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Pace University President Friedman & Congresswoman Lowey Host Higher Education Roundtable Discussion

11/12/2013

Pace University President Friedman & Congresswoman Lowey Host Higher Education Roundtable Discussion

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Senior Administrators from area Westchester colleges and universities convened on Friday, November 8th to take part in a roundtable discussion co-hosted by Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-Westchester/Rockland).  Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman led the discussion at Pace Law School in White Plains which focused on President Obama’s College Affordability Plan introduced in August as well as other areas of interest to higher education administrators such as Federal Financial Aid stability and The College Scorecard. (President Obama’s proposal)

“I was so pleased to hear directly from experts in our region’s higher education community. Their feedback and perspective is invaluable,” said Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-Westchester/Rockland). “I look forward to continuing to work closely with our higher education leaders to ensure that a quality, affordable college education remains in reach for Lower Hudson Valley families.”

“I want to thank Congresswoman Lowey for taking a leadership role on this important issue.  More than fifty-percent of our student body receives some form of federal financial aid and institutional aid remains one of our largest expenses. ” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “Making sure that college remains accessible and affordable for everyone is something of paramount importance to all of us in this room.”

Attendees at the round-table included financial aid and admissions administrators from Long Island University, Westchester Community College, St. Thomas Aquinas College, Manhattanville College, Rockland Community College, Nyack College, SUNY Purchase, Mercy College and Dominican College.

“The intentions behind the President’s proposal are good,” said Robina Schepp, Vice President for Enrollment Management at Pace University. “It is in the implementation and the execution that the challenges arise. One of the unintended consequences might be a loosening of the requirements for graduation. This is the opposite of what the President intends. The Score Card that was rushed out was incomplete. Better information exists. Placements and earnings power information on graduates still is not there.”

Congresswoman Lowey and President Friedman plan to submit comments and concerns from the group at large to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan at a meeting in Washington DC to be scheduled soon.

 

 

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Former Clinton Adviser Tells Colleges to Get Radical and Work Outside the System

11/11/2013

Former Clinton Adviser Tells Colleges to Get Radical and Work Outside the System

 

PLEASANTVILLE – In a speech marked by pointed criticism of American environmentalism, James Gustave “Gus” Speth told regional colleges this weekend “It’s time for a new environmentalism” and for “going back to the ideas of the 1960s and early 1970s, rediscovering their more radical roots, and stepping outside the system in order to change it before it is too late.”

Speaking at Pace University, the former adviser to Presidents Clinton and Carter and former Yale University Dean pulled no punches with the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities.

“The environment continues to go downhill, fast,” he told the group. “Bottom line:  a specter is haunting U.S. environmentalists — the specter of failure.”

Now a professor at Vermont Law School, Speth made headlines in 2011 when he was arrested and jailed for three days following an environmental protest at the White House.

Echoing Speth’s theme, Michelle Land, Director of the Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and Director of the Consortium, told the 124 representatives from colleges and universities, “It is our duty in the decade ahead to use our unique resources to transform our region into a world capital of environmental research, education and knowledge. . . Never have our collective talents and resources been more needed. And never has our duty to the future of the human and natural world been more clear.”

Land stunned the audience with an assessment of the size and impact of the region’s colleges and universities which she said number 130, and teach 870,000 students, employ 93,000 staff and faculty, occupy more than 40,000 acres of land and consume more than 20 billion gallons of water annually.

“Collectively, we are the largest community in the Hudson-Mohawk watershed, and the second largest community in the state of New York,” she said.

Speth was presented with the Environmental Consortium’s Great Work Award, in honor of Father Thomas Berry, former Riverdale resident and environmental author, and delivered his keynote address on Saturday.

Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace, John Cronin, said, “Professor Speth is calling on us to radicalize or face environmental failure. He sees higher education as an institution that has the talent, knowledge and influence to lead society to success.”

