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The Examiner: "Baseball got civil rights ball rolling"

01/18/2018

Baseball got civil rights ball rolling (The Examiner)

...Also during Monday’s celebration, Lupe Moe of the Independence Human Relations Commission presented a Humanitarian Award to former Independence resident Matthew Bolton and his spouse Emily Welty, both professors at Pace University in New York City, for their work with the Nobel Peace Prize-winning International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

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Times Union: "Queens Medical Associates Launches Cancer Palliative And Supportive Care Program"

01/18/2018

Queens Medical Associates Launches Cancer Palliative And Supportive Care Program (Times Union)

...After graduating with highest honors and as valedictorian from Lenox Hill Hospital – Pace University Physician Assistant’s Program, Dr. Groysman served as hospitalist Physician Assistant at Kingston Hospital in upstate New York. He subsequently graduated at the top of his class at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine.

After completion of his palliative training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, he returned to NYU Winthrop Hospital, where Dr. Groysman completed his Internal Medicine Residency and Geriatrics Fellowship training, to became a faculty-attending physician in the Division of Palliative Medicine and Bioethics. During his time at Winthrop, Dr. Groysman served as a founding faculty in creating a fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine. His passion for taking care of patients with cancer also lead him to develop and grow an outpatient Supportive Oncology program. He is fluent in English, Russian and Ukrainian.

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Westchester County Business Journal: " Pace students try out the world stage"

01/12/2018

Pace students try out the world stage (Westchester County Business Journal)

Twenty-six students from Pace University campuses in Pleasantville, White Plains and New York City, were among the more than 900 college students from around the world who went to Washington, D.C. toward the end of the year to participate in the 2017 National Model United Nations Conference.

The conference featured various meetings and discussions, plus simulation of a crisis in the Security Council and briefings by speakers from the Washington diplomatic community. 

The Pace students took on the roles of diplomats from Kenya, Namibia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. They received a Distinguished Delegation and Honorable Mention Delegation Awards, as well as six Outstanding Position Paper Awards as a result of their participation.

“At Model United Nations, you broaden your horizons,” wrote U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in a letter to the conference. “By learning and networking, you can be part of the efforts of the United Nations to establish peace, secure human rights and enable all people to live in dignity.”

“I didn’t really realize the significance of the U.N. until I was at the conference. It helped me see that this is one of the few bodies that has the forum and ability to enact change across hundreds of countries,” said student Noelle Howard, who played the role of Kenya’s representative in the International Atomic Energy Agency.

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Houston Chronicle: "US Patent Awarded for Compounds that Kill H1N1 and MRSA"

01/12/2018

US Patent Awarded for Compounds that Kill H1N1 and MRSA (Houston Chronicle)

With the flu season fully upon us, imagine making common items, such as cotton cloth, plastic bottles, and wound dressings, killers of the H1N1 flu virus or MRSA. This is now a reality with far reaching implications. Researchers at Pace University, Queens College, and Long Island University have been awarded U.S. patent number 9,832,998 B2 for a portfolio of compounds that, when applied to polymer surfaces, renders them antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial/antimicrobial.

“We have developed a compound that when bonded to a variety of surfaces, kills the H1N1 virus, MRSA, and other pathogens, fungi, and bacteria that come into contact with those surfaces, helping to stop the spread of diseases and infections,” said Chemistry Professor JaimeLee Rizzo, PhD, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Pace University. She and her fellow researchers, Professor Robert Engel, PhD, Queens College, and Professor Karin Melkonian-Fincher, PhD, of Long Island University, have worked on developing this as part of a portfolio of compounds since 2010.

The patent covers a group of groundbreaking antimicrobial technologies. These compounds have many practical applications across a variety of industries and sectors, such as healthcare, food, agriculture, construction, and the military. The range of surfaces that the compound can be bonded to includes many polymer materials, and could be used on wound dressings, facemasks, gowns, linens and countertops found in hospitals, nursing homes, clinics and physician’s offices; household items, such as sponges, cutting boards, and counters; water and air filtration systems; military uniforms; and plastic bottles used not only in the beverage industry, but the health and beauty sectors as well.

For the greater good. “With this patent, we will continue to develop compounds that will kill new flu virus strains as they emerge, which will offer enormous benefits to the health and well-being of society,” added Rizzo.

The triumvirate of researchers is working on bringing the compounds to the market in 2018.

Read the article.

This press release has run on various media sites such as Times Union Online, Beaumont Enterprise Online, San FranciscoGate and various others media sites.

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The Riverdale Press: "Parents have high hopes for new schools chancellor"

01/12/2018

Parents have high hopes for new schools chancellor (The Riverdale Press)

It’s 10 a.m., a time still considered breakfast, yet at Riverdale/Kingsbridge Academy, lunch is being served.

