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Accounting Today: "Skimmer Fraud on the Rise"

03/07/2014

Accounting Today: "Skimmer Fraud on the Rise"

Credit card and bank card skimmer fraud has spread around the world, stealing from consumers and banks at locations ranging from gas stations to ATMs and restaurants, according to a report from ACCA USA, the U.S. arm of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants, and Pace University in New York.

The report, written by Pace University professor Darren Hayes, explains how criminal enterprises are coming up with new ways to steal as skimming devices have become smaller and much more sophisticated in terms of power, memory, communication and encryption capabilities. 

“It’s a huge problem,” said Hayes. “Usually when we see these incidents of skimmer fraud, very often it’s over a million dollars per scam. These guys work in a coordinated effort. When they attach a skimmer to multiple ATMs, they can work in a coordinated effort to cash out money from those ATMs at the same time.”

Read more:

http://www.accountingtoday.com/debits_credits/skimmer-fraud-on-the-rise-69900-1.html

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Pace University receives grant from Time Warner Cable to support “Pace STEAM Program” to enhance STEM education by presenting science and math through the lens of the arts

03/06/2014

Pace University receives grant from Time Warner Cable to support “Pace STEAM Program” to enhance STEM education by presenting science and math through the lens of the arts

New York NY – March 5, 2014 – An interactive workshop, led by Pace University professors and featuring the acclaimed dance-theater group JUNK, will illustrate computer science topics through dance for an audience of 50-60 middle-school students on Friday, March 7 from 3:30-4:30 PM.

The workshop will be presented at MS 188 in the East Village at the school's performance hall in an after-school program organized by Pace’s partner, the Educational Alliance. The participating students are diverse and come from some of the most underserved communities in the New York.

The event is part of the “Pace STEAM Program,” a pilot program supported by a grant from Time Warner Cable and designed to enhance STEM education by presenting science and math through the lens of the arts.

“Through our Connect a Million Minds Initiative, Time Warner Cable is proud to support Pace University and help expose students to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in various forms of arts such as dance,” said John Quigley, Regional Vice President of Operations, Time Warner Cable. “STEM education that is fun and engaging will help students benefit and learn and we believe this program will accomplish that and much more.”

In the first part of the workshop, dancers from JUNK will give a short performance. Pace professors will then work with the students to explore the math and science topics embedded in the performance piece. Students will learn how choreography is much like a computer code with strict instructions for movements, turns, and jumps, and will work to code their own dance routine.

After the workshop, students and their families will have the opportunity to attend a full performance of JUNK at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts on Pace’s lower Manhattan campus.

“For many students who might not otherwise feel drawn to STEM topics, the arts can inspire engagement through the music, dance, and art forms they already love,” said Lauren Birney, assistant professor at the School of Education and director of the STEM Center Collaboratory at Pace. “From the geometry a painter uses to create perspective to the physics underlying a dancer's pirouettes, science and math abound in the arts and make them the perfect vehicles for introducing and exploring STEM concepts.”

While STEM education has become a major item on the national agenda, much less has been said about what role, if any, the arts might play in preparing students for success in STEM fields. For many students, especially those in underserved schools, arts programs are often the first to be cut in a difficult economy.

“The American educational pipeline is not presently equipped to provide the skills necessary to meet the increase in demand for workers in STEM occupations -- those requiring competence in science, technology, engineering, and math,” said Jonathan Hill, associate dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems and co-director of the STEM Center Collaboratory at Pace.  “Lack of school resources, deficient support in the content areas, and isolation of teachers are all contributing factors.

“As a consequence, the K-12 educational system is not sending enough students into the college ranks with the preparation necessary to be successful in science and math -- a trend reflected in the global achievement gap,” said Hill. “The result is a critical shortage of college graduates with the STEM skills required to succeed in today’s workforce.”

Birney and Hill have developed relationships with several underserved, diverse public schools in New York City. Altogether, the schools reach nearly 5,000 students. Pace faculty members support teachers and students at these schools through faculty/teacher mentoring relationships, curriculum development, the creation of inquiry-based projects for students, and teacher training and development.

