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Good Call: "3 Factors Increase Chances of Being Successful in College"

06/28/2017

Good Call: "3 Factors Increase Chances of Being Successful in College"

. . . it’s never too early to start building your brand, according to Jennifer Magas, vice president of Magas Media Consultants, and an associate professor of public relations at Pace University. “College students – especially seniors need to start integrating themselves into that career before they’ve even graduated.”

She agrees that internships are invaluable to being successful. “Internship experience can help you get a foot into the door, and lead the way to creating and fleshing out a portfolio of real-life work product.” She also recommends that college students start building resumes and cover letters while still in school.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Rent stabilization in Ossining? Village weighs options to solve housing issues"

06/26/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Rent stabilization in Ossining? Village weighs options to solve housing issues"

Ossining officials are weighing a number of options aimed at addressing an array of housing issues in the village.

Ossining Mayor Victoria Gearity said the village’s housing policy has been a top priority for the board of trustees this year, with concerns ranging from unaffordable home and rent prices to overcrowding and displacement.

“What we know is that the reaction to a rising cost of living is compelling many people to think that Ossining many not be a place where they can raise their children, where they can age in place,” land consultant Kevin Dwarka said during a June 14 village board work session.

The village earlier this year retained Kevin Dwarka Land Use and Economic Consulting, a New York City firm, to help address its housing issues. Since his hiring, Dwarka, a senior fellow at Pace law school’s Land Use Law Center in White Plains, has conducted several public meetings and engaged with many residents and village officials to better understand the community’s troubles.

Dwarka presented a dozen possible options to the village during his hour-and-a-half presentation. One option is rent stabilization.

Under the Emergency Tenant Protection Act of 1974 (ETPA), which applies to various municipalities in Nassau, Rockland and Westchester counties, the village could choose to opt-in to a rent stabilization policy for all buildings constructed before 1974 with six or more units. Aside from limitations on the amount of rent tenants would have to pay, rent stabilization would also entitle tenants to receive required services, to have their leases renewed and prevent them from being evicted except on grounds allowed by law.

Dwarka said the policy could potentially apply to 1,200 existing housing units.

“Rent stabilization allows households to continue to be part of a community, to not be displaced,” he said, adding that the policy would also protect them from an increasingly competitive housing market.

However, Dwarka noted that there are a variety of weaknesses to rent stabilization.

“There really isn’t a provision in that regulation that rent-stabilized units must go to households who are most in need,” he said.

Under the policy, tenants are also able to bestow their apartment to an immediate family member. “This creates a tricky situation,” Dwarka said. “It also creates a situation where the tenants of a rent-stabilized unit are inclined to stay put for a very long time, even if the unit no longer meets their needs, which in turn, critics will argue, has an adverse effect on the supply.”

Other considerations regarding rent stabilization include a potentially negative effect on the tax revenues the village collects from certain buildings, administrative costs to put the program in place and questions as to how the village would qualify to enact the Emergency Tenant Protection Act.

“Regardless of what decision this community goes down with respect to rent stabilization, a spectrum of different policy options have to be considered as part of the village’s pathway forward,” Dwarka said.

Another problem the village faces is high property taxes, an issue exacerbated by Ossining’s dependence on residential property taxes and its lack of a commercial property base to relieve the tax burden on homeowners.

“This situation of cost burden, while it’s one that is felt throughout the New York metro region, is certainly one that your community consistently and broadly voices as a key concern,” Dwarka said.

The consultant said the village could begin to create partnerships with larger companies and academic institutions to promote commercial development within its borders. This could also create job opportunities for residents, especially those with lower incomes.

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Bloomberg Radio: "DeBlasio Reveals Plans to Shut Infamous Rikers Prison (Audio)"

06/26/2017

Bloomberg Radio: "DeBlasio Reveals Plans to Shut Infamous Rikers Prison (Audio)"

Jonathan Blanks, a researcher at the Cato Institute, and Michael Mushlin, a professor at Pace University Law School, discuss a new plan by New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio to shutter the controversial prison on Rikers Island. They speak with June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

Listen to the story.

