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Westchester County Business Journal: "Documentary by Pace students premieres"

05/22/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Documentary by Pace students premieres"

A documentary created by students at Pace University, which examines the impact of development on Florida’s ecosystem had its premier at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville on May 10. In addition, the film has been released for worldwide viewing on YouTube. The title is “Ridge to Ranch to River to Reef: Florida’s Conservation Connections.”

Students in the documentary film class spent their spring break filming in Florida, and covered various parts of the state from the Gulf Coast to the interior. The film looks at the continuing population increase in Florida, with about 1,000 people moving there every day, and about 175,000 acres undergoing new development each year. 

Pace students Shakira Evans, Nicholas Farris, Allison Fennik, Camilla Klævold, Zhenming Liu, Megan Meyer, Felicia Robcke, Rachel Weiss and Kelly Whritenour worked on the film in the course taught by Maria Luskay.

https://westfaironline.com/89535/documentary-pace-students-premieres/

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Los Angeles Times: "NAACP will oust its president and revamp to better combat 'an uncertain era' under Trump"

05/22/2017

Los Angeles Times: "NAACP will oust its president and revamp to better combat 'an uncertain era' under Trump"

Photo: Cornell W. Brooks, president of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, speaks regarding the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, on Aug. 11, 2014, in Jennings, Mo. (Michael B. Thomas / Getty Images)

. . . Randolph M. McLaughlin, a law professor at Pace University who has studied civil rights movements, said he hoped the organization — founded in 1909 when Jim Crow was still rampant throughout the South — would thrive.

“It is critical that the NAACP has the most dynamic and creative activist leadership during the Trump era,” said McLaughlin. “The threats to civil rights and civil liberties demand no less from the oldest civil rights organization in the United States.”

Read more here.

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Pace Board of Trustees elects Charles Mak, Martin McElroy, and Robert Robotti

05/22/2017

Pace Board of Trustees elects Charles Mak, Martin McElroy, and Robert Robotti

NEW YORK, May 2017 – Charles Mak, Martin McElroy, and Robert Robotti have been elected to the Pace University Board of Trustees.

Mak, McElroy, and Robotti join the Board at a time of exciting innovation and momentum for the university, with increased enrollment, innovative new degree programs, and expanding campuses in both New York City and Westchester. Pace has been recognized for its ability to position students for exceptional outcomes and career success, ranking first in New York and second in the nation at catapulting students from the bottom fifth of income distribution into the top fifth. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project finds that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennials.

“Although Charles, Martin, and Robert are new to the Board, they are all longtime supporters of the University,” said Board Chairman Mark Besca. “Each of these highly accomplished individuals believes deeply in the power of a Pace education to change lives and help young people achieve their dreams. On behalf of the entire Board, I am delighted to welcome them as our newest Trustees and look forward to calling on their considerable talents, energy, and expertise as we continue to advance Pace’s enduring mission of Opportunitas.”

Charles Mak is Senior Advisor to Morgan Stanley Asia’s Investment Banking division and a 30-year veteran of Morgan Stanley. He announced his retirement from a full-time role at the Firm in September 2013. Most recently, Mak was the Chairman and Director of Bank Morgan Stanley AG, a Director in Morgan Stanley Asia Limited, and a member of Morgan Stanley's Asia Pacific Executive Committee, the Morgan Stanley Wealth Management Committee, and the International Operating Committee. In 2011, he was named Chairman of Bank Morgan Stanley in Switzerland.  In October 2012, he was named Vice Chairman, Morgan Stanley Asia Pacific. In October 2013, Charles was appointed Non-Executive and Independent Director of Frasers Centrepoint Limited.  He is Lead Independent Director, Chairman of Audit Committee, Vice Chairman of Board Executive Committee, and a member of Remuneration Committee, Nominating Committee and Risk Management Committee. Mak holds a BBA in General Business and an MBA in Financial Management from Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

Martin McElroy is a senior partner with over 29 years of experience with Deloitte serving large, complex clients in the financial services industry.  As a senior audit and advisory partner, McElroy serves and advises various global financial services clients in areas involving accounting and finance, internal controls, mergers & acquisitions and SEC reporting. In addition to his client service roles, McElroy is an active leader within Deloitte. He served as the East region’s Audit talent partner which entails overseeing all talent-related matters for audit professionals in the region, including, but not limited to, personnel performance evaluation, continuing education, compensation, deployment, and recruitment. McElroy holds a BBA in Public Accounting from Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. He is a member of the American Institute of CPAs and the New Jersey Society of CPAs.

