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Daily Beast: "It’s Not Just Jeff Sessions: The FBI Must Investigate Scott Pruitt for Lying to Congress"

03/03/2017

Daily Beast: "It’s Not Just Jeff Sessions: The FBI Must Investigate Scott Pruitt for Lying to Congress"

. . . When it comes to statements to Congress, Section 1001 is limited to “any investigation or review, conducted pursuant to the authority of any committee, subcommittee, commission or office of the Congress.”

This most likely includes a confirmation hearing, according to Pace Law School professor Bennett Gershman.

“Section 1001 clearly covers false statements made knowingly and willfully to congressional committees,” the expert on criminal law told The Daily Beast when asked about Pruitt’s hearing. “This is precisely the argument that some Republicans made in demanding an FBI investigation of Hillary Clinton’s testimony before Congress.”

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USA Today: "Did Attorney General Jeff Sessions misspeak, lie — or commit perjury?"

03/03/2017

USA Today: "Did Attorney General Jeff Sessions misspeak, lie — or commit perjury?"

Protestors gather outside the Justice Department on March 2, 2017, during a demonstration against Attorney General Jeff Sessions. (Photo: Susan Walsh, AP)

. . . Pace Law School professor Bennett Gershman, a former prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney's office, said perjury can be difficult to prove. What's important is the context surrounding a false statement, he said — in Sessions' case, swirling allegations of Russian involvement in the presidential campaign.

"You always have to prove intent by the circumstances," Gershman said. Session's "blanket denial ... really does raise serious questions about whether he was trying to mislead and deceive the committee."

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Newsday: "Donald Trump gives himself high marks so far"

03/01/2017

Newsday: "Donald Trump gives himself high marks so far"

President Donald Trump on Tuesday gave himself high marks for his first five weeks in office, saying he earned an A-plus for effort and an A for his achievements — but also a C or C plus for “messaging.”

Despite his view that he hasn’t gotten his message across adequately, Trump boasted in a taped interview with “Fox & Friends” on Fox News that he had done more than just about any other president during his first month.

On the day he was to deliver the most important speech in his young presidency before a joint-session of Congress, Trump also pushed ahead with his agenda, signing an executive order aimed at rolling back an Obama-era Clean Water Act regulation.

“EPA’s so-called Waters of the United States Rule is one of the worst examples of federal regulation and it has truly run amok and is one of the rules most strongly opposed by farmers, ranchers and agricultural workers all across our land,” Trump said.

The rule has been tied up in court, though if implemented it would provide protection for Long Island’s wetlands, said former EPA official Judith Enck, a visiting scholar at Pace University’s Haub Law School.

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NPR Ed: "Which Colleges Might Give You The Best Bang For Your Buck?"

02/27/2017

NPR Ed: "Which Colleges Might Give You The Best Bang For Your Buck?"

. . . A recent study took a look at each college in America and calculated the number of low-income graduates who wound up being top income earners. We call that mobility. The study comes from the Equality of Opportunity Project and is paired with an interactive tool from the New York Times.

How did schools do? It may surprise you to hear that the schools with the lowest mobility rates are Ivy League and elite colleges, where less than two percent of the student population comes from a family earning less than $25,000 a year.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Private N.Y. college leaders push back against Gov. Cuomo’s free tuition plan."

02/24/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Private N.Y. college leaders push back against Gov. Cuomo’s free tuition plan."

. . . Stephen J. Friedman, the president of Pace University, said the governor’s proposal is posed as a conflict between public and private universities. He said the governor’s office has quoted the sticker price of tuition at private colleges to criticize them. Private colleges and universities give $5 billion a year in aid, he said, which helps offset the initial price.

“For lower-income students, there is not that much of a spread between the publics and the privates,” Friedman said. “And in the case of many colleges, there is no spread at all.”

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Journal News: "Q&A with incoming Pace president"

02/23/2017

Journal News: "Q&A with incoming Pace president"

Marvin Krislov will join Pace University as its new president in August. Krislov, who for the last nine years has served as president of Oberlin College in Ohio, recently talked to The Journal News/lohud.com about what he anticipates being priorities and challenges in his first year.

Question: What was it about Pace that made you want to come here from Ohio?

Answer: I was really attracted to the mission of Pace in terms of supporting first-generation students, working-class students and really providing opportunities. I also like the Pace approach of linking liberal arts to experiential education, and it just seemed like a great group of people, too.

Q: One of the first challenges you may face is the possibility of a free tuition plan proposed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo for some students who attend SUNY and CUNY schools. What do you make of that and how do you think you'll address this issue?

