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Disability Film Festival Marathon 2017

03/16/2017

Pace University to host fifth annual Celebration of Individuals with Disabilities in Film, Thursday, March 23

Panel discussion with leading advocates for people with disabilities in New York City

New York, NY – March 16, 2017 – The fifth anniversary of Pace University’s annual Celebration of Individuals with Disabilities in Film is Thursday, March 23. The festival will be held from 4 pm to 9 pm in the Aniello Bianco Room at One Pace Plaza in lower Manhattan. Pace’s Disability Film Festival Marathon 2017 focuses on individuals with disabilities expressing dreams and hopes to be contributing members of society like other individuals without disabilities. The marathon highlights short documentary and narrative films from the Reel Abilities Film Festival in New York City, respecting the autonomy and the empowerment of people with disabilities. The event is free and open to the public.

What: The Disability Film Festival Marathon 2017 is a collaboration of the Dean for Students and the outreach programs of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems of Pace University, in close partnership with AHRC New York City, an agency for helping people with developmental and intellectual disabilities, and with the ReelAbilities: New York Disabilities Film Festival. A panel of expert practitioners on the advocacy of disability rights in society will discuss the challenges and the opportunities highlighted in each of the films, with the panelists inviting engagement from guests. Following the panel discussion, moderators will engage in Q&A with audience guests in opinion polling on film themes.

Who: Panelists include Victor Calise, Commissioner at the New York City Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities; Allan B. Goldstein, Senior lecturer, New York University, Tandon School of Engineering, Sibling; Maria Hodermarska; Parent and teacher, New York University; Gary Lind, Executive Director, AHRC New York City; and Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, Professor emerita, Pace University, Sibling. Moderators: Marijo Russell O’Grady, PhD, Dean for Students, Pace University; Melanie A. Greene, Seidenberg School, Information Technology and Marketing, Pace University; Greta Baier, Determined 3rd grader; and Gilda Lindenblatt, Self-advocate.

Where: Pace University in the Aniello Bianco Room at One Pace Plaza (opposite City Hall), Manhattan. Enter at 3 Spruce Street.

When: Thursday, March 23. Displays and Exhibits of Community Partners: 4 pm – 6 pm. Reception and Refreshments: 5 pm – 6 pm. Discussion and Films: 6 pm – 9 pm.

The festival encourages Pace students to inquire about Area of Knowledge (AOK) CIS 102W community engagement courses, disability inclusion initiatives, and disability outreach programs of the Seidenberg School of Pace University, including paid internship and mentoring projects with people with disabilities in New York City.

For more information, contact James P. Lawler, DPS, Professor of Disability Studies and Information Technologies at Pace and Chair and Organizer of Film Festival Marathon 2017. Phone: (212) 346-1013; email: jlawler@pace.edu.

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

 

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San Francisco Chronicle: "Future Apple, Google campuses go for workplace glamour"

03/13/2017

San Francisco Chronicle: "Future Apple, Google campuses go for workplace glamour"

Photo: An artist's rendering provided to the media on Thursday, March 8, 2012, shows the proposed new Apple Inc. campus.

Next month, Apple will inaugurate its circular “spaceship” campus, an eye-catching Cupertino landmark that will house some 12,000 employees of the world’s most valuable company under a single roof.

About 10 miles away in Mountain View, Google is moving past the planning stage for a futuristic campus that, when it opens in 2019, will be the first major real estate project the search engine giant has built from scratch. The central building, which resembles a puffy white cloud, will be along a bicycle and pedestrian path that connects Google’s other offices.

Though different in size, design and public accessibility, the two campuses point toward a single idea: Real estate is becoming a status symbol for Silicon Valley companies, which are now competing in part on the glamour value of their work spaces. As they vie for software engineers, Apple and Google are trying to woo potential hires with design and lifestyle flourishes, down to small details such as temperature controls at the desk level at Google’s new campus and an interior meadow, pond and orchard just for Apple employees.

