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FIOS1: "Will voters choose to change the NY constitution on Election Day?"

10/20/2017

Will voters choose to change the NY constitution on Election Day? (FIOS1)

Every election is important, but on Nov. 7, voters in New York will have the chance to open up the state's constitution and change it.

The constitutional convention is on the ballot once every twenty years, and hasn't been rewritten since 1938. 

"Most academics that look at this say we need a constitutional convention," said Dean David Yassky of the Pace School of Law. "They say it because there is a feeling that the state government is broken. Corruption scandal after corruption scandal, and inability to address fundamental issues that New Yorkers care about the most, and the only way we are going to get a government that is more responsible to New Yorkers is by changing the way it is set up."

Yassky says that state-wide proposals will be listed on the back of the ballot, including the use of forest preserve land for specified purposes and the complete or partial forfeiture of a public official's pension.

"Today, if a state legislator or an elected official convicted of taking bribes or stealing from the government, they are still going to collect their pension. I think most New Yorkers would say that's just wrong. A convention can fix that, but the regular process can't."

If voters say "No" in November, there will be no convention and the constitution will remain in place. Voters rejected a convention the last two times it appeared on the ballot.

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Earth Desk:"Pace Environmental Clinic’s Elephant Protection Act Becomes Law"

10/20/2017

Pace Environmental Clinic’s Elephant Protection Act Becomes Law (Earth Desk)

“It is time society put an end to this barbaric relic of another age.” ~ Pace Professor Michelle D, Land

Forcing elephants to perform in circuses and other entertainment venues has been relegated to a bygone era under legislation originated by students of Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Environmental Clinic and signed into law by New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo.

The Elephant Protection Act, sponsored by state Senator Terrence Murphy and Assemblywoman Amy Paulin, makes New York State the first in the nation to implement an outright ban on the use of elephants in entertainment.  Pace students first brought the idea for the bill to the legislature in 2016 and spent the next two legislative sessions lobbying for its passage. The Clinic is co-taught by Michelle D. Land, Pace clinical professor of environmental law and policy, and John Cronin, senior fellow in the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment. 

“It is time society put an end to this barbaric relic of another age,” said Michelle Land, clinical professor of environmental law and policy at Pace. “Wild elephant populations are in dire straits globally. By recognizing its duty to end entertainment acts that perpetuate misinformation and false values about the species, New York State is setting an example today that we believe other states will follow”

Once again, New York State is proving to be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves.” ~ New York State Senator Terrence Murphy.

The student clinicians, who actively lobbied in Albany and collected 1,100 student signatures in support of the bill, wrote to the governor, “The contention of circuses, trainers and managers that performing elephants are ‘educational’ is demonstrably false — one has only to attend a performance to understand. Silly tricks such as headstands, balancing on stools, and parading in foolish costumes undermine a child’s appreciation and understanding of wildlife.”

The training of elephants to perform tricks for audiences has come under fire for years, even forcing the Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus out of business. New York State law now recognizes that ordinary animal welfare laws cannot protect elephants from an industry whose practices are inherently cruel. At present, as many as nine circuses bring elephants through New York State annually. 

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Governor Cuomo Signs Elephant Protection Act Pace University Students Make New York First to Ban Performing Elephants

10/19/2017

Governor Cuomo Signs Elephant Protection Act Pace University Students Make New York First to Ban Performing Elephants

NEW YORK -- Forcing elephants to perform in circuses and other entertainment venues has been relegated to a bygone era under legislation originated by students of Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Environmental Policy Clinic and signed into law today by New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo.

The Elephant Protection Act, sponsored by state Senator Terrence Murphy and Assemblywoman Amy Paulin, makes New York State the first in the nation to implement an outright ban on the use of elephants in entertainment.  Pace students first brought the idea for the bill to the legislature in 2016 and spent the next two legislative sessions lobbying for its passage.