While early lunch might not produce too many protests among youngsters, the scheduling problems is actually a product of overcrowding at RKA — where more than 1,400 students middle and high school are forced to use limited space.

“There are only so many kids legally allowed in the cafeteria at a time,” said Vicki Auerbach, co-president of RKA’s parent association. “When your student body is so large, that’s the fallout. Kids are eating at ridiculous times through no fault of the school.”

What could be at least seven hours between meals for RKA students is one of just many issues parents and others are imploring Mayor Bill de Blasio to consider as he looks to find a new school chancellor, serving more than one million students and 1,800 schools.

Carmen Fariña announced her retirement late last month, and the mayor is conducting a national search for her replacement.

“Overcrowding and its effect on class size and effective instruction is really my main concern,” Auerbach said. “It’s hard to capture the attention of 30-something teenagers in a room.”

Overcrowing at schools like RKA grows each academic year. RKA rose from a little more than 1,380 students in 2014-15, to just under 1,460 a couple years later, according to data from the city’s education department.

“The focus should be more on building the entire being instead of just tests andnumbers,” said Crystal Teron-Salas, parent association president at AmPark Neighborhood School, which serves pre-kindergarten through fifth grade. 

“A lot of kids struggle with testing. They may be the smartest kids in the classroom but they actually struggle when they have to take a test.”

Teron-Salas praised Fariña’s work promoting literacy and wants the department to continue advocating reading. Yet, she is concerned about potential cuts to art and music programs across city schools, which she said are vital.

Because there is not a large enough amount of lower-income students at the school, AmPark does not get additional funds through Title I. That means extra money is the responsibility of the parent associations through various fundraisers like bake sales and promotions with local businesses.

A continued focus on English language learners and support for teachers — especially at renewal schools — are two of the main things Jennifer Pankowski, would like to see in a new chancellor.

“If they are going to continue with renewal schools, they need to let teachers and principals and administrators do their jobs … and not this threat on the backburner, ‘If you don’t do your job, we’re going to take it away,’” the education professor at Pace University in Manhattan said.

Under the city’s Renewal School program, low-performing schools are helped through a variety of methods that include expanding the school day, providing after-school programs with community organizations, and even requiring teachers to reapply for their jobs.

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Bustle: "How To Build Your Personal Brand To Boost Your Career, According To Experts"

01/12/2018

How To Build Your Personal Brand To Boost Your Career, According To Experts (Bustle)

Most people don’t feel the need to do any marketing unless it’s their job to promote a brand. But the truth is, that’s everyone’s job — because we all have a personal brand to promote. Especially in the digital age, the way you present yourself and the messages you send alongside yourself can have a huge impact on your career.

This was a hard pill for me to swallow. I resisted building a personal brand for a long time because I hate inauthenticity. I just want to be myself, and I think it’s unfair that people — especially women — have to think about their image to get the credit they deserve for their work. But then I realized: If you’re not going to be self-promotional, someone else will. And even if they’re no better than you, they’ll get more opportunities because more people will know about them. And building a personal brand in accordance with your true identity can actually make you feel more like yourself.

“Having an online presence is becoming increasingly essential in a society that relies so heavily on the internet,” Jennifer Lee Magas, MA, JD, VP of Magas Media Consultants and Clinical Associate Professor of Public Relations at Pace University, tells Bustle. “In today's digital age, you are your brand. Therefore, it's important to maintain your internet brand management and do so in the most effective way for your career. A key element of your personal and professional brand is your digital footprint, which can help you obtain employment, allow you to contribute significantly to your employer's operation, and advance your career.”  

Here are some ways to improve your personal brand and give yourself a competitive advantage.

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US Patent Awarded for Compounds that Kill H1N1 and MRSA

01/11/2018

US Patent Awarded for Compounds that Kill H1N1 and MRSA

Researchers at Pace University, Queens College and Long Island University collaborate on groundbreaking portfolio of antimicrobial technologies

January 11, 2018, New York – With the flu season fully upon us, imagine making common items, such as cotton cloth, plastic bottles, and wound dressings, killers of the H1N1 flu virus or MRSA. This is now a reality with far-reaching implications. Researchers at Pace University, Queens College, and Long Island University have been awarded U.S. patent number 9,832,998 B2 for a portfolio of compounds that, when applied to polymer surfaces, renders them antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial/antimicrobial.

“We have developed a compound that when bonded to a variety of surfaces, kills the H1N1 virus, MRSA, and other pathogens, fungi, and bacteria that come into contact with those surfaces, helping to stop the spread of diseases and infections,” said Chemistry Professor JaimeLee Rizzo, PhD, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Pace University. She and her fellow researchers, Professor Robert Engel, PhD, Queens College, and Professor Karin Melkonian-Fincher, PhD, of Long Island University, have worked on developing this as part of a portfolio of compounds since 2010.

