main navigation
my pace

Westchester

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Community Health" featured dietitian nutritionist Christen Cupples Cooper, founding director of the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University in "Is a plant-based diet right for you?"

04/25/2018

"Community Health" featured dietitian nutritionist Christen Cupples Cooper, founding director of the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University in "Is a plant-based diet right for you?"

To many, the thought of giving up barbecued chicken, steak and pork chops doesn’t sound too appealing. But if you’re trying to eat better, that doesn’t necessarily mean you must pass up your favorite main course to fill up on a salad.

Some research shows that when plant-based foods are the star of diets — with meat, fish, dairy and eggs playing supporting roles — people (sometimes called flexitarians) may lead healthier lives than meat eaters.

“Evidence shows that a plant-based diet can help prevent against heart disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes,” says registered dietitian nutritionist Christen Cupples Cooper, founding director of the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University in New York City. “Some of the healthiest populations in the world eat a plant-based diet.”

Fulfill your own needs

Different than a vegan diet — which excludes meat, eggs and dairy altogether — a plant-based diet centers on mainly fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers (think yams and potatoes) while just minimizing consumption of meat, dairy products and eggs.

“A plant-based diet is not an all-or-nothing proposition,” says Chanté Wiegand, a naturopathic doctor and director of education at the Synergy Co. in Jackson, Wyoming.

Cooper agrees, adding there’s no reason to give up anything on a plant-based diet. “That is part of its beauty — it is a moderate approach to eating,” Cooper says.

Plants are packed with valuable nutrients in the forms of vitamins, minerals, complex carbohydrates, fiber and phytonutrients. “All the things your body needs to radiate health from the inside out.” Wiegand says.

Plant diets also support healthy guts and digestion and may lower the risk of stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis. “Most health authorities agree ... eating mostly plant foods lowers rates of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer,” Cooper says.

According to Wiegand, by eating more plant foods, you’re also consuming less refined and processed foods and sugars. “This will help to balance your blood sugar to support healthy energy and mood all day long,” she says, adding that it can also help decrease cholesterol levels and aid in weight loss.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Westchester Business Journal" featured Pace President Marvin Krislov and Gary Laermer in "Pace University names Gary Laermer as VP for development and alumni relations"

04/25/2018

"The Westchester Business Journal" featured Pace President Marvin Krislov and Gary Laermer in "Pace University names Gary Laermer as VP for development and alumni relations"

Pace University announced Monday it has hired Gary Laermer as vice president for development and alumni relations.

Laermer, a Pace alumnus, most recently led philanthropic and charitable efforts at YMCA of Greater New York. In his new role at Pace, he will direct the university’s fundraising and institutional advancement efforts. He’s also responsible for engaging Pace’s community of more than 140,000 alumni.

In a statement accompanying the announcement, Pace President Marvin Krislov praised Laermer as not only a talented fundraising professional, but as an example of “everything we do at Pace. He was a first-generation college student when he came to Pace as an undergraduate, and today we couldn’t be happier to be welcoming him back to campus in a senior leadership role.”

Laermer will start the job April 30. He arrives at Pace as the college is imagining its lower Manhattan campus. The school has also recently completed about $100 million worth of work at its Pleasantville campus, updating its academic and athletic facilities and adding dormitory space.

Laermer holds a bachelor’s degree in agency administration from Pace and a master’s in information management from Southeastern University in Lakeland, Florida. He grew up in the Bronx and resides in Bergen County, New Jersey.

“Pace has an extraordinary legacy and exciting trajectory,” Laermer said.  “Alumni all over the world are doing amazing things and I am excited to work with them and engage them with Pace.”

