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U.S. News & World Report: "Trump’s Defamation Lawsuit Threat Could Boomerang"

10/18/2016

U.S. News & World Report: "Trump’s Defamation Lawsuit Threat Could Boomerang"

Photo: Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally Thursday in Cincinnati after aggressively denying claims he touched women without their consent. The Associated Press

. . . Trump’s accusers include a woman who says she was groped by the billionaire at his Florida Mar-a-Lago resort in 2003 and a People magazine writer who says she was pushed against a wall of the same property and kissed without consent in 2005. Another woman says that in 2005 Trump kissed her on the lips during an encounter at New York’s Trump Tower after she introduced herself. And another woman says around 1979 Trump groped her “like an octopus” without permission aboard an airplane to New York.

As with the civil deadlines in New York, Florida and Ohio – where one of the women now lives – it’s almost certain the women cannot bring assault charges in New York or Florida, where statutes of limitations passed years ago for plausible charges.

If the accusers sue Trump, they likely would be considered at least limited purpose public figures, having sought out press coverage. This means they would have to show Trump made false statements about them with actual malice, meaning that he knew what he was saying was untrue or that he was acting with reckless disregard for the truth.

But with no footage yet surfacing to prove if the incidents happened, who would decide if Trump is lying or if the women are?

Pace University law professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer says the women "wouldn't have to prove evidence of abuse, they would have to prove that Trump called them liars and as a result they suffered economic harm."

The accusers "would have to prove is that Trump called them liars," she says. "Trump then has the defense of truth. So in a perverse kind of way, Trump would have to show that the assault did not happen.”

Read the full article here.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "At 25, Pace Women’s Justice Center battles the scourge of domestic abuse"

10/14/2016

Westchester County Business Journal: "At 25, Pace Women’s Justice Center battles the scourge of domestic abuse"

Lola – her true name has been withheld at her request – showed up at Gail’s House in White Plains after learning about it during her first visit to Family Court for an order of protection against her then-husband.

For the first time in a marriage in which she said she had long been verbally abused, he had hit her during an argument the night before, leaving Lola with a badly bruised and swollen jaw. “I said, that’s the first time and the last time you’re going to hit me,” she recalled.

Her husband told police she had struck herself on the jaw with the remote control, she said. He had their 10-year-old daughter lie to authorities to protect him, she said.

Lola sat in the courthouse for about seven hours that day. Her husband was removed from their Croton-on-Hudson home that night. The difficult process that would lead to legal separation and divorce after 18 years of marriage and Lola’s transformation back to the “happy-go-lucky person” with “a sparkle in my eye” whom she had lost to depression and self-doubt as the victim of spousal abuse, had only just begun.

On a quiet residential street that borders Pace University’s North Broadway law school campus, Gail’s House does not stand out. No sign on lawn or door announces it as the home of the Pace Women’s Justice Center, a nonprofit organization celebrating its 25th anniversary this month as a free provider of legal and educational services for victims of domestic violence and elder abuse in Westchester and Putnam counties and training for attorneys, police and others dealing with those victims in the justice system. For the women who arrive there needing help, often frightened and deprived of financial resources by controlling spouses or domestic partners, it is easier to speak of stopping by “Gail’s house” than to admit they are visiting a legal services office. And its location and appearance of a modest family home on a neighborhood street help protect its visitors from the aroused anger and stalking of their abusers.

Read the full article here.

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Daily Voice: "White Plains Director Lands 2nd YoFi Film Festival Invite With 'Wacky Man"

10/14/2016

Daily Voice: "White Plains Director Lands 2nd YoFi Film Festival Invite With 'Wacky Man"

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -- What comes to mind when someone mentions the color purple? A Pulitzer Prize -winning novel? The Artist Formerly Known as Prince? Or Barney?

In Anthony Desiato's case, purple equals "Wacky Man: The Rise of a Puppeteer" and the White Plains film director's second invitation to screen a documentary at the Yonkers Film Festival -- best known as YoFi -- at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 22.

"Wacky Man" is Desiato's third documentary. This year, there were more than 1,000 submissions to air at YoFi -- narrowed down to about 100 films invited. "I'm really honored I made the cut,'' Desiato said.

His newest documentary chronicles a young Bronx man's struggle to break into the puppetry industry. The first word Zach Woliner ever spoke was "Ernie" -- the orange half of the famous Sesame Street duo Bert and Ernie. Over the next three decades, Woliner's childhood affinity for the Muppets became a lifelong passion, hobby, and, if Woliner attains his dream -- a career.

