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The Real News Network: "Clinton and Trump Promote Fossil Fuels During Second Presidential Debate"

10/14/2016

The Real News Network: "Clinton and Trump Promote Fossil Fuels During Second Presidential Debate"

KIM BROWN, TRNN: Welcome to the Real News Network. I’m Kim Brown in Baltimore.
Climate change was only mentioned once during the second presidential debate of the 2016 race held Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. This comes only days after the United Nations announced that the Paris Climate Agreement has been ratified and will go into effect in November.

Joining us to talk about the lack of climate discussion debates, from New York City, Chris Williams is joining us. He is a long time environmental activist. He’s also professor of physics and chemistry at Pace University. He’s also the chair of the science department at the Packer Collegiate Institute. He’s the author of the book titled Ecology and Socialism: Solutions to Capitalist Ecological Crisis.

Read more: http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=17400#newsletter1

 

 

 

 

 

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Forbes: "Wanted: More College Classes To Launch An Encore Career"

10/12/2016

Forbes: "Wanted: More College Classes To Launch An Encore Career"

. . . “Many of our alumni are in wonderful new jobs or projects,” said Joan Tucker, director of Pace University’s Encore Transition Program. “One is now director of Encore.org’s Encore Fellowships in the Northeast.”

The ideal time to take an encore career course (if you can find one), said Tucker, “is while you’re still working and begin to see down the tunnel that you’re not going to want to do this forever or that your company is not going to want you there forever.”

Expanding the Encore Program

Tucker said she’d love to take her program into companies and introduce the encore career concept to their employees. “This should be a benefit to employees around the country. There are 78 million boomers and many can’t afford to retire,” said Tucker.

Some firms told Tucker they’re “already doing this” with outplacement for downsized employees. “But that’s not the same thing as what we’re doing,” she said. “It’s like taking a shoemaker and trying to help him find another job making shoes. We’re trying to give people a new perspective on the second half of life.”

Aside from exposing more midlifers to the notion of encore careers, taking the program to corporations would also broaden the business model for Pace. But, Tucker, concedes, “It’s a hard sell. There’s nothing in it for companies other than goodwill.”

She’d also like the Pace program to be a role model for other colleges. “Every college and university could have something like this,” said Tucker. “We’d be happy to design programs. The potential for this is enormous.”

The next Pace University Encore Transition Program (featuring an overview of the nonprofit sector, networking with nonprofit pros and career coach, resume and social media tutorials, a preview of nonprofit job opportunities and a strategy for identifying and achieving goals) runs Nov. 14 to Nov. 17; cost: $795, with a $50 discount until Nov. 1.

Read the full article here.

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Journal News: "Hillary won debate, but Trump improved"

10/11/2016

Journal News: "Hillary won debate, but Trump improved"

. . . Strongest moment for Clinton was questioning Trump’s temperament after his weak response to videotape. Trump scored on Clinton email scandal, but failed on resolving the misogynist comments and threatening Clinton with jail. The pacing and stalking on stage — “a form of bullying?”

Trump appealed to his base and little else. Clinton attempted to talk positively, but failed to offer broad, positive plan.

DAVID A. CAPUTO (president emeritus and professor of political science at Pace University.)

Read the full article here.

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Daily Voice: "Pace's New Student Residence Completes Phase One Of $100M Initiative"

10/07/2016

Daily Voice: "Pace's New Student Residence Completes Phase One Of $100M Initiative"

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. -- Pace University marked another milestone as it held a ribbon cutting for its Elm Hall residence Thursday to complete Phase 1 of its $100 million transformation.

The 96,000 square-foot residence for upperclass students is the final piece of a $100 million initiative, combining the Briarcliff and Pleasantville campuses.

The $23 million, 272-bed residence hall features a combination of semi-suites and full suites, 24-hour security, multiple study lounges, classroom space and the University’s IT Data Center.

“This is much more than the opening of a new residence hall," said President Stephen Friedman during the ceremony. “This is the realization of many years of hard work and planning to ensure that our students have facilities that are as outstanding as the quality of the education they receive here at Pace. We could not be more pleased with the final results and the transformation of this beautiful suburban campus.’’

