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Crain's New York Business: "Schools offer new training programs to help nurse practitioners manage acute care"

07/22/2016

Crain's New York Business: "Schools offer new training programs to help nurse practitioners manage acute care"

In December, nurse practitioner Michelle Avent, 52, completed her post-master's certificate in adult acute care at Pace University. She paid out of her own pocket to participate in the yearlong program to better cope with patients needing more acute care in her unit at Forest Hills Hospital in Queens.
“I wasn't thinking about money or promotion,” she said of her decision to go back to school. “I was thinking about a way for me to better manage my patients.”
As more patients are treated at outpatient facilities, New York’s hospital-based nurse practitioners are being called upon to treat more patients with acute conditions, say nurse educators. In response, nursing schools are beginning to offer programs to meet their needs for advanced training in acute care.
There are 8,685 nurse practitioners who maintain New York state licenses specializing in family health while just 857 report their specialty as acute care, according to datafrom the New York State Department of Education. Nurse practitioners have seen the scope of their practice expand following the 2014 passage of the Nurse Practitioners Modernization Act, effective Jan. 1, 2015, which gave experienced clinicians the ability to treat patients without a written agreement with a physician.
New York's 25 Performing Provider Systems reported an interest in hiring more than 3,000 additional nurse practitioners for their health systems in applications tied to the state’s DSRIP program, according to a 2015 analysis by Patrick Coonan, dean of Adelphi University's College of Nursing and Public Health.
While Avent paid for the program herself, some employers are reimbursing tuition for students, said Renee McLeod-Sordjan, program director for Pace’s acute-care certificate, which costs $38,232. So far, Pace has graduated just three students from the new program, and will enroll its next class in the fall.
"For many years, many of us did not work in hospitals,” McLeod-Sordjan said. In her 20-year career, she said she's seen nurse practitioners take on an increasingly vital role in hospitals.
McLeod-Sordjan, also an employee of Northwell Health, said acquiring the additional certification is about providing higher-quality care, but it probably won’t lead to an automatic bump in pay.
She said the certificate could help protect nurses who practice in acute-care settings from malpractice claims by demonstrating that they are qualified to care for patients who need more complex care. While the expansion of the scope of practice means more independence it has also led to some double-digit increases in malpractice premiums, McLeod-Sordjan said.
“If we’re not trained, we’re opening ourselves up to malpractice” she said. “Now that we are independent practitioners, we can no longer hide behind a collaborating physician.”Read more: http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20160721/PULSE/160729992/schools-of...

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NY Daily News: "Pooch pilot program will give con moms some love, caring lessons"

07/22/2016

NY Daily News: "Pooch pilot program will give con moms some love, caring lessons"

Photo: A pooch pilot program will allow certified therapists to use therapy dogs in order to create better communication between inmates and their children. (Sipkin, Corey, New York Daily News)

Man’s best friend will soon give mothers in a Lower Manhattan federal prison a little love and some lessons in caring.

Under a pooch pilot program, certified therapists will use animal-assisted treatment to create a framework for better communication between inmates and their children.

“Learning how to deal with a disciplinary problem with a dog translates in some way to learning how to discipline a child in a loving way,” said Bruce Fagin, vice president of Good Dog Foundation, a therapy dog training and certification organization spearheading the program.

“The dog is loving you unconditionally, the child is, and the child of course is needing to feel unconditional love. And so we’re going to be using the dogs in that way as well as tapping into the power of therapy dogs to lower stress and anxiety.”

The program is the brainchild of Kimberly Collica-Cox, an associate professor at Pace University’s Criminal Justice Department.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/pooch-pilot-program-give-moms-love-c...