In 2008, Woliner created his own purple puppet named Wally Wackiman, a Jewish, self-aware character who advocates puppet freedom and equality with humans. "He knows someone is controlling him," Desiato explained. (Wally even thinks the hour-long documentary should have been named after him!)

By day, Desiato, 29, works at Pace University Law School's admissions office in White Plains. His website, www.flatsquirrelproductions.com includes Desiato's biography as well as a link to his first film, "My Comic Shop DocumentARy."

Read more: http://whiteplains.dailyvoice.com/lifestyle/white-plains-director-lands-2nd-yofi-film-festival-invite-with-wacky-man/685437/

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The Real News Network: "Clinton and Trump Promote Fossil Fuels During Second Presidential Debate"

10/14/2016

The Real News Network: "Clinton and Trump Promote Fossil Fuels During Second Presidential Debate"

KIM BROWN, TRNN: Welcome to the Real News Network. I’m Kim Brown in Baltimore.
Climate change was only mentioned once during the second presidential debate of the 2016 race held Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. This comes only days after the United Nations announced that the Paris Climate Agreement has been ratified and will go into effect in November.

Joining us to talk about the lack of climate discussion debates, from New York City, Chris Williams is joining us. He is a long time environmental activist. He’s also professor of physics and chemistry at Pace University. He’s also the chair of the science department at the Packer Collegiate Institute. He’s the author of the book titled Ecology and Socialism: Solutions to Capitalist Ecological Crisis.

Read more: http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=17400#newsletter1

 

 

 

 

 

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Forbes: "Wanted: More College Classes To Launch An Encore Career"

10/12/2016

Forbes: "Wanted: More College Classes To Launch An Encore Career"

. . . “Many of our alumni are in wonderful new jobs or projects,” said Joan Tucker, director of Pace University’s Encore Transition Program. “One is now director of Encore.org’s Encore Fellowships in the Northeast.”

The ideal time to take an encore career course (if you can find one), said Tucker, “is while you’re still working and begin to see down the tunnel that you’re not going to want to do this forever or that your company is not going to want you there forever.”

Expanding the Encore Program

Tucker said she’d love to take her program into companies and introduce the encore career concept to their employees. “This should be a benefit to employees around the country. There are 78 million boomers and many can’t afford to retire,” said Tucker.

Some firms told Tucker they’re “already doing this” with outplacement for downsized employees. “But that’s not the same thing as what we’re doing,” she said. “It’s like taking a shoemaker and trying to help him find another job making shoes. We’re trying to give people a new perspective on the second half of life.”

Aside from exposing more midlifers to the notion of encore careers, taking the program to corporations would also broaden the business model for Pace. But, Tucker, concedes, “It’s a hard sell. There’s nothing in it for companies other than goodwill.”

She’d also like the Pace program to be a role model for other colleges. “Every college and university could have something like this,” said Tucker. “We’d be happy to design programs. The potential for this is enormous.”

The next Pace University Encore Transition Program (featuring an overview of the nonprofit sector, networking with nonprofit pros and career coach, resume and social media tutorials, a preview of nonprofit job opportunities and a strategy for identifying and achieving goals) runs Nov. 14 to Nov. 17; cost: $795, with a $50 discount until Nov. 1.

Read the full article here.

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Journal News: "Hillary won debate, but Trump improved"

10/11/2016

Journal News: "Hillary won debate, but Trump improved"

. . . Strongest moment for Clinton was questioning Trump’s temperament after his weak response to videotape. Trump scored on Clinton email scandal, but failed on resolving the misogynist comments and threatening Clinton with jail. The pacing and stalking on stage — “a form of bullying?”

Trump appealed to his base and little else. Clinton attempted to talk positively, but failed to offer broad, positive plan.

DAVID A. CAPUTO (president emeritus and professor of political science at Pace University.)

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Daily Voice: "Pace's New Student Residence Completes Phase One Of $100M Initiative"

10/07/2016

Daily Voice: "Pace's New Student Residence Completes Phase One Of $100M Initiative"

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. -- Pace University marked another milestone as it held a ribbon cutting for its Elm Hall residence Thursday to complete Phase 1 of its $100 million transformation.

The 96,000 square-foot residence for upperclass students is the final piece of a $100 million initiative, combining the Briarcliff and Pleasantville campuses.

The $23 million, 272-bed residence hall features a combination of semi-suites and full suites, 24-hour security, multiple study lounges, classroom space and the University’s IT Data Center.

“This is much more than the opening of a new residence hall," said President Stephen Friedman during the ceremony. “This is the realization of many years of hard work and planning to ensure that our students have facilities that are as outstanding as the quality of the education they receive here at Pace. We could not be more pleased with the final results and the transformation of this beautiful suburban campus.’’

