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Westchester County Business Journal: "Tax policy in flux affects Main Street"

04/22/2016

Westchester County Business Journal: "Tax policy in flux affects Main Street"

U.S. Department of the Treasury building, in Washington. Photograph by Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

. . . Treasury was right to curtail inversions, said Philip G. Cohen, a retired vice president of tax at Unilever United States, and an associate professor of taxation at Pace University Lubin School of Business. Congress has failed to act, he said, and the government had to send a message to stop an abusive tax avoidance practice.

He said the high corporate tax not only hurts U.S. companies with global operations, it burdens smaller U.S. companies that don’t have foreign operations to use for tax avoidance techniques.

The proposed rule that would treat a company’s foreign debt as equity goes too far, he said. But putting an end to taxation of foreign earnings of American corporations, as some reformers have advocated, would encourage companies to move jobs and investments outside of the U.S.

“If Singapore decides to offer a tax holiday,” Cohen asked, “why would you put up an R&D facility in Tarrytown?”

“I want to encourage investments in the U.S. I want to make the U.S. business friendly, while at the same time curtailing abuses.”

The Treasury rules have been characterized as stopgap measures to slow down the pace of inversions. There is widespread agreement that comprehensive tax reform is needed.

Cohen said the tax base should be broadened and the statutory rates lowered. But he has written elsewhere that there is little appetite in the current Congress to change a tax system that opens the campaign donation spigot. Maybe next year, if a Democrat is elected president and Democrats control the Senate, a reform bill can be negotiated with a Republican House.

Read more: http://westfaironline.com/78889/tax-policy-in-flux-affects-main-street/

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El Diario: "Nuevo empujón para Trump y Clinton, pero la campaña sigue"

04/21/2016

El Diario: "Nuevo empujón para Trump y Clinton, pero la campaña sigue"

. . . Para la profesora Jessica Lavariega-Monforti, politóloga de la Universidad de Pace en Nueva York, los contendores de Trump tiene pocas oportunidades en las urnas, pero aparentemente esperan poder competir en la convención, si a Trump no llega al número de delegados para ganar en la primera votación.

“Ted Cruz había venido ganando en competencias recientes, pero la realidad es que el margen de Trump sigue aumentando y no hay forma de alcanzarlo en número de delegados”, dijo Lavariega-Monforti.

Read more: http://www.eldiariony.com/2016/04/19/nuevo-empujon-para-trump-y-hillary-pero-la-campana-sigue/

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San Francisco Chronicle: "Big wins by Trump, Clinton in N.Y. shift tone of campaigns"

04/21/2016

San Francisco Chronicle: "Big wins by Trump, Clinton in N.Y. shift tone of campaigns"

Photo: Jabin Botsford, The Washington Post

. . . “I think that when the history of the 2016 nomination is written, the New York presidential primary will be seen as the turning point,” said David A. Caputo, president emeritus and a professor of political science at Pace University in New York.

Read more: http://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Big-wins-by-Trump-Clinton-in...

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Daily News: "Solid New York victories for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton help pave a concrete path toward their nominations"

04/21/2016

Daily News: "Solid New York victories for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton help pave a concrete path toward their nominations"

. . . Even if Cruz were to win 100% of the remaining 674 delegates, which itself is impossible, he would still fall four delegates short of 1,237.

Cruz, however, "isn't likely to drop out," according to David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of Political Science at Pace University, and will, instead, probably stay in the race to deprive Trump of every delegate he possibly can — a strategy that could help force an increasingly unlikely contested convention.

"He remains the last and perhaps the best hope if the Republicans remain convinced Trump can be stopped," Caputo told the Daily News.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/donald-trump-hillary-clinton-closer-nominations-article-1.2608972

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IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center: "What Watson Sees In Your Personality"

04/20/2016

IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center: "What Watson Sees In Your Personality"

IBM Watson Personality Insights uncovers a deeper understanding of people's personality characteristics, needs and values to drive personalization. It extracts and analyzes a spectrum of personality attributes to help discover actionable insights about people and entities, and in turn guides end users to highly personalized interactions.

Watch the video: Pace University Entrepreneurship Lab (eLab): https://youtu.be/YdVVLWv3Fwo

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New York Times: "Jianbing, a Chinese Crepe, Migrates to Manhattan"

04/20/2016

New York Times: "Jianbing, a Chinese Crepe, Migrates to Manhattan"

The Flying Pig Jianbing’s food truck in Manhattan is a converted French crepe maker that now turns out jianbing, the savory Chinese pancakes. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

Fresh from China, they came ashore in the San Francisco Bay Area. They stormed Seattle. They descended on Portland, Ore.

Now, they are sweeping across Manhattan, with sightings near Washington Square Park, Midtown and Columbia University.

Resistance is futile.

Jianbing, a street-food crepe from northern China made with eggs, chili and sweet sauce, cilantro, scallions and a crunchy deep-fried dough wafer, is Beijing’s latest culinary flexing of soft power.

Made in the ubiquitous street carts that dot Beijing, Tianjin and other northern Chinese cities, jianbing can be eaten on the go, doubling as a hand-warmer on those frigid days when the wind invades from Siberia. The going price in the more upscale sections of the Chinese capital now is about 5 renminbi, or 77 cents.

Despite its humble origins, making jianbing is an art. Mess up the secret sauce — generally some combination of sweet sauce and bean paste — and it could overpower the crepe, dominating the chili, humbling the cilantro, running roughshod over the scallions.

