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Peace at Pace: Pace University Students and Professors See Lifelong Dream Realized as the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons Wins Nobel Peace Prize

10/06/2017

Pace University Students and Professors See Lifelong Dream Realized as the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons Wins Nobel Peace Prize

NEW YORK, NY, October 6 – Pace University students along with their professors Matthew Bolton, PhD, and Emily Welty, PhD, have been working intensely for three years on negotiations of a nuclear weapons ban treaty with the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) that today was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2017.

ICAN has led the way in recent years in campaigning for an international treaty to make nuclear weapons illegal. The Nobel Prize adds momentum to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons adopted at the United Nations by more than 120 countries on July 7 of this year, and should help the process of ratification, with 50 more countries needed. The treaty makes nuclear arms illegal and calls for assistance to victims and remediation of environmental damage.

Welty is the Vice Moderator of the World Council of Churches Commission on International Affairs which is a member of ICAN and Main Representative to the United Nations for the International Peace Research Association. Her focus has been primarily been on mobilizing communities of faith to speak out on nuclear disarmament.

Bolton was part of a specific ICAN team that advocated successfully for the treaty to include victim assistance and environmental remediation provisions, as well as obligations on states to provide international cooperation and assistance to countries affected by nuclear weapons use and testing.

 “ICAN’s Nobel Peace Prize is a vindication of an approach to global peace and security that centers on human rights, humanitarianism and the environment, on the people most affected by violence,” said Bolton. “Nuclear weapons use and testing has had catastrophic humanitarian and environmental consequences. The horrifying record of accidents and close calls show that there are no safe hands for nuclear weapons. ICAN showed the way that – like other weapons of mass destruction and inhumane weapons – nuclear weapons should be banned. The nuclear weapon prohibition treaty is the most significant shift in nuclear politics since the end of the Cold War and it is wonderful that the Nobel Peace Prize recognized the thousands of people around the world who made it happen.” Bolton participated in a press conference a year ago with the ICAN director at the UN Correspondents’ Association.

Terrie Soule and Sydney Tisch are juniors at Pace University majoring in Peace and Justice Studies, housed in Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, and just two of about 20 students who have been involved in this disarmament work. They are interns at the World Council of Churches, an ICAN partner in nuclear disarmament. The students made advocacy calls to all of the diplomatic missions who had voted in favor of the treaty at the negotiating conference this summer and urged states to sign and ratify the treaty when it opened for signature on September 20.

In speaking about a previous project, Tim Wright, ICAN’s Asia-Pacific director, applauded Pace’s peace studies initiatives. “Pace is one of a small number of academic institutions – anywhere in the world – that takes disarmament education seriously. Indeed, it is a leader in the field, teaching the theory and practice of disarmament in a way that is both meaningful for students and beneficial to society,” said Wright. “More institutions should follow its example.”

Pace is in good company. Other institutions heavily involved in these negotiations include the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic, The Program on Science and Global Security (SGS), based at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and The James Martin Center for Non-Proliferation Studies at the Monterey Middlebury Institute of International Studies. The treaty’s preamble recognizes the contribution of academics and the “importance of peace and disarmament education.”

“The Pace University community can be proud of their participation in the advocacy that led to the nuclear weapons ban,” said Bolton. “Students gave many hours to this Campaign as interns, volunteers and in civic engagement assignments. Faculty advised the campaign, engaged in advocacy and offered input based on their research.”

Welty and Bolton are a married couple who teach at Pace and made a conscious decision together to devote their lives to promoting peace and disarmament. Their life’s mission was featured in a video this year when they were nominated for a national Jefferson Award.

Pace University was featured in the former UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s report on disarmament and non-proliferation education in August, recognizing Pace’s “growing role in disarmament education”, highlighting the Model UN program, the Peace and Justice Studies major, research by Pace faculty, Disarmament Forums hosted at Pace, and a UN-funded project providing training to East African officials on the Arms Trade Treaty.

Pace University student Rachel Salcedo and Welty contributed recently to multilateral disarmament discussions in addresses to the United Nations General Assembly.