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Examiner: "Pace Seeks Answers on How to Retain its Students"

06/26/2017

Examiner: "Pace Seeks Answers on How to Retain its Students"

More than 200 college and university employees gathered at Pace University last Friday for the first-ever retention conference to provide insight and solutions on how to support students as they work toward earning their degree.

With many institutions throughout the country addressing student success and the effects it has on first- and second-year retention rates, Pace provided several workshops and lectures throughout the day to help address the issue.

“It is our collective responsibility to make sure that all of the students that enter our institutions, whether they are two-year or four-year, have the tools to succeed both in college and outside of college once they graduate,” said Sue Maxam, assistant vice president for student success. “We have an obligation to help our students succeed to the best of our abilities.”

Uday Sukhatme, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, added that if a student drops out before graduation the university has likely failed.

“It is our moral duty to give every admitted student the best shot at success,” he added. “We must use all available resources in as optimal a manner as possible in order to make sure students get the help they need when they most need it.”

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Our Town Downtown: "Pace president concludes tenure"

06/26/2017

Our Town Downtown: "Pace president concludes tenure"

The seventh president to serve Pace University leaves at the end of June, concluding his second five-year term. As of May 31, Stephen J. Friedman had already begun packing away the office he has occupied for the last 10 years.

“Moving is one of the great traumas in life,” Friedman said through laughter. “They list it along with divorces and deaths in the family.”

Friedman, who turned 79 in March, said earlier this year that he does not intend to seek a third term as president, and instead spent the past few weeks fulfilling his remaining duties, and offering wisdom to incoming president Marvin Krislov, who himself served for the last 10 years as a university president, at Oberlin College in Ohio.

“This, if done right, is a very demanding job,” Friedman said of the office he’s held since 2007. “I think I’d like to work a little less hard.”

More importantly, he said, a decade-long tenure seems appropriate.

“It takes seven to 10 years to really affect change in a place this size and this complicated,” he said. “Could I be effective for another two to three years? Sure. This is the most gratifying, and fun, and challenging thing I’ve ever done. On the other hand, I really think Pace would benefit from an infusion of new experience and new ideas.”

Pace is a diverse school attended by many first-generation immigrant students, the chairman of the school’s board of trustees, Mark Besca, said.

“And here’s Steve – coming, probably from the top university in the country – and when he came to Pace, he had a passion for our students second to none, just as much as I did coming from here,” Besca said. “And knowing that – being a first-generation student and getting help from Pace – really changed my life.”

Besca was referring to a Pace career service that helped him gain work in 1979. That approach to student mentoring is now referred to internally as the Pace Path, and seeks to pair Pace students with mentors in their chosen fields, and has grown under Friedman’s leadership.

Moreover, in addition to growing enrollment and large-scale renovations at Pace, Friedman is well-regarded by business and neighborhood boards around Lower Manhattan, according to Jessica Lappin, of the Alliance for Downtown New York.

“President Friedman has been a fixture in Lower Manhattan over the past decade,” Lappin said. “He loves Lower Manhattan and actively worked with the community to improve our neighborhood.”

Friedman earned his bachelor’s from Princeton in 1959 and, three years later, a law degree from Harvard Law School, where he received a Sears Prize for academic excellence and edited the Harvard Law Review. Since that time, he has witnessed radical changes, spurred on by technology, to the nature of jobs graduates are landing, including those from Pace.

“Evolutionary biology, which used to be all about bones and paleontology, is now all about DNA and massive computing power,” he said. “It used to be if you went to business school and didn’t like numbers, you majored in marketing, because that was all about words. Now it’s all about data analytics.”

Friedman, who previously served as dean of Pace Law School, added that while Pace is not a trade school, it is the function of the university to prepare students for the changing workload of an increasingly technical world. Krislov, he said, is the right person to do that.

“I have a very big investment in his success, because we really have accomplished a lot, and Pace is in a very different place than it was 10 years ago, or even 15 years ago,” he said. “And that’s a real springboard for further growth in stature and excellence, and rigor, and academic reputation.”

Friedman said he would be available to Krislov and they have already discussed Pace leadership together. He declined to go into detail about any specific advice offered to Krislov.

