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Associated Press: "Advertisers flee Bill O'Reilly's show but impact unclear"

04/06/2017

Associated Press: "Advertisers flee Bill O'Reilly's show but impact unclear"

. . . "Advertisers are very risk averse," said Larry Chiagouris, a Pace University marketing professor. "When advertisers see the possibility of scandal, they take the easy way out — which can be spun as the 'high road.' It's easy for them to move their money somewhere else."

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Network World: "Privacy rollback can cause headaches for corporate security pros"

04/04/2017

Network World: "Privacy rollback can cause headaches for corporate security pros"

. . . Use of Tor and other means to obfuscate who’s using the internet are likely to increase now that President Donald Trump has signed the rollback into law.

The law nullifies regulations set by the Federal Communications Commission in December that made ISPs get customer approval before they could sell information about their browsing habits. Now ISPs can sell it by default and customers have to opt out, a more involved process, says Ernesto Falcon, legislative counsel for the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

The legislation also bars the FCC from addressing this issue in the future. Enforcing privacy is now shifted to the Federal Trade Commission.

Falcon predicts that at some point ISPs will push the envelope on selling this data and there will be pushback. “The day will come when the FCC will have to act because something so egregious happens,” he says.

Jonathan Hill, dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University, is similarly concerned. “The Pandora’s box is now open, and we don’t know what’s going to fly out,” he says.

Businesses have other reasons to worry about the new law, Hill says. Most businesses have contracts with their providers that spell out limits on what they can do with browsing histories, but there are cracks that these restrictions could fall through. For example, telecommuters likely use their home internet service, so that consumer account would not be subject to the contract, Hill says.

He recommends that businesses review those contracts to be sure they restrict use of these histories.

ISPs are not allowed to sell information that is directly linked to an individual’s name, he says, but that data is stored by ISPs. The fear is that the data and the personal identification could somehow be hacked, he says.

Training of employees on safe browsing is important in general, he says. Traveling workers should avoid using airport Wi-Fi, he says, because glimpses of browsing and hence what the employee is interested in, can be hacked. Knowing that could be valuable to competitors, he says. “Don’t connect to airport Wi-Fi except with a VPN,” he says.

Omer Tene, vice president of research at the International Association of Privacy Professionals, is less concerned that ISPs will actually violate corporate privacy agreements, but he does recommend use of encryption or a VPN when connecting to corporate resources. “There are bigger threats out there than Verizon,” he says.

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TechRepublic: "The real reason behind the new law for ISPs and what it means for internet users"

04/04/2017

TechRepublic: "The real reason behind the new law for ISPs and what it means for internet users"

. . . Jonathan Hill, dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University in New York, said, "With a green light to collect this information, this law puts business users at greater risk of having their search histories sold or made public in embarrassing or potentially litigious ways."

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National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security designate Pace University as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education (CAE-CDE) through academic year 2022

03/28/2017

Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems recognized for its role in cybersecurity education and research

New York, NY – March 28, 2017 – Pace University, through the efforts of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, has been designated by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education (CAE-CDE) through academic year 2022. An evening reception during the National Cyber Security Summit in June will recognize Pace and the other schools that have received this distinction.

"This recognition by the NSA and the DHS is a tribute to the faculty and students of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University and the excellence that they have brought to the study and practice of cybersecurity for more than a decade," said Dr. Jonathan Hill, Dean of the Seidenberg School. "The Seidenberg School faculty have developed a stream of well educated, highly trained students who are now on the front lines of the cybersecurity fight on behalf of our government. We could not be more proud of our designation as a Center of Academic Excellence, but we understand that our work in preparing the next generation of cybersecurity specialists is just beginning."

The National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security jointly sponsor the National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense (CAE-CD) program. The goal of the program is to reduce vulnerability in our national information infrastructure by promoting higher education and research in cyber defense and producing professionals with cyber defense expertise for the Nation.

“Your ability to meet the increasing demands of the program criteria will serve the nation well in contributing to the protection of the National Information Infrastructure,” noted Karen Leuschner, National CAE Program Manager, NSA, in a letter to Pace about the designation. “The Presidents’ National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace, 14 February 2003 and the International Strategy for Cyberspace, May 2011, addresses the critical shortage of professionals with these skills and highlights the importance of higher education as a solution to defending America’s cyberspace.”

Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems actively promotes education, research and outreach in information security, with faculty members working to explore the challenges of securing information in areas ranging from software to networks to ethics.