“It is time society put an end to this barbaric relic of another age,” said Michelle Land, clinical professor of environmental law and policy at Pace. “Wild elephant populations are in dire straits globally. By recognizing its duty to end entertainment acts that perpetuate misinformation and false values about the species, New York State is setting an example today that we believe other states will follow”

The student clinicians, who actively lobbied in Albany and collected 1,100 student signatures in support of the bill, wrote to the governor, “The contention of circuses, trainers and managers that performing elephants are ‘educational’ is demonstrably false -- one has only to attend a performance to understand. Silly tricks such as headstands, balancing on stools, and parading in foolish costumes undermine a child’s appreciation and understanding of wildlife.”

The training of elephants to perform tricks for audiences has come under fire for years, even forcing the Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus out of business. New York State law now recognizes that ordinary animal welfare laws cannot protect elephants from an industry whose practices are inherently cruel. At present, as many as nine circuses bring elephants through New York State annually. 

“We are so pleased that this important legislation came out of the work of the students and faculty of the Pace Environmental Policy Clinic," said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “Dealing with real world issues and making a community impact is what a Pace education is all about.” 

Senator Terrence Murphy said, "Thanks to the advocacy of the students, staff and faculty of the Pace University Environmental Clinic, New York State has now passed significant legislation that will protect elephants from cruel and inhumane treatment.  Once again, New York State is proving to be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves."

“Elephants have been exploited and abused in entertainment acts for too long,” Paulin said. “Confinement, torture and unhealthy living conditions have led to early death for these intelligent, gentle animals. Today, New York has become the leader in ending this horrible practice. Elephants will no longer be subjected to cruel treatment for our amusement.”

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences:  Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

 

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GOVERNOR CUOMO SIGNS LEGISLATION TO PROTECT ELEPHANTS

10/19/2017

GOVERNOR CUOMO SIGNS LEGISLATION TO PROTECT ELEPHANTS

For Immediate Release: 10/19/2017                                                       FROM GOVERNOR ANDREW M. CUOMO

GOVERNOR CUOMO SIGNS LEGISLATION TO PROTECT ELEPHANTS

'Elephant Protection Act' Prevents the Use of Elephants in Entertainment, Including Circuses, to Protect them from Physical Harm and Abuse

Entertainment Elephants Live Half as Long as Wild Elephants Due to Abusive Treatment

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today signed legislation prohibiting the use of elephants in entertainment acts. Under the Elephant Protection Act (S2098B/A464B) no person or entity can use elephants in entertainment acts, which include circuses, carnivals, parades or trade shows.

"The use of elephants in these types of settings is dangerous to their health and potentially abusive," Governor Cuomo said. "The Elephant Protection Act furthers this administration's efforts to fight animal cruelty, and create a stronger, more humane New York." 

The legislation aims to prevent performance tricks that are never executed by elephants in the wild and that are stressful or harmful to the animal. Elephants used for entertainment purposes often suffer physical and psychological harm due to the living conditions and treatment to which they are subjected, resulting in increased mortality with life spans only one-half as long as wild elephants. A civil penalty of up to $1,000 can be assessed per act that violates the law.

Senator Terrence Murphy said, "Thanks to the advocacy of the students, staff and faculty of the Pace University Environmental Clinic, New York State has now passed significant legislation that will protect elephants from cruel and inhumane treatment.  Once again, New York State is proving to be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves."

Assemblywoman Amy Paulin said, "Elephants have been exploited and abused in entertainment acts for too long. Confinement, torture and unhealthy living conditions have led to early death for these intelligent, gentle animals. Today, New York has become the leader in ending this horrible practice. Elephants will no longer be subjected to cruel treatment for our amusement."

 

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Financial Advisor: "State Fiduciary Laws Seen Adding to Chaos, Confusion"

10/19/2017

State Fiduciary Laws Seen Adding to Chaos, Confusion (Financial Advisor)

...Jill Gross, a law professor at Pace University, said at the Practicing Law Institute conference last month that she believes “any state law that tries to outlaw in any shape or form mandatory arbitration in customer agreements will be preempted by the FAA.”

