main navigation
my pace

NYC

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Daily Voice: "Work By Pace To Abolish Nuclear Weapons Awarded Nobel Peace Prize"

10/12/2017

Work By Pace To Abolish Nuclear Weapons Awarded Nobel Peace Prize (Daily Voice)

Pace University students found their efforts to abolish nuclear weapons rewarded Tuesday with the ultimate prize.

The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to establish a nuclear weapons ban treaty. Pace students and professors Matthew Bolton and Emily Welton, who are married to each other, had been working for three years on the negotiations.

Welty is the Vice Moderator of the World Council of Churches Commission on International Affairs which is a member of ICAN and main representative to the United Nations for the International Peace Research Association. Her focus has been primarily been on mobilizing communities of faith to speak out on nuclear disarmament.

Bolton was part of a specific ICAN team that advocated successfully for the treaty to include victim assistance and environmental remediation provisions, as well as obligations on states to provide international cooperation and assistance to countries affected by nuclear weapons use and testing.

"The nuclear weapon prohibition treaty is the most significant shift in nuclear politics since the end of the Cold War," Bolton said. "It is wonderful that the Nobel Peace Prize recognized the thousands of people around the world who made it happen.

Two Pace juniors, Terrie Soule and Sydney Tisch, have made advocacy calls to all of the diplomatic missions who had voted in favor of the treaty at the negotiating conference this summer and urged states to sign and ratify the treaty.

“Nuclear disarmament is an important issue to me because I believe that long-lasting peace cannot be achieved through threats to destroy one another,” said Tisch. However, I believe it can be achieved through meaningful dialogue and cooperation, for which a ban on nuclear weapons sets an amazing precedent."

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

WNYC: "Celebrating Bottom Line"

10/12/2017

Celebrating Bottom Line (WNYC)

The Bottom Line was an iconic NYC music venue that featured a range of talented and high-profile artists during its run from 1974 to 2004. Artists like Eric Clapton, Neil Young and Dolly Parton all played there, and its contributions to the NYC music scene have not been forgotten. A two-night, multimedia event “If These Walls Could Talk" is being held at the Schimmel Center to celebrate the venue's legacy. The venue's co-owner Allan Pepper and Paul Shaffer, David Letterman's longtime musical director and a Bottom Line regular, explain what we can expect from the event.

"If These Walls Could Talk" will be take place on Oct. 13 and 14 at 7:30 p.m. at the Schimmel Center at Pace University (3 Spruce St.).

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Playbill: "Sydney Lucas and Lilla Crawford to Play U.S. Senators for American Scoreboard Readings"

10/12/2017

Sydney Lucas and Lilla Crawford to Play U.S. Senators for American Scoreboard Readings (Playbill)

Fun Home Tony nominee Lucas will be Senator Elizabeth Warren, while Annie star Crawford is cast as Senator Patricia Murray.

A handful of young Broadway stars have been tapped for the next installment of American Scoreboard: The Trump Administration, a series of dramatic political readings.

The upcoming reading, chronicling the confirmation hearing of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, will be presented October 23 at 7 PM at Pace University’s Schimmel Center.

The cast will include Lilla Crawford (Annie) as Senator Patricia Murray, Tony nominee Sydney Lucas(Fun Home) as Senator Elizabeth Warren, Sam Poon (The King and I) as Senator Bernie Sanders, Nicholas Barasch (She Loves Me) as Senator Al Franken, Edward O’Blenis (Law & Order SVU) as Senator Lamar Alexander, and Tracy Shayne (Chicago) as Betsy DeVos.

Conceived and produced by Fran Kirmser and Christopher Burney, American Scoreboard presents free, verbatim readings of Congressional hearing transcripts.

Read the full article.

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westfair: "Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance Jr. addresses growing cyberthreat"

10/12/2017

Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance Jr. addresses growing cyberthreat (Westfair)

Speaking at Pace University on Oct. 6, Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. said that when he first arrived in the Manhattan office as an assistant DA in the 1980s, computer crime was as simple as “when someone went into an office building and took a computer.”

Vance was addressing a room full of students and business executives at Wilcox Hall on Pace’s Pleasantville campus as the keynote speaker for “Cyberstorm: Cybersecurity in Business.”

As the title of the all-day conference suggests, computer and cybercrime has grown in both complexity and frequency well beyond Vance’s initial understanding. He said cybercrime now represents about a third of the cases his office prosecutes.

To illustrate the issue, he listed a series of high-profile hacks and cybercrimes just in the last three years. The “staggeringly large crimes” included attacks on Target and Sony Pictures, both hacked in 2014, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management in 2015, the Democratic National Committee in 2016 and Equifax in 2017.

