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CRM Buyer: "Marketers Poised to Run the Customer Experience Show, Survey Says"

04/14/2016

CRM Buyer: "Marketers Poised to Run the Customer Experience Show, Survey Says"

. . . "Just because a consumer's refrigerator or dishwasher is connected to the Internet does not mean the consumer has a relationship with the brand that produces the appliance," observed Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

"Most consumers will ignore much of the connectivity until real benefits are delivered to them via the Internet and the things concerned," he told CRM Buyer.

Read more: http://www.crmbuyer.com/story/83356.html

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Inc.: " What You Can Learn From Olive Garden's Breadstick Battle"

04/14/2016

Inc.: " What You Can Learn From Olive Garden's Breadstick Battle"

. . . "When you talk about a company or an industry with very thin margins, tiny changes can have an enormous impact," says Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical professor of management at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.inc.com/jeremy-quittner/olive-garden-battle-over-breadsticks-...

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New York Times: "Unlocking the Truth About the Clinton Crime Bill"

04/12/2016

New York Times: "Unlocking the Truth About the Clinton Crime Bill"

AT a campaign event in Philadelphia last week, former President Bill Clinton was interrupted by protesters incensed about his 1994 crime bill, writes David Yassky, the dean of Pace University School of Law. Mr. Clinton did not hold back: “Because of that bill we had a 25-year low in crime, a 33-year low in the murder rate, and because of that and the background-check law, we had a 46-year low in deaths of people by gun violence,” he said.

It is undeniable that two decades of mass incarceration have inflicted grievous harm on African-American men and their families. And yet Mr. Clinton was right to defend his policies (and, by extension, Hillary Clinton’s support for those policies at the time).

As counsel to the House Subcommittee on Crime led by Charles E. Schumer, then a representative, I spent 18 months helping to draft and negotiate the 1994 crime bill. Anyone who thinks the bill was just about locking people up is simply wrong.

If the battle over the 1994 bill was just campaign noise, we could shrug it off, but what’s really at stake is the future of crime policy. If we are going to move forward thoughtfully — keeping our neighborhoods safe without consigning huge segments of the population to life behind bars — we must understand how we got here.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/10/opinion/campaign-stops/unlocking-the-t...

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PIX11: "U.S. Marine Veteran given chance to pursue academic dreams, continues to give back around the world"

04/11/2016

PIX11: "U.S. Marine Veteran given chance to pursue academic dreams, continues to give back around the world"

Watch the video: http://pix11.com/2016/04/06/u-s-marine-veteran-given-chance-to-pursue-academic-dreams-continues-to-give-back-around-the-world/

Life changing is how Matt Mainzer, a U.S. Marine, describes his five years serving our country.

“I did mature a lot, I've come a long way," Mainzer said. "Most importantly, I met a lot of people I never would have met, and I went to places like Afghanistan. It really changed me, being exposed to abject poverty like that,” said the 27-year old who grew up on Long Island.

He was deployed twice to Afghanistan. His mission was to gather intelligence, and brief infantry and reconnaissance units. After saying goodbye to Camp Pendleton in California, Mainzer embarked on a month-long road trip, before returning home for good in the fall of 2013.

“It was freeing, liberating and it was exciting to think of all the possibilities,” he remembered. “ I was excited about the opportunities, like going to school.

Mainzer chose veteran-friendly Pace University as the place that would put him on the right path to reaching his goals.  He’s considering going to graduate school to study international relations, with hopes of one day working for the State Department.

"Here at PACE we're invested in that not only Veterans transition from combat to classroom seamlessly but equally as important that they transition from the classroom to their respective meaningful careers, " Rob Rahni, Assistant Director of Veteran Affairs at Pace University, explained.

The second semester junior has full coverage under the post-9/11 GI bill.  It includes Pace’s unlimited Yellow Ribbon Program which pays his entire tuition and fees.  And he’s taking full advantage of this opportunity, by pursuing a BA in Economics and Political Science.

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Law360: "Earnings-Stripping Regs Test Limits Of Treasury's Authority"

04/11/2016

Law360: "Earnings-Stripping Regs Test Limits Of Treasury's Authority"

. . . “I expect somebody will challenge it,” said Philip G. Cohen, a professor in the legal studies and taxation department of Pace University's Lubin School of Business.