“There has never been a more important moment to think about and work for nuclear disarmament and I hope that this award creates new urgency for all nations to sign and ratify the treaty,” said Emily Welty, PhD, assistant professor and director of Peace and Justice Studies at Pace. “The new treaty banning nuclear weapons honors the voices and experiences of the survivors of the horrific suffering wrought by the United States when we bombed Hiroshima and Nagasaki and all of the victims of nuclear testing. Being a part of ICAN and working for nuclear disarmament on behalf of faith communities has been one of the most important parts of my activism and putting into practice the theory I teach in the classroom.”

“Nuclear disarmament is an important issue to me because I believe that long-lasting peace cannot be achieved through threats to destroy one another,” said Tisch. However, I believe it can be achieved through meaningful dialogue and cooperation, for which a ban on nuclear weapons sets an amazing precedent.”

“The ban on nuclear weapons is so important because it is a huge step towards a more safe and peaceful world,” said Soule.

Welty's work with the campaign was profiled here. Bolton writes regularly about disarmament and the nuclear weapons ban treaty on his blog. He also wrote a brief guide to the new treaty. They both contributed to a Special Section of the journal Global Policy on the process leading to the ban, telling the ICAN story and the role of faith groups.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law). The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, N.Y., enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

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Broadway World: "Pace Performing Arts Students Collaborate with David Marshall Grant for Reimagined SNAKEBIT"

10/04/2017

Pace Performing Arts Students Collaborate with David Marshall Grant for Reimagined SNAKEBIT (Broadway World)

David Marshall Grant's 1998 hit play "Snakebit" has been reimagined thanks to a collaboration with the Bachelor of Fine Arts Acting students at the School of Performing Arts of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.

"Snakebit" will be presented beginning this week, October 4-14, 2017 at Pace University, Schaeberle Theater, 41 Park Row, New York, NY, 10th Floor. For show times and tickets visit: http://snakebitpace.brownpapertickets.com.

Grant has spent several months working with Director Christopher J. Hake and the students working on changes. "In revisiting it so many years later, there seemed to be an opportunity to more fully realize the original intent of the piece," says Grant. Hanke and Grant have known each other for some time and Hanke calls the collaboration, "excellent," and adds, "We collaborate so well and it has been wonderful helping him fully realize this revision."

Of the cast and production team of student actors, Hanke admits he has been blown away. "The unexpected joy in this process has been the Pace Performing Arts actors. Of course, they rank among one of the best undergraduate BFA programs in the country, but these actors are the finest young artists I have seen and are truly ready for the professional world, and they haven't even graduated yet. I am very proud to be working with them all."

David Marshall Grant (playwright) Broadway credits include: Bent, staring with Richard Gere, and Joe Pitt in Angels in America, for which he was nominated for a Tony Award and a Drama Desk Award. He has appeared in over 25 movies, including "American Flyer," "The Chamber," "Air America," "Stepford Wives," and "The Devil Wears Prada." Television work includes Bobby Kennedy in "Citizen Cohn," "And The Band Played On," "Thirty-Something," and "Party Down." Grant's first play, "Snakebit" was produced off-Broadway and was nominated for a Drama Desk award and an Outer Critics Circle Award.

Christopher Hanke (director) is an American actor, director, and all around theater nerd. He recently starred in the hit one-man comedy, "Buyer & Cellar," and the play, "Perfect Arrangement," at "Primary Stages," both in NYC. Before that was Bud Frump in the Broadway revival of "How to Succeed..."

Read the original article and the press release.

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Express Newsline: "Lankford: DACA Plan Has 'No Special Privileges' for Family Members"

09/28/2017

Express Newsline: "Lankford: DACA Plan Has 'No Special Privileges' for Family Members"

More recently, on September 14, he announced that he was working with Democratic leaders in Congress to pass legislation ensuring protection for Dreamers, or children who entered the country illegally as children but were registered with the DACA program. "The program has served Pace, our community, and our country well. We're providing a means whereby they can get there". During my time at Pace I have already met impressive and highly motivated students, making wonderful contributions to the community, who have benefited from DACA.

