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CFO Magazine: "Rethinking Disclosure"

04/11/2016

CFO Magazine: "Rethinking Disclosure"

. . . Top executives are just as frustrated as investors with the opacity of their reports. Leslie Seidman, a former chairman of FASB, moderated a panel during a forum on disclosure effectiveness last fall. “Many companies said that their own senior executives had got to the point where they didn’t understand what the key messages were in their own financial statements,” says Seidman, now executive director of the Center for Excellence in Financial Reporting at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

Read more: http://ww2.cfo.com/disclosure/2016/04/rethinking-disclosure/

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Financial Times: "Ted Cruz starts to broaden his appeal"

04/11/2016

Financial Times: "Ted Cruz starts to broaden his appeal"

Photo © Bloomberg

. . . "Cruz captured just about every demographic group including those rural and small town, males and all age groups which were part of Trump's base support," said David Caputo, a politics professor at Pace University. "Now if Wisconsin voters are the canary in the coal mine, the Trump candidacy is in serious difficulty."

Read more: https://next.ft.com/content/1e91b2ea-fc15-11e5-a31a-7930bacb3f5f

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Public Radio International: "How the threat of nuclear winter changed the Cold War"

04/05/2016

Public Radio International: "How the threat of nuclear winter changed the Cold War"

Photo Credit: Aaron Roe Fulkerson/Wikimedia Commons

It’s hard to imagine life after a nuclear holocaust. Fires from nuclear blasts would create enough clouds to cover the Earth, something that would block out the sun and push the planet into a deep freeze.   

As the United States and the Soviet Union amassed terrifying collections of nuclear weapons during the height of the Cold War, Carl Sagan tried to warn the world about the dangers of a “nuclear winter.”

“Beneath the clouds, virtually all domesticated and wild sources of food would be destroyed,” Sagan says. “Most of the human survivors would starve to death. The extinction of the human species would be a real possibility.”

A new piece from The New York Times and the Retro Report documentary team shows how Sagan’s theory reverberated across the scientific community, and infiltrated the minds of policymakers.

“It was pretty stark stuff, and it came at point when people were seriously worried,” says Andy Revkin, a writer for The New York Times’ Dot Earth blog and a professor at Pace University. “At that time, there was a lot of tension, and a lot of possible adverse outcomes.”

In many ways, the nuclear winter theory was a game changer — Revkin says the scientific community had never before tried to quantify or calculate the destruction that would come from all out nuclear war.

Read more: http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-04-05/how-threat-nuclear-winter-changed-cold-war

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InsideClimate News: "Another $1.2 Billion Substation? No Thanks, Says Utility, We'll Find a Better Way"

04/04/2016

InsideClimate News: "Another $1.2 Billion Substation? No Thanks, Says Utility, We'll Find a Better Way"

Photo: Technicians with Con Edison work on restoring power in the Queens borough of New York City. Amid a looming power crisis in parts of Queens and Brooklyn, and climate change concerns, utility ConEd has launched a new project to meet electricity demand through distributed clean energy generation and other non-traditional measures by 2018. Credit: Chris Hondros/Getty Images

. . . Relying on existing programs initially is a good move since they've already been approved by regulators, said Karl Rabago, executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School in New York. Rabago has an extensive background as an energy executive and regulator in Texas and at the U.S. Department of Energy.

"I'm hoping this will lead to a lesson—that, okay, we can't just turn up the volume on the old stuff," Rabago said. To succeed, he said, Con Ed will need a more holistic approach. "My overall assessment is, good start, good way to think about it, they seem to be speaking the right stuff," Rabago said. "I want to see this graduate to real and not just opportunistic."

Read more: http://insideclimatenews.org/news/04042016/coned-brooklyn-queens-energy-...

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Monster: "How to Recruit Nurses in 2016: Eight Strategies to Fill the Pipeline"

04/01/2016

Monster: "How to Recruit Nurses in 2016: Eight Strategies to Fill the Pipeline"

Think like a Millennial about professional development. Younger workers especially are always looking for readily available resources to advance their careers -- through mentoring and further education, for example. Many are thinking about masters studies, especially second-career candidates, says Harriet Feldman, Ph.D., RN, dean of the Lienhard School of Nursing  at Pace University. So even if it seems premature, pitch your career resources starting with the first candidate contact.

Help nursing schools accommodate your future hires. Nursing schools turned away nearly 70,000 qualified applicants in 2014 due to insufficient faculty, classrooms, clinical programs and money, according to a fact sheet released by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Providers that partner with nursing schools to help ease critical bottlenecks in nursing education can also help themselves stoke their nurse-recruitment pipeline. 

"Our very big challenge is clinical placements," says Feldman. "And finding people who are doctorate-prepared for tenure-track faculty positions is the difficulty," says Feldman. "We’re using masters-prepared nurses to fill in temporarily."

It's never too soon to start thinking about retaining new nurses. What keeps nurses from job hopping? Real power to affect how patients are cared for, and how provider organizations are run. 

Read more:http://hiring.monster.com/hr/hr-best-practices/recruiting-hiring-advice/...

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Global Times (China): "New charity law provides no certainty for foreign NGOs"

04/01/2016

Global Times (China): "New charity law provides no certainty for foreign NGOs"

Children from Shaoping county in the South China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region show off desks and chairs donated by the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund in December 2008. Photo: CFP

. . . foreign organizations are still in a "grey area" if they act independently without cooperating with any domestic parties, because the law does not mention the legal standing of foreign NGOs, He Lijun, a New York-based professor on public administration at Pace University, told the Global Times.

