewsWorld: "USA Today to Experiment With Virtual Reality News Show"

03/15/2016

TechNewsWorld: "USA Today to Experiment With Virtual Reality News Show"

. . . At risk with the launch of VRtually There is more than money for the USA Today Network. A poorly received user experience could impact negatively the adoption of VR, according to Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University's Lubin School of Business.

Google's Cardboard VR platform, the cheapest and most basic form of VR available, also could have a negative impact on the USA Today Network's efforts and the industry at large.

"The most important contributing factor to the success of VR is creating as realistic an experience as possible," Chiagouris told TechNewsWorld. "In the early stages, if an inexpensive means negatively impacts the user experience, that will do more harm than good to the adoption of VR."

Read more: http://www.technewsworld.com/story/83231.html

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Wall Street Journal: "Can a College Student Outsmart Janet Yellen?"

03/14/2016

Wall Street Journal: "Can a College Student Outsmart Janet Yellen?"

Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen, front, posed with Pace University’s victorious Fed Challenge team—from left: Jozef Lampa, Daniella Gambino, Yuliya Palianok, Katherine Craig, Jonathan O'Kane, Melissa Navas, Prof. Gregory Colman, Omar Habib, Prof. Anya Shostya and Prof. Joseph Morreale—in December in Washington. Photo: Federal Reserve

“The labor market is strengthening, but inflation remains stubbornly below target and financial conditions are volatile,” Daniella Gambino, 22 years old, told listeners gathered in the Federal Reserve’s chandeliered boardroom in Washington.

Katherine Craig, 21, said her colleagues were considering “the risk of premature tightening” and discussed an option that “prescribes low rates until inflation shows clear signs of picking up.”

If those sound like the private deliberations of Federal Reserve officials, they are meant to.

As Fed officials were weighing what to do with interest rates ahead of their mid-December policy meeting, students at dozens of U.S. colleges were learning how it is done.

Each fall, many of the nation’s keenest college economics students—such as Ms. Gambino and Ms. Craig from New York’s Pace University—face off in a central-bank-run contest called Fed Challenge. Last year, the national finals won by Pace wrapped up in Washington two weeks before the central bank’s hotly anticipated Dec. 16 decision to raise rates.

Read more: http://www.wsj.com/articles/can-a-college-student-outsmart-janet-yellen-1457865215

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