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Westchester Magazine: "Pace University - Evening Reception, Bedford Hills"

01/05/2018

Pace University - Evening Reception, Bedford Hills (Westchester Magazine)

On Oct 28, Pace University held an evening reception at the Glen Arbor Golf Club in Bedford Hills to welcome Marvin Krislov as the university’s new president. Krislov was inaugurated the next day, during a ceremony at Pace.

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Westchester Magazine: "Going to the Dogs"

01/05/2018

Going to the Dogs (Westchester Magazine)

Pace University leads the way with a new animal based therapy program for incarcerated mothers.

Following the remarkable success of animal-assisted therapy (AAT), therapy dogs are now helping incarcerated mothers in Westchester hone their parenting skill while learning to deal with feelings such as fear, guilt, depression, and trauma.

Parenting, Prison & Pups (PPP) is a two year research partnership - the first of its kinds anywhere - between Pace University's Dyson College, Department of Criminal Justice; The good Dog Foundation, a nonprofit that trains and certifies therapy-dog teams and provides AAT; the Metropolitan Correctional Center, under the Federal Bureau of Prisons; Westchester County Department of Correction (WCEOC).  While animal-based programs have been used by correctional institutions before, PPP is the first to employ a structured curriculum.

"The (PPP) program is a way for us to reach women and help them become better parents for their children," say PPP director Kimberly Collica-Cox, PhD. " What we are really looking to do is to stop the cycle of intergenerational incarceration, and we believe that this program can help achieve that."

Animal-assisted WCDOC classes are scheduled to begin in September 2018.

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MNN: "Like your pet cat, pumas are peculiar about where they sleep"

01/02/2018

Like your pet cat, pumas are peculiar about where they sleep (MNN)

It's well-known that house cats sleep wherever they want, however they want — and often. They have a penchant for pouring themselves into cozy alcoves, perching atop important papers or disappearing into wormholes under furniture.

Pet cats share many of these idiosyncrasies with their wild relatives, which also tend to be catnap connoisseurs. And beyond the amusement of watching domestic cats snooze around the house, understanding the various criteria of a good catnap may also help researchers protect vulnerable felines that are rapidly losing habitat in the wild.

That's the idea behind a recent study, published in the journal PeerJ, that examined the bed-site preferences of wild mountain lions, also known as pumas or cougars. The study was part of Panthera's Teton Cougar Project (TCP), which has already shed valuable light on other puma puzzles, from their ecological effects to their secret social lives.

"Despite the fact that scientists know a lot about the relationships between predators and their prey, we know surprisingly little about the sleeping habits of large predators, especially cryptic carnivores like pumas," writes TCP member Anna Kusler, a graduate researcher at Pace University, in a blog post about the findings. Pumas gravitate to hidden bed sites where it would be hard for a competitor to see them, Kusler says, noting that pumas face more danger in their natural habitats than many people realize.

"Even though most of us probably think of pumas as top predators with little to fear, that's not always the case," Kusler adds. "In North America, much larger grizzly and black bears steal their hard-earned kills. Wolves, as pack animals, steal their kills AND kill them and their kittens." Pumas need to find safe sleeping spots, she explains, where it's unlikely other predators can harm them.

From 2012 to 2016, TCP researchers used GPS collars to identify about 600 puma bed sites, then carefully studied each one.

Pumas may not have many opportunities to curl up inside a mixing bowl or behind a sofa, but they do have comparable quirks about where they sleep. "We often found puma beds tucked underneath the low-lying boughs of a tree, or against the rugged face of an inaccessible cliff," Kusler writes. "They seem to prefer steep, rugged terrain, like cliff bands and boulder fields."

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Independent: "Similarities in Texting Habits Could Be the Key to Relationship Satisfaction, Suggest Study"

01/02/2018

Similarities in Texting Habits Could Be the Key to Relationship Satisfaction, Suggest Study (Independent)

Texting is ubiquitous in modern day dating culture.

While relationships were once born out of thoughtful love letters and red, red roses, today romance blossoms via witty observations and phallic emojis.

However, the art of written communication is not to be dismissed, as a new study suggests that couples with similar texting habits might be more satisfied in their relationship as a result.

Psychologists at Pace University, New York, surveyed 205 Americans between the ages of 18 and 29, all of whom were in relationships.

Each participant was asked about different aspects of their texting behaviour, from frequency of initiation to the nature of their conversations i.e. whether they text just to say hello, to show affection or to raise an issue.

Respondents also took standard surveys which measured their attachment styles and levels of contentment in their relationships.

The researchers concluded that perceived similarities in texting habits correlated strongly with overall relationship satisfaction.

“Findings highlight the importance of perceived similarity between romantic partners regarding texting behaviours for their level of satisfaction, even when taking into account the robust predictors of attachment anxiety and avoidance,” the study, which was published in the journal Computers in Human Behaviour, states.

