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Ambassadors Macharia Kamau of Kenya and Csaba Kőrösi of Hungary receive Elizabeth Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy from Pace Law School and International Council of Environmental Law

07/29/2015

Ambassadors Macharia Kamau of Kenya and Csaba Kőrösi of Hungary receive Elizabeth Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy from Pace Law School and International Council of Environmental Law

New York, NY -- July 28, 2015 -- In recognition of their exemplary leadership in drafting the United Nations’ “Sustainable Development Goals,” Pace University School of Law and the International Council of Environmental Law conferred upon Ambassador Macharia Kamau of Kenya and Ambassador Csaba Kőrösi of Hungary the 2014 Elizabeth Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy on July 28 at the University Club in New York City.  Pace provost Uday Sukhatme presided at the awards ceremony, which was attended by the diplomatic corps.

Christian and Liliane Haub, continuing their family’s ardent support for the development of environmental law, were in attendance to confer the solid gold medals on the ambassadors, and Pace Law School dean David Yassky conferred the diplomas certifying their accomplishments.

“Ambassador Macharia Kamau and Ambassador Csaba Kőrösi are rightfully being honoured for their extraordinary service in helping to establish a set of visionary sustainable development goals,” said Ban Ki-moon, the Secretary-General of the United Nations. “Without their tireless efforts we would not be where we are today. 

The Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy recognizes extraordinary ambassadorial achievements in shaping international law for environmentally sustainable development. This year’s award recognizes that, for the first time, the objectives of the United Nations’ efforts towards socio-economic development cover equally developed and developing countries while fully integrating the environment into development. As all nations confront problems such as water shortage, severe natural disasters, loss of biodiversity, and pollution, the goals frame integrated ways to tackle many problems at the same time. With acumen and patience, as co-facilitators of the UN General Assembly’s negotiations, Ambassadors Kamau and Kőrösi achieved unprecedented agreement by nations on a new agenda for environmentally sustainable development. These goals are to be confirmed at a UN Summit Meeting to be held in September, 2015.

The Elizabeth Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy is the premier international recognition for extraordinary diplomatic achievements in shaping international environmental law and policy for sustainable development. The award was establishment upon the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the UN Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment as well as the 5th anniversary of the 1992 Rio Earth Summit. Since 1999, the award has recognized “particular practical accomplishment in a specific instance or a new idea or diplomatic initiative, leading to progress in the field of international law and policy.” Key diplomatic accomplishments have been honored in such sectors as desertification, biodiversity, small island developing states, forests, mountains, climate change, energy, and oceans. 

Pace University and the International Council of Environmental Law established the award in memory of the distinguished German environmentalist Elizabeth Haub, a philanthropist devoted to the sound stewardship of nature and natural resources. Born in Germany in 1889, Elizabeth advocated for laws to conserve nature in the Federal Republic of Germany and internationally. Her family enterprises, including Tengelmann Group, supported her belief that laws should conserve the Earth’s resources.  In 1968, she initiated the establishment of a German foundation to support efforts towards the development and implementation of environmental law and policy. Today, the Elizabeth Haub Foundation for Environmental Law and Policy continues to provide assistance for projects vital to the development of international environmental law and policy, including promoting formative agreements such as the African Convention on Environment and Development, the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species, the Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears, the Convention on Conservation of Nature in the South Pacific, and the Convention on Migratory Species.

Expanding on her legacy, Elizabeth Haub’s children and grandchildren have continued her philanthropic work.  In 1973, Erivan and Helga Haub, her son and daughter-in-law, established the Elizabeth Haub Prize in Environmental Law, which Stockholm University now confers. Helga Haub also led the establishment of additional Elizabeth Haub Foundations in Canada and the United States. Working in close-collaboration, the foundations have primarily supported the work of the International Council of Environmental Law and the Environmental Law Programme of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. The combined resources of these organizations have continued to contribute to the development, negotiation and fulfillment of many important environmental agreements including the Antarctic Protocol, the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations World Charter for Nature, and the Draft International Covenant on Environment and Development. Pace University bestowed honorary doctorates on Erivan and Helga Haub in 2014.