“They’re constantly locked in an arms race for talent,” said Jonathan Hill, dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at New York’s Pace University. “The best engineers want to work in not only the nicest facilities, but they want to work in a place that is eco-friendly and is accessible to the community, so there aren’t any walls up between the tech community and the local folks.”

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New York Daily News: "Trump’s messy execution of new health care law, border wall leaves some conservative supporters’ heads spinning"

03/13/2017

New York Daily News: "Trump’s messy execution of new health care law, border wall leaves some conservative supporters’ heads spinning"

They loved the ideas  — but not how they’re being carried out.

The conservative groups and politicians that helped usher President Trump to his unexpected and historic victory last November are now blasting how he’s carrying out two of his signature proposals — a new health care bill and the border wall — even though he never bothered to offer specific details for either idea.

Experts say the groups should have known the devil was in the details.

“Policy specifics” were “not demanded of Trump during the past presidential campaign,” David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of Political Science at Pace University, told the Daily News.

“Thus President Trump was given greater opportunity to develop specifics later."

“So it should come as no surprise that specifics are often lacking and plans appear disorganized," he added.

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LI News Radio: "Pace University's Dr. David Caputo LIVE on L.I. in the A.M!"

03/09/2017

LI News Radio: "Pace University's Dr. David Caputo LIVE on L.I. in the A.M!"

David A. Caputo, President Emeritus and Professor of Political Science at Pace University, appeared on LI News Radio (103.9) to discuss President Trump's travel ban.

Listen to the interview.
 

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SC Media: "Experts not surprised by CIA's leaked cyber weapons, but stunned agency failed to protect them"

03/09/2017

SC Media: "Experts not surprised by CIA's leaked cyber weapons, but stunned agency failed to protect them"

. . . James Gabberty, associate dean and professor of information systems at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, told SC Media that he thinks the U.S. Office of the CISO (which sits unoccupied due to the January resignation of Gregory Touhill) should establish a framework, perhaps based on NIST standards, that specifically protects cyber assets belonging to the CIA and other spying agencies. “These clandestine agencies would then be in a position to be audited regularly by external agencies to demonstrate proof of compliance,” Gabberty said.

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Homeland Security Today: "CIA’s Covert Cyber Spy Office Rocked by Leak on its Hacking Tools"

03/08/2017

Homeland Security Today: "CIA’s Covert Cyber Spy Office Rocked by Leak on its Hacking Tools"

Photo: The C.I.A. headquarters in Langley, Va. If the WikiLeaks documents are authentic, the release would be a serious blow to the agency. Credit Jason Reed/Reuters

. . . “By putting these tools into the public domain, WikiLeaks has done the equivalent to handing lighter fluid and matches to children,” said James W. Gabberty, associate dean and professor of information systems at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York City.

“The potential damage done to the United States - both from a military and personal safety perspective - resulting from WikiLeaks’ transmittal of thousands upon thousands of program codes stolen by hacktivists puts us all in danger, as now our enemies possess the greatest weapon possible to inflict harm to us: the keys to the kingdom,” Gabberty said. “One can only imagine the sophistication of the tools developed by our clandestine agencies and now leaked by WikiLeaks.”

“What this means to the casual reader,” Gabberty explained, “is our most advanced network data collection tools have been made public to everyone on earth, and anyone using them has the capability to access just about any network on earth. The resulting hacking activity that will ensue will be like nothing we’ve seen to date. For those of us living in the northeast, recall how easy a simple software bug led to the northeast blackout of 2003. Image having tools that were specifically designed to allow attackers to gain access to these same computers with aplomb and the subsequent damage that could be done … As the Internet of Things (IoT) promises billions of interconnected devices, the collective vulnerability of these devices becomes painfully evident.”