However, due to the majority of participants being female (74 per cent), the researchers added that their findings may not apply to men and could instead suggest that women place particular importance on texting compatibility.

They also suggested that the results could benefit couples in counselling.

“Clinicians might be able to work with individuals in relationships or romantic couples about their expectations for and actual text messaging behaviours in order to promote relationship satisfaction and functioning,” the study states.

However, the psychologists added that further research is necessary in order to fully examine the role of texting compatibility in both romantic and non-romantic relationships.

Read the article.

Read Daily Mail: "Happiness is... texting as much as your partner: Couples whose message habits are similar are more content with their relationships"

Read The Times: "Lovers’ texting presses all the right buttons for a happy relationship"

 



 

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Financial Express: "University of Peace seeks India’s involvement to boost Sustainable Development Goals"

01/02/2018

University of Peace seeks India’s involvement to boost Sustainable Development Goals (Financial Express)

Recognising India as a key player in global efforts for the maintenance of international peace and security, University for Peace (UPEACE), a UN mandated university based in Costa Rica, is planning to set up a Yoga chair. Also, being a leader in South-South Cooperation, UPeace is keen on India playing a larger role in Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) ahead of a major conference in 2019. Talking to FE, Francisco Rojas Aravena, rector of the university, said, “As part of South-South Cooperation, the UPEACE is seeking India’s involvement in working on developing Objective 16 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), in preparation for 2019 conference at UN Headquarters in New York.” “SDG 16 highlights that Rule of law at national and international levels, inter alia, has to be ensured by providing equal access to justice for all. Developing effective, accountable and transparent institutions is therefore necessary in order to provide good governance. In the absence of peace, achieving sustainable development itself will become difficult,” explained Narinder Kakar, permanent observer of the University for Peace to the UN. On plans of setting up of a yoga chair at UPeace, Kakar, distinguished senior fellow, Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, said, “Yoga can help in attaining inner peace, and through education for peace, help in sustaining peace. Education for peace can play a useful role in supporting the process for peace building on the one hand and achieving peace that is sustained through understanding developed between people of different ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds.”

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Cheatsheet: "Controversial Theories Reveal What Actually Happens When You Have an Out-of-Body Experience"

01/02/2018

Controversial Theories Reveal What Actually Happens When You Have an Out-of-Body Experience (Cheatsheet)

...Elzière and Lopez’s study connects the vestibular system to out-of-body experiences. Their findings suggest “that problems with the vestibular system were a factor in creating the odd sensations,” Lopez told Scientific American. Although others in the scientific community are unsure. “I don’t think it’s the only explanation for out-of-body experiences,” Terence Hines, a psychology professor at Pace University, told the publication. “But we know that this part of the inner ear plays a role in how we orient ourselves in our bodies, so if something is wrong there, things can go kind of haywire,” Hines added.

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The New York Times: "With Cuomo Assist, Homeowners Rush to Soften Tax Bill’s Impact"

01/02/2018

With Cuomo Assist, Homeowners Rush to Soften Tax Bill’s Impact (The New York Times)

...“This tax bill is a direct attack on the most precious aspects of the American system of governance. We have to resist,” said Vanessa H. Merton, the committee chairwoman and a professor at the Pace University law school.

Ms. Merton lives in the house her parents bought in 1950 and has seen Hastings-on-Hudson change from a town of factory workers to hipsters and hedge fund managers.

“The reason I live in one of the most expensive places in the world is because I was born there,” said Ms. Merton. “I don’t have it in me to walk away from this house, but it’s getting harder and harder.”

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The Journal News: "Former Putnam Valley star Kayte Kinsley named NCAA Division II field hockey coach of year"

01/02/2018

Former Putnam Valley star Kayte Kinsley named NCAA Division II field hockey coach of year (The Journal News)

She was a state champion in field hockey.

That was before she decided to pursue soccer in college at Adelphi.

But former Putnam Valley standout Kayte Kinsley is once again a field hockey champion and on an even bigger stage.

The 29-year-old, second-year Pace University coach has been named NCAA Division II field hockey coach of the year after leading the Setters to a 15-4 record.

Pace, which went 9-9 a year ago and has only had a field hockey program for three seasons, finished this season ranked 10th in the country after an overtime playoff loss to Assumption College.

Kinsley, who graduated from Putnam Valley in 2006 after the Tigers won the State Class B Championship, was hired by Mercy College to begin its field hockey program immediately after she graduated from Adelphi.

She passed up an offer from Adelphi , which added field hockey while she was a student --- to play a year of field hockey for it as a grad student. Her younger sister, Britt, was playing for the team at the time.