There is an acute shortage of information assurance professionals in an industry challenged with an evolving threat to digital security. Pace’s Cybersecurity Education and Research Lab is committed to address that shortage and contribute to building a strong workforce in a field that is crucial to keeping cyberspace secure.

The Lab focuses on education, research, and partnerships with academia, industry, and government. Pace’s academic programs empower students with the knowledge they need to make a difference. Pace faculty members work in innovative research projects that help discover new ways to combat cyberattacks. Through partnerships, Pace strives to maintain a shared knowledge base that benefits the industry as a whole.

The Cybersecurity Education and Research Lab at Pace is directed by Dr. Li-Chiou Chen and Andreea Cotoranu. Dr. Chen is the Chair of the Information Technology department and has secured a wealth of grants for the Seidenberg School’s continued research and activities in cybersecurity. Andreea Cotoranu is the Assistant Dean for Academic Innovation and has similarly obtained many grants that have enabled Pace to offer excellent academic opportunities, as well as workshops and events, to students and the community.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

 

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Herald-Tribune: "Do you have what it takes to be a successful leader?"

03/28/2017

Herald-Tribune: "Do you have what it takes to be a successful leader?"

Being a good leader will have a lot to do with your success. But how do you measure it?

As Bruce Bachenheimer of Pace University says, "A definition of a leader is someone with followers. The top quality of a leader is the ability to attract top-quality followers."

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Los Angeles Times: "The strange journey of a Chinese Internet addict"

03/27/2017

Los Angeles Times: "The strange journey of a Chinese Internet addict"

Photo: People play at a net bar in Zhengzhou, China. (VCG / VCG via Getty Images)

. . . According to the Center for Net Addiction in New York, problematic Internet use — when a preoccupation with being online interferes with work and personal life — is common in China, where rigid educational structure and pressure to succeed academically can push adolescents to seek escape online, said Marcella Szablewicz, an assistant professor at Pace University who studies Chinese Internet culture.

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Huffington Post: "What’s Really Missing In The D.C. Missing Girls Case"

03/27/2017

Huffington Post: "What’s Really Missing In The D.C. Missing Girls Case"

The media and D.C. police and city officials were hammered for allegedly ignoring the plight of more than a dozen missing black and Latina girls in Washington D.C. Community activists chalked the seeming indifference up to racism. The outcry triggered a spate of news stories on the missing girls, angry denials from the police that they were asleep on the job in trying to find the girls, and lots of stats that purported to show that there’s been no major uptick in the number of missing persons in the District, and certainly nothing that points to any conspiracy to nab, traffic in, or murder young black females. The push back against the charges of murder and conspiracy is almost certainly right. However, it doesn’t answer the perennial question about how black female lives versus the lives of white females in distress are viewed and treated.

The gaping disparity in the number of black kids missing, and how their disappearance is treated, is glaring. According to FBI figures, African-American children make up 42 percent of non-family abduction. Yet, one would be hard pressed to find amber alert tweets and their pictures plastered on freeway alert signs. The media is no better. A 2010 Pace University study compared reporting by race and gender on several major news stations between 2005 and 2007. Predictably, it found that black kids were almost invisible in news coverage.

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Pace University celebrates fifth anniversary of Disability Film Festival Marathon

03/24/2017

Panel discussion with leading advocates for people with disabilities in New York City

New York, NY – March 24, 2017 – Pace University’s annual Celebration of Individuals with Disabilities in Film was held on Thursday, March 23 at One Pace Plaza in lower Manhattan.

The Disability Film Festival Marathon 2017 is a collaboration of the Dean for Students and the outreach programs of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems of Pace University, in close partnership with AHRC New York City, an agency for helping people with developmental and intellectual disabilities, and with the ReelAbilities: New York Disabilities Film Festival. The marathon highlighted short documentary and narrative films from the Reel Abilities Film Festival in New York City, respecting the autonomy and the empowerment of people with disabilities.

“This year marks the fifth anniversary of Pace’s annual Celebration of Individuals with Disabilities in Film,” said James P. Lawler, DPS, Professor of Disability Studies and Information Technologies at Pace and Chair and Organizer of the Film Festival Marathon. “I am extremely grateful to our distinguished panel of experts and audience guests for making this year’s program a great success.”

A panel of expert practitioners on the advocacy of disability rights in society discussed the challenges and the opportunities highlighted in each of the films, with the panelists inviting engagement from guests. Following the panel discussion, moderators engaged in Q&A with audience guests in opinion polling on film themes.