“Now that WikiLeaks has unleashed the potentially most damaging cyber security tools ever to hit the street,” he continued, “I wonder if supporters of Army private Chelsea Manning and former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden will continue to cheer when the electricity powering their computing digital devices, ATMs, cellular networks and mass transportation systems stops flowing … we are in the midst of a massive cyber war that is increasing both in its ferocity and frequency, and everything from our research centers, financial, military and civilian infrastructures are at risk of being compromised and used against us.”

The problem, he added, is, “The United States, it turns out, still does not have a public policy on how to best safeguard our information assets; we simply hobble along, taking the best advice from this framework or that, and watch in dismay as our systems are constantly overwhelmed by attackers.”

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Agence France-Presse: "Pressure mounts on Uber and CEO after missteps"

03/07/2017

Agence France-Presse: "Pressure mounts on Uber and CEO after missteps"

Photo: Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is known for being brash and aggressive in propelling the ridesharing giant's rise.

. . . The firm's founder and chief executive might help Uber by stepping aside as CEO, possibly taking the role of chairman, said Larry Chiagouris, a Pace University marketing professor.

"If I were him I would remain connected to the business but I would step up and bring someone with a fresh face and a lot of maturity," said Chiagouris.

This would "give riders and drivers a sense there is a serious and mature person running the business," he said. "He needs to find a way to put a face on Uber other than his own."

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New York Post: "Snap Inc. valued at $34B after fantastic first day of trading"

03/03/2017

New York Post: "Snap Inc. valued at $34B after fantastic first day of trading"

. . . Snap admits that it doesn’t foresee making a profit any time soon. But some tech mavens predict the app will embed itself in every part of users’ lives through the “internet of things.”

“Snap will be one of the first to viably connect your coffee maker at home or juicer at home, those kinds of applications,” said Jonathan Hill, dean of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science.

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CFO Magazine: "Hire Expectations"

03/02/2017

CFO Magazine: "Hire Expectations"

. . . “Companies are telling us they want finance students who know how important analysis will be in any finance function and who show a willingness to embrace and explore analytical tools and methods,” says Aron Gottesman, chair of the finance and economics department at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “Students don’t necessarily need to know how to code.”

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New York Post: "Half of college students think their loans will be forgiven"

02/28/2017

New York Post: "Half of college students think their loans will be forgiven"

Owing to a serious misconception, almost half of college students recently polled believe they won’t be saddled with student loans soon after graduation.

According to a survey of 500 current college students conducted by LendEDU, a private firm that connects students and their families with student loans and loan refinancing, 49.8 percent believe they would be able to receive federal forgiveness on their student loans after graduation.

This belief is hardly justified, given the limited circumstances in which these loans can actually be forgiven.

The US Department of Education says that federal direct student loan borrowers can get off the hook if they enter public service jobs for a specified period of time, agree to teach in an underserved area, die or become permanently disabled, or if the school they attended shuts down while they are enrolled or within 120 days after they leave.

“The biggest exemption is the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, and very few students go into public service,“ said Nate Matherson, who co-founded LendEDU in 2014.

“With maybe 14 percent of the American workforce in a public service job, the actual numbers of those who may qualify for student loan forgiveness or discharge is maybe below 10 percent.

“The fact that many students do not understand this means that they may be significantly underestimating the cost of financing a college education,” he added.

Many students polled said they would rely on financial aid to make up the difference in reduced debt load. So while 90 percent knew of FASFA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), 84 percent did not know the correct filing deadline for the application.

Mark Stephens is financial aid director at Pace University, where the “sticker price” annual tuition is $42,354 for the 2017-18 academic year, a figure that he says is on the average “about 50 percent discounted” through a combination of gift scholarships and other freebies like Pell Grants.

Given the high degree of dependence today’s students have on this aid, he said he and other financial aid professionals are aware of the need to make sure students and their families understand how the process works.

He said Pace conducts 25 or 30 financial aid workshops in high schools each year as well as online tutorials.

“It’s not very realistic at all to expect loan forgiveness,” he said. “We try to tell students to understand your loan and manage your spending.”

Read more here.

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