The Elizabeth Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy is conferred on recommendation of an international jury. The jury invites nominations to be sent to The Secretary of the Jury, Elizabeth Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy, Pace University School of Law, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY, 10603. Each award consists of a solid gold medal and a diploma. Past laureates appear on a permanent scroll of honor at Pace Law School, and their names also are honored on line (http://law.pace.edu/elizabeth-haub-award-environmental-diplomacy; and www.elizabeth_haub.com).

Contact: Joan Gaylord, Media Relations, 914-422-4389, JGaylord@law.pace.edu.

Secretary-General's remarks at ceremony honouring the recipients of the Elizabeth Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy [as prepared for delivery]:

http://www.un.org/sg/statements/index.asp?nid=8865

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U.S. News: "Debunk 6 Myths About the Cost of Online Education"

07/28/2015

U.S. News: "Debunk 6 Myths About the Cost of Online Education"

. . . In the absence of dining halls, libraries, climbing walls and other amenities, prospective students could be forgiven for assuming that online tuition is lower than  tuition for on-ground programs. But that's not always the case. "I think there is a misconception that online is cheaper, and it's not," says Christine Shakespeare, assistant vice president of continuing and professional education at Pace University

Read more: http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2015/07/28/debunk-6-myths-about-the-cost-of-online-education

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U.S. News: "Impress Campus Tour Guides With These Questions"

07/27/2015

U.S. News: "Impress Campus Tour Guides With These Questions"

. . . Cassidy Macca, a student tour guide at Pace University, says, "My advice is to not hesitate to ask questions, regardless of how small they may be. I love to answer them!"

Read more: http://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/2015/07/24/questions-college-tour-guides-wish-they-heard-from-high-school-students

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Computerworld: "The worst thing about tech bubbles isn't what you may think"

07/27/2015

Computerworld: "The worst thing about tech bubbles isn't what you may think"

Photo Credit: REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

. . . "It's often difficult to recognize a bubble while you're in it, as unreasonable optimism and speculative greed lead to the belief that a 'new paradigm' will validate wildly aggressive projections," said Bruce Bachenheimer, clinical professor of management at Pace University and executive director of its Entrepreneurship Lab. "It certainly appears that certain sectors of the market are due for a major correction," he said.

Read more: http://www.computerworld.com/article/2952732/it-industry/the-worst-thing...

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New York Times: "Group Petitions to Save a Prehistoric Fish From Modern Construction"

07/24/2015

New York Times: "Group Petitions to Save a Prehistoric Fish From Modern Construction"

PHOTO: Riverkeeper attributes rising deaths of Atlantic sturgeons to construction on the replacement for the Tappan Zee Bridge, above. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

. . . When the Fisheries Service issued an opinion on the bridge project, it concluded that dredging or pile driving would probably kill two of each species of sturgeon over the entire project. As for boat collisions, it concluded that given the relatively small increase in traffic and anticipated speeds, “it is unlikely that there would be a detectable increase in the risk of vessel strike.”

The project was “likely to adversely affect, but not likely to jeopardize the continued existence” of the fish, it concluded.

Daniel E. Estrin, supervising attorney at the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, urged officials to reconsider that assumption in light of the recent mortalities. The Hudson’s sturgeon population, he said, cannot sustain such losses.

“This is do-or-die time for the Atlantic sturgeon,” Mr. Estrin said. “The numbers are pretty damning.”

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/22/nyregion/group-petitions-to-save-a-prehistoric-fish-from-modern-construction.html

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City & State: "Panel On STEM Education In New York City"

07/23/2015

City & State: "Panel On STEM Education In New York City"

This summer many teenagers are just kicking back and relaxing. But thanks to several free summer programs offered throughout New York City select teens are participating in programs to promote STEM education (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). City & State spoke with three teens in these programs about why they are important for them personally and their fellow students.

