main navigation
my pace

Westchester

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Hill's Pundits Blog: "President Trump: Cutting financial aid won’t Make America Great Again"

07/10/2017

The Hill's Pundits Blog: "President Trump: Cutting financial aid won’t Make America Great Again"

"Despite a strengthening national economy, President Donald J. Trump’s just-released budget proposal paints a bleak picture for anyone aspiring to earn a college degree, build a successful career, and realize the American Dream," writes Stephen J. Friedman, president of Pace University.

"Not only does it propose a staggering $150 billion in federal cuts to financial aid programs, practically obliterating programs that have made college access possible for hundreds of millions of young people from middle and lower income families.

"The number and scope of education programs affected is startling and the impact students, prospective students, and the schools themselves will feel if these cuts are adopted is devastating.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

USA Today: "15 ways to negotiate a higher salary"

07/10/2017

USA Today: "15 ways to negotiate a higher salary"

(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Once an employer makes you a job offer, consider it hooked. But curb your urge to reflexively say yes to the first number it throws out. Now is your time to negotiate a higher salary.

“You’ll never have more power in your relationship with a company than the time in which you’re offered the job until when you’ve accepted it,” says Katie Donovan, a salary and career consultant and founder of Equal Pay Negotiations in Boston.

Yet most young people who are offered jobs aren’t negotiating salary. Only 38% of those who responded to a 2015 NerdWallet survey said they negotiated with their employer when they got a job offer. Of those who did ask for a salary increase, 80% of those surveyed were at least partially successful. Most hiring managers said they had room in negotiations to bump up their salary offers by 5% to 10%.

Employers aren’t going to volunteer a higher salary in a job offer unless you’re willing to be your own advocate. If you’re feeling squeamish about having this talk, here are 15 tips to help you come out on top in negotiations.

Kicking off the conversation

1. Let salary come up naturally

Once you’re offered a job, let the employer be the first one to throw out a number. If you’re first asked to spill your salary history, deflect the question. The goal is to have the employer mention an amount or an ideal range first, which will put you in a better position to negotiate, says Jennifer Lee Magas, vice president of Magas Media Consultants and clinical associate professor of public relations at Pace University in Pleasantville, New York.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Law360: "Banks Ask Sessions To Discuss Fair Lending Enforcement"

07/06/2017

Law360: "Banks Ask Sessions To Discuss Fair Lending Enforcement"

. . . civil rights advocates said that the delay in pulling back on fair housing discrimination issues at the Justice Department under Sessions was only temporary.

Pointing to the Justice Department’s reversal on issues ranging from voting rights enforcement to consent decrees with local police departments on issues related to discrimination and conduct, advocates said that fair housing enforcement is likely to fall by the wayside as well.

“It’s only a matter of time,” said Randolph M. McLaughlin, the co-chair of the civil rights practice at Newman Ferrara LLP and a professor at Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law.

Even if the Justice Department does not take a clear position differentiating its current positions on fair lending and other civil rights issues from those under Obama, those issues are likely to fall by the wayside, he said.

“They can just not take these cases,” McLaughlin said.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

New York Law Journal: "Environmentalists Sue EPA Over NYC Water Quality"

07/05/2017

New York Law Journal: "Environmentalists Sue EPA Over NYC Water Quality"

Runoff from sewer overflows into the waters around New York City deprives millions of the chance to enjoy the waters for recreation, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is to blame for not forcing the state to update clean water rules, a coalition of environmental groups allege in a new lawsuit.

When it rains in New York City, stormwater washes into the city's combined sewer system and mixes with sewage and overloads the system; the cocktail then bypasses treatment plants and runs into waterways.

In a suit filed on June 29, nine environmental groups that include Riverkeeper Inc. and the Natural Resources Defense Council, said that the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation still uses total and fecal chloroform as its criteria for measuring water quality that the EPA has not supported since 1986.

The suit, filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, claims the EPA informed the state in a 2012 letter that the agency expects New York to adopt new, scientifically defensible criteria for water quality, but has yet to do so.

The suit alleges that the EPA failed to promulgate water quality standards that comply with the Clean Water Act.

"It's the EPA's job to protect people and ensure we all have access to water that won't make us sick when we drink or play in it," said Larry Levine, a senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council's water program in a news release.

Todd Ommen and Karl Coplan of the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic from the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University are listed on the brief.

