main navigation
my pace

Westchester

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Patch: "Pace University Names New Provost"

02/05/2018

Pace University President Marvin Krislov has announced that Vanya Quiñones will assume the role of Provost of Pace, effective July 1, 2018 in the Pleasantville Patch

Pace University President Marvin Krislov has announced that Vanya Quiñones, Ph.D., a neurobiologist and biopsychologist who serves as Associate Provost for Student Success and Retention at CUNY's Hunter College, will assume the role of Provost of Pace, effective July 1, 2018.

Quiñones brings to Pace decades of experience in scientific research, academic administration, program- and research-focused fundraising, and a long record of working to improve diversity in science and the arts.

As a young researcher at The Rockefeller University, Quiñones realized that she saw few who looked like her. This led to her career-long focus on creating opportunities for underrepresented students across scientific disciplines and within the arts. Quiñones holds a bachelor's degree in biology and master's in cell biology from the University of Puerto Rico and a doctorate in neurobiology and physiology from Rutgers University.

"We were looking for a creative and inspiring provost," said Krislov. "We found one in Dr. Quiñones. She has a compelling vision for our academic program, and she shares our commitment to diversity and inclusion. She's an impressive academic, an inspirational leader and a champion of student success. Most important, she is a tireless advocate for the transformative impact of an education."

"Pace University routinely demonstrates how higher education can change lives," said Quiñones. "I have dedicated my career to improving minority representation in STEM and the arts, and Pace is the perfect place for me to build on that work. I'm honored to have been selected as provost and will work tirelessly to help faculty and students maximize their potential."

"Pace University routinely demonstrates how higher education can change lives," said Quiñones. "I have dedicated my career to improving minority representation in STEM and the arts, and Pace is the perfect place for me to build on that work. I'm honored to have been selected as provost and will work tirelessly to help faculty and students maximize their potential."

Quiñones will succeed Interim Provost Nira Herrmann, Ph.D., who will reassume her role as dean of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace. Herrmann has served as interim provost since July 2017, and will continue in that role for the remainder of this academic year. "Dr. Herrmann's stewardship has been instrumental in advancing Pace's vast academic endeavors during a year of considerable transition and the entire Pace Community is grateful for her service," Krislov said.

This appointment follows an exhaustive national search that included exceptional candidates from across the country.

Read the full article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Law & Crime: "Why Do Police Defendants Want to be Tried by Judges, and Not By Juries?"

02/05/2018

Law School Professor Bennett Gershman's opinion piece on "Why Do Police Defendants Want to be Tried by Judges, and Not By Juries?" in Law & Crime

The U.S. Constitution guarantees a person charged with a crime the right to be tried by a jury. But does a criminal defendant have a right to waive a jury trial and be tried by a judge instead of a jury? It depends.  In a federal courtroom the answer is no, unless the prosecutor consents, and federal prosecutors rarely consent.  But in many state courtrooms,  including New York, the answer is yes, even if the prosecutor objects. And interestingly, in many recent  high-profile criminal cases, especially cases in which police officers were charged with homicide for fatally shooting a civilian, the defendant-officers opted for a “bench trial” rather than a jury trial, and in every case were found by the judge not guilty.

This week, in Bronx, New York, the trial of a police sergeant has commenced in which he is charged with murdering a 66-year-old schizophrenic black woman. The officer, Hugh Barry, has opted for a judge-trial instead of a jury trial. Sergeant Barry, who is white, claims that the victim, Deborah Danner, wielded a baseball bat when he shot her, twice, allegedly in self-defense.  The facts are complicated, and the emotions surrounding the case are intense. The case has attracted considerable media attention, numerous street protests, and public statements by New York’s mayor Bill DiBlasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neillcondemning the shooting.  

The decision by Sergeant Barry to waive a jury is not unusual.  Indeed,  in several other recent police shootings,  the police officer-defendants opted for a trial before a judge instead of a jury, and always won.  In Baltimore, Maryland, in the high-profile case involving the 2015 death of Freddie Gray,  three officers charged in connection with his death bypassed a jury for a judge-trial, and all were acquitted. In Cleveland, Ohio, police officer Michel Brelo, charged with manslaughter in the 2012 deadly chase and fatal shootings of Melissa Williams and Timothy Russell, was tried before a judge and acquitted.  In St. Louis, Missouri,  police officer Jason Stockley, charged with the 2011 murder in the shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith, waived a jury trial and was acquitted by the judge. In Queens, New York, three officers charged in 2008 with fatal shooting of Sean Bell outside a strip club were acquitted by a judge.  Indeed, I have found no recent case in which a police officer charged with the unlawful death of a civilian and tried by a judge has been found guilty.