The guests were:

Jahanara Nares is participating in Girls Who Code and spending her summer learning computer science and other technology skills at AT&T, which supports various STEM programs across New York City. The company has contributed nearly $2 million to the City's Education Department to develop and implement a STEM curriculum and last year contributed $1 million to Girls Who Code.

Nicholas Austin is a mentor at Pace University's STEM Collaboratory Summer Program. He participated in the program in the previous two years.

Pavan Khosla is a participant in the Brooklyn Science Innovation Initiative at Kingsborough Community College.

See the video: http://www.cityandstateny.com/27/28/30/gwc-panel.html#.VbE7pJzwqPH

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MarketWatch: "3 reasons the Apple Watch disappointed"

07/23/2015

MarketWatch: "3 reasons the Apple Watch disappointed"

. . . first-generation devices usually have more buzz and fewer features than second-generation devices. “People who buy the first generation of a device are the ones who feel like they got burned,” says Darren Hayes, director of cyber security and an assistant professor at Pace University. “They were probably the coolest person on the block at the time, but those that bought the first generation iPad didn’t have the camera. I would advise on holding off and seeing what the second version will have.”

Read more: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/3-reasons-buyers-may-have-rejected-the-apple-watch-2015-07-21

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Westchester Magazine: "Pace University Training The Next Generation Of Cybersecurity Experts"

07/23/2015

Westchester Magazine: "Pace University Training The Next Generation Of Cybersecurity Experts"

Over the last several years, it’s become increasingly clear how important cybersecurity is on both a national and personal level. Think about it: Everyday we walk around with high-tech computers, chock full of personal information and data, in our pockets. We are more susceptible than ever to getting our devices hacked and having our important information stolen. Due to this this heightened need for security, the National Security Agency (NSA) has been developing and preparing the next generation of highly trained cybersecurity experts—and it’s happening in our own backyard.

On their Pleasantville campus, Pace University recently wrapped up its first ever GenCyber cybersecurity workshop for high school teachers. From July 6 to July 17, about 25 high school teachers from around the country gathered at Pace to learn the fundamentals of cybersecurity and how, in turn, to teach it to their students.  

Read more: http://www.westchestermagazine.com/Blogs/914INC-Incoming/July-2015/Pace-University-Cybersecurity-NSA-Program/

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New York Times: "Medical Care Is a Right"

07/21/2015

New York Times: "Medical Care Is a Right"

To the Editor:

Re “If Law ‘Is Here to Stay,’ So Are Doubts About It” (news analysis, front page, June 26):

As a nurse practitioner and a professor of nursing at Pace University, I am baffled by those who are so eager to overturn a law that provides health care to millions of people, the Affordable Care Act. Do they think it’s just fine that Americans die routinely of preventable and treatable illnesses because they have no insurance? writes CAROL ROYE, author of “A Woman’s Right to Know: How Women’s Health Became a Political Pawn — and the Surprising Alliances Working to Reclaim It.”

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/06/opinion/medical-care-is-a-right.html

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Georgia Public Broadcasting: "KKK, New Black Panthers Rally In South Carolina"

07/21/2015

Georgia Public Broadcasting: "KKK, New Black Panthers Rally In South Carolina"

. . . Randolph McLaughlin, a law professor at Pace University who has litigated against the KKK in the past and written about them, said, "Nothing that the Klan does or could do would surprise me. They have longed embraced Confederate symbols and emblems and the Confederate flag. So I think, in a sense, we have to thank them for showing the nation what the Confederate battle flag -- I call it the Confederate flag -- what it really represents and who really supports the flag."

Listen to the interview: https://soundcloud.com/gpbnewsfeatures/kkk-rally-preview

Read the story: http://www.gpb.org/news/2015/07/17/kkk-new-black-panthers-rally-south-ca...

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