"Neighbors Link is not completely surprised by the decision of the Department of Justice at the request of President Trump to cease and desist the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival", said Otero Bracco.

"These are kids that literally do not have a home anywhere", he said.

Eighty percent of DACA recipients are of Mexican Heritage. If these are not the values and activities that we believe in as a country, then what are? "We are also even more determined to support and defend the rights of the nearly 800,000 individuals who proudly call themselves DACAmented Americans".

The Trump administration announced September 5 that it was ending the DACA program in six months, placing the onus on Congress to come up with a plan to address these 700,000 young men and women brought to this country by their parents.

Additionally, Pace University President Krislov issued a statement in support of DACA on behalf of the university.

Read the full article.

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Education Week Teacher: "Response: 'Courageous Conversations' Are Needed to Discuss Race in Schools"

09/28/2017

Education Week Teacher: "Response: 'Courageous Conversations' Are Needed to Discuss Race in Schools"

Response From Dr. Mara Lee Grayson

Dr. Mara Lee Grayson is a lecturer of English at Pace University whose research focuses on racial literacy in composition studies and memoir writing as self-reflection. Her scholarship and creative work can be found in Teaching English in the Two-Year College, Columbia Journal, and Fiction, among other publications. Her book on racial literacy is forthcoming from Rowman & Littlefield:

While people tend to think of themselves as unique, everyone is influenced by the cultural contexts of the larger society and the smaller families and communities of which they are a part. Unpacking these social and cultural influences is integral to understanding race, racism, and implicit bias. In the classroom, teachers can assign an informal, ungraded Racial Autobiography to encourage students to begin to reflect upon their experiences with and understanding of race and identity.

The racial autobiography is built from the model of the broader literacy narrative. Instead of inviting reflection upon early reading and writing experiences, the racial autobiography asks students to recall their early experiences learning about race and racism. The structure for the assignment is flexible and should serve the needs of the class and its students. Teachers may ask for an essay, a list of short answers, or a thematic personal story. Useful questions to get students thinking include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • When did you first learn about race?
  • Was race talked about in your home?
  • What does the word "culture" mean to you?
  • Did you grow up near people who looked like you, spoke your language, or shared similar customs?
  • Have you ever felt out of place because of your race, ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic class (or some part of your "culture," however you define that term)?
  • Have you ever been discriminated against? How so?
  • Have you ever discriminated against someone else? How so? Why?

This assignment is especially useful early in the schoolyear, when students may not yet be fully comfortable sharing their ideas and experiences openly in the classroom, especially where complex, emotionally charged issues like racism and identity are concerned. The racial autobiography invites reflection without the pressure of direct interpersonal interaction. Not only does the practice of reflective writing encourage students to see how they themselves fit into larger questions about race and racism, beginning with what they know from experience eases students into conversations and debates than can otherwise seem abstract and difficult to articulate. Assigning the essay early on also helps the teacher establish a baseline of racial awareness for each student; teachers can then shape the rest of the curriculum to respond to the needs of the students in the classroom.

After students write their autobiographies, they should further reflect (in guided in-class activities, free writing, or class discussion) upon how those experiences might contribute to their understandings of the world. Reflecting upon their own experiences with race, racism, and identity helps students see that what is normative in society may not feel normal or typical for everyone. In classroom interaction, the recognition that all knowledge is situated may help students become more open to listening to their peers' perspectives. Once students have gotten to know one another inside the classroom, instructors can invite students to share their personal narratives in small groups. The embodied learning that occurs when students share with and listen to one another can be transformative in understanding others' experiences and perspectives.

Teachers too can benefit from intensive reflection upon their own experiences with race and racism—and teachers should never assign a personal essay they themselves would not be willing to write. Before bringing this activity into their classrooms, teachers should write their own racial autobiographies and then reflect, through additional writing or in conversation with likeminded colleagues, about the ways in which their own social identities might influence their beliefs about education, pedagogy, and the students they teach.

Read the full article.