Even though a jury is supposed to be the conscience of the community and one of the greatest bulwarks against government oppression, defense lawyers occasionally decide to waive a jury trial and place their client’s life and liberty in the hands of a judge. The reasons they make this choice are not that hard to surmise.  One of the principal impetuses to waiving a jury is the fear that a jury might be less likely to evaluate the facts dispassionately and might be more prone to bring into their judgment undue emotion.  Thus, in many urban settings where police conduct is increasingly being criticized, especially in racially-charged confrontations with civilians, a police officer’s decision to bypass a jury in favor of a judge might seem like a prudent decision. For example,  given the widely-held perception of Bronx County as harboring a significant anti-police bias, as well as the undoubted sympathy that jurors would feel for Ms. Danner’s mental and emotional condition, Sergeant Barry’s decision to waive a jury does not seem unreasonable.

By the same token, in a jurisdiction in which strong anti-immigrant feelings predominate, a decision by an immigrant-defendant to bypass a jury for a judge-trial is also understandable.  So too would be a decision in a case involving a vile and despicable type of crime, such as a sexual assault of a child. Reinforcing the decision to forego a jury would be  an assessment by a defendant that the case involves difficult legal issues that a judge would be better able to analyze more carefully than a jury, and particularly a case where witness-credibility might not that critical a factor. Also, a judge’s background might be a relevant consideration in the decision. Indeed, a judge learned in the law might be seen as preferable to a jury, especially if there are complex legal issues. Moreover, the fact that several of the judges in the above police trials were former prosecutors could also factor into the decision.  It would not be unreasonable for a defense lawyer to believe that the judge based on his prosecutorial experience might have a pro-police bias, or at least be in a position to more intelligently understand the circumstances facing the officer when he concluded that lethal force was necessary.    

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

RNN: "Pace Law School professor Mimi Rocah speaks with Richard French about the impending release of the Nunes memo"

02/05/2018

Pace Law School professor Mimi Rocah speaks with Richard French on RNN about the impending release of the Nunes memo

Richard French speaks with former federal prosecutor and Pace Law School professor Mimi Rocah about the impending release of the Nunes memo.

Watch the video.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace University President Marvin Krislov Names Neurobiologist Vanya Quiñones as New Provost

02/05/2018

Press Release: Pace University President Marvin Krislov Names Neurobiologist Vanya Quiñones as New Provost

Champion of diversity in science and arts joins Pace from CUNY’s Hunter College

NEW YORK AND WESTCHESTER, NY, FEBRUARY 5—Pace University President Marvin Krislov has announced that Vanya Quiñones, Ph.D., a neurobiologist and biopsychologist who serves as Associate Provost for Student Success and Retention at CUNY’s Hunter College, will assume the role of Provost of Pace, effective July 1, 2018.

Quiñones brings to Pace decades of experience in scientific research, academic administration, program- and research-focused fundraising, and a long record of working to improve diversity in science and the arts.

As a young researcher at The Rockefeller University, Quiñones realized that she saw few who looked like her. This led to her career-long focus on creating opportunities for underrepresented students across scientific disciplines and within the arts. Quiñones holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and master’s in cell biology from the University of Puerto Rico and a doctorate in neurobiology and physiology from Rutgers University.

“We were looking for a creative and inspiring provost,” said Krislov. “We found one in Dr. Quiñones. She has a compelling vision for our academic program, and she shares our commitment to diversity and inclusion. She’s an impressive academic, an inspirational leader and a champion of student success. Most important, she is a tireless advocate for the transformative impact of an education.”

“Pace University routinely demonstrates how higher education can change lives,” said Quiñones. “I have dedicated my career to improving minority representation in STEM and the arts, and Pace is the perfect place for me to build on that work. I’m honored to have been selected as provost and will work tirelessly to help faculty and students maximize their potential.”

Pace Board of Trustees Chairman Mark Besca added, “There has never been a more exciting time at Pace University. As the nation’s number one four-year private university for driving social mobility, we are creating life-changing opportunities for our students. I’m confident that with Dr. Quiñones serving as our new provost, Pace will build on its strong foundation of academic excellence and student achievement.”

