main navigation
my pace

Westchester

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

International Business Times: "Pace is Ranked the Best Private University in the Nation for Upward Economic Mobility of Students"

11/01/2017

Pace is Ranked the Best Private University in the Nation for Upward Economic Mobility of Students (International Business Times)

Pace University was ranked number one among private, non-profit, four-year institutions nationwide in a list published last week by the Chronicle of Higher Education, “Colleges with the Highest Student-Mobility Rates, 2014.”

The list is based on data from the Equality of Opportunity Project’s study, “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility” (Chetty, Friedman, Saez, Turner, and Yagan, 2017). The study compared the median parent household income for students at colleges and universities across the country with the earnings these same students achieved after graduation.

“This list reaffirms Pace’s commitment to successful outcomes for our students and that education is the path forward,” said Pace’s President Marvin Krislov.

New York is a national leader in this arena. Six of the top 10 private four-year institutions for economic mobility are located in New York State, while seven CUNY campuses are ranked in the top 10 four-year public colleges.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, median annual earnings for Americans with less than a high school degree amounts to $25,636 while the unemployment rate for the same population is 8 percent, the highest of any of the educational categories. Workers with a high school diploma achieve a median income of $35,256 per year while experiencing an unemployment rate of 5.4 percent. Americans with a bachelor’s degree earn significantly higher with median annual income of $59,124 per year and face a much lower unemployment rate at 2.8 percent. Median annual earnings continue to rise with advanced and professional degrees. In 2012, New York residents with a bachelor's or post-graduate degree earned a median annual income of approximately $70,700, which ranks among the highest in the nation. (New York Building Congress, 2014).

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

SF Gate: "Governor Cuomo Signs Elephant Protection Act"

11/01/2017

Governor Cuomo Signs Elephant Protection Act (SF Gate)

Forcing elephants to perform in circuses and other entertainment venues has been relegated to a bygone era under legislation originated by students of Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Environmental Clinic and signed into law Thursday by New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo. 
  
The Elephant Protection Act, sponsored by state Senator Terrence Murphy and Assemblywoman Amy Paulin, makes New York State the first in the nation to implement an outright ban on the use of elephants in entertainment. Pace students first brought the idea for the bill to the legislature in 2016 and spent the next two legislative sessions lobbying for its passage. 
  
“It is time society put an end to this barbaric relic of another age,” said Michelle Land, clinical professor of environmental law and policy at Pace. “Wild elephant populations are in dire straits globally. By recognizing its duty to end entertainment acts that perpetuate misinformation and false values about the species, New York State is setting an example today that we believe other states will follow” 
  
The student clinicians, who actively lobbied in Albany and collected 1,100 student signatures in support of the bill, wrote to the governor, “The contention of circuses, trainers and managers that performing elephants are ‘educational’ is demonstrably false -- one has only to attend a performance to understand. Silly tricks such as headstands, balancing on stools, and parading in foolish costumes undermine a child’s appreciation and understanding of wildlife.”

The training of elephants to perform tricks for audiences has come under fire for years, even forcing some big name circuses out of business. New York State law now recognizes that ordinary animal welfare laws cannot protect elephants from an industry whose practices are inherently cruel. At present, as many as nine circuses bring elephants through New York State annually.  
  
“We are so pleased that this important legislation came out of the work of the students and faculty of the Pace Environmental Policy Clinic," said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “Dealing with real world issues and making a community impact is what a Pace education is all about.”  
  
Senator Terrence Murphy said, "Thanks to the advocacy of the students, staff and faculty of the Pace University Environmental Policy Clinic, New York State has now passed significant legislation that will protect elephants from cruel and inhumane treatment.  Once again, New York State is proving to be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves." 
  
“Elephants have been exploited and abused in entertainment acts for too long,” Paulin said. “Confinement, torture and unhealthy living conditions have led to early death for these intelligent, gentle animals. Today, New York has become the leader in ending this horrible practice. Elephants will no longer be subjected to cruel treatment for our amusement.” 
 