That is why Yolanda Lee and Dolkar Tsering, friends from Pace University in New York, spent months in northern China in late 2014 going from city to city. They sampled more than 100 kinds of jianbing, learning from the street-side masters, who, more often than not, were happy to offer advice.

“We both gained 20 pounds after that,” Ms. Lee said. “No joke.’’

Ms. Lee, 25, a Beijing native who studied marketing and art history, and Ms. Tsering, 26, an ethnic Tibetan from Sichuan Province who studied finance, wanted to recreate the classic jianbing in New York, with a few modifications.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/21/world/asia/china-jianbing-new-york-bei...

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New York Times: "Review: Salut Salon Mixes Whimsy and Virtuosity"

04/19/2016

New York Times: "Review: Salut Salon Mixes Whimsy and Virtuosity"

The Salut Salon members, from left, Anne-Monika von Twardowski, Angelika Bachmann, Meta Hüper and Sonja Lena Schmid. Credit Robert Altman for The New York Times

In a classical-music-comedy market (yes, there is one) buoyed by social media, the German female quartet Salut Salon has developed a loyal following. The group’s performance style mixes the virtuosic silliness perfected by the duo Igudesman & Joo with the high-octane performance style of the rock-cover specialists Two Cellos, but adds lavish doses of whimsy and sex appeal. A video clip of the violinists Angelika Bachmann and Iris Siegfried, the cellist Sonja Lena Schmid and the pianist Anne-Monika von Twardowski engaged in competitive instrumental acrobatics during a medley of Vivaldi, Mozart and Weill has drawn over 20 million clicks on YouTube.

On Sunday the ensemble made its New York debut at the Schimmel Center at Pace University, with the violinist Meta Hüper replacing Ms. Siegfried, who is on maternity leave.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/19/arts/music/review-salut-salon-mixes-wh...

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The Science Coalition: "Super Science Tuesday - Pace University"

04/18/2016

The Science Coalition: "Super Science Tuesday - Pace University"

Throughout the 2016 presidential campaign, The Science Coalition is asking people to answer the question: Why should science matter to the presidential candidates? For more information, visit www.ScienceMatters2.me.

Watch the video. Pace University: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mD-fTY3eWFM

The Science Coalition is a non-profit, nonpartisan organization of the nation’s leading public and private research universities. It is dedicated to sustaining strong federal funding of basic scientific research as a means to stimulate the economy, spur innovation and drive America’s global competitiveness. Learn more at www.sciencecoalition.org.

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Poughkeepsie Journal: "NY Harbor getting cleaner, 1 oyster at a time"

04/14/2016

Poughkeepsie Journal: "NY Harbor getting cleaner, 1 oyster at a time"

Editor’s note: The following is a question-and-answer interview by Hudson River environmentalist John Cronin with Billion Oyster Project (BOP) Co-Founder Murray Fisher. Since 2011, BOP has planted 16.5 million oysters in New York Harbor with the help of more than 100 partners and thousands of kids. Fisher, who also founded the New York Harbor School on Governors Island, will share his stories and oyster science April 21 at The Hop bar/restaurant to launch Beacon Institute’s new Science Café Series.

Hudson River environmentalist John Cronin is Beacon Institute’s Founding Director and editor of its Watermark blog. He is Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace University’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment, and was the first full-time Riverkeeper, serving from 1983-2000.

I was raised a city kid and have never warmed up to the idea that city kids must be removed to the woods to learn why they should care about the environment. Sometimes I think it can have the opposite effect. Does the Billion Oyster Project have the answer?

One of the failures of the modern environmental movement has been its inability to engage meaningfully the huge numbers of people — mostly young and non-white — who live in our biggest cities. After a dozen years of experience, the folks at the New York Harbor School created the Billion Oyster Project (BOP), which provides students in public schools — numbering 1.1 million kids —the tools and curriculum necessary to participate in the restoration of New York Harbor. Oysters disappeared from the harbor and lower Hudson due to overharvesting and pollution. One billion oysters, successfully restored to NY Harbor by our project, its students and teachers, will filter the polluted waters of the harbor every three days. BOP has already engaged over 50 schools and is adding a new school every week.

What have they tapped into? One of the most vexing problems facing public school teachers and administrators is the ‘engagement’ problem: Kids don’t care. Too often environmental education programming is geared toward minimizing kids negative impact on the planet — recycling, water usage, electricity usage — which is important but not necessarily inspirational. A project, however, that allows you to participate in maximizing your positive impact on the planet can be transformational. Young people in New York City are leading an effort to re-wild the waters that surround them. They can actually picture a harbor that is once again swimmable, ringed by massive oyster reefs and teaming with hundreds of species of fish and dozens of species of marine mammals. For most of them, New York Harbor will be the closest thing to wilderness that they will experience locally, so it is in their best interest to make it as accessible, bountiful, beautiful and abundant as possible.

Read more: http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/tech/science/environment/2016/04/14/valley-environment-beacon-institute-oysters/83027786/

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CRM Buyer: "Marketers Poised to Run the Customer Experience Show, Survey Says"

04/14/2016

CRM Buyer: "Marketers Poised to Run the Customer Experience Show, Survey Says"

. . . "Just because a consumer's refrigerator or dishwasher is connected to the Internet does not mean the consumer has a relationship with the brand that produces the appliance," observed Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

"Most consumers will ignore much of the connectivity until real benefits are delivered to them via the Internet and the things concerned," he told CRM Buyer.

Read more: http://www.crmbuyer.com/story/83356.html

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