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Public: "Lowey Announces Nearly $450K To Improve Safety For Sexual Assault Survivors"

09/28/2017

Public: "Lowey Announces Nearly $450K To Improve Safety For Sexual Assault Survivors"

The City of White Plains, in collaboration with Pace University/Women's Justice Center (PWJC), Westchester Independent Living Center, El Centro Hispano, My Sister's Place (MSP), The Loft, and Westchester Jewish Community Services, will use this funding to support activities in its 'TRUST' (Training, Response, Underserved Support Team) project. Specifically, 'TRUST' will:

  • Support overtime costs for two White Plains Department of Public Safety (WPDPS) police officers, who will monitor offenders, conduct follow-up home visits, and make cross-referrals for services for victims;
  • support a bilingual attorney, and a supervising attorney from the PWJC, who will represent victims at protection order;
  • support a domestic violence advocate/counselor from MSP, who will receive calls via their hotline from victims who have met with officers during home visits, and will offer access to services;
  • conduct outreach and multi-disciplinary team meetings with project partners to reduce domestic violence in the disabled, Hispanic, and LGBT communities; and
  • provide training for law enforcement on the trauma-informed response to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking, to increase understanding of the impact of trauma, encourage trauma-informed practices and techniques, and provide strategies for developing and implementing trauma-informed policies department-wide.

Read the full article.

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Jewish Standard: "Living in many worlds"

09/28/2017

Jewish Standard: "Living in many worlds"

...Dr. Viswanath was living in Jersey City then, teaching at Rutgers; he taught there until 1995, when he moved over to Pace University. That’s where he teaches now — he is a professor of finance at the university’s Lubin School of Business. He took courses at the Jewish Theological Seminary, as well as continuing his study of Yiddish. At some point, his interest in Judaism went beyond his interest in religion in general.

Why? “Probably because religion was so important to me when I was growing up,” he said. “I was always very interested in theology, from the time that I was exposed to the Vedas by my grandmother. I was always interested in logic, and this was such a logical thing. How do you prove the nature of God? I’ve always been interested in the relationship between logic and theology. God is beyond human feelings, so it is unnatural to develop a personal relationship with God. Having a personal relationship with God is both a contradiction and a necessity. It is a built-in contradiction.”

Read the full article.

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Backstage: "How to Get Cast on Broadway"

09/28/2017

Backstage: "How to Get Cast on Broadway"

...Re-negotiate contracts. When your contract is up for re-negotiation for a TV show, Broadway show, or network commercial extension, you agent can negotiate an increase in pay. You need to understand the commitment and the possibility of having to turn down a larger, more lucrative offer for a competitive show or project. You need to take responsibility for the results once you sign or re-sign a contract.

Again, though, just because your chances are higher of finding and booking a gig with an agent than without one, that doesn’t mean it’s not possible. “Some actors will tell you that it’s not worth your time to go to an EPA or Open Call, that we’re not really looking, or only seriously seeing agent/manager submissions,” says JV Mercanti, a Backstage Expert and head of acting for the musical theater program at Pace University’s School of the Arts. “I can tell you that when casting the Broadway production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s ‘The Woman in White’ many years ago that seven of our ensemble members came from the EPA. Musicals and shows requiring younger people (think “Spring Awakening”) especially use these calls to find young, unrepresented talent. For plays, understudy roles can often be cast from these calls.”

Ultimately, if you do decide an agent is the right path for you and your career to move forward, actually getting one will be a feat all its own. Lucky for you, we’ve already devoted an entire guide (similar to this one!) to how to get an acting agent.

 

Read the full article.

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Multichannel News: "One Day Immersion In Media, Entertainment & Technology and Girls Inc. Partner to Support Next Generation of Media Industry Innovators"

09/22/2017

One Day Immersion In Media, Entertainment & Technology and Girls Inc. Partner to Support Next Generation of Media Industry Innovators

Girls Inc. Awarded ODI Scholars Grant and Six Students Provided Opportunity to Attend Oct. 20 Conference in NYC

The Executive Committee for the 2017 One Day Immersion in Media, Entertainment & Technology (ODI) collegiate conference announced today that it has awarded Girls Inc. of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey and Girls Inc. of New York City ODI Scholars Grants. As part of this grant, it will also provide six Girls Inc. students from Philadelphia and New York the opportunity to travel to and attend the 2017 ODI event, in association with Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and supported by the Emma Bowen Foundation, on Friday, October 20 at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University in New York.