Read more: http://pleasantville.dailyvoice.com/schools/paces-new-student-residence-completes-phase-one-of-100m-initiative/684657/
 

 

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Journal News: "Pace dedicates new dormitory, part of $100M transformation"

10/07/2016

Journal News: "Pace dedicates new dormitory, part of $100M transformation"

Attendees listen to speakers during a ceremony marking the official opening of Elm Hall, a new student dormitory at the Pace University's Pleasantville campus Oct. 6, 2016. The opening of Elm Hall marks the completion of the first phase in the university's master site plan. (Photo: Seth Harrison/The Journal News)

PLEASANTVILLE - Pace University on Thursday dedicated a new 96,000 square-foot residence hall as it caps off a three-year, $100 million transformation aimed at making the commuter-friendly school more appealing to boarding students.

University President Stephen Friedman helped dedicate Elm Hall, a 272-bed dormitory home mostly to juniors and seniors.

"The story of Elm Hall began with a commitment to create a new and modern campus on this wonderful site focused around a strong, integrated student life in a living and learning community ..." Friedman told an assembled crowd of more than 100 people.

"We turn the page and we experience the real thrill and excitement of walking on what is essentially a brand-new campus."

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/news/education/2016/10/06/pace-dormitory-transformation/91669014/

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Politico: "TWO SIDES TO THE ‘MORAL IMPERATIVE’ ARGUMENT"

10/06/2016

Politico: "Two Sides To The 'Moral Impreative' Argument"

Members of the American Farm Bureau Federation feel it’s their responsibility to help provide food for a growing population, and a report published Wednesday by the Environmental Working Group insinuates that U.S. farmers and ranchers, by not exclusively exporting goods to the least developed countries, shouldn’t be looked at as having a major role in combating hunger, says Bob Young, chief economist at the Farm Bureau.

Young’s statement was in response to an analysis the EWG conducted of U.S. agricultural exports, which made the case that agribusiness uses the oft-cited statistic that world food production must double in order to feed 9 billion people by 2050, to “defend the status-quo farm policy and deflect attention from the destruction that ‘modern’ agriculture is inflicting on the environment and human health.” The group found that over the last decade, 86 percent ($114 billion) of all U.S. agricultural exports went to 20 countries — most of which are developed — in the form of commodities like corn, soybeans, wheat and meat products.

Young explained that food is a “fungible thing,” and that providing supplies to another country, regardless of its income levels and development, frees up other goods to go elsewhere. China, for example, will continue to demand soybeans, even if the U.S. doesn’t supply them. U.S. farmers also have made “considerable strides” over the last few decades toward more environmentally friendly production systems, such as no-till that reduces soil erosion. “Yes, we stand accused of viewing feeding the world as a moral imperative. That’s an accusation to which we will plead guilty with great pride,” Young said.

A different view comes from Margot Pollans, an assistant professor of law at Pace University and faculty director of the Pace-Natural Resources Defense Council Food Law Initiative. She says that dismantling the moral imperative narrative is essential to an honest and productive dialogue on both agriculture’s environmental footprint and the causes of hunger and malnutrition.

“To find evidence that creating environmental sacrifice zones in the name of plentiful and cheap food cannot solve our global hunger problem, we need look no further than here in the United States, where we grow far more food than we need and yet still have nearly fifty million people who are food insecure,” Pollans said. She added that the environmental impact of farming, including greenhouse gas emissions, may threaten future productivity, and that overproduction in developed countries like the U.S. can depress global food prices and income for the world’s hungry people — many of whom depend on agriculture for their livelihood.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/tipsheets/morning-agriculture/2016/10/flotus-digs-in-on-future-of-white-house-garden-lets-move-216714#ixzz4ML4PitWJ

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New York Times: "A Farming Revolution, Minus Factories"

10/03/2016

New York Times: "A Farming Revolution, Minus Factories"

. . . Agriculture contributes about 9 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States; it remains the leading source of river and stream contamination, writes MARGOT J. POLLANS, assistant professor and faculty director of the Food Law Initiative at Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law, in a letter to the editor of the New York Times.

Fertilizer runoff throughout the Midwest produces a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico as big as Connecticut, and millions of Americans drink water and breathe air laden with poisonous agricultural chemicals.

We need our large farms, and we should celebrate many of the innovations of contemporary farming. But the farmers responsible for these vast environmental harms should not get a pass.