Read more: http://pleasantville.dailyvoice.com/schools/paces-new-student-residence-completes-phase-one-of-100m-initiative/684657/
 

 

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Journal News: "Pace dedicates new dormitory, part of $100M transformation"

10/07/2016

Journal News: "Pace dedicates new dormitory, part of $100M transformation"

Attendees listen to speakers during a ceremony marking the official opening of Elm Hall, a new student dormitory at the Pace University's Pleasantville campus Oct. 6, 2016. The opening of Elm Hall marks the completion of the first phase in the university's master site plan. (Photo: Seth Harrison/The Journal News)

PLEASANTVILLE - Pace University on Thursday dedicated a new 96,000 square-foot residence hall as it caps off a three-year, $100 million transformation aimed at making the commuter-friendly school more appealing to boarding students.

University President Stephen Friedman helped dedicate Elm Hall, a 272-bed dormitory home mostly to juniors and seniors.

"The story of Elm Hall began with a commitment to create a new and modern campus on this wonderful site focused around a strong, integrated student life in a living and learning community ..." Friedman told an assembled crowd of more than 100 people.

"We turn the page and we experience the real thrill and excitement of walking on what is essentially a brand-new campus."

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/news/education/2016/10/06/pace-dormitory-transformation/91669014/

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Politico: "TWO SIDES TO THE ‘MORAL IMPERATIVE’ ARGUMENT"

10/06/2016

Politico: "Two Sides To The 'Moral Impreative' Argument"

Members of the American Farm Bureau Federation feel it’s their responsibility to help provide food for a growing population, and a report published Wednesday by the Environmental Working Group insinuates that U.S. farmers and ranchers, by not exclusively exporting goods to the least developed countries, shouldn’t be looked at as having a major role in combating hunger, says Bob Young, chief economist at the Farm Bureau.

Young’s statement was in response to an analysis the EWG conducted of U.S. agricultural exports, which made the case that agribusiness uses the oft-cited statistic that world food production must double in order to feed 9 billion people by 2050, to “defend the status-quo farm policy and deflect attention from the destruction that ‘modern’ agriculture is inflicting on the environment and human health.” The group found that over the last decade, 86 percent ($114 billion) of all U.S. agricultural exports went to 20 countries — most of which are developed — in the form of commodities like corn, soybeans, wheat and meat products.

Young explained that food is a “fungible thing,” and that providing supplies to another country, regardless of its income levels and development, frees up other goods to go elsewhere. China, for example, will continue to demand soybeans, even if the U.S. doesn’t supply them. U.S. farmers also have made “considerable strides” over the last few decades toward more environmentally friendly production systems, such as no-till that reduces soil erosion. “Yes, we stand accused of viewing feeding the world as a moral imperative. That’s an accusation to which we will plead guilty with great pride,” Young said.

A different view comes from Margot Pollans, an assistant professor of law at Pace University and faculty director of the Pace-Natural Resources Defense Council Food Law Initiative. She says that dismantling the moral imperative narrative is essential to an honest and productive dialogue on both agriculture’s environmental footprint and the causes of hunger and malnutrition.

“To find evidence that creating environmental sacrifice zones in the name of plentiful and cheap food cannot solve our global hunger problem, we need look no further than here in the United States, where we grow far more food than we need and yet still have nearly fifty million people who are food insecure,” Pollans said. She added that the environmental impact of farming, including greenhouse gas emissions, may threaten future productivity, and that overproduction in developed countries like the U.S. can depress global food prices and income for the world’s hungry people — many of whom depend on agriculture for their livelihood.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/tipsheets/morning-agriculture/2016/10/flotus-digs-in-on-future-of-white-house-garden-lets-move-216714#ixzz4ML4PitWJ

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New York Times: "A Farming Revolution, Minus Factories"

10/03/2016

New York Times: "A Farming Revolution, Minus Factories"

. . . Agriculture contributes about 9 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States; it remains the leading source of river and stream contamination, writes MARGOT J. POLLANS, assistant professor and faculty director of the Food Law Initiative at Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law, in a letter to the editor of the New York Times.

Fertilizer runoff throughout the Midwest produces a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico as big as Connecticut, and millions of Americans drink water and breathe air laden with poisonous agricultural chemicals.

We need our large farms, and we should celebrate many of the innovations of contemporary farming. But the farmers responsible for these vast environmental harms should not get a pass.

It is time to modernize federal law both to eliminate the many perverse incentives that encourage harmful farming techniques and to provide farmers the support they need to improve their practices.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/03/opinion/a-farming-revolution-minus-factories.html

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