Speth’s message to teachers and students was clear on that point: “We environmentalists can legitimately claim many victories but we are losing the struggle–losing the overall effort to pass our beleaguered planet on to our children and grandchildren. . . My hope is that you can help redesign the university’s approach to environmental studies, and environmental education generally, in a way that embraces the true keys to environmental success.”

About the Conference

Other conference highlights included the opening keynote by David Hales, President, Second Nature, on Friday. Hales spoke about living sustainably in the future climate. He believes that while evidence of climate change mounts, colleges and their communities are not prepared and have not assessed the impacts of climate on their missions, curriculum, infrastructure, operations, students, workforce, investments, and endowments.

“Institutions of higher education have a responsibility to create research-based knowledge aimed at assessing and responding to climate impacts and to prepare themselves and help others prepare,” said Hales.

Plenaries included “Preparing our Campuses for an Uncertain Future” (Fri.) moderated by Andrew Revkin, New York Times Dot Earth blogger and Senior Fellow of Environmental Understanding at Pace; and “The Middlebury Campus as a Learning Laboratory via the Classroom and the Boardroom” (Sat.) moderated by Jack Byrne, Director of Sustainability Integration at Middlebury College.

Revkin pointed out at the end of his panel that it is important to know your audience when framing discussions of climate resilience, because – in the business world particularly — “Not everyone believes climate change is a clear and present danger” but almost everyone agrees that it’s a bad idea to build in harm’s way.

Breakout sessions included discussions of various topics on sustainability in higher education. On Friday afternoon, Professor Ghassan Karam, a Pace University environmental economist, led a spirited discussion of limits to growth in which Liu Mingming, a visiting associate professor of environmental law from Shandong University of Science and Technology, took the stance that developing countries cannot be denied the right to advance their economies. There was wide agreement that the status quo is not sustainable and that universities play a vital role in testing new ideas.

There was also an exhibitor expo and musical performance by Revkin’s Breakneck Ridge Revue.

Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities:

The Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities was established in 2004 to advance our understanding of the cultural, social, political, economic and natural factors affecting the region, and currently has 60 member institutions. By promoting collaboration among its members, the Consortium works to provide ecosystem-based curricular and co-curricular programming aimed at improving the health of the regional ecosystem. The mission of the Environmental Consortium is to harness higher education’s intellectual and physical resources to advance regional, ecosystem-based environmental research, teaching, and learning with a special emphasis on the greater Hudson-Mohawk River watershed.

Spearheaded and hosted by Pace University, the Consortium’s headquarters is situated within the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in Pleasantville, New York.  Among Pace Academy’s stated goals is to externally apply the university’s strengths to local and global environmental problems. As a testament to its commitment to interdisciplinary pedagogy, scholarship and service, the Academy provides essential administrative support that grounds the Consortium’s programs.

Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies: Pace Academy is the first of several centers envisioned by Pace University’s President, Stephen J. Friedman, to promote high-level collaborative and interdisciplinary programming in key thematic, academic areas throughout the University. The Academy is a freestanding institute that renews and deepens the University’s long-standing commitment to environmental research, scholarship, and service.

Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies builds on its predecessor, the Pace Academy for the Environment, created in 2002 and known for regional leadership spearheading the formation of the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities and serving as the incubation office for the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, which concentrates on applied technological innovation.

The current breadth and depth of Pace University’s environmental programming is evidenced by globally recognized undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs augmented by related curricular, co-curricular, experiential, and service programs centered on the environment.

Contact: Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu.

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Pace University To Unveil New Labs For Nursing Students

11/08/2013

Pace University To Unveil New Labs For Nursing Students

 

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. - Pace University will formally unveil its new Clinical Education Labs at a grand opening reception on Friday, Nov.  8.

Every day, nurses make countless decisions that affect patient care and ultimately save lives. How do they know they are making the right decision?  They have been taught by experts in the field and have developed crucial skills such as clinical reasoning and critical thinking, and they’ve had hands-on experience.
One way they get that experience is through simulation.
The new labs at Pace’s College of Health Professions allow students to take part in simulations that expose them to a range of scenarios so they know exactly what to do when faced with these situations in real life. The labs also enable students to familiarize themselves with electronic medical records and prepare medications using computerized systems to reduce the chance of error.