Panelists included Jonathan Novick, Coordinator for Information Technology, New York City Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities; Allan B. Goldstein, Senior lecturer, New York University, Tandon School of Engineering, Sibling; Maria Hodermarska; Parent and teacher, New York University; and Gary Lind, Executive Director, AHRC New York City. Moderators: Marijo Russell O’Grady, PhD, Dean for Students, Pace University; Melanie A. Greene, Seidenberg School, Information Technology and Marketing, Pace University; Greta Baier, Determined 3rd grader; and Gilda Lindenblatt, Self-advocate. Keynote Presenter: Jonathan Hill, DPS, Dean, Seidenberg School, Pace University.

The festival encourages Pace students to inquire about Area of Knowledge (AOK) CIS 102W community engagement courses, disability inclusion initiatives, and disability outreach programs of the Seidenberg School of Pace University, including paid internship and mentoring projects with people with disabilities in New York City.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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ACCA USA Cautions Finance Sector, Consumers, to Take Steps to Combat Cybercrime

03/22/2017

ACCA USA prepares to unveil new professional development cyberdefense course for accountants, finance professionals, this summer

March 22, 2017 01:32 PM Eastern Daylight Time

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fast food chain Arby’s. Quest Diagnostics. Madison Square Garden. Yahoo. Verizon. Even, the Internal Revenue Service. Hardly a week passes without yet another revelation of a cybersecurity breach striking businesses both large and small.

The financial hit on business can be troubling: An IBM report last year found the cost of a breach rose to $4 million per incident. And recently. Home Depot agreed to pay more than $27 million to financial institutions affected by its 2014 data breach, and court documents reportedly identified the total cost to Home Depot at $179 million.

ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants), the global body for professional accountants, has been tracking cybersecurity issues over the last several years, as cyber threats have become more sophisticated and penetrated every aspect of business.

This summer, ACCA USA and The Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University in New York, a National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security-certified Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education, will hold their first-ever cyberdefense course, offering professional development credits to accountants and other finance industry professionals.

“ACCA understands the challenges that accountants face and is determined to equip them with the necessary knowledge and training to address these cyber-challenges,” said Warner Johnston, Head of ACCA USA.

“The threat from cybercrime and hackers has only increased over time,” said Jonathan Hill, Dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University. “The ACCA has been a particularly adept partner in educating financial professionals and the at-risk accounting and CPA professional communities on coping with these threats. This program is specifically designed for these financial professionals to build awareness and tools to protect themselves, their firms and their clients from the ravages of cybercrime.”

Anyone interested in receiving further details about the new course and registration should email acca.usa@accaglobal.com.

In February 2016, ACCA reported that cybercrime was growing too dangerous and powerful to ignore, and a head-in-the-sand attitude to this once nascent, now pervasive threat was no longer an option. In the report, “Cybersecurity – Fighting Crime’s Enfant Terrible”, ACCA and IMA® (Institute of Management Accountants) reported that the theft of financial assets through cyber-intrusions was the second largest source of direct loss from cybercrime.

ACCA stressed that accountants and finance professionals can, and should, play a leading role in defining key areas of a strategic approach to mitigating cybercrime risks. These include:

    Creating reasonable estimates of financial impact that different types of cybersecurity breaches will cause, so that a business can be realistic about its ability to respond to an attack and/or recover from it;

    Defining risk management strategy;

    Helping businesses to establish priorities for their most valuable digital resources to implement a “layered” approach to cybersecurity; and,

    Closely following the work of government and various regulators, to have clear, up-to-date information on adequate legislation and on requirements for adequate disclosure and prompt investigation of cybersecurity breaches.

Several months earlier, ACCA issued a report, “Cyberwarriors with Calculators”, in partnership with Pace University, revealing that top-level managers in the finance industry are adapting to address cybercrime threats. The survey of ACCA professionals, including Chief Financial Officers, Managing Directors, Senior Vice Presidents and practicing accountants, found weak communication between line managers and senior managers about attacks and attempted attacks, and that the application of fundamental risk management cybersecurity practices should be applied more consistently throughout firms.

“In order for our nation to continue to prosper in a rapidly changing world we must diligently protect our public and private technological infrastructures and maintain the trust of the international community,” the report stated. “Computers, servers and the Internet are indispensable tools for financial professionals – and they are under relentless attack. For accountants, measures must be taken to ensure that the sensitive personal and corporate financial information they handle is safe: accountants need to be at the forefront of cybersecurity.”

ACCA members were asked about company policies and personal practices regarding cybersecurity, and how evidence of cyberattacks is communicated within firms. The findings highlighted weaknesses:

    Nearly 50% indicated it was somewhat or very likely that consultants would be hired after a breach.