The hacks are evidence of a cyberthreat that Vance said represents a “clear and present danger.” He stressed the need for companies and agencies to work together to address cybersecurity issues.

“More than ever, cyber should bring us all together,” Vance said. “Because we are either going to get together and figure out how we share solutions on cyber, or, if we don’t, we are going to be picked off company by company, agency by agency.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Good Call: "Should You Work for the Family Business to Gain Experience?"

10/10/2017

Should You Work for the Family Business to Gain Experience?m (Good Call)

For college students looking for experience, working for the family business might seem like a no brainer. But, is it a good idea? Can family members be objective enough to provide honest feedback? And will recruiters or hiring managers view working for your family as “real” experience?

Less than half of college seniors feel very prepared for a career, and if you’re considering this type of work arrangement to bolster your resume, consider the following factors:

When The Goal Is To Gain Experience

According to Helen Cruz, director of career counseling at Pace University, there’s no one-size-fits-all answer, so the school advises students on a case-by-case basis.

“At Pace, we have many students whose families own businesses both in the U.S. and overseas.”

Cruz believes that working in the family business can help students develop and practice the types of skills needed to succeed in a career.

Monique Frost, associate director of career and professional development at the Farmer School of Business at Miami University, believes that it can be beneficial to work for the family, but she also thinks it would be helpful to work for someone who might fire them.

“It is best if a student interns or volunteers with their family business early in their career exploration journey if possible.” She explains, “This will allow students to gain insight and knowledge about that particular industry, as well as the dynamics surrounding working with family members.”

However, Frost also thinks students can benefit from interning/working at other companies.

“Learning from others can add tremendous value to a student’s or new grad’s ability to collaborate with constituents outside of their current network, receive open and honest feedback – without family bias – and gain insights and perspectives from a diverse range of people.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Backstage: "The College Audition: Part I"

10/10/2017

The College Audition: Part I (Backstage)

If you’re a high school junior, senior, or the parent of either, it’s officially the time of year to begin the task of researching, applying to, and preparing for the college audition process. It can sometimes (most times) feel like a daunting task. You have so many questions. There is so much pressure. There are so many schools. There are very few slots.

Our first question is: Are you (as either young artist or parent of one) ready to make the commitment to pursuing a life in the creative arts? Are you prepared to study for a field in which there is no guarantee of financial success or stability? Ever? Scary, huh?

If you’re serious about this, there are five steps to take when starting the process.

FIRST: Make a list of questions.

  1. What do I want out of an arts training program?
  2. Do I want an urban or suburban campus?
  3. Do I want conservatory or liberal arts training? What’s the difference between the two?
  4. What are the top schools in my field? (i.e. acting, musical theater, playwriting, etc.)
  5. How many students does the program admit?
  6. Who’s teaching within the program?
  7. What industry connections do they have?
  8. Is there a New York showcase? A Los Angeles showcase?
  9. Am I guaranteed a place in the showcase or is it by admission?
  10. Does the program support internships, independent studies, etc.?
  11. Are there performance opportunities?
  12. When am I allowed to audition?
  13. Does the program have a “must-cast” policy or could I go through four years not guaranteed an opportunity?
  14. What theaters are around the school? Do I have the ability to see other shows while there?
  15. And any other question you may have.

You don’t have to provide definitive answers to the more subjective questions but these are things you really should consider.

SECOND: Visit the website for each school. 
Narrow down your choices. Do you like the vibe? Do the production photos excite you? Is the philosophy of the school one you can adhere to for four years?

Not every school is right for every student, especially when you’re studying something as vulnerable as creative arts.

READ: 25 Amazing Acting Colleges You Should Know

THIRD: Visit the school.
It’s very easy to imagine yourself getting into a top program, but that doesn’t always mean you’ll feel connected to the faculty, other students, and location. Every school has a cultural identity that attracts students who feel inspired by the environment, so it’s important that you see yourself at assimilating and thriving within the culture.

All schools offer tours. Some will allow you to observe classes or, at a minimum, talk with other students and faculty. Take advantage of those opportunities.

Additionally, do you respond positively to the environment around the campus?

FOURTH: Create a folder and master Excel document.
Start with a timeline of deadlines and audition dates. Each program will have its own audition requirements and you want to make certain you’re preparing the correct material for each school. Some will want two contemporary monologues; or a contemporary and a classical; or two contrasting songs and a contemporary monologue. See: confusing. Write it all down.