“Oh, I don’t think I would share that,” Friedman said, again through laughter. “It’s between presidents.”

http://www.otdowntown.com/local-news/20170621/pace-president-concludes-tenure&template=

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University Business: "Universities expand ways how a mentor can coach a mentee"

06/26/2017

University Business: "Universities expand ways how a mentor can coach a mentee"

. . . Since 2011, Pace University in New York has offered a three-tier leadership development program that includes a mentoring component. Participants in the top tier, who represent the school’s leaders, choose a mentor for 18 months from the president’s operations committee.

Mid-level managers in tier two select a mentor for one year from tier one graduates or the school’s management council. Those in tier three—nonmanagerial—pick their mentor for nine months from the tier two graduates.

“We hear from graduates that this is one of the best aspects of the program,” says Susan Donahue, Pace’s director of organizational learning and development. “But they can’t pick someone from their functional area; they need to have an outside perspective.”

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Pace University’s 54th Annual Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner Honors President Stephen J. Friedman with the 2017 Leaders in Management Award on Wed., June 14

06/15/2017

Pace University’s 54th Annual Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner Honors President Stephen J. Friedman with the 2017 Leaders in Management Award on Wed., June 14

Faculty award honoree is William Offutt, Professor of History and Faculty Adviser of the Pforzheimer Honors College at Pace

Young Alumnae Emcee: Ashley Scott ’17, BFA Acting Major, Pace School of Performing Arts

New York, NY – June 15, 2017 – At its Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner last night, Pace University recognized President Stephen J. Friedman as the honoree of the 2017 Leaders in Management Award, and this year's Homer and Charles Pace Faculty Award recipient, William Offutt, JD, PhD. The event was held at the American Museum of Natural History.

“President Friedman has overseen a period of tremendous accomplishment and growth, one that has set the stage for Pace to reach new heights in the coming years,” said Mark M. Besca ’81, Chairman, Pace Board of Trustees. “Thanks to his vision and commitment, Pace leads the way in educating the next generation of thinking professionals who will take the reins of the 21st century economy and form the executive, entrepreneurial, and innovator class of tomorrow.”

Friedman is the seventh President of Pace University. President Friedman has presided over an increase in enrollment, and advocated for the value of combining education in liberal arts and professional preparation, all for the purpose of creating opportunity for students and improving the nation’s global competitiveness.

Under his leadership, Pace has established new academic and study abroad programs, launched significant renovations of the New York and Pleasantville campuses, and built a solid financial foundation for advancing Pace’s mission.

Prior to his presidency, he served as Dean of Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law and is a former Senior Partner of Debevoise & Plimpton LLC. He served as a Commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury and law clerk to Justice William Brennan at the Supreme Court of the United States. He also has an extensive background as a leader of nonprofit organizations.

The 2017 faculty award honoree is William Offutt, Professor of History and Faculty Adviser of the Pforzheimer Honors College at Pace’s New York City Campus. He has been a Pace faculty member since 1990. He has taught classes on colonial and revolutionary America, the Civil War, Constitutional history, and American women’s history. An accomplished scholar, his book, Patriots, Loyalists, and Revolution in New York City, 1775-1776, is part of a simulation game in the “Reacting to the Past” series, which has been adopted by dozens of colleges around the world. He was director of Pace’s New York City Honors Program (2001-07), which in 2003 became the Pforzheimer Honors College. He has advised hundreds of Honors College students and graduates.

The Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner began in 1962 as the Leaders in Management Award Dinner to highlight the support and encouragement the University receives from the corporate community. Pace's signature fundraising event celebrates the University's continued advancement and honors distinguished individuals with remarkable entrepreneurial and visionary talents. This gala embraces the University's identity as a leader in higher education. Proceeds from the dinner directly support student scholarships and special projects, including the New York City Masterplan—making a critical difference in the lives of Pace students and their educational futures.