The patent covers a group of groundbreaking antimicrobial technologies. These compounds have many practical applications across a variety of industries and sectors, such as healthcare, food, agriculture, construction, and the military. The range of surfaces that the compound can be bonded to includes many polymer materials, and could be used on wound dressings, face masks, gowns, linens and countertops found in hospitals, nursing homes, clinics and physician’s offices; household items, such as sponges, cutting boards, and counters; water and air filtration systems; military uniforms; and plastic bottles used not only in the beverage industry, but the health and beauty sectors as well.

For the greater good.  “With this patent, we will continue to develop compounds that will kill new flu virus strains as they emerge, which will offer enormous benefits to the health and well-being of society,” added Rizzo.

The triumvirate of researchers is working on bringing the compounds to the market in 2018. 

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences:  Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high-quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

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Lincoln Journal Star: "Sound of Music' actress a big fan of Julie Andrews"

01/11/2018

'Sound of Music' actress a big fan of Julie Andrews (Lincoln Journal Star)

...Set in Salzburg in 1938, “The Sound of Music” is Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical about a young Austrian woman studying to become a nun who is sent to the villa of a retired naval officer and widower to be governess to his seven children. The Rodgers and Hammerstein score includes some of the most well-known songs in musical theater history, including “My Favorite Things,” “Do-Re-Mi,” “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” and “Edelweiss.”

And Wiley’s favorite?

“Every week it changes,” she admitted. “I like ‘Do-Re-Mi’ because it’s the first time Maria and the children come together and form a connection. But right now it’s my duet with the Captain, ‘Something Good.’ It always gets a reaction from the audience. Maria and the Captain finally get together and admit they love each other.”

“The Sound of Music” is Wiley’s second national tour. Four years ago, after completing her sophomore year at Pace University in New York City, she was offered her first tour, understudying Belle in Disney’s “The Beauty and the Beast.” She eventually played Belle in an Arizona Broadway Theatre production. She also performed Ariel in “The Little Mermaid” at Arizona Broadway Theatre.

“I've gotten to do a few of my Disney princess dream roles,” Wiley said. “The running joke is ‘Who am I going to do next?’”

When she’s not onstage, she makes her home in New York City, where she’s been collaborating with friend and music director Matthew Glover on a solo show, “I’ll Be Seeing You: A Story of Hope, Love and Change.” A cabaret venue picked up the show, but Wiley and Glover had to push back its premiere when Wiley booked “The Sound of Music” national tour, which concludes in June.

“We thought it would be neat to come up with a show we could pitch to cabaret venues and cruise ships,” Wiley said. “Once a week we would meet and I would sing some of my favorite songs, which led to medleys, different arrangements and harmonies.”

For now, Wiley's enjoying touring the country and playing Maria, taking her photo of Julie Andrews with her to every stop.

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Westchester Magazine: "Therapy Dogs Are Helping Incarcerated Mothers in Westchester"

01/10/2018

Therapy Dogs Are Helping Incarcerated Mothers in Westchester (Westchester Magazine)

Following the remarkable success of animal-assisted therapy (AAT), therapy dogs are now helping incarcerated mothers in Westchester hone their parenting skills while learning to deal with feelings such as fear, guilt, depression, and trauma.

Parenting, Prison & Pups (PPP) is a two-year research partnership — the first of its kind anywhere — between Pace University’s Dyson College, Department of Criminal Justice; The Good Dog Foundation, a nonprofit that trains and certifies therapy-dog teams and provides AAT; the Metropolitan Correctional Center, under the Federal Bureau of Prisons; and the Westchester County Department of Correction (WCDOC). While animal-based programs have been used by correctional institutions before, PPP is the first to employ a structured curriculum.

“The [PPP] program is a way for us to reach women and help them become better parents for their children,” says PPP director Kimberly Collica-Cox, PhD. “What we are really looking to do is to stop the cycle of intergenerational incarceration, and we believe that this program can help achieve that.”

Animal-assisted WCDOC classes are scheduled to begin in September 2018.

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U.S. News & World Report: "6 Things to Know About a Strategy MBA"

01/08/2018

6 Things to Know About a Strategy MBA (U.S. News & World Report)

3. Attending a school with accomplished classmates is valuable. Experts say it's especially helpful if your classmates have leadership experience in diverse industries.

"While the school’s reputation, ranking and accreditation are obviously extremely important, applicants frequently do not consider just about how vital their peers will be in preparing them for a career in corporate strategy," Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical professor of management at Pace University's Lubin School of Business, where he teaches both undergraduate and MBA strategy courses, said via email.

Bachenheimer says discussing business strategy case studies with classmates who have a significant amount of work experience can yield insights beyond those given by a strategy professor in a lecture, so strategy MBA applicants should target schools with a seasoned student body, where the average student has several years of work experience.

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