She added that the Charity Law benefits organizations that share the same philosophy as the Chinese government, while foreign organizations, which often focus on social issues or human rights, might be frustrated in this regard.

She noted that foreign NGOs may also be concerned about the management of the Ministry of Public Security (MPS) over the NGO sector, which will likely be expanded by the new law.

Read more: http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/976836.shtml

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Corporate Counsel: "Experts: GCs are Aghast Over Hacks at Top Law Firms"

04/01/2016

Corporate Counsel: "Experts: GCs are Aghast Over Hacks at Top Law Firms"

. . . Expert Darren Hayes advises using an “overabundance of caution.” Hayes is assistant professor and director of cybersecurity at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York.

“Assume the worst case scenario,” Hayes says. “Maybe you have every employee change their passwords, and move your data from one server to another.”

He also advises trying to monitor websites to see if any company data is showing up for sale, including sites on the so-called dark web.

Read more: http://www.corpcounsel.com/id=1202753838879/Experts-GCs-are-Aghast-Over-Hacks-at-Top-Law-Firms

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Smart growth drives development in suburban communities"

03/31/2016

Westchester County Business Journal: "Smart growth drives development in suburban communities"

Visiting Westchester recently, Parris N. Glendening, the former Maryland governor, dined one evening at a restaurant on Central Avenue. A national advocate for smart growth – high-density, mixed-use development near mass transit centers to reduce sprawl and protect the natural environment in more walkable cities and suburbs – Glendening glimpsed the commercial avenue’s possibilities beyond its streaming lanes of exhaust-emitting auto and truck traffic.

“What a grand boulevard that could be,” he mused before an audience of about 225 real estate, finance and planning professionals and municipal officials from New York and Connecticut at Pace Law School.

Glendening – the keynote speaker at a recent panel discussion on smart growth presented by the Land Use Law Center at Pace and the Business Journal’s parent company, Westfair Communications – was alluding to a rising trend among municipal planners and private developers that promotes foot traffic in place of driving in urban areas being redeveloped for a new generation of downtown residents. The new urbanism championed by Glendening, first as Maryland’s governor and now as president of Smart Growth America’s Leadership Institute and the Governor’s Institute on Community Design, and adopted by an increasing number of municipalities in this region is to a large degree, as New Rochelle Mayor Noam Bramson noted on the panel, “the old urbanism all over again.”

For public officials like Bramson, smart-growth development proposals often encounter strong local opposition. “The job of a mayor in moving development forward is tough,” said panel moderator John R. Nolon, a Pace law professor and founder of the Land Use Law Center. “There are two things that Americans hate: one is sprawl and the other is density.”

Read more: http://westfaironline.com/78459/smart-growth-drives-development-in-subur...

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SC Magazine: "FBI investigating attack against computer networks at U.S. law firms"

03/31/2016

SC Magazine: "FBI investigating attack against computer networks at U.S. law firms"

. . . Darren Hayes, director of cybersecurity at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, noted that law firms have been a target for hackers because they possess large quantities of intellectual property. “The recent slew of attacks on Wall Street law firms is a new phenomenon, but makes sense given their access to sensitive information.”

Read more: http://www.scmagazine.com/fbi-investigating-attack-against-computer-netw...

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Future Tense: "China’s E-Sports Paradox"

03/30/2016

Future Tense: "China’s E-Sports Paradox"

Photo: The stage and crowd at KeyArena for an e-sports event in 2014. Jakob Wells/Flickr

. . . "The China Internet Network Information Center estimates that close to 400 million Chinese citizens play online games, writes Marcella Szablewicz, an assistant professor of communication studies at Pace University. A good number of these gamers grew up in the late 1980s and 1990s, a time when playing PC games in Internet cafes was a way to assert independence. Chinese youth are subject to a rigid schooling system, in which success on a single college entrance exam is the sole factor that determines college admissions. Parents and schools often restrict extracurricular activities, focusing on test prep above all else. As such, playing games is the quintessential form of Chinese teenage rebellion, not unlike underage drinking in the United States. 

The Chinese e-sports industry has, as a result, been plagued by the public’s overwhelmingly negative response to digital gaming, one that has been exacerbated by a media moral panic over Internet addiction. At professional tournaments, it is not uncommon to hear government officials openly proclaim that gaming has a negative effect on youth. For example, during a press conference for the 2012 World Cyber Games, I heard a local official remark that her husband forbade her son to attend the competition, fearing that it would impact his studies. As such, e-sports marketers have made a concerted effort to separate “healthy” e-sports games from those deemed unhealthy and “addictive.” At the Esports Champion League tournament held in Beijing in 2010, an official opened the competition by declaring that, “e-sports [dianzi jingji] is a sport, it must be strictly separated from Internet [wangluo] games.” This separation has carried over into the language used by average gamers, who often insist upon a division between “e-sports” and other “addictive and wasteful” “Internet games,” such as massively multiplayer online role-playing games like World of Warcraft. In spite of this carefully constructed division, SARFT still bans the broadcast of video gaming, including e-sports, on public television channels.

So how does a country that bans television broadcasts of digital games and sends young gamers to Internet addiction rehabilitation camps become a leader in the emergent field of e-sports?

Read more: http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2016/03/china_is_a_world_leader_in_e_sports_even_as_the_government_remains_suspicious.html

 

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