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The Chronicle of Higher Education: "Colleges With the Highest Student-Mobility Rates, 2014"

10/18/2017

Colleges With the Highest Student-Mobility Rates, 2014 (The Chronicle of Higher Education)

The Chronicle List October 15, 2017

City University of New York campuses made a strong showing among colleges with the highest mobility rates, a measure of the percentage of all students in a birth cohort at a particular college whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent for household income, and who reached the top 20 percent for individual earnings. Seven CUNY campuses were in the top 10 for mobility rates among four-year public colleges, and five CUNY campuses were in the top 10 among two-year public colleges. Five historically black colleges and universities ranked in the top 40 for mobility rates among four-year private nonprofit institutions.

4-year private nonprofit institutions

Rank Institution Median parent household income Median child earnings, 2014 Mobility rate
1. Pace U. $68,600 $60,700 8.43%
2. St. John's U. (N.Y.) $69,200 $58,900 6.80%
3. College of Mount Saint Vincent and Manhattan College $94,800 $67,900 5.78%
4. Long Island U. system $59,000 $39,900 5.54%
5. New York Institute of Technology at Old Westbury $78,500 $49,900 5.40%
6. Xavier U. of Louisiana $63,100 $48,400 5.26%
7. Tuskegee U. $54,400 $38,900 5.23%
8. U. of the Pacific $96,500 $59,000 4.25%
9. Howard U. $76,900 $49,600 4.00%
10. Fordham U. $113,300 $63,300 3.98%
11. U. of Southern California $120,100 $63,700 3.93%
12. Park U. $65,300 $43,600 3.87%
13. Saint Leo U. $57,300 $38,000 3.63%
14. New York U. $130,500 $58,100 3.63%
15. Mercy College $50,700 $31,100 3.52%
16. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U.-Extended Campus $92,400 $65,600 3.48%
17. Barnard College $148,000 $56,300 3.45%
18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology $141,000 $98,500 3.40%
19. Fairleigh Dickinson U. $87,000 $48,200 3.33%
20. MCP Hahnemann and Drexel Universities (now Drexel U.) $94,100 $65,500 3.30%
21. Clark Atlanta U. $54,500 $35,200 3.30%
22. Rochester Institute of Technology $95,700 $62,400 3.27%
23. Adelphi U. $96,300 $50,700 3.26%
24. Seton Hall U. $100,900 $56,900 3.18%
25. Kettering U. $100,100 $85,400 3.11%
26. Morehouse College $81,800 $49,800 3.10%
27. Campbell U. $69,900 $42,700 3.09%
28. Loyola U. Chicago $98,600 $53,500 3.08%
29. Columbia U. $169,600 $75,300 3.07%
30. Iona College $97,400 $56,200 3.05%
31. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute $114,200 $84,100 3.05%
32. U. of Rochester $129,200 $62,000 3.02%
33. Hofstra U. $105,300 $55,700 2.99%
34. U. of Miami $110,100 $54,800 2.98%
35. Clarkson U. $94,600 $73,300 2.97%
36. Saint Mary's College of California $110,500 $55,200 2.94%
37. Bentley U. $119,600 $79,800 2.94%
38. Syracuse U. $119,700 $61,100 2.94%
39. Hawaii Pacific U. $68,600 $41,100 2.92%
40. Cornell U. $143,300 $79,800 2.91%

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The Tribeca Trib: "American Scoreboard: Dramatic Readings of Confirmation Hearing of US Education Secretary Betsy DeVos"

10/18/2017

American Scoreboard: Dramatic Readings of Confirmation Hearing of US Education Secretary Betsy DeVos (The Tribeca Trib)

American Scoreboard: The Trump Administration will present the fourth installment of its series of live dramatic readings on Monday, October 23, from 7:00 p.m. to 8:20 p.m. at Pace’s Schimmel Center at 3 Spruce St. There is no charge for admission.  Reserve tickets today. RSVP is required.