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Press Release: Pace University Hosts Westchester Walk for World Water to Raise Awareness about Clean Water Scarcity Around the World

04/24/2018

Press Release: Pace University Hosts Westchester Walk for World Water to Raise Awareness about Clean Water Scarcity Around the World

Pace University in Pleasantville hosted the Westchester Walk for World Water on Saturday in partnership with the Children’s Environmental Literacy Foundation (CELF) Student Ambassadors. Participants included more than 100 Pace students, staff, faculty, community members and students from local high schools including Bedford, Eastchester, Irvington, Kent Place, Scarsdale, Sleepy Hollow/Tarrytown and The Hackley School, including CELF student ambassadors.

Participants walked one mile with large buckets of water on their heads to demonstrate the trek that many women around the world make each day to collect water.

Westchester Walk for World Water, organized by the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment at Pace University and CELF, was held to draw attention to the scarcity of safe drinking water around the world and raise funds to provide LifeStraw® Community filters to schools in need. While most of us are just steps to the nearest source of clean drinking water, in many parts of the world people (mostly women and children) walk miles to find water.

"CELF is thrilled to once again partner with Pace University on a student event that addresses one of the most pressing issues of our time: the global freshwater crisis,” said Katie Ginsberg, Founder and Executive Director of CELF. "Just as we see young people across the country stand up and address societal issues, the CELF Student Ambassadors work to build awareness of the global fresh water crisis. We are so proud of them for speaking up and for contributing their talent and energy to the Walk. As high school students, they are already making an impact by educating their own communities about this crisis and enabling students in Kenya to have access to fresh water."

“Photos or stories of women and children throughout the developing world traveling miles for water, often of terrible quality, is not enough,” said Michelle D. Land, Director of Programming, Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment, Pace University. “Our water walk helps Pace students briefly experience what it is like to have to do this every day.”

John Cronin, Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment, Pace University, delivered the keynote address, “Water, Water, Everywhere . . . and Nowhere.”

The walk recognized contributions of Patti Bressman, founding CELF board member and founder of CELF’s Student Ambassador Program (SAM).

About the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment: The Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment (DCISE) is a central environmental hub at Pace University that provides enhanced educational opportunities for Pace University students. It serves to address major issues in sustainability, resilience, the growing urbanization of the 21st century and the impact of these changes on the global environment, through multidisciplinary programs encompassing research, policy-making, education, and building greater community awareness and consensus on how to manage these issues.  Harnessing the expertise of the many accomplished Pace faculty, as well as other professionals, including scientists, philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, economists, humanists, artists, and financial, policy and legal experts concerned with the interaction between humans and the natural world, it functions as an academic center and resource for the College and University, as well as for external communities.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

Follow us on Twitter at @PaceUnews or on our website: http://www.pace.edu/news

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace students Walk for World Water on News 12

04/24/2018

Pace students Walk for World Water on News 12

News 12 ran a segment on the Walk for World Water at Pace.

Approximately 120 people walked a mile with buckets of water on their heads Pace in Pleasantville. Pace students, faculty and staff along with students from area high schools participated through a partnership between the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment and the Children's Environmental Literacy Foundation (CEFL). The walk simulated a small portion of what women and children in many areas of the world need to do regularly to attempt to obtain usable water. 

View the News 12 video here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"ABC News" featured Haub Law School Professor Mimi Rocah in "Trump lawyer Michael Cohen is facing 'epic battle' by prosecutors for his cooperation: Alan Dershowitz"

04/23/2018

"ABC News" featured Haub Law School Professor Mimi Rocah in "Trump lawyer Michael Cohen is facing 'epic battle' by prosecutors for his cooperation: Alan Dershowitz"

... Another panelist, former federal prosecutor Mimi Rocah, disagreed with Dershowitz. Rocah, now a criminal justice fellow at Pace University Law School, said she believes Cohen will cooperate with prosecutors because he's vulnerable.

“I think he flips because I think he committed a lot of crimes, and he has got a lot of jail time that he's facing for that reason,” Rocah said

Dershowitz said Trump has "a unique weapon" on his side in any investigation -- the presidential pardon. However, he said in regard to Cohen, "I don't think he's going to be pardoned."