If there’s content on a website that confuses you, make a list of questions and follow up with a call if necessary. While you might have friends who have gone through this process, avoid hearsay and get the information directly from the school. Being armed with research can make a huge difference not only for your own anxiety but also in the overall quality of your audition.

Example: At Pace Performing Arts, we specifically ask for one contemporary monologue for the acting program. The musical theater program requires one monologue, contemporary or classical, and two contrasting songs.

FIFTH: Consider summer programs.
Many of these departments run summer programs. Find out if that’s the case for schools you’re interested in and whether they’re taught by the actual faculty. If so, apply and audition!This will give you a glimpse as to what your life would be like on campus.

This process will at times be daunting but take charge of what you can control and it’ll lead to much less anxiety. It might even become enjoyable or fun!

Grant Kretchik is the associate director of Pace University’s School of Performing Arts, the head of its BFA acting program, and a Backstage Expert. For more information, check out Kretchik’s full bio

JV Mercanti is the head of acting for the musical theater program at Pace University’s School of the Arts, author of the monologue book series, “In Performance,” and a Backstage Expert. For more information, check out Mercanti’s full bio!

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Huffington Post: "Puerto Rico After Maria: When Resiliencia Humana Is The Only Resilience That Remains"

10/10/2017

Puerto Rico After Maria: When Resiliencia Humana Is The Only Resilience That Remains (Huffington Post)

In the days leading up to and after Hurricane Maria, Sarah Gabriella Pereira lived by her cell phone. She had learned the hard way that a even a moment’s hesitation might disconnect her from home, thanks to Puerto Rico’s now frail cellular system. She abruptly left her Pace University classes without warning to talk to her mother. “Sometimes, I’d see I had a missed call, and I would start crying. On my birthday, the day before Maria landed, I received none of my usual family calls.” They were anxiety-filled days.

“Resiliencia” is hand-engraved into the silver ring that every day adorns the left hand of the international management major at the university’s Lubin School of Business. She was unfamiliar with the word when she found the ring a year and a half ago in a display of homemade jewelry back home in the city of Caguas. “It captured my attention,” she said. “When I learned what it meant, I understood. I identify with it.”

Caguas, in the central eastern part of Puerto Rico, endured more than three feet of rain during the historic storm that began hammering the island on Sept. 20 with 155-mph wind gusts. Shortages and ruined services made living conditions dire. Power outages are the norm. Like the rest of the island, the local supply chain was crippled by fuel shortages, damaged highways and logistical confusion.

Keeping up with the purchase of everyday necessities is a challenge. In the aftermath, Sarah’s mother, named Sarah as well, could only withdraw $100 at a time from the local bank teller or the ATM, if it were operational. Bank lines were long and she had to make money last. Food is still dear and neighbors take turns preparing meals for each other. “It is economical. They never know when the money is going to run out. My mom said she has been eating cereal. They can’t even eat ham and cheese sandwiches because there is no place to store ham or cheese ― ice is necessary. They have to stand in line for ice.

Sarah says resiliencia is integral to Puerto Rican culture and her upbringing, the reason the island and its people will survive and thrive. “We are literally a hopeful and happy people. Obviously, many back home are desperate now and they have reason to be. But we will do the impossible and have a Puerto Rico that is even better.”

Resilience is also a favored word among climate and security experts, but cold and technical in its application. It is discussed at a distance from disasters ― in conferences, meeting rooms, and agency strategy sessions. Resilience is about models that theoretically assure systems are securely in place, responders are prepared to mobilize, and resources are at the ready. That is, until a weather bomb like Hurricane Maria explodes in people’s lives, leaving only human resilience to stand and fight.

The Department of Homeland Security says resilience requires “the shared responsibility of all levels of government, the private and nonprofit sectors, and individual citizens.” But what happens when government and the private and nonprofit sectors fail in their shared responsibility, are rendered as helpless as the family short on food because it hasn’t access to its own money?

“No matter how much we plan, without human resilience we don’t survive,” said Professor Joseph Ryan, chair of Pace University’s masters program in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals. “When Tom Ridge [Secretary of Homeland Security under President George W. Bush] spoke at Pace University’s first resiliency conference about the 2010 National Security Strategy, he said we will achieve resilience through public private partnerships. The private sector has 90% of the resources and no authority. Government has few resources and all the authority. They have no idea what a public private partnership is. And if we are really going to achieve resilience, we need to work together.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Ledger: "Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center policy keeps relatives in dark about Polk County Jail inmates’ condition"

10/09/2017

Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center policy keeps relatives in dark about Polk County Jail inmates’ condition (The Ledger)

Inmates are actually the only population group in the United States with a constitutional right to health care, said Kimberly Collica-Cox , an associate professor of criminal justice and security at Pace University in New York. That right was established by the U.S. Supreme Court in the 1976 case Estelle v. Gamble.