It is time to modernize federal law both to eliminate the many perverse incentives that encourage harmful farming techniques and to provide farmers the support they need to improve their practices.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/03/opinion/a-farming-revolution-minus-factories.html

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Westchester County Business Journal: "WCA to recognize five Women in Tech award winners"

10/03/2016

Westchester County Business Journal: "WCA to recognize five Women in Tech award winners"

Five accomplished women from STEM fields will be recognized by the Westchester County Association on Oct. 20 as part of its third annual “Women in Tech” awards.

The WCA launched the awards in 2014 to recognize women for accomplishments while working in STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

This year’s winners will be recognized at an 11 a.m. reception at the Tappan Hill Mansion in Tarrytown.

The 2016 honorees are:

• Jean F. Coppola: Award-winning educator, author and professor of gerontechnology at Pace University. Coppola has won multiple national awards for her work researching the effects of technology on older adult life quality, attitudes toward aging and cognitive functioning.

Karen D’Ambrosio: Senior director of clinical systems for Montefiore Information Technology, a subsidiary of Montefiore Health System. During a 10-year career with Montefiore, D’Ambrosio has led a team of more than 200 information technology professionals to design and maintain the health system’s IT systems. She has worked in the information technology field for more than 30 years.

Theodora Diamantis: Building project director for Skanska USA. An engineer and architect, Diamantis has led multiple high-profile, multimillion-dollar projects in health care, higher education, retail, commercial and research laboratories. Most recently, she was part of the leadership team that completed the $600 million City University of New York Advanced Science Research Center.

Rebecca Jones: Assistant professor in the psychiatry department at NewYork- Presbyterian Hospital Center for Autism and the Developing Brain. Jones studies the development of the social brain and how and why it differs with autism spectrum disorders. She uses a variety of technologies in her research, including wearable devices, eye tracking and functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine variations in social behavior in children, adolescents and adults.

Rong Xu: Principal research scientist at Profectus BioScience Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine development company in Tarrytown. Xu leads the immunology team in performing preclinical and clinical studies. She previously worked as the senior research scientist at Pfizer Vaccine Research and as a research associate at the Seattle Biomedical Research Institute.

The luncheon will also recognize two students for achievements and passion in STEM fields: Lucie LeBlanc, a senior at Mamaroneck High School, where she created her school’s Code Club in partnership with The Flatiron School, and Esmeralda A. Michaca, a mathematics and computer science major at Purchase College.

Tickets are $125 for WCA members and $150 for non-members. To purchase tickets, visit www.westchester.org.

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Journal News: "The grades are in and Hillary won debate, experts say"

09/27/2016

Journal News: "The grades are in and Hillary won debate, experts say"

. . . Here’s what the judges said:

DAVID A. CAPUTO: (president emeritus and professor of political science at Pace University)

Clinton: Grade A

Trump: Grade D

Summary: Trump started well on trade but fell apart on birther and tax issues. Lacked foreign policy knowledge; poor on specifics; visually “impatient and disrespectful.” Interrupted too much.

Clinton was clear winner. Scored on defending her stamina and overall was well prepared. Worst moment was on the Trans Pacific Partnership, which she was for until she was against it. “Now the question is whether it will have major impact with the voters.”

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/opinion/columnists/phil-reisman/2016/09/27/reisman-grades-clinton-trump/91174094/

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Associated Press: "The tale of the tape: when should police videos be released?"

09/23/2016

Associated Press: "The tale of the tape: when should police videos be released?"

Photo: A protester walks in front of a line of police officers blocking the access road to I-277 on the third night of protests in Charlotte, N.C. Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, following Tuesday’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. (Chuck Burton/Associated Press)

Two police shootings, both recorded by police. In one city, the police recordings were released almost immediately and protests remained calm. In the other, the chief has so far refused to provide the videos to the public and violent protests have wrought destruction in the heart of the city. Two different outcomes that raise some key questions: How soon are police obligated to release the recordings and why might they keep a lid on it?

In this era of a 24/7 cycle of citizen journalists and live video feeds, civil rights activists are saying the refusal to release video almost immediately underscores the fractured relationship between police and the community they serve.

“There’s a knee jerk reaction on the part of police departments. We used to call it the blue wall of silence,” said Randolph M. McLaughlin, a civil rights attorney and professor at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University. “Now it’s just a blue wall.”

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/the-tale-of-the-tape-when-should-police-videos-be-released/2016/09/23/4023052c-815c-11e6-9578-558cc125c7ba_story.html

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