For an entire, intensive day, One Day Immersion pulls back the curtain and connects the industry’s most influential media and technology executives with students and recent grads —our next generation of tech savvy, creative trailblazers. This one-day program offers unprecedented networking opportunities with some of today’s most successful entertainment and media imaginative thinkers, and includes interactive panel discussions with media executives, and the chance to learn about internships and job opportunities. The 2017 One Day Immersion in Media, Entertainment & Technology will feature a keynote interview by Time Warner Inc. Chairman and CEO, Jeff Bewkes.

The ODI Scholars program is spearheaded by Cable TV Pioneers and industry benefactors, Zenita Henderson, director, marketing operations and business development, Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers/International Society Broadband Experts, and board member, Girls Inc. of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey; and Matt Aden, vice president sales and sales operations, Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers/International Society Broadband Experts. Henderson and Aden created the program with their vision of driving diversity and encouraging college students to seek STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) careers in the cable telecommunications industry.

“We are thrilled to partner with Girls Inc. this year to provide six well-deserving young women the opportunity to meet and learn from some of today’s top media and entertainment executives, and to share their creative ideas and passions as the next generation of media industry innovators,” said Aden. “This will be an unforgettable experience for them, and we are pleased to welcome them as our guests for the day.”

With a mission to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold; Girls Inc. responds to the changing needs of girls through research-based programs and public education efforts that empower girls to understand, value, and assert their rights. Girls Inc. serves over 150,000 girls annually through 83 affiliates.

“At Girls Inc., we provide girls with the tools they need to be strong, independent women.  Career exploration is a critical component of this goal,” said Dena Herrin, executive director of Girls Inc. of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey. “One Day Immersion will help introduce these young women to careers they might not have encountered and allow them the opportunity to speak with women who have successfully navigated careers in this fast-paced and intriguing industry.”

Pam Maraldo, CEO of Girls Inc of New York City also expressed a high level of enthusiasm about their participation: "We are excited about having girls participate in this extraordinary program; experiences like the One Day Immersion are the key to creating the leaders of groundbreaking new developments in media of the future. It's an unprecedented opportunity."

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NY1: "Fundraiser held in East Harlem to help hurricane victims"

09/22/2017

NY1: "Fundraiser held in East Harlem to help hurricane victims"

A fundraiser was held in East Harlem Thursday to help the hurricane victims.

The event at the Julia de Burgos Art Center included music and dance performances and an art auction.

Organizers say the fundraiser is meant not only to help the victims, but the people here concerned for their loved ones.

"It's a sad time right now. There's a lot of people that don't know where their families are and they're not communicating. So we want to be there to support our people in Puerto Rico, but we also want to be able to support one another here," said Adrian Roman, co-founder of "Defend Puerto Rico."

"I'm here to support my people and to help. Especially, this particular event really resonates with me and what we need to be doing in Puerto Rico because it's targeting communities that need it the most," said Aileen Cardona, professor of Latin studies at Pace University.

The director of the center says they will be collecting food, medicine and other donations from October 6 to October 10.

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Broadway World: "Aaron De Jesus, Nicolas Dromard, Mark Edwards and Cory Jeacoma to Star in JERSEY BOYS Off-Broadway"

09/22/2017

Broadway World: "Aaron De Jesus, Nicolas Dromard, Mark Edwards and Cory Jeacoma to Star in JERSEY BOYS Off-Broadway"

...Cory Jeacoma (Bob Gaudio) is thrilled to bring Bob Gaudio back to back to New York after recently wrapping the national tour production of Jersey Boys. Prior to touring, Cory performed regionally at theatres such as The Fulton Opera House and Maine State Music Theatre as well as participating in Lincoln Center's Sinatra Centennial Concert. Jeacoma is a graduate of Pace University's Musical Theatre Program. He is repped by Don Buchwald & Associates.

Read the full article.

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