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Journal News: "Injuries put athletes' families in financial bind"

01/03/2017

Journal News: "Injuries put athletes' families in financial bind"

In this file photo, Chris DiCintio talks with his players from Rye High School during a time out in the Class A boys semifinal game of the Section 1 basketball championships at the Westchester County Center on Mar. 1, 2006. (Photo: File Photo by Matthew Brown/The Journal News)

. . . Postgame Solutions, a start-up business in Massachusetts, has tried to help erase some of those gray areas and fill what president Jeff Lerner believes is a void in the marketplace.

Lerner founded his business early this year to help handle the complicated finances of expansive youth sports organizations. Chief among the products he offers is Season Interruption Insurance, which provides families reimbursement based on time lost to injury.

Lerner, a father of two, was inspired after watching his daughter miss three-quarters of a club soccer season that has cost him $3,000.

"My daughter suffered a high-ankle sprain in the first half of the first game of the season," Lerner said. "I don't think the ink had dried on the check. I had written the check and thrown out about $2,250 and there was nothing I could do."

Lerner found an insurer, Crum & Forster, to underwrite policies. They are sold to the club organizations — not directly to families — to and those organizations will, in theory, roll the cost of a premium (2.5 percent) into their participation fee. Families covered by the insurance are eligible to file a claim that will reimburse them for 90 percent of what they paid for that portion of the season.

"You would have to get a buy-in from the club overall, which means that you must get a buy in from the parents," said Paul Kurnit, a clinical professor of marketing at Pace University's Lubin School of Business. "The idea is interesting because of the legitimate fears from the parents and kids that you might get hurt. The level of play at every level is so much higher than it was 20 years ago. ... The issue of injury is much more center stage."

Lerner's product has been approved in seven states, and he hopes to add New York to that list soon.

"Parents are spending a tremendous amount of money in an uncontrolled environment," he said. "There's a ton of money being passed around and nobody's monitoring it."

Yet even with few safety nets in place, athletes and their parents are willing to take what can be serious a financial leap.

"These are kids who are the best athletes and many of them are looking at club sports as an oppotunity to do the best they can," Kurnit said. "They are looking to their futures, to trying to get college scholarships, which are a really big business. Many will jump in and pay the freight even though it's high risk."

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U.S. News & World Report: "Supreme Court Faces Its Own Campaign Season"

01/03/2017

U.S. News & World Report: "Supreme Court Faces Its Own Campaign Season"

Photo: The U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. (RandyHarris/iStockphoto)

. . . ideally, experts say, the high court will serve the role it is intended to serve, that of an independent arbiter which calms the emotions whipped up by campaigns and elections. "Some would argue that the court did put their hands on the scale and tipped it," says Randolph M. McLaughlin, professor of law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University and co-chair of the civil rights practice at Newman Ferrara LLP in New York. But "the court could put some of these divisive issues to rest."

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NBC News' TODAY: "Professor explains why students should leave their laptops at the door"

01/03/2017

NBC News' TODAY: "Professor explains why students should leave their laptops at the door"

Darren Rosenblum, a professor at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, won't allow laptops in classrooms, saying that the devices are a distraction, and that the new lack of technology is helping him to build a better human connection with his students.

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New York Times: "Leave Your Laptops at the Door to My Classroom"

01/03/2017

New York Times: "Leave Your Laptops at the Door to My Classroom"

"When I started teaching, I assumed my 'fun' class, sexuality and the law, full of contemporary controversy, would prove gripping to the students," writes Darren Rosenblum, a professor at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University. "One day, I provoked them with a point against marriage equality, and the response was a slew of laptops staring back. The screens seemed to block our classroom connection. Then, observing a senior colleague’s contracts class, I spied one student shopping for half the class. Another was surfing Facebook. Both took notes when my colleague spoke, but resumed the rest of their lives instead of listening to classmates.

"Laptops at best reduce education to the clackety-clack of transcribing lectures on shiny screens and, at worst, provide students with a constant escape from whatever is hard, challenging or uncomfortable about learning. And yet, education requires constant interaction in which professor and students are fully present for an exchange.

"Students need two skills to succeed as lawyers and as professionals: listening and communicating. We must listen with care, which requires patience, focus, eye contact and managing moments of ennui productively — perhaps by double-checking one’s notes instead of a friend’s latest Instagram. Multitasking and the mediation of screens kill empathy.

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North Country Public Radio: "Is SLC a black hole for aspiring prosecutors?"

12/20/2016

North Country Public Radio: "Is SLC a black hole for aspiring prosecutors?"