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

U.S. News & World Report:"Why Meal Timing Is Important for Better Diabetes Control"

10/31/2017

Why Meal Timing Is Important for Better Diabetes Control (U.S. News & World Report)

...On the other hand, eating breakfast can actually help you maintain or lose weight. The best practice is to eat within a maximum of 1.5 hours after you wake up and have a breakfast that combines at least two of the food groups. If you’re trying to lose weight, just trim your portion size, recommends Christen Cupples Cooper, assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University in Pleasantville, New York.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

News LI: "Energy Assistance Programs at Risk in DC Budget Battles"

10/31/2017

Energy Assistance Programs at Risk in DC Budget Battles (News LI)

With cold weather on the way, programs that help low-income New Yorkers keep warm are still in jeopardy in Washington.

The federal Department of Health and Human Services has begun distributing funds for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program for the 2018 fiscal year. But the Trump administration has said the program is no longer necessary and wants to eliminate it and other energy assistance programs from the budget.

According to Sheryl Musgrove, senior staff attorney with the Pace University Energy and Climate Center, LIHEAP is vital to the health and safety of the most vulnerable families.

“It served 1.2 million New York households in 2014,” Musgrave said. “And 94 percent of these households had either an elderly member, a disabled member or a young child.”

Funding for LIHEAP is included in the Continuing Resolution passed by the House and the Senate, which expires on December 8. That sets the framework for negotiating the final 2018 budget.

Also at risk is the Weatherization Assistance Program, which helps low-income families cut energy costs. Musgrove pointed out that in 2015 almost 13,000 low-income families in New York received more than $57 dollars through that program.

“Through weatherization improvements and home-efficiency upgrades, it’s estimated that the average household will save at least $283 per year on their energy bills,” she said.

Musgrove added that the efficiency upgrades also make homes healthier by removing asthma and allergy triggers, saving families money in avoided medical costs. And she noted that the energy-efficiency programs are cost effective, returning almost $4 for every $1 invested.

“They bring economic development to the state as well,” she said. “They bring jobs, they increase health and they bring money in, which provides a boost to our economy.”

In a single year, she said the Weatherization Assistance Program brought more than $192 million in economic benefits to New York.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Journal News: "Video: Pace University plants tree for new president"

10/31/2017

Video: Pace University plants tree for new president (The Journal News)

Pace University in Pleasantville held a tree planting ceremony Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017 to celebrate the inauguration of the college's new President Marvin Krislov.Pace University/Submitted

Watch the news clip.

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westchester Magazine: "Making College Dreams a Reality for First-Generation Latino Students"

10/31/2017

Making College Dreams a Reality for First-Generation Latino Students (Westchester Magazine)

...When it came to her own choice for college, Buontempo decided to stay close to her family in the Bronx. She attended Pace University in Pleasantville, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1984. After college, she was able to parlay her business background and bilingual skills into a career in Hispanic marketing. Working for Font & Vaamonde, a Hispanic subsidiary of Grey Advertising, Buontempo served as an account executive on such prestigious accounts as Procter & Gamble’s Downy fabric softener and Crisco Corn Oil.

In 1987, Buontempo (née Acevedo) married her high-school sweetheart, Anthony Buontempo. Also the first generation in his family to go to college, he’s now the chief operating officer for a Greenwich high-net-worth family, overseeing their finances and real estate portfolio. The couple had their first daughter, Cassandra, in 1993, followed by Alexa two years later.

Ever since her days at Pace, Buontempo’s hope was to come back and raise her family in Westchester. In 2001, they moved from New Jersey to Somers, and Buontempo found herself in a dreamlike situation, living with her husband and girls in a beautiful home with a pool. She soon began to feel guilty about how blessed she was and started to look for ways she could give back to the community.

“Shirley has always had a terrific heart, and that’s what attracted me to her ever since we were teenagers,” says Anthony. “She’s a beautiful person inside and out, and I’ve always admired her commitment  to giving back to the community. As the kids have grown up, we’ve discussed as a family how important it is to do something to help someone else, to give back to help your neighbor or friends or anyone who needs it.”