Kinsley, who now lives in New Windsor, coached at Mercy for six seasons and, despite her youth, also became the school’s assistant athletic director for operations.

She began work at Mercy in the spring of 2010 and got a D-II college team together by that August in a rather unconventional way. She went around campus, asking even people who’d never played field hockey if they wanted to join the team.

Building a program while handling other stressful things like team bus transportation proved valuable.

“I learned a lot from that experience,” Kinsley said. “It kind of prepared me for anything that came my way. It definitely shaped me.”

While the first couple of years were “rough,” the team improved.

Kinsley said she was happy at Mercy but couldn’t pass up the opportunity to move to the rival school when that job opened.

“I liked what I saw,” she explained. “There were all brand new facilities. I came over and saw the growth and opportunity.”

Kinsley has focused on recruiting players who are committed to being “good students in the classroom, good players on the field and really being good people.”

Her Pace roster includes four athletes from local high schools.

Mahopac’s Jane Kasparian, a junior midfielder, tied for the Setter lead in points this season with 19. Also seeing playing time was fellow Mahopac grad Kim Schiera, a freshman midfielder.

Brewster’s Carly Corbett, a junior midfielder, made nine starts.

Lakeland grad Sarah Bard, a junior defender, was a starter until she was sidelined with a season-ending knee injury.

Kasparian, who noted Pace won only five games her freshman year, said, after being hired, Kinsley immediately set about turning things around.

“She was very eager for us to get off to a better start. She was always coming in early and staying late. She was very committed to do the best for our team,” she said.

Kasparian, who describes Kinsley as “easy to talk to” and “pretty easygoing” until she gets stricter if her squad isn’t doing what it’s capable of doing, wasn’t caught off guard by Kinsley winning the national coaching honor.

“I was definitely not surprised,” Kasparian said. “She has definitely worked hard and deserved it. We were ranked eighth in the country at one point.”

Kinsley, though, was surprised.

Terming the award “awesome,” she added, “The one thing I want to make sure of is the team knows this is their award, too.”

“I have a great team,” Kinsley said. “I really do. They truly take pride in what they’re doing. They care about the program. They’re respectful of each other. They work really hard. It’s really a team award. I wouldn’t have gotten it without them.”

Kinsley said securing a winning record so quickly has made her “set her mindset for a new goal.”

That’s getting farther in the playoffs. The loss to Assumption, coming after Pace had beaten it twice during the regular season – once in overtime and the second time by a goal – stung.

But she said her players are now focused on a longer playoff run next year, when many, including the four from the local area, are expected to return.

“I see a lot of success in the future,” she said.

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TPM: "Why Trump Takes Legal Advice From Fox’s Conspiracy-Stoking ‘Judge Jeanine"

12/18/2017

Why Trump Takes Legal Advice From Fox’s Conspiracy-Stoking ‘Judge Jeanine’ (TPM)

...Bennett Gershman, a Pace University law professor who has tracked Pirro’s career for years, called her “probably the most political prosecutor I’ve ever encountered.”

“She wanted to create a star moment for herself as a stepping stone for higher office,” said Gershman, who once filed a misconduct complaint against Pirro for discussing the H.I.V. status of an indicted sex offender during a press conference.

Her attempted star moment came in 2005-06 when she dropped out of the New York Senate race against Hillary Clinton (after receiving donations from the likes of Trump) and became the GOP nominee for state attorney general, losing by nearly 20 points to Andrew Cuomo. Her bids for statewide office were dogged by her husband’s legal troubles (Al Pirro was convicted in 2000 of hiding over $1 million in personal income on falsified returns, some of which his wife also signed) and her own. In 2006, Pirro came under federal investigation for asking former NYC police commissioner Bernie Kerik how best to secretly record her husband, whom she believed was cheating on her. No charges were ultimately filed, and the Pirros split up the following year.

Like Trump, Pirro ultimately found a home on TV, where their brash, say-anything personalities were assets. Trump spun “The Apprentice” into a hit franchise, while Pirro won a daytime Emmy for a reality court show, “Judge Jeanine Pirro,” before landing at Fox News in 2011. Trump was a frequent guest on the network.

When Trump announced his 2016 presidential run, Pirro became an early, ardent supporter. She advised #NeverTrump Republicans to “get in line” with the GOP frontrunner’s unorthodox campaign. According to Caputo, she would stop by Trump Tower for occasional meetings with Trump, “talking strategy and bucking him up.” The Access Hollywood recording in which Trump boasted of sexually assaulting women was “disgusting, devastating and embarrassing,” she told viewers, but she “still, without a doubt” would vote for him.

This unyielding loyalty paid off. Trump in March urged the public to watch an episode of “Judge Jeanine” in which Pirro said House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) should step down for embarrassing the President by failing to pass Obamacare repeal. He filmed an episode of her show in the Oval Office in May, and the New York Times reported he rarely misses an episode of the 9 p.m. ET Saturday program.

