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New York State Legislature Votes to Ban Elephants in Entertainment

06/07/2017

New York State Legislature Votes to Ban Elephants in Entertainment

Bill Sponsored by Senator Murphy and Assemblywoman Paulin Originated With Pace Environmental Policy Clinic Students

PLEASANTVILLE, NY -- June 7, 2017 – A bill that bans the use of elephants in circuses and other forms of entertainment is headed to Governor Andrew Cuomo for his signature following passage in both houses of the New York State legislature. The “elephant protection act,” originated and lobbied by students of the Pace University Environmental Policy Clinic, supported by The Humane Society of the United States, and sponsored by State Senator Terrence Murphy (R-40) and Assemblywoman Amy Paulin (D-88), cites the “physical  and  psychological harm  due  to  the  living  conditions  and  treatment to which [elephants] are subjected.”

Students of Pace’s Environmental Policy Clinic devoted their spring semester to assuring passage of the legislation which would make New York the first state in the nation to institute such a ban. They maintain that the methods used to train elephants have a direct impact on the survival of the species.

“The elephant protection act reflects the values of my generation, who don’t want animals to suffer for the sake of human entertainment,” said Paola Idrovo, a student in Pace’s Environmental Policy Clinic. “Through the experience of writing and lobbying for the bill, we gained a first-hand understanding about the cruelty to which entertainment elephants are subjected and how that threatens the entire species.”

“A performing elephant is a tortured elephant,” said Michelle Land, Pace clinical professor of environmental law and policy. “Given the global controversy about elephants in the wild, New York State has a duty to end these practices that foster false values and misinformation about the species. We believe New York’s leadership will embolden other states to prohibit performing elephants, and put an end to this barbaric relic of a bygone era.”

Senator Terrence Murphy said, “It is a fact that elephants used for entertainment purposes suffer irreparable physical and psychological harm that shortens their lifespans. They spend a significant portion of their lives crammed inside trucks, trains or trailers, and then they are poked, prodded or shocked into performing tricks. Thankfully, we have come to our senses as a society and we no longer tolerate the abuse of performing elephants. We have taken a bold step as the first state to pass legislation outlawing elephants having to suffer for our amusement. Let us hope it starts a national and international trend.”

“Performance elephants have been exploited and abused for too long,” Assemblywoman Amy Paulin said. “We can no longer ignore the cruelty that they have endured for our amusement. Confinement, torture and unhealthy living conditions have led to early death for these intelligent, gentle animals.”

“Elephants are a treasured species, and there is growing popular support for their protection,” said Brian Shapiro, New York state director for The Humane Society of the United States. “We applaud Senator Murphy and Assemblymember Paulin for their leadership, and respectfully urge Governor Cuomo to sign this historic bill into law.”

The Pace Environmental Policy Clinic trains undergraduate students through a program of learning and service that encourages students to apply their Pace University education to the solution of real-world problems in the professional world. This interdisciplinary course, housed within Dyson College, is an example of the “Pace Path,” where students apply classroom theory directly to a real-world experience, and is co-taught by Professors John Cronin and Land.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences:  Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

 

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Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

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Agence France-Presse: "Bloomberg leads mass coalition declaring support for Paris climate deal"

06/05/2017

Agence France-Presse: "Bloomberg leads mass coalition declaring support for Paris climate deal"

Former New York mayor, Michael Bloomberg, seen here meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron and Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo, leads a group of US business and government leaders pledging continued support for the Paris climate accord (AFP Photo/CHRISTOPHE PETIT TESSON)

. . . Darren Rosenblum, law professor at Pace University in New York, says the business community is coming together to address the most direct threat posed by a US pullout -- loss of competitiveness as the rest of the world barrels toward a greener economy.

"I do think that in the end, the effect is a positive one," he said.

"It starts to put in place the mechanisms for US companies and local governments to follow international norms."

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Journal News: "Trump budget will have negative effect on the nursing workforce: View"

06/05/2017

Journal News: "Trump budget will have negative effect on the nursing workforce: View"

"On the heels of the announcement of President Trump’s proposed federal budget, the public is beginning to visualize what the world may look like after the Trump administration is through with it," writes Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean and Professor, College of Health Professions, Pace University. "Those of us in the health care industry are concerned for the future health of an already aging and ailing population.