Read more: http://www.law360.com/articles/782256/earnings-stripping-regs-test-limits-of-treasury-s-authority

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CFO Magazine: "Rethinking Disclosure"

04/11/2016

CFO Magazine: "Rethinking Disclosure"

. . . Top executives are just as frustrated as investors with the opacity of their reports. Leslie Seidman, a former chairman of FASB, moderated a panel during a forum on disclosure effectiveness last fall. “Many companies said that their own senior executives had got to the point where they didn’t understand what the key messages were in their own financial statements,” says Seidman, now executive director of the Center for Excellence in Financial Reporting at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

Read more: http://ww2.cfo.com/disclosure/2016/04/rethinking-disclosure/

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Financial Times: "Ted Cruz starts to broaden his appeal"

04/11/2016

Financial Times: "Ted Cruz starts to broaden his appeal"

Photo © Bloomberg

. . . "Cruz captured just about every demographic group including those rural and small town, males and all age groups which were part of Trump's base support," said David Caputo, a politics professor at Pace University. "Now if Wisconsin voters are the canary in the coal mine, the Trump candidacy is in serious difficulty."

Read more: https://next.ft.com/content/1e91b2ea-fc15-11e5-a31a-7930bacb3f5f

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Public Radio International: "How the threat of nuclear winter changed the Cold War"

04/05/2016

Public Radio International: "How the threat of nuclear winter changed the Cold War"

Photo Credit: Aaron Roe Fulkerson/Wikimedia Commons

It’s hard to imagine life after a nuclear holocaust. Fires from nuclear blasts would create enough clouds to cover the Earth, something that would block out the sun and push the planet into a deep freeze.   

As the United States and the Soviet Union amassed terrifying collections of nuclear weapons during the height of the Cold War, Carl Sagan tried to warn the world about the dangers of a “nuclear winter.”

“Beneath the clouds, virtually all domesticated and wild sources of food would be destroyed,” Sagan says. “Most of the human survivors would starve to death. The extinction of the human species would be a real possibility.”

A new piece from The New York Times and the Retro Report documentary team shows how Sagan’s theory reverberated across the scientific community, and infiltrated the minds of policymakers.

“It was pretty stark stuff, and it came at point when people were seriously worried,” says Andy Revkin, a writer for The New York Times’ Dot Earth blog and a professor at Pace University. “At that time, there was a lot of tension, and a lot of possible adverse outcomes.”

In many ways, the nuclear winter theory was a game changer — Revkin says the scientific community had never before tried to quantify or calculate the destruction that would come from all out nuclear war.

Read more: http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-04-05/how-threat-nuclear-winter-changed-cold-war

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InsideClimate News: "Another $1.2 Billion Substation? No Thanks, Says Utility, We'll Find a Better Way"

04/04/2016

InsideClimate News: "Another $1.2 Billion Substation? No Thanks, Says Utility, We'll Find a Better Way"

Photo: Technicians with Con Edison work on restoring power in the Queens borough of New York City. Amid a looming power crisis in parts of Queens and Brooklyn, and climate change concerns, utility ConEd has launched a new project to meet electricity demand through distributed clean energy generation and other non-traditional measures by 2018. Credit: Chris Hondros/Getty Images

. . . Relying on existing programs initially is a good move since they've already been approved by regulators, said Karl Rabago, executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School in New York. Rabago has an extensive background as an energy executive and regulator in Texas and at the U.S. Department of Energy.

"I'm hoping this will lead to a lesson—that, okay, we can't just turn up the volume on the old stuff," Rabago said. To succeed, he said, Con Ed will need a more holistic approach. "My overall assessment is, good start, good way to think about it, they seem to be speaking the right stuff," Rabago said. "I want to see this graduate to real and not just opportunistic."

Read more: http://insideclimatenews.org/news/04042016/coned-brooklyn-queens-energy-...

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Monster: "How to Recruit Nurses in 2016: Eight Strategies to Fill the Pipeline"

04/01/2016

Monster: "How to Recruit Nurses in 2016: Eight Strategies to Fill the Pipeline"

Think like a Millennial about professional development. Younger workers especially are always looking for readily available resources to advance their careers -- through mentoring and further education, for example. Many are thinking about masters studies, especially second-career candidates, says Harriet Feldman, Ph.D., RN, dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing  at Pace University. So even if it seems premature, pitch your career resources starting with the first candidate contact.

Help nursing schools accommodate your future hires. Nursing schools turned away nearly 70,000 qualified applicants in 2014 due to insufficient faculty, classrooms, clinical programs and money, according to a fact sheet released by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Providers that partner with nursing schools to help ease critical bottlenecks in nursing education can also help themselves stoke their nurse-recruitment pipeline. 

"Our very big challenge is clinical placements," says Feldman. "And finding people who are doctorate-prepared for tenure-track faculty positions is the difficulty," says Feldman. "We’re using masters-prepared nurses to fill in temporarily."

It's never too soon to start thinking about retaining new nurses. What keeps nurses from job hopping? Real power to affect how patients are cared for, and how provider organizations are run. 

Read more:http://hiring.monster.com/hr/hr-best-practices/recruiting-hiring-advice/...

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