A: I’ve worked in public and private and I think in general more money for education is great, and what I would want to do is try to work with the state to provide funding for private education. What I’ve understood is that there are a lot of private colleges and universities in New York state that pick up a lot of the in-state students. I’d like to make whatever changes there are a win-win, if possible.

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Timothy (Tim) Marino, military student veteran at Pace University, is the first time recipient of PLG Veterans Assistance Fund Scholarship Award

02/22/2017

Timothy (Tim) Marino, military student veteran at Pace University, is the first time recipient of PLG Veterans Assistance Fund Scholarship Award

New York, NY – February 22, 2017 -- A special ceremony to present the Scholarship Award, under PLG Veterans Assistance Fund Inc., to first time award recipient, Timothy (Tim) Marino, military student veteran at Pace University, will be held on Friday, February 24, at One Pace Plaza on the downtown New York City campus from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

WHO and WHAT: The PLG Veterans Assistance Fund Inc., 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Inaugural Launch of their Scholarship Award by Founder, Marleen “Molly” Levi. The award will be presented to first time recipient Timothy (Tim) Marino, military student veteran at Pace University's College of Health Professions.

WHEN and WHERE: Friday, February 24 at Pace University, One Pace Plaza, Student Union, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Entrance on Spruce Street.

WHY: Education is one of the three (3) pillars of support under the PLG Veterans Assistance Fund Inc. and highly valued. This Scholarship Award provides limited financial assistance for a qualified military student veteran selected from a pool of applicants. This is consistent with the Mission Statement(s) for PLG Veterans Assistance Fund Inc., dedicated to the memory and continued ‘living legacy’ of Patrick (“Pat”) Gualtieri, U.S. Army, Vietnam veteran (d. July 21, 2015).

ABOUT PATRICK L. GUALTIERI

Patrick (“Pat”) L. Gualtieri [d. July 21, 2015] served in the U.S. Army (1966-68); Vietnam veteran (in country 1967-68 during TET Offensive). A champion in the veterans’ community, he worked tirelessly with organizations to produce events that honor service. Most notable, flagship event was the NYC Veterans Day Parade [Nov. 11th] - largest of its kind in the nation. His vision, passion, purpose and drive were legendary and inspirational. Pat's dedicated efforts elevated the Parade to unprecedented new heights and visibility, expanding group participation, televised broadcast, sponsorship, volunteers and spectators along NYC’s Parade route. Pat, consummate event specialist; leader, mentor, visionary, friend, family member, life partner and more; was well respected in the veterans' community and beyond.

ABOUT PLG VETERANS ASSISTANCE FUND INC.

The PLG Veterans Assistance Fund Inc., [501(c)3 non-profit], was established in 2015, as a vehicle to continue Pat's ‘living legacy’ and desire to 'help others.' To this end, the PLG Veterans Assistance Fund Inc.’s primary pillars of support include: [Visit website for expanded information: ThePatFund.com]

▪ Education / ▪ Suicide Prevention / ▪ Special Needs [TBI-Traumatic Brain Injury; PTS- Post Traumatic Stress; Injuries/Disabled].

The PLG Veterans Assistance Fund Inc. actively participates in events and organizes various initiatives including clothing drives for veterans and most recently, a Valentine’s For Veterans 2017 event at the Brooklyn VA.

ABOUT PACE UNIVERSITY: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

###

Contact: Rob Rahni, Pace University / rrahni@pace.edu / 914 380 0700

 

 

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Journal News: "Pace University names Martin Krislov as new president"

02/17/2017

Journal News: "Pace University names Martin Krislov as new president"

Pace University's board of trustees has elected the college's eighth president.

Marvin Krislov, who most recently served as president of Oberlin College in Ohio for nine years, will take over the helm of the more than 11,000-student school in August 2017, according to an announcement from Pace.

"(Krislov) is the ideal person to lead Pace into a new era of growth and build on the renewal and revitalization that Pace has experienced under Steve Friedman," said Mark Besca, Pace's board chairman. "Marvin has demonstrated throughout his career the strong, effective, enlightened, and passionate leadership to propel Pace to a new level of impact and stature.”

About a year ago, Pace's current president, Stephen Friedman, announced he would not seek a third five-year term at the private, nonprofit school.

“I thought 10 years is about the right time to accomplish major change," he said in an interview last February. "At the end of my second term, I’ll be 79 and I thought that would be an appropriate age to step down from a job so challenging.”