A spokesperson for the EPA said in an email that the agency does not comment on lawsuits.

http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/this-weeks-news/id=1202792090592/Environmentalists-Sue-EPA-Over-NYC-Water-Quality?mcode=1202615036097&curindex=5&slreturn=20170605103252

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Associated Press: "Off-duty cop who killed daughter's boyfriend faces 3rd trial"

07/05/2017

Associated Press: "Off-duty cop who killed daughter's boyfriend faces 3rd trial"

In this Friday, June 30, 2017 photo, Shannon Kepler, left, arrives with his legal team for afternoon testimony in his trial in Tulsa, Okla. Kepler, a former Oklahoma police officer who fatally shot his daughter's black boyfriend in 2014 is on trial for the third time after jurors in previous trials couldn't decide whether or not to convict him of first-degree murder. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

A former Oklahoma police officer who said he was trying to protect his daughter when he fatally shot her black boyfriend in 2014 is on trial for the third time in seven months, after jurors in previous trials couldn't decide whether he was guilty of murder.

Experts say Shannon Kepler's case illustrates a broad unwillingness to convict police officers, particularly in cases involving fatal shootings — and even when the lines between officer and civilian are blurred.

Kepler was off duty when he shot 19-year-old Jeremey Lake in August 2014. Lake was walking with Kepler's daughter when Kepler approached them near the home of Lake's aunt. Kepler later claimed Lake was armed and that he was acting in self-defense, but police didn't find a weapon on Lake or at the scene.

While one jury found the 57-year-old former Tulsa police officer guilty of recklessly using a firearm, it was unable to agree on whether that crime led to the far more serious conviction of first-degree murder.

While Kepler is white, experts say the institutional deference shown to law officers isn't about an officer's race. For example, jurors in Milwaukee last month acquitted a black officer who fatally shot a black man who ran from a traffic stop holding a gun. The now former officer, Dominique Heaggan-Brown, shot Sylville Smith in the arm as he appeared to be throwing away his gun and again in the chest after he fell.

"Police officers are viewed in America as they can do no wrong, black or white," said Tulsa civil rights activist Marq Lewis, who described what he called a "cultural marketing" of the infallible, crime-busting police officer.

"They sacrifice their lives every day; when you keep hearing that over and over, that is always going to be in the back of your mind," Lewis said. "They're the first point of contact to deal with evil on the streets.

"This is an American perception problem," he said.

The inherent, powerful bias to back the badge is instilled at an early age and almost impossible to undo, experts say. Despite public outcry in recent years over police shootings throughout the U.S., few officers are prosecuted, and even fewer are convicted.

"A juror might say, 'I know that person shot that person, but I kind of like that person,'" said Lou Manza, a psychology professor at Lebanon Valley College in Annville, Pennsylvania. "It really has a lot to do with not just the nature of the crime, but what's going on in the heads of the jurors you pick."

Even with video — whether from a squad car, an officer's body camera or a bystander's cellphone — all the rules change once an officer is in the courtroom, said David N. Dorfman, a criminal law professor at Pace University and a former defense attorney in New York.

"This goes back to Rodney King," said Dorfman, referencing the video recorded by a bystander of the 1991 beating of taxi driver Rodney King by four Los Angeles police officers, who kicked and hit him dozens of times, even after he was on the ground. The four officers were acquitted in criminal court 1992.

"The officers testified they felt threatened in testimony, even though the video didn't show it, and that was enough to get an acquittal," Dorfman said.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "USCG Suspends Hudson River Anchorages Proposal "

06/30/2017

WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "USCG Suspends Hudson River Anchorages Proposal "

. . . John Cronin is senior fellow for environmental affairs at Pace University and former Hudson Riverkeeper.

“The fact remains that the Coast Guard can propose 47 anchorages on the Hudson without ever having to do an environmental impact statement and, in fact, they’re exempt from doing so,” says Cronin. “And the Pace Environmental Clinic believes that that loophole has to be closed, and we’ve proposed that to Congress.”

He says the regulatory change is needed to require the EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act.

“It’s the only smart thing to do right now. Promises from the Coast Guard don’t mean anything any longer,” Cronin says. “And we believe the proposal is going to come back at at least three-quarters the strength of the original.”

He believes the Coast Guard feels more responsible to the maritime industry than to the Hudson River.

Listen to the story.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Forbes: "Eric Trump Foundation Told Donors Money Went To Kids With Cancer, Then Gave To Different Causes"

06/29/2017

Forbes: "Eric Trump Foundation Told Donors Money Went To Kids With Cancer, Then Gave To Different Causes"

BRIARCLIFF MANOR, NY - SEPTEMBER 21: (L-R) Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump and Ivanka Trump attend the 9th Annual Eric Trump Foundation Golf Invitational Auction & Dinner at Trump National Golf Club Westchester on September 21, 2015 in Briarcliff Manor, New York. (Photo by Grant Lamos IV/Getty Images)

. . . “If you are raising money for X, and you give it to Y, that is fraud, even if Y is a charity,” says James Fishman, a former assistant attorney general for the state of New York who now teaches at Pace University’s law school. “If I’m writing a check for somebody, and you give it to somebody else, I mean that is fraudulent.”

