main navigation
my pace

Westchester

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Economic development and business advocacy group Westchester County Association has teamed with Pace University's Land Use Law Center to put together the Land Use Development Playbook featured in "Bisnow"

02/16/2018

Economic development and business advocacy group Westchester County Association has teamed with Pace University's Land Use Law Center to put together the Land Use Development Playbook featured in "Bisnow"

Bisnow: "Westchester Officials Hope To Boost Development With New Zoning Playbook"

Featured in the photo: Pace University Land Use Law Center Executive Director Jessica Bacher and CBRE Senior Vice President and Westchester County Association Smart Growth Initiative Chair William Cuddy

From: "Bisnow"

With demand for larger-scale development in Westchester County at high levels, one of the biggest restricting factors for developers is municipalities and their zoning and land use procedures. But a new initiative is hoping to change that.

Economic development and business advocacy group Westchester County Association has teamed with Pace University's Land Use Law Center to put together the Land Use Development Playbook, a set of resources, policy suggestions and process outlines to assist the county's towns and cities in updating their procedures.

“Communities often have out-of-date land use documents and zoning or inconsistencies between the two," Pace University Land Use Law Center Executive Director Jessica Bacher told Bisnow. "The lack of updated zoning results in a disconnect with the communities’ view of development and developers’ plans, and developers are often left guessing with what they should propose.” The drive for baby boomers to downsize and stop owning homes, and some millennials' desire to start families in more affordable neighborhoods with better public schools, has Westchester well-positioned to capitalize on New York City's softening multifamily market — but only with the right development. “We believe we’re at an inflection point where our municipalities have an opportunity to really grow and prosper and take advantage of the economic conditions and the impact of New York City,” CBRE Senior Vice President and WCA Smart Growth Initiative Chair William Cuddy said.

Read the full article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

John R. Nolon, Distinguished Professor of Law at Pace University, wrote a Blog about Low Carbon Land Use in "Law Professor Blogs Network"

02/16/2018

John R. Nolon, Distinguished Professor of Law at Pace University, wrote a Blog about Low Carbon Land Use in "Law Professor Blogs Network"

Law Professor Blogs Network: "Low Carbon Land Use: Paris, Pittsburgh, and the IPCC"

IPCC: Post 4: Shaping Human Settlements: A Series 

by John R. Nolon Distinguished Professor of Law at Pace University

From "Law Professor Blogs Network:"

The concept that municipal governments can physically shape their development is not well understood. The uniform, single-use land use pattern originally created by zoning designed communities to accomplish discrete objectives such as protecting child health and safety, controlling traffic congestion, and providing housing and commercial space to meet market demands.  As time progressed, the environmental and economic harm caused by the resultant urban patterns led many local governments to reshape their settlements.

The 1972 Petaluma Plan discussed in the previous post rebalanced the future housing stock of the City through zoning reform that required an even mix of single-family and multi-family housing. The local legislature changed its land use law to achieve more environmentally friendly design, protect open space, create a greenbelt around the community, provide for a variety of housing choices, evenly distribute housing between the east and west sides of the City, and to service growth efficiently.  Only in retrospect do we recognize these strategies as mitigation measures that reduce per capita energy consumption and protect the sequestering environment.

Petaluma’s reforms were not novel, even in 1972. In 1937, for example, the local legislature in Bridgeport, Connecticut amended its zoning ordinance to allow small commercial developments along major arterials in single-family neighborhoods in order to reduce downtown traffic congestion. As the population increased in Bridgeport’s single-family zones, more and more residents drove to the central business district to shop for goods and services. The commercial uses allowed in these new small districts included hardware, grocery, and drug stores, bake shops, and beauty parlors.  Permitting these developments reduced downtown congestion but also vehicle trips and vehicle miles travelled, one of the largest contributors to CO2 emissions.  This climate change mitigation effect was not on the minds of Bridgeport’s legislators at the time, but the zoning technique they created can be used today to reduce carbon emissions from vehicle travel.