Quiñones will succeed Interim Provost Nira Herrmann, Ph.D., who will reassume her role as dean of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace. Herrmann has served as interim provost since July 2017, and will continue in that role for the remainder of this academic year. “Dr. Herrmann’s stewardship has been instrumental in advancing Pace’s vast academic endeavors during a year of considerable transition and the entire Pace Community is grateful for her service,” Krislov said.

This appointment follows an exhaustive national search that included exceptional candidates from across the country.

Photo of Quiñones available here.

Background on Quiñones: Quiñones joined Hunter College in 1997 as an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology. As a tenured professor, she went on to lead its biopsychology and neuroscience doctoral graduate sub-program before assuming the role of department chair. During her 20 years at Hunter she has held numerous positions culminating in her current role as associate provost for student success and retention. A few highlights from her distinguished career include:

• Published more than 70 peer-reviewed articles and given over 200 presentations, monographs or invited papers.
• Brought more than $25 million in funding for Hunter from the NIH, private foundations, the Department of Education, among others grants. Many of the grants were to support underrepresented minorities, including the NIH’s Career Opportunities in Research and Enhancing Neuroscience Diversity through Undergraduate Education Experiences (ENDURE) programs.
• Supported cross-departmental infrastructure projects at Hunter, including renovating the Baker Theater Building and Library Learning Centers, developing a STEM flex laboratory, and design/renovation of the Online Technology Center.
• Increased department funding by $3.4 million during her six years as chair of Psychology (Hunter’s largest and highest extramurally funded department).

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its College of Health Professions, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

###

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The New York Times: "Online Learning Successes"

02/02/2018

Online Learning Successes (The New York Times)

President Krislov published a letter in "The New York Times" about the value of online education, particularly for returning adult students.

From The New York Times:

"I applaud many of the points raised in the article. However, an important segment of online learners not mentioned are adult students looking to advance in their careers who are often juggling a full-time job and family responsibilities. A 2016 survey found that more than two-thirds of students felt time spent in online academic programs was worth it.

Pace University was an early adopter of online learning nearly 16 years ago, largely to meet the needs of students who don’t have the ability to attend classes full-time or conform to a schedule. We’ve learned that older students, often beginning studies after many years of work, need more feedback and engagement with professors and classmates.

Online programs work best when they are part of a university curriculum that is monitored by quality faculty and offers classroom and experiential learning opportunities.

While online learning might not be one-size-fits-all, I’ve seen it transform lives for the better.

MARVIN KRISLOV, NEW YORK

The writer is president of Pace University."

Read the letter here.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace University Announces New Scholarship for Honors Students who are New York State Residents

02/02/2018

Pace University Announces New Scholarship for Honors Students who are New York State Residents

As part of a continuing effort to attract the best and brightest students to Pace University, the university is offering new donor funded scholarships that will benefit incoming honors students.

The “Opportunity Scholarship” will support new students in the Pforzheimer Honors College with $5,000 awarded to those who qualify.

“This new scholarship helps keep the doors of opportunity open for students of all backgrounds,” said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “We are so grateful that our friends and donors are making these dreams a reality for these driven and deserving students who will add vibrancy and tenacity to the classroom.”

This new scholarship will be an addition to the Honors Scholarships currently awarded to students at Pace.

Pace already provides substantial financial aid to students, with 92% receiving aid, and nearly half are the first in their families to attend college. Also, Pace participates in the New York State Enhanced Tuition Awards program that provides tuition awards to students who are New York State residents attending a private college or university in New York State. Recipients receive $6,000 through a combination of their TAP award, ETA award and a match from their institution.

Approximately 20% of the new students admitted to the Honors College are candidates for this award. To be eligible for an Opportunity Scholarship, students need to be enrolled in the Honors College at Pace in their freshman year, be a New York State resident, and have a family adjusted gross income of $125,000 or less. Students could renew the $5,000 award for their four years at Pace assuming they remain in good standing and maintain a 3.0 GPA.

Those interested in applying to the Pforzheimer Honors College can get more information here.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

###

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westchester Magazine: "These Dogs Are Solving Cybercrimes"

02/01/2018

These Dogs Are Solving Cybercrimes (Westchester Magazine)

Westchester’s cutest detective is taking a byte out of crime — literally. Meet Harley, a 2-year-old Golden Lab with an unusual job: solving cybercrimes.