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New York Magazine: "A Kid’s World Is a Pleasing, Confusing Mashup of Magic and Reality"

07/21/2016

New York Magazine: "A Kid’s World Is a Pleasing, Confusing Mashup of Magic and Reality"

Photo: Gordon Chibroski/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Put yourself in the mind of a small child visiting Disney World for the first time. Yes, it’s exciting and magical and all that, but it’s hard to imagine that the Most Magical Place on Earth isn’t also brain-meltingly confusing. Last you checked in with Princess Tiana, which was on your mom’s iPad on the drive over here, she was an actual frog, hopping around New Orleans with her caddish, ambiguously European frog prince; now she’s right in front of you, in not-New Orleans, looking distinctly human and un-slimy. You just saw Captain America fighting Iron Man on the big screen, like, last week; now — okay, whoa, he’s coming in for the hug.

“It’s a very strange thing that we do to kids,” says Thalia Goldstein, an assistant professor of developmental psychology at Pace University. “Parents don’t teach their kids that Elsa and Cinderella and Wolverine are real — we talk about them as fictional characters, we talk about their worlds as fictional worlds. And yet we take them to Disney World and Universal Studios and there, standing in front of you, is an actual human being that looks like the movie, talks like the movie, is interacting with you. And it’s like, ‘Hey, what are they doing in this theme park? Why aren’t they in Arendale [the setting of Frozen] or wherever Wolverine lives?”

It’s a legitimate question. Goldstein, who runs Pace’s Social Cognition and Imagination Lab, has devoted much of her research career to answering a closely related one: How do kids learn to separate fictional characters, and their worlds, from the very real circumstances of their own lives? And what does the world look like in the years before they do?

One the most basic level, she says, the ability to understand the concept of pretend is already in place by the time kids can communicate well enough for psychologists to study them: “As soon as you can ask them a question that they understand [about fiction versus reality], they get it correct.”

Read more: http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/07/to-a-kid-the-world-is-a-pleasing-ma...

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Law.com: "Countdown to New York's First Uniform Bar Exam"

07/20/2016

Law.com: "Countdown to New York's First Uniform Bar Exam"

. . . Danielle Bifulci Kocal, director of academic success at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, said in an email that Pace students prepared for this year’s exam “in many of the same ways they always have,” but said that the school increased its focus on students’ skills with multiple-choice exams, since multiple choice makes up a larger portion of the test this year.

“This makes their performance on this portion of the exam more important than ever, so we have been emphasizing incorporating intense, daily practice questions sessions into all study plans,” Bifulci Kocal said.

Read more: http://www.law.com/sites/articles/2016/07/20/countdown-to-new-yorks-first-uniform-bar-exam/

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Dow Jones Newswires: "Research: Incentives Discourage Profit Warnings -- Market Talk"

07/19/2016

Dow Jones Newswires: "Research: Incentives Discourage Profit Warnings -- Market Talk"

Dow Jones Institutional News

14:07 ET - Pay and job-security incentives appear to discourage CEOs from warning investors about negative earnings surprises, according to a forthcoming paper in the Journal of Business Finance and Accounting from researchers at Pace University, Baruch College-CUNY and Binghamton University. CEOs who issue profit warnings near quarter-end were more likely to lose their jobs the next year than those delivering a negative surprise without warning; but that risk rises if company shares are lagging, Pace's Ping Wang said. CEOs who warned also got smaller bonuses and more options than those who didn't. The study examined US companies from 1996 through 2010. (theo.francis@wsj.com; @theofrancis)

(END) Dow Jones Newswires

July 18, 2016 14:08 ET (18:08 GMT)

Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

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Variety: "Rupert Murdoch’s Billion-Dollar Headache: Who Can Replace Roger Ailes at Fox News?"

07/19/2016

Variety: "Rupert Murdoch’s Billion-Dollar Headache: Who Can Replace Roger Ailes at Fox News?"

. . . If Ailes were to step down, will Fox News be able to maintain its status as one of the empire’s jewels? The network is said to contribute $1.35 billion in earnings before interest, taxes and amortization, or EBITDA, to 21st Century Fox, according to estimates from Nomura analyst Anthony DiClemente. That figure would represent about 20% of total EBITDA for the parent company in its fiscal 2016, the analyst said. Millions of dollars are at stake: Market-research firm SNL Kagan projects advertising revenue at Fox News Channel and Fox Business Network, both under Ailes’ aegis, will jump about 5.6% to $932.1 million in 2016, compared with $882.6 million last year. Operating revenue from the two networks this year is seen as exceeding $2.5 billion.