Robert Robotti is the President and Chief Investment Officer of Robotti & Company, an asset management firm he founded in 1983. Before establishing Robotti & Company, Robotti was a vice president and shareholder for Gabelli & Company. Robotti holds a BS in Accounting from Bucknell University and an MBA in Accounting from Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. He is a Director of Panhandle Oil & Gas Company, AMREP Corporation, and Pulse Seismic. He is also a Trustee of the Catholic Medical Mission Board and Dominican Academy, and a member of the Variety Boys & Girls Club of Queens President’s Council.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project finds that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennials. www.pace.edu

Media Contact:  Bill Caldwell, wcaldwell@pace.edu, 212-346-1597 or Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

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New York Law Journal: "Court Becomes Classroom in Program for High School Students"

05/17/2017

New York Law Journal: "Court Becomes Classroom in Program for High School Students"

Photo: Chief Judge, Janet DiFiore, far left, and other Court of Appeals judges discuss the law with high school students in White Plains. David Handschuh/NYLJ

A recent three-day Court of Appeals session in White Plains has provided a model for future trips of the court outside Albany, Chief Judge Janet DiFiore said.

The court invited more than 100 high school and college students last month to the Richard J. Daronco Westchester County Courthouse, and enlisted volunteer attorneys and law students to meet with the students before oral arguments to prepare them for what they would be observing.

DiFiore described the program as a "tremendous success."

The chief judge said such trips are important because they give more New Yorkers a close-up look at the workings of a court that affects all of them but that they might not otherwise have a chance to see. That, in turn, inspires public confidence in the courts, she said.

But she said the session in White Plains gave her an opportunity to promote her "intense interest" in educating young people about the workings of the courts. Holding arguments outside Albany, she said, "is a way to reach greater numbers of young people around the state, to educate them about the court and the justice system, and hopefully pique their interest in the law and public service."

The court, New York's highest, has gone on the road several times in recent years: in 2016 to Rochester—its first sitting there in 168 years—in 2015 to the Judicial Institute at Pace Law School in White Plains and to Syracuse University College of Law, and 2012 to the Appellate Division, First Department.

At the session in White Plains, students and faculty from six high schools in Westchester County and the Bronx-Bronxville, Hackley in Tarrytown, Maria Regina and Woodlands in Hartsdale, Mount Saint Michael Academy in the Wakefield neighborhood of the Bronx, and Mount Vernon participated in the program as well as students from the Dobbs Ferry Campus of Mercy College. (DiFiore lives in Bronxville and is a graduate of Mount Vernon High School.)

About 40 students attended arguments on each day of the April 25-27 session. Before the arguments, they prepared by reading briefs in one of three criminal law cases before the court and meeting with volunteers from the Westchester County District Attorney's Office and the Legal Aid Society and, in the case of Mercy, with students from the Elisabeth Haub School of Law from Pace University.

Five assistant district attorneys and six Legal Aid attorneys worked with the high schools. Eight students from Pace Law's Pro Bono Scholar Program visited Mercy classrooms to answer questions about what law school was like and to discuss the upcoming arguments.

Read more here.

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NPR: "Why Are Americans Drinking Less Cow's Milk? Its Appeal Has Curdled"

05/17/2017

NPR: "Why Are Americans Drinking Less Cow's Milk? Its Appeal Has Curdled"

When's the last time you had a glass of cow's milk?

Americans are drinking a lot less milk than they used to. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the average person drinks 18 gallons a year. Back in the 1970s it was more like 30 gallons a year. We once hoisted a glass with dinner, soaked our breakfast cereal or dipped into the occasional milkshake. This habitual milk drinking was no accident.