Dogs have served on police forces for nearly 150 years, but Harley’s job is unique to the 21st century. She’s one of only 10 police-trained K9s in the world certified to sniff out cyber technology. (In 2015, a black Lab named Bear was responsible for finding the thumb drive that led to Subway pitchman Jared Fogle’s arrest on child-pornography charges.) Harley works for both the Westchester County Police Department and the FBI’s Cyber Crime Task Force, and sports a shield-shaped detective badge.

Harley and her human partner, Detective Brett Hochron, gave a demonstration of Harley’s tech-sniffing skills at Pace University in November. “Nearly all crimes committed today have some kind of cyber element,” Hochron explained to an audience of Pace computer-science students. Electronic devices that could contain illegal or incriminating information are easily concealed. But with Harley’s keen sense of smell, she can sweep a crime scene for hidden devices more swiftly and thoroughly than humans ever could.

As a puppy, Harley attended Yorktown’s Guiding Eyes for the Blind, a school for guide dogs, but her boundless energy led her to switch careers. Hochron says that Guiding Eyes remains an active part of Harley’s life.

To stay sharp, Harley does a practice sniffing test six days a week. During the Pace demonstration, she uncovered a hard drive in a fire extinguisher, thumb drives hidden under furniture, and a tiny MicroSD card — smaller than a dime but capable of holding thousands of pictures — taped behind a door handle. Hochron says his canine comrade is “an incredible asset to the county,” adding that Sundays are her days of rest, during which she revels in treats and cuddles.

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Hudson Independent: "Third Public Workshop Set for Tarrytown’s Comprehensive Plan"

02/01/2018

Third Public Workshop Set for Tarrytown’s Comprehensive Plan (The Hudson Independent)

...The workshop will be hosted by the professional consulting team established by the village to work with its committees and Board of Trustees. The team consists of representatives from WXY architecture + urban design, the Land Use Law Center-Pace Law School, Regional Plan Association, Sam Schwartz Engineering and Westchester County Planning.

Public input from Tarrytown’s residents at the first two workshops has formed the basis for progress toward the Comprehensive Plan’s goals, according to Tiffany Zezula, the Deputy Director for the Land Use Center at Pace University School of Law. At the February workshop, “Participants will also vote on strategies and actions that help implement the goals of the Comprehensive Plan,” Zezula said. “Facilitators will be on hand to record feedback and engage citizens in conversation.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Voice of America: "FBI: 'Grave Concerns' About Accuracy of Classified Russia-Linked Surveillance Memo"

02/01/2018

FBI: 'Grave Concerns' About Accuracy of Classified Russia-Linked Surveillance Memo (Voice of America)

...Bennett Gershman, a former prosecutor and a professor at Pace University's law school in White Plains, New York, said the memo could lead to Mueller’s dismissal.

Trump has said he has no intention of firing either official.

Some experts say the memo’s more lasting damage could be an erosion of public trust in the FBI and the Justice Department, institutions that closely guard their reputation as nonpartisan law enforcement agencies.

“To just excoriate these people [at the FBI and Justice Department] and suggest that they’re all acting for political motives, to me, what it does is it undermines the public’s confidence in law enforcement,” Gershman said.

Read the full article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Boston Herald: "Law firm eyes Wynn Resorts for possible securities fraud"

01/31/2018

Law firm eyes Wynn Resorts for possible securities fraud (Boston Herald)

...A Pomerantz spokesman declined to comment on the investors’ investigation.

In order to prove Wynn higher-ups committed securities fraud, there would have to be evidence they knew or should have known about the sexual misconduct allegations and did not disclose it to the public, according to an expert.

“They would have to show that they were reckless in not knowing or they recklessly disregarded the truth,” said Jill Gross, a law professor at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University in New York.

Wynn also is being investigated by the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, which will hold a public meeting tomorrow to discuss allegations of sexual harassment against Wynn first reported by The Wall Street Journal Friday.

“The Commission is profoundly aware of the gravity of this matter and will proceed with the appropriate sense of urgency and rigor,” spokeswoman Elaine Driscoll said in a statement.

A Wynn spokesman said “we restate our commitment to be fully cooperative with any review the Massachusetts Gaming Commission chooses to undertake. Construction continues and remains on schedule for our opening in 2019.” The spokesman declined to comment on the Pomerantz investigation or the stock outlook.

Read the full article.

Pages