But ABC News chief legal analyst Dan Abrams, who was also part of the panel, had a different take.

“I think he's going to be pardoned," Abrams said. "I think he feels confident about that.” 

Read the full article.

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The New York Times" featured Dyson Professor George Picoulas in "Special Elections in New York on Tuesday Will Decide 11 Races"

04/23/2018

"The New York Times" featured Dyson Professor George Picoulas in "Special Elections in New York on Tuesday Will Decide 11 Races"

...The big challenge with special elections, of course, is voter turnout. Unlike the November elections, special elections can escape the notice of all but the most avid followers of politics. In the past year, more Democrats have become involved in local politics than any time in recent memory. “The Democratic base is a lot more energized since the election of President Trump,” said George Picoulas, a lecturer in political science at Pace University.

In the Assembly, where Democrats have a nearly three-to-one advantage over Republicans, the nine elections on Tuesday could afford Republicans the opportunity to make inroads and the Democrats to solidify their grip. Five of the nine seats were held by Republicans, including all three on Long Island and two upstate.

Two fresh vacancies in the Assembly, resulting from two certainties of life in Albany — death and indictment — will be decided in the November election.

The three Assembly seats in New York City are expected to be filled by Democrats. In the 39th District in Queens, which includes Jackson Heights, the only major-party candidate to appear on the ballot is Aridia Espinal, a Democrat and former aide to Francisco Moya, who left the Assembly for a spot on the City Council.

In the 80th District in the Bronx, which includes Pelham Gardens, Mark Gjonaj also quit the Assembly for the City Council. The Republican candidate, Gene DeFrancis, is a United States Navy veteran who founded a merchants association. He will face Mr. Gjonaj’s former chief of staff, Nathalia Fernandez, who also worked as a Bronx representative for Mr. Cuomo.

The recent move of Brian Kavanagh, a Democrat, from the Assembly to the Senate opened up the seat in the 74th District on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, where Harvey Epstein, a lawyer and former community board chairman, has the Democratic nod. He will oppose Bryan Cooper, an event planner and perennial Republican candidate.

On Long Island, the outcome of the special elections is far less certain.

In the Fifth District in Suffolk County, where Republicans dominate the electoral rolls, Al Graf, a former Republican assemblyman, left the seat for a district court judgeship. Competing to replace him are two Holbrook residents: Doug Smith, a Republican and former aide to Mr. Graf, and Deborah Slinkosky, a Democrat and former school board member who twice tried to unseat Mr. Graf.

Another seat in Suffolk was also under Republican control. Chad A. Lupinacci stepped down after winning the race for Huntington town supervisor. Republicans have held the seat in the 10th District for decades, despite the Democratic advantage in voter registration.

On Tuesday, Janet Smitelli, a Republican lawyer of Huntington, will face the Democrat, Steve Stern, a lawyer and former county legislator. Both said they want to confront the problems of high taxes, gang activity and groundwater contamination.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Daily Voice" featured Pace Students and Professor John Cronin in "Pace Students Travel To DC, Advocate For Hudson River"

04/22/2018

"Daily Voice" featured Pace Students and Professor John Cronin in "Pace Students Travel To DC, Advocate For Hudson River"

Students in Pace University's Environmental Policy Clinic along with their adviser, John Cronin, spent Friday, April 20 in Washington, D.C., advocating for issues related to the Hudson River.

Cronin is the senior fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace.

Cronin said a controversial proposal for oil barge anchorages on the Hudson River was the subject of their visit with the region’s congressional delegation.

“Our students conveyed the need for Coast Guard procedures that assure both river protection and river safety,” said Cronin, who is the Clinic instructor.