Trump supporters are Pirro viewers, and vice versa. The longtime political operative friendly with the Fox host told TPM this symbiotic relationship sometimes means promoting narratives that might not be fully grounded in reality, but appeal to the converted.

“I think she realized that the Trump message works for her viewership and she’s feeding her viewership and it’s good for her ’cause it keeps her numbers up,” the source said. “And she’s a personal supporter of Trump ’cause she’s known him for so long.”

“That’s something the President never forgets,” Caputo said of Pirro’s allegiance. “She may have been stern with him about something she disagreed with, but she never left his column of support. Those are the people the President relies on most because they’ve never given up on him.”

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The Chronicle of Higher Education: "What Is This ‘Even’?"

12/18/2017

What Is This ‘Even’? (The Chronicle of Higher Education)

When I last addressed the word even, in 2013, it had already migrated from its accustomed function as an adverb in such sentences as “I can’t even move this suitcase, much less pick it up” or “Even vegetarians sometimes have a hankering for bacon.” The Oxford English Dictionary elegantly gives this traditional meaning as:

Intimating that the sentence expresses an extreme case of a more general proposition implied (=French même). Prefixed … to the particular word, phrase, or clause, on which the extreme character of the statement or supposition depends.

By the time of my post, the word had for some time established itself — in expressions like “What does that even mean?” “I don’t even know you,” and “Is that even a thing?” — as, in Mark Liberman’s formulation, a “purely emphatic” intensifier. I noted that it had migrated “to an unexpected part of the sentence, so that is ostentatiously not ‘prefixed … to the particular word, phrase, or clause’ it has to do with.”

Four and half years on, there are some new things to say. Well, one is an old thing — in the original post, I somehow neglected the expression, “I can’t even,” which had gotten its first Urban Dictionary definition in 2010 (sic throughout):

Yes thoes three words are a sentence a full sentence, well only on tumblr. is often used when something is either too funny, scary, cute, to have a good reaction too.

girl: “it was so awkward”
girl2: “OMFG AHAHAHA I CAN’T EVEN”

Its popularity peaked in late 2013, some months after my post (which is my unconvincing excuse for whiffing on it). In October of that year, according to the Know Your Meme website,

the Tumblr blog TheBunionPaper published a satirical news article titled “Rich Girl in Dining Hall Can’t Even,” accumulating upwards of 1,900 notes in seven months. On November 20th, the feminist culture blog The Toast published an article about Internet linguistics, which described the meaning of the expression “I have lost all ability to can.” On January 26th, 2014, country music singer Kacey Musgraves repeated the phrase “I can’t even” during her acceptance speech for Best Country Album at the 2014 Grammy Awards.

Not surprisingly, Liberman and his Language Log colleagues have been all over “I can’t even.”

Know Your Meme credibly traces the expression to the earlier-emerging, “I don’t even,” which it cites first in a 2007 message board. However, three years before that, Regina used it in the movie Mean Girls: “She’s so pathetic. Let me tell you something about Janis Ian. We were best friends in middle school. I know, right? It’s so embarrassing. I don’t even … Whatever.”

Tina Fey’s Mean Girls is linguistically astonishingly fruitful; my sense is that it reflected and created, in equal measure, loads of new ways of talking. The screenplay is a veritable symphony merely in its uses of the modern-day even, including “What does that even mean?” and these exchanges:

  • Crying Girl: “I wish we could all get along like we used to in middle school … I wish I could bake a cake filled with rainbows and smiles and everyone would eat and be happy …” [about to cry]  Damian: [shouting from back] “She doesn’t even go here!” Ms. Norbury: “Do you even go to this school?” Crying Girl: “No … I just have a lot of feelings …”
  • Regina: “Cady, do you even know who sings this?” Cady: “Um … the Spice Girls?”
  • Gretchen: [to Cady] “Two years ago she told me hoops earrings were her thing and I wasn’t allowed to wear them anymore. And then for Hanukkah my parents got this pair of really expensive white gold hoops and I had to pretend like I didn’t even like them and … it was so sad.”
  • Cady: “What do we even talk about?” Janis: [shrugs shoulders] “Hair products!”

The latest even development takes it a step beyond I can’t even. In that construction, a following verb is implied and elided: “I can’t even [begin to express how funny/scary/cute/whatever the thing I'm reacting to is].” But now that’s thrown aside and even is a pure signifier of emphasis, improbability, and disbelief. I first encountered from Jon Danziger (@jondanziger)  who tweeted on November 17, apropos of a confounding news item, “What is this even?” I asked him about it and he reported it is a favorite of his students at Pace University.

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