"At the College of Health Professions at Pace University in New York, we prepare future health care professionals to enter the workforce. Reacting to President Trump's proposed budget, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the National League for Nursing expressed alarm at the negative impact that the budget will likely have on the nursing workforce, nursing research, and the nation's access to high-quality nursing care. I echo their concerns.

"Their concern is in response to the budget’s near elimination of funding for programs that help educate aspiring nurses and nurse educators. For more than 50 years, Health Resources and Services Administration's Title VIII Nursing Workforce Development Programs have improved access and quality of health care in under-served communities. This funding strengthens educational programs, faculty recruitment and retention, clinical lab enhancements, loans, scholarships, and services that assist students in completing their nursing education. Many students have benefited from workforce funding over the years, including myself in pursuit of baccalaureate and master’s degrees in nursing. Because of this support, I have given back a hundred fold over nearly 50 years of clinical practice and higher education, as have many of my colleagues.

"Eliminating $146 million in Title VIII nursing program funding seems in direct opposition to the President's stated goal of increasing access and reducing costs. Private and state funding will not be sufficient to meet current and future nursing and nurse educator demands. Nurses are critical contributors to a healthy population. Without sufficient providers, who will address the growing health care needs of our nation?

Read more here.

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WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "NY Congressman's Amendment To Slow Anchorage Site Proposal Advances"

05/25/2017

WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "NY Congressman's Amendment To Slow Anchorage Site Proposal Advances"

. . . John Cronin is senior fellow for environmental affairs at Pace University’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment.

“I think the amendment that Congressman Maloney proposed for the Coast Guard project is a good one,” says Cronin. “I don’t think it goes far enough.”

Democratic Congressman Jerrold Nadler sits on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. Cronin, who also is managing faculty of the Pace Environmental Policy Clinic, says he has spoken with Nadler’s staff about the following proposal.

“The Environmental Policy Clinic at Pace has also proposed an amendment to the annual Coast Guard authorization that would make the Coast Guard proposal for the Hudson a major federal action — that’s a designation — a major federal action under the National Environmental Policy Act, which would then require the Coast Guard to follow the rules of the National Environmental Policy Act in writing an extensive Environmental Impact Statement,” Cronin says. “This would also require hearings, it would require another public comment period, it would involve additional federal agencies and all stakeholders and would launch a process that would probably have gone for at least three years, not one year.”

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Mid-Hudson News: "State may ban elephant acts"

05/25/2017

Mid-Hudson News: "State may ban elephant acts"

ALBANY – The state Senate passed legislation that would outlaw the use of elephants in circuses, fairs, TV, movies and any other form of entertainment. 

The bill was written by students at Pace University.  They were in Albany on Wednesday with their faculty members, John Cronin and Michelle Land.

Cronin, a resident of Cold Spring and the senior fellow for environmental affairs at Pace, noted the only way to get an elephant to perform is to torture it and make it afraid to disobey.

“This is done with something called bull hooks," Cronin said. "It is done by depriving them of food, by chaining their legs. In addition to that they spend hours on end in trucks and train cars. It’s totally inhumane.”

It is expected that the Assembly will take up the bill in the coming weeks. If approved and signed by the governor, New York would become the first state in the union to ban the use of elephants in entertainment.

The action comes, coincidentally, days after Ringling Brothers Circus ended 146 years of performances with a final show on Long Island.  The circus retired its elephants a year ago.

http://www.midhudsonnews.com/News/2017/May/25/NY_elephant_ban-25May17.html

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Documentary by Pace students premieres"

05/22/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Documentary by Pace students premieres"

A documentary created by students at Pace University, which examines the impact of development on Florida’s ecosystem had its premier at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville on May 10. In addition, the film has been released for worldwide viewing on YouTube. The title is “Ridge to Ranch to River to Reef: Florida’s Conservation Connections.”

Students in the documentary film class spent their spring break filming in Florida, and covered various parts of the state from the Gulf Coast to the interior. The film looks at the continuing population increase in Florida, with about 1,000 people moving there every day, and about 175,000 acres undergoing new development each year. 