Buontempo and her daughters started volunteering at a food pantry operated by the Katonah-based Community Center of Northern Westchester, which provides meals, clothing, and other support services to families and individuals in need. More than 75 percent of the center’s clients are Hispanic, so when they found out about Buontempo’s many skills — including the fact that she was bilingual — they asked her to come onboard. For the next four years, she served as their assistant director and focused on client intake.

“That was my first job in the nonprofit world, and it touched my heart and soul in ways I never imagined,” says Buontempo. “I felt that this is what I really want to do: I want to help families in our community have better lives.”

As she continued her new career path at organizations that gave back to the community, Buontempo strengthened her devotion to working for social good and became enthralled with the business of the nonprofit industry. Deciding to pursue a master’s degree in nonprofit management, she enrolled in Pace University’s public-administration program in 2009.

 

Read the full article.

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Forbes: "This Halloween Buzzkill Could Shrink Your Waistline And Fatten Your Wallet"

10/31/2017

This Halloween Buzzkill Could Shrink Your Waistline And Fatten Your Wallet (Forbes)

Tonight is the night, Hallow's eve. Time to don your favorite super hero cape and hit the 'hood with your young ones hoping to snag a pillow case full of treats. The best part...coming home and spreading your scores across the kitchen table and "sneaking" your favorite candies before your child notices it's gone.

Before you dig in to your kids Halloween booty think about that sweet treat and how your psychological sugar addiction is affecting your financial well-being.

Americans spend between $2 and $3 billion on Halloween candy and sweets, says Dr. Christen Cupples Cooper, assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University. "There is evidence that having 'just one' is nearly impossible."

Research points to the fact that these foods are engineered to make it difficult to stop eating them once you have started.  It is also a fact that today’s highly available and quite affordable processed foods, both sweet and salty, are engineered to provide the ideal taste experience. Everything from the texture to the color and “mouthfeel”— the way foods feel in the mouth — is evaluated. Manufacturers then tweak foods to have the perfect flavor, texture, crispiness, softness and moisture.  Today’s food system has allowed us access to much more food and much more flavorful food than our bodies actually need, said Cooper.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

News12: "New Pace University President"

10/31/2017

New Pace University President (News12)

The installation ceremony was held for Marvin Krislov. Krislov served as Oberlin College's President for a decade and graduated from Yale. He is the universities 8th President.

Watch the news clip.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Journal News: "Video: Pace University president inaugurated"

10/31/2017

Video: Pace University president inaugurated (The Journal News)

Despite heavy rain, hundreds came out to Pace University in Pleasantville today, Oct. 29, 2017, to witness the inauguration of the college’s new President, Marvin Krislov. Krislov became Pace’s eighth president. Pace University/Submitted

Watch the video.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Tap Into: "Somers Woman Helps Guide Hispanics Through College Admissions Process"

10/24/2017

Somers Woman Helps Guide Hispanics Through College Admissions Process (Tap Into)

SOMERS, N.Y.--The Hispanic population has fewer students graduating from college than any other ethnic group in the county and one Somers resident is trying to change that.

Shirley Acevedo Buontempo, 54, is the founder and executive director of Latino U College Access, a nonprofit that helps Hispanic students get into college and supports them until they get their degree. 

Acevedo Buontempo, who left a decade-long marketing career to work with local nonprofits in Westchester for 10 years, said she was inspired to launch Latino U in 2012 while she was helping her own daughters—now 24 and 21—through the admissions process for college.

“I became very aware of how complex, competitive and expensive the process was,” Acevedo Buontempo said. “I was going to graduate school for my master’s at Pace University and was doing research on educational equity and recognized that the Hispanic community had the lowest admission rates to college of all ethnic groups.”

According to the Pew Research Center, until 2013, Hispanics were the least enrolled ethnicity in college. 
The same study showed that Hispanics are less likely to graduate with a four-year degree than other groups. In 2014, 15 percent of Hispanics ages 25 to 29 had a bachelor’s degree or higher. It was the lowest percentage among the same age group of other ethnicities.

“That gap in education and the complexity of the process was really what inspired me to say that something needed to be done. There were a lot of great kids going to local high schools in Westchester that can go to college but are not achieving their goals because of the complexity and the barriers they face in admissions and financial aid.”

Read the full article.

 

Pages