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TechNewsWorld: "OnePlus Offers Free Headsets to Lure Crowd to VR Smartphone Launch"

06/01/2016

TechNewsWorld: "OnePlus Offers Free Headsets to Lure Crowd to VR Smartphone Launch"

. . . "This would be a very expensive launch for most companies, but OnePlus at the moment is an unknown brand to most consumers," noted Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

If OnePlus's strategy is to align itself with the emergence of VR as a mobile device, and if it intends to be known as the consumer electronics brand that's most in alignment with VR applications, it "will be seen as a brilliant move," he told TechNewsWorld.

However, if the VR initiative flops, it "could be seen as a very big mistake because OnePlus could have put far more of its mobile devices in the hands of consumers by simply discounting them," Chiagouris said.

OnePlus "likely could have put more than 100,000 devices in the hands of consumers with big discounts, and the related word of mouth would have been substantial," he argued.

Read more: http://www.technewsworld.com/story/83545.html

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: "Analysis: Companies make up, then break up"

06/01/2016

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: "Analysis: Companies make up, then break up"

. . . After spending billions on acquisitions that stoked its downstream business of making parts for the aerospace, automotive and other markets, Alcoa will spin the unit off into a new company, Arconic, later this year. The thinking: investors are not putting a high enough price tag on Arconic’s fast-growing downstream operations because they perceive Alcoa to be a commodity aluminum producer plagued by global overcapacity and depressed metals prices.

“It’s hard for investors to get excited about that, particularly when commodities prices are falling,” said Bruce Bachenheimer, executive director of Pace University’s Entrepreneurship Lab.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/in-the-lead/itl-2016-companies/2016/05/27/Commentary-Len-Boselovic-Companies-make-up-then-break-up/stories/201605270027

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The Hollywood Reporter: "THR Ranks the 25 Best Drama Schools for an MFA"

05/31/2016

The Hollywood Reporter: "THR Ranks the 25 Best Drama Schools for an MFA"

Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University was again ranked among Hollywood Reporter's Top 25 Best Drama Schools.

... There's no denying the history of a place where Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan taught the Stanislavski method to the likes of Marlon Brando, James Dean, Al Pacino and Robert De Niro. Plus, students get to sit in the audience during Bravo's Inside the Actors Studio and listen in as James Lipton asks movie stars, "What is your favorite curse word?"

... A degree from one of a select group of institutions — in the U.S. and abroad — can give graduates a solid foundation for a career, or at least a decent shot at being taken seriously by casting agents. To find those schools and rank them in their proper order, THR talked to deans, teachers and other insiders and triangulated their input with reporting from the magazine's own staff.

Read more: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lists/25-best-drama-schools-895029/item/actors-studio-drama-school-at-895028

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The Hollywood Reporter: "The Top 25 Undergraduate Drama Schools Ranked"

05/31/2016

The Hollywood Reporter: "The Top 25 Undergraduate Drama Schools Ranked"

Pace School of Performing Arts in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences was ranked again among Hollywood Reporter's Top 25 performing arts schools.

From the Hollywood Reporter:

"Aspiring thesps can follow in the footsteps of some of the industry's biggest stars, who got their start at these top programs."

Pace's undergraduate performing arts school was attended by Dominique Fishback and Michelle Borth, among others.

Read more: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lists/top-25-undergraduate-drama-schools-895399/item/savannah-college-art-design-top-895438

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New York Daily News: "Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton both fewer than 100 delegates shy of securing nominations; both are likely to seal the deal on June 7"

05/18/2016

New York Daily News: "Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton both fewer than 100 delegates shy of securing nominations; both are likely to seal the deal on June 7"

Following Tuesday’s contests in Oregon and Kentucky, Hillary Clinton has 2,291 delegates, making her only 92 delegates short of the 2,383 she needs to formally secure the nomination.
(Photo credit: AARON P. BERNSTEIN/REUTERS)

. . . “By forcing Clinton to campaign and use resources she would rather spend in the general campaign, Sanders will attempt one last rally in the hopes of convincing the super delegates that he has a better chance of defeating Donald Trump than she does,” David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of Political Science at Pace University, told the Daily News.

But, “barring a major and unexpected change of events,” he added, “it is nearly impossible for Sanders to have a larger pledged delegate count than Clinton. This would mean she can stake the claim that she has more delegates and therefore the superdelegates are merely ratifying the choice of the participants in the Democratic nominating processes.”

Because her nomination is imminent, Clinton’s goal throughout the remaining contests, Caputo explained, will be to “figure out a realistic way to bring Sanders and his supporters into their camp.”

“This will likely not happen until the convention, but the foundation for it has to be completed in the period leading up to the final primaries and then during the immediate post primary period,” he said.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/trump-clinton-100-delegates-shy-securing-noms-article-1.2641277

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New York Times: "Saving Farm and Factory Jobs"

05/16/2016

New York Times: "Saving Farm and Factory Jobs"

The production line of a lamp factory in Suining, China. Despite efforts to revive manufacturing in the United States, economists say the chances of a recovery are slim, and developing countries face extra challenges as industry fades. Credit Zhong Min/European Pressphoto Agency

To the Editor:

Re “Moving On From Farm and Factory” (Economic Scene column, April 27):

Eduardo Porter’s article on the futility of trying to bring back manufacturing jobs to the United States from abroad makes it clear that our presidential candidates are embarking on a fool’s errand when they claim they can do it.