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Good Call: "3 Factors Increase Chances of Being Successful in College"

06/28/2017

Good Call: "3 Factors Increase Chances of Being Successful in College"

. . . it’s never too early to start building your brand, according to Jennifer Magas, vice president of Magas Media Consultants, and an associate professor of public relations at Pace University. “College students – especially seniors need to start integrating themselves into that career before they’ve even graduated.”

She agrees that internships are invaluable to being successful. “Internship experience can help you get a foot into the door, and lead the way to creating and fleshing out a portfolio of real-life work product.” She also recommends that college students start building resumes and cover letters while still in school.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westchester County Business Journal: "Rent stabilization in Ossining? Village weighs options to solve housing issues"

06/26/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Rent stabilization in Ossining? Village weighs options to solve housing issues"

Ossining officials are weighing a number of options aimed at addressing an array of housing issues in the village.

Ossining Mayor Victoria Gearity said the village’s housing policy has been a top priority for the board of trustees this year, with concerns ranging from unaffordable home and rent prices to overcrowding and displacement.

“What we know is that the reaction to a rising cost of living is compelling many people to think that Ossining many not be a place where they can raise their children, where they can age in place,” land consultant Kevin Dwarka said during a June 14 village board work session.

The village earlier this year retained Kevin Dwarka Land Use and Economic Consulting, a New York City firm, to help address its housing issues. Since his hiring, Dwarka, a senior fellow at Pace law school’s Land Use Law Center in White Plains, has conducted several public meetings and engaged with many residents and village officials to better understand the community’s troubles.

Dwarka presented a dozen possible options to the village during his hour-and-a-half presentation. One option is rent stabilization.

Under the Emergency Tenant Protection Act of 1974 (ETPA), which applies to various municipalities in Nassau, Rockland and Westchester counties, the village could choose to opt-in to a rent stabilization policy for all buildings constructed before 1974 with six or more units. Aside from limitations on the amount of rent tenants would have to pay, rent stabilization would also entitle tenants to receive required services, to have their leases renewed and prevent them from being evicted except on grounds allowed by law.

Dwarka said the policy could potentially apply to 1,200 existing housing units.

“Rent stabilization allows households to continue to be part of a community, to not be displaced,” he said, adding that the policy would also protect them from an increasingly competitive housing market.

However, Dwarka noted that there are a variety of weaknesses to rent stabilization.

“There really isn’t a provision in that regulation that rent-stabilized units must go to households who are most in need,” he said.

Under the policy, tenants are also able to bestow their apartment to an immediate family member. “This creates a tricky situation,” Dwarka said. “It also creates a situation where the tenants of a rent-stabilized unit are inclined to stay put for a very long time, even if the unit no longer meets their needs, which in turn, critics will argue, has an adverse effect on the supply.”

Other considerations regarding rent stabilization include a potentially negative effect on the tax revenues the village collects from certain buildings, administrative costs to put the program in place and questions as to how the village would qualify to enact the Emergency Tenant Protection Act.

“Regardless of what decision this community goes down with respect to rent stabilization, a spectrum of different policy options have to be considered as part of the village’s pathway forward,” Dwarka said.

Another problem the village faces is high property taxes, an issue exacerbated by Ossining’s dependence on residential property taxes and its lack of a commercial property base to relieve the tax burden on homeowners.

“This situation of cost burden, while it’s one that is felt throughout the New York metro region, is certainly one that your community consistently and broadly voices as a key concern,” Dwarka said.

The consultant said the village could begin to create partnerships with larger companies and academic institutions to promote commercial development within its borders. This could also create job opportunities for residents, especially those with lower incomes.

Read more here.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Bloomberg Radio: "DeBlasio Reveals Plans to Shut Infamous Rikers Prison (Audio)"

06/26/2017

Bloomberg Radio: "DeBlasio Reveals Plans to Shut Infamous Rikers Prison (Audio)"

Jonathan Blanks, a researcher at the Cato Institute, and Michael Mushlin, a professor at Pace University Law School, discuss a new plan by New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio to shutter the controversial prison on Rikers Island. They speak with June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

Listen to the story.

Pages