Friedman called his roles at Pace, both as president and three years as dean of the university's School of Law, the most “challenging and rewarding” of his career.

Krislov was chosen to take over the school, which has two campuses in New York City and Pleasantville, following a search process conducted by a 15-member committee of trustees, faculty, staff, alumni, school benefactors and students.

“I am honored to be chosen to lead Pace University during this exciting period of growth and revitalization as the University advances its position as one of the nation’s foremost institutions in fostering the leaders of tomorrow," Krislov said in a statement. "I look forward to joining a community of scholars and leaders who are dedicated to academic excellence and who have such a powerful impact on so many lives.”

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace University names Marvin Krislov as its eighth president"

02/17/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace University names Marvin Krislov as its eighth president"

Oberlin College President Marvin Krislov has been chosen to succeed Stephen J. Friedman as president of Pace University.

The 56-year-old Krislov takes over the post on Aug. 1. Friedman, 78, announced a year ago that he would not request reappointment after the conclusion of his current term on June 30, 2017. He served 10 years as president.

In announcing the choice on Tuesday morning, Mark M. Besca, chairman of the board of trustees, said Krislov “is the ideal person to lead Pace into a new era of growth and build on the renewal and revitalization that Pace has experienced under Steve Friedman. Marvin has demonstrated throughout his career the strong, effective, enlightened, and passionate leadership to propel Pace to a new level of impact and stature.”

Krislov, who has been president of the Ohio school since 2007, said, “I am honored to be chosen to lead Pace University during this exciting period of growth and revitalization as the University advances its position as one of the nation’s foremost institutions in fostering the leaders of tomorrow. Pace’s commitment to access and pathways to success for students inspires me.”

In addition to serving as president of Oberlin, Krislov taught advanced courses every semester on aspects of law and public policy. In November 2009, he was appointed to the advisory board of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

During his leadership, Oberlin “became more inclusive, strengthened its academic programs, improved student outcomes, created new career opportunities for faculty and staff, expanded fundraising and alumni participation and improved its campus facilities” according to a press release.

Krislov also led a fundraising campaign that exceeded its $250 million target by $68 million and achieved it 18 months ahead of schedule.

The selection process for Friedman’s successor began last March and was led by a 15-member search committee representing trustees, faculty, administrators, alumni, benefactors, and students.

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Inside Higher Ed: "At His Own Pace"

02/17/2017

Inside Higher Ed: "At His Own Pace"

Marvin Krislov is in for a dramatic change of scenery.

Krislov, the 56-year-old president of Oberlin College, was announced on Tuesday as the next president of Pace University, effective Aug. 1. The move will have him leaving a 3,000-student liberal arts college and conservatory in northern Ohio that’s known for sharply leaning to the left in order to lead a professionally oriented 13,000-student university with campuses in Manhattan and New York’s Westchester County.

The differences don’t stop there. Oberlin’s student body is decidedly whiter, richer and more traditional than Pace’s. While Oberlin reports that 20 percent of its student body consists of students of color, Pace says its undergraduates are 49 percent white. At Oberlin, 9 percent of first-time undergraduates received Pell Grants in 2014-15, indicating they came from low-income families. The portion of first-time undergraduates receiving Pell Grants at Pace that year was 34 percent, according to federal data. Pace also has more than 3,500 graduate students and more than 500 law students.

It’s not the typical next step for a college president in Krislov’s position. He announced in September that he would be stepping down at the end of this academic year after a decade as Oberlin’s president. But one might expect his career arc to bend more toward another liberal arts college or a widely known research institution next. He was a finalist for the president’s position at the University of Iowa in 2015.

Instead, Krislov sees Pace as an opportunity to grow personally. He hears tremendous concern right now over whether higher education is providing students with enough opportunity, he said in a telephone interview Tuesday. Krislov sees Pace as a place that has traditionally helped first-generation students, students from working-class families and immigrants.

“I think higher ed is changing,” he said. “I think Pace may be the model for the kind of college or university we’re going to need more of. I’m excited about building a different model and taking this opportunity.”

Krislov sees himself as a longtime advocate of opportunity for those who are disadvantaged and for civil rights. At Oberlin, he created an access initiative that eliminated loan requirements for Pell-eligible students. Before that, he was among the leaders of the University of Michigan’s successful legal defense of affirmative action in front of the U.S. Supreme Court when he was that university’s vice president and general counsel.

Pace’s institutional values fit with Krislov’s, he said. He also pointed out that Pace has a liberal arts core, arguing that there are similarities with Oberlin.

Read more here.

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