Not only would higher tariffs on foreign goods mean higher prices for Americans, but the increase in American jobs would be severely limited because manufacturing jobs are decreasing throughout the world.

Displaced workers and adversely affected local economies would be much better off with measures to enhance the safety net via better unemployment insurance and job training. More job sharing with higher hourly wages may also be necessary.

Politically these policies may be harder to sell, but they are more likely to be effective than the absurd notion that we can return to the halcyon industrial era long past.

ANTHONY A. CUPAIUOLO

South Lake Tahoe, Calif.

The writer is professor emeritus of public administration at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/07/opinion/saving-farm-and-factory-jobs.html

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Business Insider: "Target boycott has reached a boiling point — and sales may suffer as a result"

05/16/2016

Business Insider: "Target boycott has reached a boiling point — and sales may suffer as a result"

. . . Ultimately, access to goods will outweigh moral outrage for many consumers, says Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York.

"The boycott is not going to last very long," Chiagouris told Business Insider. "There is a big difference between signing a petition compared to not taking advantage of a big sale at Target. People will always take advantage of the sale."

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/target-boycott-impact-on-sales-2016-5

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E-Commerce Times: "Walmart Tests 2-Day Subscription Shipping"

05/16/2016

E-Commerce Times: "Walmart Tests 2-Day Subscription Shipping"

Walmart on Thursday began testing a two-day unlimited shipping service priced at US$49 a year.

Subscribers will get more than a million items, including the most commonly purchased items on Walmart.com, delivered to their door in two days or fewer, Walmart spokesperson Bao Nguyen said.

"Customers will continue to enjoy their two favorite features -- no minimum order requirements and free returns online and in stores," he told the E-Commerce Times.

The service, called "ShippingPass," launched last year as a three-day shipping pilot program with a $50 annual subscription fee.

Interested consumers can join the waiting list.

Consumer Acceptance

Consumer reaction to the three-day ShippingPass pilot likely was not been favorable "because Amazon has already trained consumers to expect to receive many goods in two days or less," said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/83505.html

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NY1: "Students Discuss How College is a Transformative Experience"

05/12/2016

NY1: "Students Discuss How College is a Transformative Experience"

Starting a new chapter in life, like going to college, can be a stressful but transformative experience. In this Parenting report, NY1’s Shelley Goldberg talks to students at Pace University about what college taught them about themselves.

NY1 VIDEO: http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/parenting/2016/05/11/students-discuss-how-college-is-a-transformative-experience.html

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O'Dwyer's PR News: "FDA Examines Definition of 'Healthy'"

05/12/2016

O'Dwyer's PR News: "FDA Examines Definition of 'Healthy'"

The Food and Drug Administration plans to re-evaluate its official definition of what constitutes "healthy" food. An update to that agency's meaning of the term could have a direct effect on how food companies today market their products.

The decision to revisit the definition, which has not been updated since the 1990s, comes as the FDA is expected to issue its final revised updates to the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages later this year.

The agency seeks to update the Nutrition Facts label to make it more consistent with new scientific information, as well as the updated dietary guidelines released by the USDA in January. That government policy statement scaled back previous recommendations on dietary cholesterol and accounted for an updated scientific distinction between healthy fats — such as nuts — from regular fats.  The updated dietary guidelines also shifted its focus to account for overall eating patterns, emphasizing food choices in the context of the patterns in which they are consumed, versus simply listing foods that Americans should avoid or eat more of.

Discrepancies between the FDA’s current definition of “healthy,” compared to recent scientific findings and the USDA's newest dietary guidelines, have become a source of confusion. One example is the avocado, which is now considered a super food, though it remains considered “unhealthy” according to the FDA’s definition, due solely to its total fat content.

Currently, the FDA allows food brands to market their product as "healthy" only if it meets the agency’s nutrient content criteria requirements, which largely places an emphasis on fats, cholesterol and sodium. That strict — and arguably, dated — criteria made headlines last year, when popular granola bar maker Kind was served with an FDA warning letter for labeling its snacks as "healthy," a term the agency said didn’t meet the FDA’s requirements that govern the use of that claim.  The company responded, stating its use of the word "healthy" was apt, as the product’s fat content is derived from nuts, a food now recommended in the latest USDA dietary guidelines. The FDA later agreed to allow Kind to continue use of the word “healthy” as a sort of broad, philosophical claim about the company, if not its food products.

Kind in February hired public affairs powerhouse Glover Park Group for lobbying help on FDA issues.

“I think [the FDA] realized they were caught out by this, and they needed to rethink their standards and do something about the facts that the Kind case brought out,” said E. Melanie DuPuis, a professor and chair of environmental studies and science at Pace University.

DuPuis, who is also author of Dangerous Digestion: The Politics of American Dietary Advice, told O’Dwyer’s that the notion of a new definition for "healthy" opens a potential Pandora’s box for food marketers, because like all industries, they rely on processes they want to keep stable, and when the definition of a term they use starts changing, companies have to change those processes.

Read more: http://www.odwyerpr.com/story/public/6887/2016-05-11/fda-examines-definition-healthy.html

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