. . . The legal job market has finally bounced back from the recession in New York State and around the country. "Offices in and closer to the cities have been doing more hiring than they were in the five years before," said Jill Backer, an assistant dean at Pace University. "So they are absorbing more of the population willing and wanting to get into the criminal defense and prosecution areas."

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Connecticut Law Tribune: "5 Questions With Small Law Blogger Adrian Baron"

12/13/2016

Connecticut Law Tribune: "5 Questions With Small Law Blogger Adrian Baron"

As a law student, New Britain's Adrian Baron aimed to work for a large corporate law firm. But his career plans changed after he went to work for an environmental litigation clinic run by Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Baron, now an attorney at the three-lawyer Podorowsky Thompson & Baron, came away with the belief that working for a smaller firm would mean more flexibility and more opportunity to tackle important issues. It's also allowed him to work with a broad range of clients. "What I like about the small law firm I work for is I was thrown into it and had the opportunity do different types of law," said Baron. "I have a friend who worked for a large law firm and he wasn't allowed to have much contact with clients and the only time he was in court was for his own divorce."

Baron recently sat down with the Connecticut Law Tribune to discuss his mixed practice of criminal defense, personal injury and real estate matters, life in small law and his legal blog, "The Nutmeg Lawyer."

You had planned a corporate career in law but then began working for Robert F. Kennedy Jr., son of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy. How did that experience change your focus?

I began working for the litigation clinic at the Pace University School of Law. Because it was a full-time job, I took law classes in the evening. Working at the clinic provided a tremendous education for me. I served as an assistant to the co-directors Karl Coplan and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Karl had come from a white-shoe law firm and had once clerked for the Supreme Court. Bobby came from the Kennedy dynasty and was a nationally recognized environmental law expert. Both men seemingly had their pick of Manhattan's most prestigious law firms. Despite this, they decided to teach law in the suburbs.

Each semester they would take on 10 law students to teach them the craft of litigation. Their environmental clinic primarily defended working-class fishermen against corporations that were polluting the Hudson River. Bobby and Karl devoted their lives to helping the little guy and I really admired that about them. I realized that with a law degree, you have many avenues open to you. Why not use those skills to help those in need? When I moved back to Connecticut, I began working for attorney David Thompson. He was the son of the former Wisconsin attorney general and came from a long line of successful attorneys. Like Kennedy and Coplan, Dave seemed to follow the path of helping the little guy. I decided to stay with the firm and was lucky enough to make partner a few years later.

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Teen Vogue: "The GPA That Will Double Your Chances of Qualifying for Scholarships"

12/08/2016

Teen Vogue: "The GPA That Will Double Your Chances of Qualifying for Scholarships"

. . . If you’re lucky, your school will actually have a merit-based scholarship calculator posted online, like these calculators from Pace University in New York and Bradley University in Illinois.

Read more here.

 

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Journal News: "Pearl Harbor lessons for the Twitter generation"

12/07/2016

Journal News: "Pearl Harbor lessons for the Twitter generation"

(Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

. . . At Pace University in Pleasantville, Durahn Taylor, assistant professor of history, sums up the change brought by Pearl Harbor by pointing to two maps on his office wall.

One is the continental U.S., plus Alaska and Hawaii. The other is a world map.

"During the Great Depression, the American public was focused on the map of the United States, what was happening inside the country, mostly stateside material," Taylor says. "When Pearl Harbor happened, we had to add another map, the map of the world, where you could still see the United States, but it was much smaller. As President Roosevelt said: 'We can no longer measure our safety in terms of miles on any map any more.'"

Luis Flores, 23, a graduate student in Information Systems, from Elmsford, says Pearl Harbor was personal for his family.

"My grandmother had family friends in Hawaii during the attack," he says. "Hearing her stories made me want to research what happened, that it led to World War II. I think people nowadays, if they even know about it, they don't really know what happened, that it was a surprise attack that got us into World War II."

Still, the attack isn't on the radar of millennials he knows.

"My generation doesn't have the drive or curiosity to find out what happened and why. If it's not something that's pertaining to them specifically, nowadays, they don't bother to care or look into it," Flores said.

Case in point: 500 yards from where Flores speaks, 20-year-old business major Arie Cammock drew a blank when asked what happened on Dec. 7, 1941. The power forward on the Pace women's basketball team is sure she learned about it in high school in Brooklyn, "but that was a long time ago," she adds with an embarrassed laugh.

Diego Caro, 21, a global marketing major from Stamford, Connecticut, agrees that, unless you're a history major, Pearl Harbor is a subject mostly covered in high school, not college.

"It's an important date in history, but it's not really talked about throughout campus."