The labs have the latest generation of human patient simulators (HPS), along with a video capture and playback system, so faculty members can evaluate students on their performance.
Feedback from students has been extremely positive so far. “They look forward to practicing in the labs,” says Clinical Instructor Joanne Knoesel, RN. “A mistake made and learned from in the lab today under the watchful guidance of a faculty member could help save a life tomorrow in a real clinical setting.”
Hospitals and other health care organizations seek out students with simulation on their resumes, according to Associate Dean Gerrie Colombraro, PhD, RN, “Our students have a competitive advantage when they graduate because they’ve done simulation. It shows potential employers that they’ve worked in teams to solve problems and that they’ve been exposed to complicated or high risk scenarios.”

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Pace University To Host Environmental Conference

11/07/2013

Pace University To Host Environmental Conference

 

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. - The Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities will hold its tenth annual conference on Friday, Nov. 8, from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 9, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Pace University’s Pleasantville campus, Kessel Student Center, 861 Bedford Road  The theme of this year’s conference is ”Sustain What? Preparing our Students by Greening our Campuses.”

The Environmental Consortium was established in 2004 with a mission to harness higher education’s intellectual and physical resources to advance regional, ecosystem-based environmental research, teaching, and learning with a special emphasis on the greater Hudson-Mohawk River watershed. It currently has 60 member institutions and headquarters situated within the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies at Pace University in Pleasantville.  
James Gustave "Gus" Speth, Professor of Law, Vermont Law School will be presented with the Environmental Consortium's "The Great Work Award, in honor of Thomas Berry" and deliver a keynote on Saturday.  Speth is co-founder of the Natural Resources Defense Council and founder of the World Resources Institute. He is considered one of the great environmental leaders of our time through his diverse positions in government, advocacy, and education.
Michelle Land, Director of the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and Director of the Consortium, will give welcome remarks. 
Other conference highlights will include an opening keynote on Friday by David Hales, President of Second Nature.   Breakout sessions will include discussions of sustainability in higher education. Plenaries include “Preparing our Campuses for an Uncertain Future” on Friday, moderated by Andrew Revkin, New York Times Dot Earth blogger and Senior Fellow of Environmental Understanding at Pace University. Middlebury College will share its campus as a case study on Saturday in a roundtable discussion, “The Middlebury Campus as a Learning Laboratory via the Classroom and the Boardroom.”  The conference will also include an exhibitor expo and special musical guests Andy Revkin's Breakneck Ridge Revue. 
The conference is open to the public. The rate for people affiliated with institutions in the Environmental Consortium is $20 for students ($30, nonmembers), $100 for members ($125, nonmembers).  Group discounts and single day registrations are also available. The fee includes admission to conference, meals and breaks, Friday reception, dinner and music, exhibitor expo, and poster session.
For more information: www.environmentalconsortium.org

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Newly Renovated Clinical Education Labs and Simulation Experiences Give Future Nurses and Edge

11/05/2013

Newly Renovated Clinical Education Labs and Simulation Experiences Give Future Nurses and Edge

 

PLEASANTVILLE, NY – Every  day nurses make countless decisions that impact patient care and ultimately save lives. How do they know they are making the right decision?  They have been taught by experts in the field and have developed crucial skills such as clinical reasoning and critical thinking, and they’ve had hands-on experience.

One way they get that experience is through simulation.

New labs in the College of Health Professions at Pace University allow students to take part in simulations that expose them to a range of scenarios so they know exactly what to do when faced with these situations in real life.  The labs also enable students to practice skills, familiarize themselves with electronic medical records, and prepare medications using computerized systems to reduce the chance of error.

The new Clinical Education Labs are set to be formally unveiled at a grand opening reception scheduled for Friday, November 8.