About the Educational Alliance: Founded in 1889 to help Jewish immigrants get settled in the U.S., the Educational Alliance is a non-profit organization that serves a broad and diverse group of downtown New Yorkers -- of all religions, ethnicities, races and socio-economic backgrounds. Educational Alliance breaks the cycle of poverty for low-income children and families through preschool, after school programs, and college prep programs. Visit http://www.edalliance.org

About JUNK: Brian Sanders' JUNK is known for their ingenious use of found objects and clever inventions that bridge the gap between dance and physical theater. Sanders' choreography blends traditional dance theater with an inventiveness and physicality. One of the company's main objectives is to make dance more accessible to a younger audience. JUNK does this through outreach and the performance of its children's theater show; inspiring young audiences throughout the city with its unique creativity and artistry. Visit http://briansandersjunk.com/

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Visit https://www.pace.edu/

About Time Warner Cable: Time Warner Cable Inc. (NYSE: TWC) is among the largest providers of video, high-speed data and voice services in the United States, connecting more than 15 million customers to entertainment, information and each other. Time Warner Cable Business Class offers data, video and voice services to businesses of all sizes, cell tower backhaul services to wireless carriers and enterprise-class, cloud-enabled hosting, managed applications and services.  Time Warner Cable Media, the advertising arm of Time Warner Cable, offers national, regional and local companies innovative advertising solutions. Visit www.twc.com, www.twcbc.com and www.twcmedia.com.

Media contacts:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu or Ziggy Chau, Time Warner Cable, 212-379-5828, Ziggy.Chau@twcable.com

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Wall Street & Technology: "After the Mt. Gox Collapse, Wall Street is Wary of Bitcoin"

03/03/2014

Wall Street & Technology: "After the Mt. Gox Collapse, Wall Street is Wary of Bitcoin"

. . . “I think it’s a tremendous blow to Bitcoin and I think the trust in the currency has diminished,” said Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York, in an intervew. Hayes points to the drop in the exchange rate for Bitcoin since the virtual exchange went offline.

Read more: http://www.wallstreetandtech.com/exchanges/after-the-mt-gox-collapse-wall-street-is/240166385

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International Business Times: "Russian Ships And Troops In The Crimea Threaten To Split An Unstable Ukraine In Two"

02/26/2014

International Business Times: "Russian Ships And Troops In The Crimea Threaten To Split An Unstable Ukraine In Two"

. . . “No way would Russia agree to what is going on right now, because they will not accept that Ukraine is a separate nation," said Andriy Danylenko, a New York-based Ukrainian professor at Pace University. "They still think in terms of the Soviet Union and Russian Empire, so they cannot accept this revolution, so they will be doing everything possible, legally or otherwise, to ensure that the protesters are not successful in stopping the imperial culture that exists in the Ukraine.”

Read more: http://www.ibtimes.com/russian-ships-troops-crimea-threaten-split-unstab...

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Reuters: "UAW chief says VW vote tainted by outside 'threats'"

02/25/2014

Reuters: "UAW chief says VW vote tainted by outside 'threats'"

. . . Challenges to union election results typically focus on allegations of improper conduct by management, and labor experts see the UAW's focus on outsiders as complicating their case.

"I think it is flimsy," said John James, executive director of the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace University in New York. Comments by Corker were protected by both free speech safeguards and Congressional immunity, he noted.

Read more:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/25/us-auto-vw-challenge-idUSBREA1N1TT20140225

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Pace University Nursing Dean Elected To National Board

02/25/2014

Pace University Nursing Dean Elected To National Board

 

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Harriet R. Feldman, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., dean and professor at the Pace University College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing, has been elected to The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Board of Directors. Her two-year term will begin in March.

The AACN is the national voice for university and four-year college education programs in nursing, representing more than 740 member schools of nursing at public and private institutions nationwide. Board members are elected by member deans and directors from schools of nursing with baccalaureate and higher degree programs.