Pace students Shakira Evans, Nicholas Farris, Allison Fennik, Camilla Klævold, Zhenming Liu, Megan Meyer, Felicia Robcke, Rachel Weiss and Kelly Whritenour worked on the film in the course taught by Maria Luskay.

https://westfaironline.com/89535/documentary-pace-students-premieres/

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Los Angeles Times: "NAACP will oust its president and revamp to better combat 'an uncertain era' under Trump"

05/22/2017

Los Angeles Times: "NAACP will oust its president and revamp to better combat 'an uncertain era' under Trump"

Photo: Cornell W. Brooks, president of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, speaks regarding the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, on Aug. 11, 2014, in Jennings, Mo. (Michael B. Thomas / Getty Images)

. . . Randolph M. McLaughlin, a law professor at Pace University who has studied civil rights movements, said he hoped the organization — founded in 1909 when Jim Crow was still rampant throughout the South — would thrive.

“It is critical that the NAACP has the most dynamic and creative activist leadership during the Trump era,” said McLaughlin. “The threats to civil rights and civil liberties demand no less from the oldest civil rights organization in the United States.”

Read more here.

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Pace Board of Trustees elects Charles Mak, Martin McElroy, and Robert Robotti

05/22/2017

Pace Board of Trustees elects Charles Mak, Martin McElroy, and Robert Robotti

NEW YORK, May 2017 – Charles Mak, Martin McElroy, and Robert Robotti have been elected to the Pace University Board of Trustees.

Mak, McElroy, and Robotti join the Board at a time of exciting innovation and momentum for the university, with increased enrollment, innovative new degree programs, and expanding campuses in both New York City and Westchester. Pace has been recognized for its ability to position students for exceptional outcomes and career success, ranking first in New York and second in the nation at catapulting students from the bottom fifth of income distribution into the top fifth. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project finds that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennials.

“Although Charles, Martin, and Robert are new to the Board, they are all longtime supporters of the University,” said Board Chairman Mark Besca. “Each of these highly accomplished individuals believes deeply in the power of a Pace education to change lives and help young people achieve their dreams. On behalf of the entire Board, I am delighted to welcome them as our newest Trustees and look forward to calling on their considerable talents, energy, and expertise as we continue to advance Pace’s enduring mission of Opportunitas.”

Charles Mak is Senior Advisor to Morgan Stanley Asia’s Investment Banking division and a 30-year veteran of Morgan Stanley. He announced his retirement from a full-time role at the Firm in September 2013. Most recently, Mak was the Chairman and Director of Bank Morgan Stanley AG, a Director in Morgan Stanley Asia Limited, and a member of Morgan Stanley's Asia Pacific Executive Committee, the Morgan Stanley Wealth Management Committee, and the International Operating Committee. In 2011, he was named Chairman of Bank Morgan Stanley in Switzerland.  In October 2012, he was named Vice Chairman, Morgan Stanley Asia Pacific. In October 2013, Charles was appointed Non-Executive and Independent Director of Frasers Centrepoint Limited.  He is Lead Independent Director, Chairman of Audit Committee, Vice Chairman of Board Executive Committee, and a member of Remuneration Committee, Nominating Committee and Risk Management Committee. Mak holds a BBA in General Business and an MBA in Financial Management from Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

Martin McElroy is a senior partner with over 29 years of experience with Deloitte serving large, complex clients in the financial services industry.  As a senior audit and advisory partner, McElroy serves and advises various global financial services clients in areas involving accounting and finance, internal controls, mergers & acquisitions and SEC reporting. In addition to his client service roles, McElroy is an active leader within Deloitte. He served as the East region’s Audit talent partner which entails overseeing all talent-related matters for audit professionals in the region, including, but not limited to, personnel performance evaluation, continuing education, compensation, deployment, and recruitment. McElroy holds a BBA in Public Accounting from Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. He is a member of the American Institute of CPAs and the New Jersey Society of CPAs.

Robert Robotti is the President and Chief Investment Officer of Robotti & Company, an asset management firm he founded in 1983. Before establishing Robotti & Company, Robotti was a vice president and shareholder for Gabelli & Company. Robotti holds a BS in Accounting from Bucknell University and an MBA in Accounting from Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. He is a Director of Panhandle Oil & Gas Company, AMREP Corporation, and Pulse Seismic. He is also a Trustee of the Catholic Medical Mission Board and Dominican Academy, and a member of the Variety Boys & Girls Club of Queens President’s Council.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project finds that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennials. www.pace.edu

Media Contact:  Bill Caldwell, wcaldwell@pace.edu, 212-346-1597 or Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

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New York Law Journal: "Court Becomes Classroom in Program for High School Students"

05/17/2017

New York Law Journal: "Court Becomes Classroom in Program for High School Students"

Photo: Chief Judge, Janet DiFiore, far left, and other Court of Appeals judges discuss the law with high school students in White Plains. David Handschuh/NYLJ

A recent three-day Court of Appeals session in White Plains has provided a model for future trips of the court outside Albany, Chief Judge Janet DiFiore said.