“Fox News is very powerful and very influential, especially among conservatives,” said David Caputo, professor of political science at Pace University in New York. “They see it as a balance among the more liberal media.”

Read more: http://variety.com/2016/biz/news/roger-ailes-rupert-murdoch-fox-news-gre...

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New York Daily News: "Thousands of Cleveland cops and FBI officials prep for RNC as a slew of protesters plan to demonstrate"

07/18/2016

New York Daily News: "Thousands of Cleveland cops and FBI officials prep for RNC as a slew of protesters plan to demonstrate"

. . . "There is no longer any reason to expect the anti-Trump forces to be successful or to even mount a serious attempt to influence the outcome of the convention," explained David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of Political Science at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/thousands-fbi-officials-prep-rnc-cleveland-article-1.2714299

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Houston Chronicle: "Trump aims to heal GOP divisions in Cleveland"

07/18/2016

Houston Chronicle: "Trump aims to heal GOP divisions in Cleveland"

. . . "It is a bit ironic that the candidate who ran so strongly as an outsider is now looking for a set of convention outcomes which are quite traditional," said David Caputo, a campaign scholar at Pace University in New York. "Trump must be Trump, even if it is a toned-down version, in order to carry the image of individuality and populism into the next phase of the campaign."

Read more: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/politics/us/article/Trump-aims-to-h...

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Homeland Security Today: "Redacted Section of 9/11 Report on Possible Saudi Ties to Al Qaeda Released"

07/18/2016

Homeland Security Today: "Redacted Section of 9/11 Report on Possible Saudi Ties to Al Qaeda Released"

07/15/2016: Following a lengthy declassification review, the Obama administration today released a redacted version of the controversial 28 page classified section of the 2002 Joint Congressional Inquiry into Intelligence Community Activities Before and After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001 regarding possible connections between the Saudi government and the 9/11 terrorist plotters.

But the long awaited 28 pages doesn't necessarily contain the bombshell information some believed it contained. The once classified pages do, however, raise some troubling questions.

"The question here is whether United States law enforcement and military fully investigated the leads in the previously secret 28 pages regarding the possible involvement of the Saudi Arabian government in the 9/11 attacks," Homeland Security Today was told by Thomas M. McDonnell, a professor of international law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, and author of, The United States, International Law and the Struggle against Terrorism. "Recall that 15 of the 19 September 11 hijackers were Saudi Arabian citizens as was Osama Bin Laden."

"The broader question," he added, "is to what extent has the Saudi government’s financial support for Wahhabi imams and the spread of their extreme strain of Islam throughout the world have contributed to the rise of Al Qaeda, Daesh and Islamic terrorism generally. Given that Saudi Arabia has one of the worse human rights records on the planet, it is high time for the United States and the West generally to look beyond the economic interest in oil and demand that Saudi Arabia reject extremism in all its forms and begin to respect fundamental rights."

Read more: http://www.hstoday.us/briefings/daily-news-analysis/single-article/redacted-section-of-911-report-on-possible-saudi-ties-to-al-qaeda-released/8e84f455b0beab604db86b429ba0451b.html

 

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News 12: "Terror expert says recent attacks can't be accepted as new normal"

07/18/2016

News 12: "Terror expert says recent attacks can't be accepted as new normal"

The attack in Nice Thursday makes it the third act of terror in France over the last 18 months.

"We've gone past the days of 'if it happens.' We know it will happen, so we have to be prepared," says Joseph Ryan, a retired NYPD officer and the chair of the Criminal Justice Department at Pace University.

http://westchester.news12.com/news/terror-expert-says-recent-attacks-can...

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