Courts have defined a prisoner’s “serious medical need” as one that is “so obvious that even a lay person would easily recognize the necessity of a doctor’s attention,” said Dr. Isaac Alexis, who was worked as a physician in prisons in Michigan and West Virginia.

“The states try to interpret what that adequacy entails, resulting in tens of thousands of lawsuits annually in this country,” Alexis said.

Collica-Cox said guidelines on how to provide medical care vary by state and even within states can vary by facility.

“Jails do monitor the health needs of inmates, and some do so better than others,” Collica-Cox said. “It is very similar to seeing a physician on the outside, where sometimes you receive quality medical care and other times, not so much.”

Jails and prisons can be held liable for medical neglect through the “medical indifference standard,” Collica-Cox said, meaning officials knew an inmate required medical attention but opted to ignore it. Deliberately disregarding signs of substantial risk to an ailing inmate would be a violation of the Eighth Amendment, which forbids the “unnecessary and wanton infliction of pain.”

Prisons generally provide a higher standard of medical care for inmates than jails do, said Bruce W. Cameron, a counselor in Texas and a retired federal prison official.

“Jail is a place where people come in and out and don’t really serve time,” Cameron said. “Therefore, the health-care system for a jail mirrors that process and is not as intense as it would be in a prison.”

Cameron said jails train their staffs to recognize certain symptoms of medical episodes, such as heart failure and stroke.

Although it might seem logical for jail officials to notify family members when an inmate is hospitalized, Collica-Cox said they face no legal obligation.

“There is no constitutional right to visitation, and even if there were, correctional facilities can restrict an inmate’s rights as long as the restrictions are based on a reasonable penological objective,” Collica-Cox said. “In this case, there could be concern for contraband and that could be enough to justify denial of a hospital visit. But since it is not a constitutional right, no formal justification is really needed.”

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 – HIPAA – is another barrier, unless the inmate has signed a privacy-rule waiver allowing medical authorities to share information.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Broadway World: "Lilla Crawford, Sydney Lucas to Headline 'AMERICAN SCOREBOARD' Reading of Betsy DeVos Hearing"

10/09/2017

Lilla Crawford, Sydney Lucas to Headline 'AMERICAN SCOREBOARD' Reading of Betsy DeVos Hearing (Broadway World)

AMERICAN SCOREBOARD: The Trump Administrationwill present the next installment of its series of live dramatic political readings on Monday, October 23rd from 7:00 p.m. to 8:20 p.m. at Pace University's Schimmel Center, 3 Spruce Street in downtown New York City.

This month's reading will feature: Lilla Crawford (Annie) as Senator Patricia Murray, Syndey Lucas (Fun Home) as Senator Elizabeth WarrenSam Poon(The King and I) as Senator Bernie Sanders, Nicholas Barasch (Big River, 2017 Encores!) as Senator Al Frankin, Edward O'Blenis as Senator Lamar Alexander (Law & Order SVU), and Tracy Shayne (Bronx Bombers, Chicago) as Betsy DeVos.

Ripped directly from the U.S. Senate Chamber in Washington DC, AMERICAN SCOREBOARD: The Trump Administration series explores, from an all new perspective, the serious issues facing President Donald Trumpand the America public today. Conceived and produced by Fran Kirmserand Christopher Burney, AMERICAN SCOREBOARD presents one hour verbatim readings of Congressional hearing transcripts in a format that can't be found on C-SPAN or CNN. The readings are FREE and open to public.

Coinciding with the Fall 2017 Semester and in cooperation with Pace University's Office of Government & Community Relations, AMERICAN SCOREBOARD's fourth installment features the confirmation hearing of U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. U.S. Senators represented in the hearing will be portrayed by current students and recent graduates including young professionals from Broadway productions, colleges and universities, including Pace University, and the New York City Public School System. All Actors appear courtesy of Actors Equity Association.

AMERICAN SCOREBOARD's first readings were presented at HB Studio Players Theater on January 24, 2017, reaching back into 2016 on the topic of corporate fraud with The Wells Fargo Hearing Panel 1. The second reading, The Tom Price Confirmation Hearing - Panel 1, was presented March 1, 2017, and the third installment on The Investigation of Russian Interference in the 2016 Election with Clint Watts was presented on June 26, 2017.

Read the full article.