Feldman, who recently served as interim provost at Pace, has been active in nursing education at the state and national levels, previously serving on the board of Nurses Education Fund, as an appointed member of the New York State Board of Nursing, and a member and past president of the New York State Council of Deans of Nursing. She has served on the board of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education for eight years, including a two-year appointment as its chair.

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, N.Y., enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

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Pace University to celebrate Individuals with Disabilities in Film, Monday, March 31

02/24/2014

Pace University to celebrate Individuals with Disabilities in Film, Monday, March 31

New York, NY – February 24, 2014 -- Pace University will hold its second annual film festival celebrating individuals with disabilities in film on Monday, March 31 at Pace’s Lower Manhattan campus in the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street, from 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM.

“Celebration of Individuals with Disabilities in Film: International Film Festival & Discussion Panel” focuses on individuals with disabilities expressing dreams and hopes to be contributing members of society like other individuals without disabilities. The festival highlights short documentary and narrative films from leading domestic and international film festivals, respecting the autonomy and the empowerment of people with disabilities.

A distinguished panel of expert practitioners on the advocacy of disability rights in society will discuss the challenges and opportunities highlighted in each of the films. Panelists will include: Alice Elliott, Director, Welcome Change Productions; Maria Hodermarska, Parent and Teacher, New York University; Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, Member, Board of Directors, AHRC New York City; Gary Lind, Executive Director, AHRC New York City, Community Engagement Partner with Pace University; Adil Imran Sanai, Self-Advocate; and Issac Zablocki, Co-Founder and Director, ReelAbilities: New York Disability Film Festival. Moderator: Marijo Russell-O’Grady, Dean for Students, Pace University.

The program will be beneficial to those who are interested in learning about the growing movement for disability rights, in an especially positive and powerful setting. The festival is sponsored through the Dean of Students and the outreach programs of Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, in partnership with AHRC New York City, an organization for helping individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities.

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is required. Contact: James Lawler, Chair of the International Film Festival and Professor of Service-Learning at Pace’s Seidenberg School. Email lawlerj@aol.com or phone 212-346-1013.

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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China Daily USA: "Reclaiming a heritage lost, stolen or sold"

02/21/2014

China Daily USA: "Reclaiming a heritage lost, stolen or sold"

. . . UNESCO estimates that at least 17 million Chinese cultural relics are scattered all over the world, far more than are housed in China's own museums.

Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, a professor of history at Pace University who specializes in cultural-heritage management, said that of those 17 million, 1 million are art objects now in 200 different museums in 47 countries, not to mention private collections.

"So basically we're talking about huge numbers of Chinese art," Lee said, adding that when you look closely at the history of some of these items, most of them were taken from China since the late 19th century, but it's not that simple. "If we talk about 'stolen' Chinese art, one of the problems is the definition of 'stolen'."

"Most of the time we tend to focus on those arts taken by foreign invaders in the late 19th, like just after the Boxer Rebellion," Lee said. "But after the collapse of the Qing Dynasty (in 1911), we had huge numbers of Chinese arts being taken away from the old Imperial Palace by officials, and they were put on the market in the 1910s and 1920s."

Lee said it was also known that a huge amount of art was taken by the Red Guard during China's "cultural revolution" (1966-76) as well, "and those items are in the open market and also on the black market, either in China or in Hong Kong".

As a good example, Lee mentioned a Shanghai historian who told him that most of the collection in the municipal museum in Shanghai came from three major local collector families and most of the items had been confiscated by the state after 1949.

Read more:

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/epaper/2014-02/21/content_17298439.htm

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MarketWatch: "Talk is dead; long live WhatsApp"

02/20/2014

MarketWatch: "Talk is dead; long live WhatsApp"

. . . Darren R. Hayes, assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in Westchester, N.Y., uses WhatsApp to connect with friends in the U.S. and abroad. “It’s a terrific app, but I’m not sure if I will continue using it if the deal goes through,” he says. “This acquisition is one more conduit for mining personal data from millions of people.”

Read more: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/talk-is-dead-long-live-whatsapp-2014-02-20

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