It started in the 1800s, when Americans moved from farms to cities. "First, you had to have the rise of milk trains that would bring milk from the countryside. That milk was refrigerated with ice," says Melanie DuPuis, a professor at Pace University and author of Nature's Perfect Food: How Milk Became America's Drink.

Before that, she says, milk was not a reliable source of nutrition for city dwellers. Nor was it all that safe. In the 1850s there was a major scandal in New York after thousands of babies died from drinking swill milk — the stuff that came from sickly cows, animals fed from the waste of city grain-alcohol distilleries.

This led to reformers calling for safe milk. At the same time, rural and upstate dairy farmers wanted customers. A political bargain was born. "We are going to make this deal, where we're going to feed those children and enable them to get enough nutrition through this thing that the nutritionists were calling a protective food," says DuPuis. "That will enable your farmers and your farm regions to have a vibrant economy."

Milk get its healthy halo

DuPuis says early-20th century nutritionists mounted studies to better understand the health benefits of milk. For instance, they'd feed dairy products or vegetable oil to rats or dogs, and then they'd measure the results.

"These rats that had dairy products would be sleek and healthy-looking and larger, and the other animals would look scrawny and unhealthy," adds DuPuis. Groups that represented milk interests embraced the research and infused their advertisements with glowing claims about milk's health benefits.

Listen to the story.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "County executives say look to schools, not local governments, for big savings"

05/16/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "County executives say look to schools, not local governments, for big savings"

For years, three Hudson Valley county executives say, the counties have been finding ways to consolidate local government services, so they are miffed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s shared services initiative.

Cuomo recently mandated that county officials develop plans with local governments to cut property taxes by eliminating duplicative services.

“This was a political ploy by the governor to divert attention from what is happening in the state,” Westchester County Executive Robert Astorino said this morning at a Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress forum at Pace University in Pleasantville.

Read more here.

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FiOS1 News: "Lower Hudson Valley county executives hold Q&A at Pace"

05/16/2017

FiOS1 News: "Lower Hudson Valley county executives hold Q&A at Pace"

. . . A Newburgh nonprofit called Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress hosted the $70-per-ticket event, which reassured business, finance and other industry leaders that the region's executives will protect and serve their and taxpayers’ interests.

The pre-written questions were asked only by Pace University students from the respective counties.

Watch the video.

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Journal News: "County executives take aim at health care, opioids, housing"

05/15/2017

Journal News: "County executives take aim at health care, opioids, housing"

Westchester County Executive Robert Astorino, Rockland County Executive Ed Day and Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell addressed members of the Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress at a breakfast talk at Pace University in Pleasantville on May. 15, 2017.  (Photo: Ricky Flores/The Journal News)

The opioid epidemic, better rental housing options and shared services topped the agenda Monday at a meeting of all three Lower Hudson Valley county executives at Pace University.

They spoke at a breakfast meeting before about 100 attendees at Pace University’s Kessell Student Center in Pleasantville, sponsored by Patterns for Progress, a nonprofit that promotes solutions to issues in a nine-county region on both sides of the Hudson from Yonkers to just south of Albany.

Read more here.

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Washington Post: "When it comes to vaccines, rich parents get away with child neglect"

05/12/2017

Washington Post: "When it comes to vaccines, rich parents get away with child neglect"

Linda C. Fentiman is a professor at the Elisabeth Haub Law School at Pace University and author of the new book “Blaming Mothers: American Law and the Risks to Children’s Health.”

Public health experts once again must defend the safety — and necessity — of vaccination, this time in response to misinformation spread among the Somali community in Minnesota by anti-vaccine activists.

The rising skepticism about vaccines is dangerous on its own, of course. Last year, a study in the journal Pediatrics found that more parents than ever believe vaccines are simply unnecessary to prevent childhood diseases. But the anti-vaccine movement highlights another, troubling aspect in the world of child health: Wealthy people are more likely to be let off easy when they do things that can harm their children than low-income people are.

Parents in affluent communities enjoy a privileged status under the law that manifests most clearly — and most dangerously — when they refuse to have their children vaccinated. These parents are vaccination “free-riders” who are not held legally accountable for putting their own children — as well as other people’s children — at risk of potentially fatal childhood diseases.

Read more here.

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