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Journal News: "Pace: Coast Guard didn't follow procedures on anchorages"

12/06/2016

Journal News: "Pace: Coast Guard didn't follow procedures on anchorages"

State Sen. Terrence Murphy, R-Yorktown, speaks at a press conference Monday, Dec. 5, 2016, alongside John Cronin of Pace University, State Sens. Sue Serino, R-Hyde Park, and David Carlucci, D-Clarkstown, and Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino. (Photo: Matt Coyne/The Journal News)

SLEEPY HOLLOW - The Coast Guard skipped ahead of its own internal processes in proposing 10 new commercial shipping anchorages on the Hudson River, exempting themselves from speaking to the public Pace University Environmental Policy Clinic students contend.

“In the 43 years I’ve worked on the Hudson River, I have not seen an agency take the actions the Coast Guard has taken to block transparency, to block public access to information and, in fact, to hide behind the filing of the regulation so it doesn’t even have to talk to us anymore,” said Pace Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs John Cronin at a press conference on Monday.

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Pace Environmental Clinic Study: Coast Guard Blocked Public Access To Information In Hudson Anchorage Controversy

12/05/2016

PACE ENVIRONMENTAL CLINIC STUDY: COAST GUARD BLOCKED PUBLIC ACCESS TO INFORMATION IN HUDSON ANCHORAGE CONTROVERSY

Pace environmental clinic Study: Coast Guard blocked public access to information in Hudson Anchorage controversy

Clinic Students Petition Agency to Withdraw Shipping Industry Proposal

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, December 5 – The Environmental Policy Clinic of the Dyson College Department of Environmental Studies and Science at Pace University has charged the Coast Guard with circumventing its own procedures to the benefit of the shipping industry when the agency launched a proposal to create 43 anchorages for oil barges on the Hudson River.

A letter authored by Pace students in the Clinic, sent today to Coast Guard Commandant Paul F. Zukunft, called for the immediate withdrawal of the proposal by the commandant as the only way to initiate the agency’s proper procedures. In June, the Coast Guard published the shipping industry proposal in the Federal Register as an “Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking” (ANPR).

According to the Clinic, before publishing the ANPR, the Coast Guard should have completed two major studies addressing river hazards and impacts, conducted public sessions with mariners, environmental groups, and government, and provided all members of the public the opportunity to change the proposal, or even prove it unnecessary.

The Clinic further charges that “the premature publication of the proposal triggered a Coast Guard rule that effectively shielded the agency from having to communicate with the public or participate in numerous government forums.” The Clinic letter cites the Coast Guard’s July 2015 “Waterways Management Anchorage Management Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures” (WWM) as the basis of its allegations.

“This is one of the most egregious violations of public transparency and public trust I have seen in four decades working on Hudson River issues,” said John Cronin, senior fellow at the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment at Pace, and one of the faculty leaders of the Clinic. “I suspect the Coast Guard knew the proposal would not survive the level of public scrutiny its own procedures require. The Clinic is therefore calling on the Coast Guard to scrap the proposal and start over, despite the imminent December 6 deadline for public comment.”

Pace student clinician Christina Thomas coordinated the 13-student team that participated in the research. “The shipping industry has gained a distinct advantage over the public in the regulatory process,” she said. “The Coast Guard was able to decline repeated invitations to public meetings from government officials because once it published the industry proposal, its own rules conveniently barred it from talking to the public.”

The Clinic petition concludes, “It should come as no surprise to the Coast Guard that its decision to forgo its own procedures has caused one of the largest Hudson River controversies in recent history, and at a substantial cost to the Coast Guard in public faith. The only viable remedy is for the Coast Guard to withdraw the proposal and begin the proper public process.”

“The research into the Coast Guard practices was a sad revelation for our student clinicians,” said Cronin. “But at Dyson College we put a premium on the ability of our students to focus on information-based solutions, and learn professional skills by entering the public fray. The work of our students is a prime example of what we call the Dyson Advantage of the Pace Path, which provides students the opportunity to apply classroom theory directly to real-world experience.”

The Pace Environmental Policy Clinic is housed within the Department of Environmental Studies and Science of the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment at Pace University. The Clinic trains students in professional policy and advocacy skills through hands-on casework on real-world issues. It is co-taught by Professors John Cronin and Michelle D. Land. Last May, The New York Times Editorial Board cited the Clinic for its work writing and lobbying the Elephant Protection Act, which passed unanimously in the New York State Senate.

About Dyson College Institute of Sustainability and the Environment: DCISE was established to address major issues in sustainability, resilience, the growing urbanization of the 21st century and the impact of these changes on the global environment, through multidisciplinary programs encompassing research, policy-making, education, and building greater community awareness and consensus on how to manage these issues.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, N.Y., enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contacts
Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu
John Cronin, 845-661-6961, jcronin@pace.edu

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