The labs have the latest generation of human patient simulators (HPS), along with a video capture and playback system that includes camera feeds from the simulation rooms.  Videos are stored and viewed on computers, allowing faculty members to evaluate and debrief students on performance. Students may also review their own performance in scenarios, as self-reflection is a vital component to learning in the simulation environment.  Several of Pace’s clinical partners throughout the region will also use the space to develop and reinforce critical clinical skills required of health care workers.

The new labs include a “control room” so students will be immersed in simulations without faculty members having to be in the same room. This helps students suspend their disbelief and helps them to be fully present in the simulation experience.

“Students are on their own. Without interference of faculty members, the situation becomes more real,” says Professor Elizabeth Berro, RN. She notes that faculty members are still able to cue students with phone calls, patient behaviors (controlled through computerized mannequins), and “standardized patients” (actors playing the role of patients) to meet the overall objectives of the scenario.

The renovations enable multiple acute scenarios to take place simultaneously, so students are exposed to situations where patients need a specific course of action to be taken; these situations may not occur in a hospital every day, but students need to learn about them so they know exactly what to do when they occur.

The improvements allow for an area designated for standardized patients (actors) to get ready for their scenarios.  Keeping them separated from students increases the authenticity of the scenario, aiding in the learning experience.  The actors will be able to watch scenarios unfold on monitors so they know when to join the scene.

The renovations also mean there is ample space for students from all programs to learn and practice basic skills.  There are skills rooms for family nurse practitioner (FNP) students and physician assistant (PA) students to provide physical exams and to be evaluated by their professors.  The labs will be heavily used in the upcoming semester; in fact, according to Marybeth Carpiniello, MPA, RN, Clinical Education Labs manager, there will be more than 500 “events” in the lab this semester, from simulations to skills learning, to tutoring.

Feedback from students has been extremely positive so far. “They look forward to practicing in the labs; they are so excited, and they benefit from the safe environment we create.  A mistake made and learned from in the lab today under the watchful guidance of a faculty member could help save a life tomorrow in a real clinical setting,” says Clinical Instructor Joanne Knoesel, RN.

According to Dean and Professor Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, “Our students get evidence-based learning experiences that are deeply meaningful while at the same time realistic and safe. They develop confidence in their skill set before moving on to the clinical setting.”

Hospitals and other health care organizations seek out students with simulation on their resumes, according to Associate Dean Gerrie Colombraro, PhD, RN, “Our students have a competitive advantage when they graduate because they’ve done simulation. It shows potential employers that they’ve worked in teams to solve problems and that they’ve been exposed to complicated or high risk scenarios.”

About the College of Health Professions: Pace’s College of Health Professions is made up of the Lienhard School of Nursing and the Pace University-Lenox Hill Hospital Physician Assistant Studies program. Students at the College learn evidence-based care, cultural competence and primary health care in an interprofessional setting in programs preparing them to be family nurse practitioners, advanced practice nurses, physician assistants, registered nurses and clinical leaders.

About the CEL: The Clinical Education Labs at Pace’s College of Health Professions create an active interprofessional learning environment which promotes intellectual curiosity and integration of clinical and didactic health care knowledge utilizing current effective technology in full collaboration with Pace University, the College of Health Professions, students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community partners.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high-quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

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Job Seekers Invited To Pace University Boot Camp

11/04/2013

Job Seekers Invited To Pace University Boot Camp

 

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. - Pace University’s Career Services department is inviting the community to attend an employer-run job search boot camp on its Pleasantville campus. The event will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Tues., Nov. 12, and is free and open to the public.

Attendees will learn directly from top company professionals what it takes for job search success. Indeed.com, a major website for job postings, will explain how your resume can make the cut. Hear from PepsiCo what you need to ace an interview. Robert Half will share how to use LinkedIn and social media. It should be a great opportunity to network directly with these company representatives and get your job search moving in the right direction, according to Pace.