Ripped directly from the US Senate Chamber in Washington DC, the American Scoreboard series explores, from an all-new perspective, the serious issues facing President Donald Trump and the America public today. Conceived and produced by Tony Award-winning producer Fran Kirmser and Christopher Burney, American Scoreboard presents one-hour verbatim readings of Congressional hearing transcripts in a format that can’t be found on C-SPAN or CNN.

Coinciding with the fall 2017 semester and in cooperation with Pace University’s Office of Government and Community Relations, American Scoreboard's fourth installment features the confirmation hearing of US Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. US Senators represented in the hearing will be portrayed by current students and recent graduates including professionals from Broadway productions, colleges and universities, including Pace, and the New York City public school system. All actors appear courtesy of Actors Equity Association.

Pace Performing Arts student Bartek Szymanski '18 will play Senator Bob Casey, Pennsylvania (D); Pace Performing Arts alumna Amber Jaunai '17 will play Senator Johnny Isakson, Georgia (R); and Pace Performing Arts alumnus Cole Taylor '17 will be the clerk/narrator.

Broadway performers include: 

Lilla Crawford (Senator Patricia Murray), who made her Broadway debut in the Tony Award winning musical Billy Elliot and then booked the title role in the Broadway revival of Annie against 5,000 actresses who auditioned in a nationwide search. Crawford also starred opposite Johnny Depp and Meryl Streep as Little Red Riding Hood in Disney's Into the Woods, and is currently starring in the new Nextflix sketch comedy series, The Who Was Show.

Sydney Lucas (Senator Elizabeth Warren), who earned a Tony nomination for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical for her performance as Small Alison in Broadway’s Fun Home.

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WNYC: "After Harvey Weinstein; Did Cy Vance Get it Right?; Housing Affordability and Mayor de Blasio; The Spinning Ball"

10/17/2017

After Harvey Weinstein; Did Cy Vance Get it Right?; Housing Affordability and Mayor de Blasio; The Spinning Ball (WNYC)

Bennett Gershman, professor of Law at Pace University, former prosecutor with Manhattan D.A.'s office, Special State prosecutor with the New York State Anti-Corruption office and author of treatise "Prosecutorial Misconduct," discusses the Cy Vance revelations regarding both Weinstein and the Trump Organization, and whether the charges should have been dropped by the District Attorney's office.

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Monster: "10 things to do senior year of college to set yourself up for career success"

10/16/2017

10 things to do senior year of college to set yourself up for career success (Monster)

Clean up your social media profiles

Regardless of how great you look in that Instagram photo or how funny you think your tweet is, your future employer does not want to see pictures of you twerking at frat parties or read tweets about how you spent every lecture playing Pokemon Go—and yes, they will know. According to a recent SHRM survey, 84% of companies use social media to find candidates. Making sure you don’t have anything publicly available that could damage your chances at securing a job is a good first step in professionalizing your digital footprint.

“Any unprofessional photos, posts, tweets, etc. should be taken down, and all profiles should be set to private,” suggests Jennifer Magas, associate professor of public relations at Pace University in New York City. “Social media is oftentimes the first thing a future employer turns to when considering a new hire, so be sure that all of your public posts and friends are things you’d want to represent yourself.”

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Glass Door: "A Successful Performance Review Is Guaranteed With These 8 Tips"

10/16/2017

A Successful Performance Review Is Guaranteed With These 8 Tips (Glass Door)

Data Talks

Preparation is key to your success. So give yourself plenty of time to reflect as you populate the requisite forms, and amass data to accompany them.

While your manager likely has a good sense of your contributions, s/he doesn’t know the particulars like you do. Jennifer Lee Magas, Vice President of Magas Media Consultants, LLC and a Clinical Associate Professor of Public Relations at Pace University, advises conducting a thorough self-evaluation:

“The main goal of the self-evaluation is to highlight your accomplishments. . . List any leadership roles, internal processes or systems that you redesigned or improved, money you saved the company or the client, any special projects you worked on/led, any new programs, systems or processes you designed or implemented, any courses you’ve taken or certificates you’ve achieved, all awards and recognitions you won.” 

Don’t leave it to your manager to track your success.

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