“We hope that representatives of the tug and barge industry, who have also been active in Washington, agree with the Clinic that these issues need not be at odds," Cronin told Daily Voice.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"News12" featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Gov. Cuomo orders voting rights restored for all parolees"

04/19/2018

"News12" featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Gov. Cuomo orders voting rights restored for all parolees"

New York state is restoring the voting rights of 35,000 parolees under an executive order from Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

The governor issued the directive on Wednesday, adding New York to a list of 14 states and the District of Columbia that allow people to vote once they have served their sentence.

Cuomo noted that nearly three-fourths of the people on parole in New York are black or Latino. He said that allowing parolees to participate in voting is another way to help them re-establish ties to the community as law-abiding citizens.

Advocates for criminal justice reform hailed the move.

The second-term governor is facing a spirited Democratic primary challenge from "Sex and the City" star Cynthia Nixon, who has faulted Cuomo for not doing enough to help minorities.

Under current law, residents who commit crimes are not permitted to have their voting rights restored until after their parole is finished.

Pace Law School professor Bennett Gersham says in an election year, the move could be perceived as a political decision, but it’s one he believes is right for the people.

“These individuals have served their time, they are back in society,” he says. “Why deny them the ability to participate in the democratic process?”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Examiner" featured Pace University's University Health Care in "Pace Celebrates 40 Years of Health Care With Opening of New Center"

04/19/2018

"The Examiner" featured Pace University's University Health Care in "Pace Celebrates 40 Years of Health Care With Opening of New Center"

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of its University Health Care (UHC), Pace University last Thursday opened a new and enlarged facility on its Pleasantville campus.

The first nurse-managed academic health care service on a university campus in the United States, UHC opened its doors at Pace in 1977. A novel concept at the time, the use of nurse practitioners is now common in primary care. UHC offers a wide range of primary health care services and its leading edge care continues to be a model nationally and internally.

The center, which moved from the Goldstein Fitness Center to the Paton House, is about 2,000 square feet with four patient exam rooms, a procedure room, larger reception area and a lab. More than 1,700 patients, including students, staff, faculty, alumni and their families are treated there each year.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Nyack News & Views" featured Haub Law Professor Karl Coplan in "Earth Matters: Life on a (Carbon) Budget"

04/18/2018

"Nyack News & Views" featured Haub Law Professor Karl Coplan in "Earth Matters: Life on a (Carbon) Budget"

As she wrapped up a recent talk on the current state of polar ice, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory geophysicist Dr. Robin Bell spoke of the need for us all to live sustainably. As a shining example, she cited her own husband, environmental law professor Karl Coplan, who works hard to live on a carbon emissions “budget” of four tons a year. “He does it,” said Bell. “I try really hard . . .”

Coplan blogs about his endeavor to live within his ambitiously low budget of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, and is working on a book about living sustainably on a tiny fraction of the typical American’s annual 44-ton carbon output.

Earth Matters spoke to Coplan by phone last week about his quest to curb his carbon footprint. The interview has been edited and condensed. 

EM: What inspired you to start tracking your carbon budget?

It wasn’t anything sudden. It was more of an evolution than an epiphany.

I’ve taught environmental law since 1994 at Pace College Law School, in the Environmental Litigation Clinic. Before that, I worked at a law firm that did a lot of public-interest environmental work. So I’ve always been sensitive to our environmental footprint. I always got the smallest, best-mpg car to get to work and back, and all the rest. Climate change seemed like something way off in the future, and not something we have to fight right now, like Indian Point dumping radioactive tritium into the Hudson River, or nitrogen coming from NYC sewage treatment plants (to give examples from cases I worked on).

We have environmental laws because people make business and personal decisions without considering  environmental impact. We justify coming in and taking action, and wag our fingers at people who choose to pollute to make a dime. But if you look at your own choices—how you get to work or where you go on vacation—you realize that, like the old Walt Kelly comic, we have met the enemy and he is us: every one of us with a high-emissions lifestyle, especially in the U.S.

So, I came back from a sabbatical ten years ago and thought: What can I do? I realized that I should start keeping track of my own carbon footprint with trackers that were beginning to appear online.

Read the full article.

Pages