Plus, free pizza and soda will be provided.

The site of the event will be Pace’s Kessel Student Center, Butcher Suite, 861 Bedford Road in Pleasantville. For more information and to RSVP, contact: careers@pace.edu.

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The Hall Monitor blog: Science Saturdays

11/01/2013

The Hall Monitor blog: Science Saturdays

. . . Pace University’s School of Education is entering its third year of Science Saturdays for participating students in grades 4-8 in Croton, White Plains and Briarcliff schools. Sessions began in early October 2013 and will continue through late April.

Read about it on Journal News blog The Hall Monitor.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace Teacher's Article Cited by Liberian Court"

11/01/2013

Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace Teacher's Article Cited by Liberian Court"

An article written by Pace Law Professor Alexander “Sasha” Greenawalt was cited by the Special Court for Sierra Leone when it upheld the conviction and 50-year sentence of former Liberian President Charles Taylor.

Read about it in Westchester County Business Journal.

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Pace University Improves Science Education, Participation Locally Through Science Saturday Enrichment

10/31/2013

Pace University Improves Science Education, Participation Locally Through Science Saturday Enrichment

Pleasantville, NY -  October 31, 2013 — Entering its third year, Science Saturdays brings a myriad of science concepts to life for participating students in grades 4-8 in Croton, White Plains and Briarcliff schools. Sessions began in early October 2013 and will continue through late April.

Each monthly session lasts for three hours and students learn about a science concept from a Pace University professor and then complete their own experiments, bringing science to life in new and exciting ways.  The program expands this year from four sessions to six, and planned topics include computers, microbiology and ecology.

The approach works. In a White Plains session last year, 4th and 5th grade boys conducted chemistry experiments with Sandra Flank, PhD, professor emeritus at the School of Education. “I liked it and I want to take chemistry in high school,” one boy reflected. “I think that [the session] was too short, especially that I was having fun. I wish I could spend the whole day with [Professor] Flank doing this.”

The following workshops will take place at the Croton Harmon High School science labs from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.:

•           November 23 – “Making Computers Talk, Part 1” with Dr. Gerald Ardito

•           December 14 – “Making Computers Talk, Part 2” with Dr. Gerald Ardito

•           February 8, 2014 – “Reducing Our Impact On the Environment” with Professor Angelo Spillo

•           March 8, 2014 – “Ecology: Change Right Under Our Noses” with Profs. Carl and Charlene Hoegler

•           May 10, 2014 – “Investigating Microscopic Critters” with Professor Andrew Weir

The following two-hour workshops for White Plains students, as part of the “Making Computers Talk” series with Dr. Gerald Ardito, will take place in the Fall and Spring during the White Plains Saturday Academy:

•           October 26 and January 25, 2014 – Making Computers Talk, Session #1: The Basics of Scratch

•           November 16 and February 22 – Making Computers Talk, Session #2: Beyond the Basics of Scratch

•           December 21 and March 29 – Making Computers Talk, Session #3: Connecting Scratch to the Outside World-Sensors and Motors

 Members of the media are invited to attend to see first-hand how the School of Education at Pace University is making a difference in engaging students in science and generating interest in STEM fields.

Instruction in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) is taking on a new importance as American student performance in these areas continues to decline, and these disciplines command greater importance in our evolving global economy. Part of the problem is also encouraging traditionally underrepresented minority students and women into these fields and supporting their pathways to success. The need for more than 100,000 STEM teachers in the next 10 years underscores the need for quality instruction to keep students competitive and encourage American innovation and economic strength.

Science Saturdays are just one example of Pace’s deep commitment to improving science study and STEM instruction. Pace’s School of Education and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems are partners in the Pace STEM Collaboratory, a program that facilitates interdisciplinary research and the exchange of ideas among students, faculty, and staff in STEM disciplines, and improves and supports STEM teaching and learning at the middle and high-school levels through continued and expanded relationships with public schools in the region.

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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