    Nearly 70% said they had a high or very high level of awareness of their company’s cyber risk management policies and procedures.

    57% said their IT systems were well-protected against cyber threats.

    32% had no knowledge of company policy on data encryption in transit or in storage.

    Auditors are more concerned about cybercrime today than a year ago (58% for auditors compared with 48% for accountants).

    27% of accountants felt their firms adhered to Control Objectives for Information and Related Technologies (COBIT 5) standards whereas 43% of auditors believed their firms followed the standards.

In another report, ACCA and Pace also delved more deeply into the growing number of incidents involving skimming devices, which rip off consumers at gas pumps and ATMs. A skimmer is an electronic device used to read and store electronic data. The new research focused on devices that read and recorded data from consumer payment cards, such as ATM, credit, debit, prepaid and electronic gift cards.

The report illustrated how skimmer scams were spreading globally, and noted that in the first half of 2011, the U.S. ranked number one in the world in financial losses associated with skimming fraud. The report noted:

    One of the most common types of skimmer is the ATM skimmer, used to record data contained on the magnetic strip on the back of an ATM card. A skimmer may be placed on a stand-alone ATM, such as one at a convenience store or gas station.

    Security standards with European credit, debit and ATM cards differ from standards in the U.S., rendering it easier to conduct skimmer fraud in the U.S.

    The U.S. is pivotal for criminal gangs because it has more ATMs than another country and because it is not EMV-compliant (cards do not contain a global chip) and its EMV cards skimmed can easily be cloned. Cards that are cloned by criminals are also used in other non-EMV countries, such as Ghana, Costa Rica, Mexico and Malta.

About ACCA

ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) is the global body for professional accountants. We aim to offer business-relevant, first-choice qualifications to people of application, ability and ambition around the world who seek a rewarding career in accountancy, finance and management. We support our 188,000 members and 480,000 students in 178 countries, helping them to develop successful careers in accounting and business, with the skills required by employers. We work through a network of 100 offices and centers and more than 7,110 Approved Employers worldwide, who provide high standards of employee learning and development. Through our public interest remit, we promote appropriate regulation of accounting and conduct relevant research to ensure accountancy continues to grow in reputation and influence. For more information about ACCA, visit www.accaglobal.com.

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. The Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University prepares men and women for professional work, research, and lifelong participation in a new and dynamic information age. Located in the financial capital of the world, the Seidenberg School offers a wide variety of courses and exposure to internships and work with leading corporations, banks, federal agencies, and global entities. Degrees and certificates are conveniently available on Pace’s campuses in New York City and Westchester County as well as online and in special programs. Visit http://www.pace.edu/seidenberg/

Contacts

For ACCA

Jeff Simmons, 917-673-0024

jeff@anatgerstein.com

or

Jaime Williams, 718-793-2211

Jaime@anatgerstein.com

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Science360 News: "Women's History Month: Lauren Birney is getting urban middle school students hands-on experience in restoring oyster habitats in New York Harbor"

03/20/2017

Science360 News: "Women's History Month: Lauren Birney is getting urban middle school students hands-on experience in restoring oyster habitats in New York Harbor"

Research consistently shows that children who have opportunities to actively investigate natural settings and engage in problem-based learning greatly benefit from the experiences. They gain skills, interests, knowledge, aspirations and motivation to learn more. But how can educators provide these rich opportunities in densely populated urban areas, where resources and access to natural areas are limited? With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Pace University educator Lauren Birney and her team are getting middle school students involved in an ambitious restoration program called the "Billion Oyster Project." The students study New York Harbor and the extensive watershed that empties into it, and conduct field research in support of restoring native oyster habitats. "This National Science Foundation grant has made the 'Curriculum and Community Enterprise for Restoration Science (CCERS) Project' possible, advancing environmental restoration through experiential and inquiry-based learning with New York City students and teachers involved at the core of the research," explains Birney, director of Pace University's STEM Collaboratory. "Pace University serves as the prime research institution leading a city-wide collaboration emphasizing the benefits of citizen science to underrepresented students in New York City. We are enormously grateful to the NSF for supporting this work and creating such outstanding digital imagery depicting the 'real work' of the project!" This research involves a broad partnership of institutions and community resources, including Pace University, the New York City Department of Education, the Columbia University Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the New York Academy of Sciences, the New York Harbor Foundation, the New York Aquarium, The River Project, Good Shepherd Services, University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Science, Smartstart Evaluation and Research, Gaylen Moore Program Evaluation Services, and others.

Watch the video.

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