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Annie’s Lilla Crawford Cast as Senator Patricia Murray Joins the American Scoreboard Ensemble Alongside Fun Home’s Sydney Lucas as Senator Elizabeth Warren

10/09/2017

Annie’s Lilla Crawford Cast as Senator Patricia Murray Joins the American Scoreboard Ensemble Alongside Fun Home’s Sydney Lucas as Senator Elizabeth Warren

    

 

 

Annie’s Lilla Crawford Cast as Senator Patricia Murray Joins the American Scoreboard Ensemble Alongside Fun Home’s Sydney Lucas as Senator Elizabeth Warren

NEW YORK, NY – October 9, 2017 – AMERICAN SCOREBOARD: The Trump Administration will present the next installment of its series of live dramatic political readings on Monday, October 23rd from 7:00 p.m. to 8:20 p.m. at Pace University’s Schimmel Center, 3 Spruce Street, downtown New York City featuring; Lilla Crawford (Annie) as Senator Patricia Murray, Syndey Lucas (Fun Home) as Senator Elizabeth Warren, Sam Poon (The King and I) as Senator Bernie Sanders, Nicholas Barasch (Big River, 2017 Encores!) as Senator Al Frankin, Edward O’Blenis as Senator Lamar Alexander (Law & Order SVU), and Tracy Shayne (Bronx Bombers, Chicago) as Betsy DeVos.

WHO and WHAT: Ripped directly from the U.S. Senate Chamber in Washington DC, AMERICAN SCOREBOARD: The Trump Administration series explores, from an all new perspective, the serious issues facing President Donald Trump and the American public today. Conceived and produced by Fran Kirmser and Christopher Burney, AMERICAN SCOREBOARD presents one hour verbatim readings of Congressional hearing transcripts in a format that can’t be found on C-SPAN or CNN. The readings are FREE and open to public.

Coinciding with the Fall 2017 Semester and in cooperation with Pace University’s Office of Government & Community Relations, AMERICAN SCOREBOARD’s fourth installment features the confirmation hearing of U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. U.S. Senators represented in the hearing will be portrayed by current students and recent graduates including young professionals from Broadway productions, colleges and universities, including Pace University, and the New York City Public School System. All Actors appear courtesy of Actors Equity Association.

AMERICAN SCOREBOARD’s first readings were presented at HB Studio Players Theater on January 24, 2017, reaching back into 2016 on the topic of corporate fraud with The Wells Fargo Hearing Panel 1. The second reading, The Tom Price Confirmation Hearing - Panel 1, was presented March 1, 2017, and the third installment on The Investigation of Russian Interference in the 2016 Election with Clint Watts was presented on June 26, 2017. 

WHEN and WHERE: Thursday, October 23rd, from 7:00 p.m. to 8:20 p.m. at Pace University’s Schimmel Center, 3 Spruce Street, downtown New York City. Pace University is adjacent to the Brooklyn Bridge, opposite City Hall. The production runs 80 minutes, with no intermission.

Media RSVP Required: Cara Cea, Office: 914.773.3312/Cell: 914.906.9680, No later than Noon on October 23, 2017. For General Public Reservations Call: 212.554.3431.

Lilla Crawford

Lilla Crawford is a 16 yr-old Brazilian-American actress.  She began acting, singing and dancing at a very young age and made her Broadway debut in the Tony Award-Winning musical Billy Elliot.  She then booked the title role in the Broadway revival of Annie against 5,000 actresses who auditioned in a nationwide search.  Lilla left to make her film debut opposite Johnny Depp and Meryl Streep as Little Red Riding Hood in Disney's "Into the Woods".  She is currently starring in the new Nextflix sketch comedy series, The Who Was Show.  You can hear Lilla's iconic voice as the lead character in Nick Jr.'s animated series Sunny Day.  Lilla also enjoys writing original scripts for TV episodic and musicals, performing for charity benefits, and spending time with her family and friends.  Her sister, Savvy Crawford, is also a Broadway and screen actress.

Sydney Lucas

Tony nominated for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical for her performance as Small Alison in Broadway’s Fun Home. Other theater work includes The Secret Garden at Lincoln Center, Hollywood Arms and Amelie. Film/TV: Dude, Girl Most Likely, Law & Order: SVU, How & Why, Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and Saturday Night Live.

About AMERICAN SCOREBOARD series producers: Fran Kirmser is a two time Tony Award winning producer. In 2008, off the heels of the financial crisis, Kirmser conceived and produced a sports series for stage to explore leadership and competition beginning first with Lombardi. Christopher Burney is the Artistic Producer of Second Stage Theatre where he has worked since 1996. He teaches at Columbia University in the Graduate School of the Arts. https://www.americanscoreboard.com/

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its College of Health Professions, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.  http://www.pace.edu/

Pages