Pace University is shaped by its enduring traditions of opportunity and innovation. More than 100 years after its founding, Pace continues its commitment to providing access to a diverse population while innovating to meet the needs of the global economy. A January 2017 study ranked Pace first in New York and second in the nation at catapulting students from the bottom fifth of income distribution into the top fifth. The Equality of Opportunity Project study found that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennials.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its College of Health Professions, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Media contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

 

 

 

 

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Journal News: "NY bill passes: Elephants out as entertainment"

06/12/2017

Journal News: "NY bill passes: Elephants out as entertainment"

Elephants would be banned from circuses and other performances in New York within two years under a bill the state Legislature recently approved.

The measure will now head to Gov. Andrew Cuomo's desk for review. The bill was praised by animal-rights groups and advocated for by students at Pace University in Westchester County.

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Hudson Valley News Network: "Kuh Named First Haub Professor of Environmental Law"

06/08/2017

Hudson Valley News Network: "Kuh Named First Haub Professor of Environmental Law"

WHITE PLAINS – Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law announces that Katrina Fischer Kuh will join the Law School’s faculty as the first Haub Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law.

An accomplished scholar with extensive experience working in the government and private sectors to protect the environment and natural resources, Professor Kuh will begin her role as a full time faculty member teaching classes in the fall of 2017.

“We are so pleased to welcome Katrina Kuh to Pace Law as the Haub Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law,” said Dean David Yassky. “Our Environmental Law Program is nationally recognized, and the addition of Professor Kuh and her environmental law and teaching expertise, along with her experience working in environmental litigation only bolsters the program. Professor Kuh is a tremendous addition to the Law School.”

“Professor Kuh’s cutting edge research offers new and creative approaches to deal with climate change,” said Jason Czarnezki, Associate Dean and Kerlin Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law.  “Her addition further strengthens our world renowned environmental faculty.”

“I’m humbled and excited to join one of the country’s most respected and innovative environmental law programs,” offers Professor Kuh.  “Pace faculty, alumni and students have long been at the forefront of developing law and policy to protect the environment and promote sustainability.  I look forward to contributing to this important work and thank the Haub family for the opportunity.”

Professor Kuh comes to the Elisabeth Haub School of Law from the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University where she taught Environmental Law, International Environmental Law, Global Climate Change and U.S. Law, Administrative Law, and Torts.  Her scholarship, which focuses on climate change, sustainability, and second generation environmental challenges, has been widely published. Professor Kuh is also the co-editor of “The Law of Adaptation to Climate Change: United States and International Aspects” and Co-Chair of the International Bar Association Working Group on the Legal Aspects of Climate Change Adaptation.

Prior to her work in academia, Professor Kuh worked in the environmental and litigation practice groups in the New York office of Arnold & Porter LLP and served as an advisor on natural resource policy in the United States Senate.  She received her law degree from the Yale Law School and served as a law clerk to Judge Charles S. Haight of the District Court for the Southern District of New York and Judge Diana Gribbon Motz of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.

Pace Law’s environmental law program is nationally recognized and is ranked third in the country by “US News & World Report.” As previously announced, funding for the Haub Professor of Environmental Law was made possible by a gift from the Haub family.

http://hudsonvalleynewsnetwork.com/2017/06/07/kuh-named-first-haub-professor-environmental-law/

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Journal News: "Suffer the children: When broken romance turns deadly"

06/08/2017

Journal News: "Suffer the children: When broken romance turns deadly"

Photo: New Rochelle Police Commissioner Patrick Carroll talks about the arrest of Neil White in the alleged suffocation death of his 7-year old daughter Gabrielle White, during a press conference in New Rochelle, June 7, 2017.

. . . “In any family, children are associated with their parents and in any divorce situation it’s likely that children are used as pawns," said Linda Fentiman, an author and professor of criminal law and health law at Pace University Law School in White Plains.

Fentiman noted that it is more common for men, and not women, to target their own children to hurt their female partner. 

“There are certain kinds of domestic violence, sometimes called intimate terrorism, in which the partner deliberately targets the children as a way of getting at the mother," she said. "So, a lot of domestic violence is both physical and psychological."

Fentiman said that 30 to 60 percent of instances of child abuse also involve domestic violence, and vice versa.

Read more here.

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