The court invited more than 100 high school and college students last month to the Richard J. Daronco Westchester County Courthouse, and enlisted volunteer attorneys and law students to meet with the students before oral arguments to prepare them for what they would be observing.

DiFiore described the program as a "tremendous success."

The chief judge said such trips are important because they give more New Yorkers a close-up look at the workings of a court that affects all of them but that they might not otherwise have a chance to see. That, in turn, inspires public confidence in the courts, she said.

But she said the session in White Plains gave her an opportunity to promote her "intense interest" in educating young people about the workings of the courts. Holding arguments outside Albany, she said, "is a way to reach greater numbers of young people around the state, to educate them about the court and the justice system, and hopefully pique their interest in the law and public service."

The court, New York's highest, has gone on the road several times in recent years: in 2016 to Rochester—its first sitting there in 168 years—in 2015 to the Judicial Institute at Pace Law School in White Plains and to Syracuse University College of Law, and 2012 to the Appellate Division, First Department.

At the session in White Plains, students and faculty from six high schools in Westchester County and the Bronx-Bronxville, Hackley in Tarrytown, Maria Regina and Woodlands in Hartsdale, Mount Saint Michael Academy in the Wakefield neighborhood of the Bronx, and Mount Vernon participated in the program as well as students from the Dobbs Ferry Campus of Mercy College. (DiFiore lives in Bronxville and is a graduate of Mount Vernon High School.)

About 40 students attended arguments on each day of the April 25-27 session. Before the arguments, they prepared by reading briefs in one of three criminal law cases before the court and meeting with volunteers from the Westchester County District Attorney's Office and the Legal Aid Society and, in the case of Mercy, with students from the Elisabeth Haub School of Law from Pace University.

Five assistant district attorneys and six Legal Aid attorneys worked with the high schools. Eight students from Pace Law's Pro Bono Scholar Program visited Mercy classrooms to answer questions about what law school was like and to discuss the upcoming arguments.

Read more here.

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NPR: "Why Are Americans Drinking Less Cow's Milk? Its Appeal Has Curdled"

05/17/2017

NPR: "Why Are Americans Drinking Less Cow's Milk? Its Appeal Has Curdled"

When's the last time you had a glass of cow's milk?

Americans are drinking a lot less milk than they used to. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the average person drinks 18 gallons a year. Back in the 1970s it was more like 30 gallons a year. We once hoisted a glass with dinner, soaked our breakfast cereal or dipped into the occasional milkshake. This habitual milk drinking was no accident.

It started in the 1800s, when Americans moved from farms to cities. "First, you had to have the rise of milk trains that would bring milk from the countryside. That milk was refrigerated with ice," says Melanie DuPuis, a professor at Pace University and author of Nature's Perfect Food: How Milk Became America's Drink.

Before that, she says, milk was not a reliable source of nutrition for city dwellers. Nor was it all that safe. In the 1850s there was a major scandal in New York after thousands of babies died from drinking swill milk — the stuff that came from sickly cows, animals fed from the waste of city grain-alcohol distilleries.

This led to reformers calling for safe milk. At the same time, rural and upstate dairy farmers wanted customers. A political bargain was born. "We are going to make this deal, where we're going to feed those children and enable them to get enough nutrition through this thing that the nutritionists were calling a protective food," says DuPuis. "That will enable your farmers and your farm regions to have a vibrant economy."

Milk get its healthy halo

DuPuis says early-20th century nutritionists mounted studies to better understand the health benefits of milk. For instance, they'd feed dairy products or vegetable oil to rats or dogs, and then they'd measure the results.

"These rats that had dairy products would be sleek and healthy-looking and larger, and the other animals would look scrawny and unhealthy," adds DuPuis. Groups that represented milk interests embraced the research and infused their advertisements with glowing claims about milk's health benefits.

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