A decade after Bridgeport’s innovation, the Village of Tarrytown, New York, adopted a floating zone to provide affordable garden apartments to attract workers needed for employers whose businesses were essential to stabilize the Village’s real property tax base.  The 1947 zoning ordinance created a floating garden apartment zone, but it did not specify where the dwelling units would be permitted. This was left to private-market developers who could petition the Village legislature for a zoning map amendment, allowing them to build garden apartments. Significant landscaping was required to buffer the effect of multi-family housing in single-family neighborhoods where the new housing type was permitted. By zoning for workforce housing close to jobs and requiring significant landscaping, the Village created a mechanism that communities today can use to mitigate climate change.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

02/16/2018

Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

Pleasantville Patch: "Pace University Hires Communications Strategists"

From Pleasantivlle Patch:

Seasoned communications strategists will support Pace President Marvin Krislov and highlight University successes.

Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications, respectively.

Ternes comes to Pace from DKC, a public relations firm consistently named one of the most influential public relations companies in the United States, where she served as executive vice president. Her client list included Fortune 50 companies, tech start-ups, biotech firms, and real estate leaders. Prior to that she worked as Chief of Staff to former Congressman Anthony Weiner in New York and Washington, D.C. As Executive Director of Media Relations, she will sharpen the University's focus on press engagement and help tell the story of the nation's most upwardly mobile private nonprofit university.

Oxfeld began his career as a journalist and has more recently worked in marketing communications. He was an editor at "New York Magazine" and the theater critic for the "New York Observer." He has been a copywriter at Ogilvy and the director of content at Vox Creative, Vox Media's content studio. He has also worked on speechwriting and editorial projects for several political communications firms. In his new role reporting to President Marvin Krislov, Oxfeld will develop presidential communications and work closely with the university's media relations and editorial staff to ensure consistent messaging that strengthens Pace's position as a leading private educational institution.

"Pace has an impressive story of student success, and more than any other private university we demonstrate the transformational impact of an education," said Krislov. "We are a well-kept secret that needs to be less well-kept. I know Marie and Jesse will use their skills and expertise to shine a bright spotlight on the important work that we do."

"With President Krislov at the helm, there has never been a more exciting time to be at Pace," said Ternes. "Every day Pace is creating transformational opportunities for its students and I couldn't be more thrilled to be a part of that."

"Pace does important, meaningful work, and not enough people know about it," said Oxfeld. "I'm excited to help President Krislov tell that story."

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Mimi Rocah, distinguished criminal justice fellow at Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law opened a conference at Pace Law titled “Child Sex Trafficking – It’s Happening in Westchester County.” featured in "Westchester Rising"

02/14/2018

Mimi Rocah, distinguished criminal justice fellow at Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law opened a conference at Pace Law titled “Child Sex Trafficking – It’s Happening in Westchester County.” featured in "Westchester Rising"

Westchester Rising: "Pace Conference Addresses Child Sex Trafficking"

Featured in the photo: From left are Pound Ridge Police Chief David Ryan; Cindy Kanusher, executive director of Pace Women’s Justice Center; Alison Boak, of the International Organization for Adoles- cents; J.S., a child sex trafficking survivor; Mimi Rocah, former assistant U.S. attorney; and Carol Barry, executive director of the Pace Criminal Justice Institute.

From "Westchester Rising:"

Child sex trafficking is not a phenomenon that is happening in foreign countries or in other states. It is happening right here in Westchester County, and it is a subject that needs to be talked about to help protect children.

That was the message that Mimi Rocah, distinguished criminal justice fellow at Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law and a former assistant U.S. attorney imparted to about 100 state and federal law enforcement officials, social services providers, parents and educators as she opened a recent conference at Pace Law titled “Child Sex Trafficking – It’s Happening in Westchester County.”

“We are not helpless in the face of these horrible acts,” said Rocah. “There are things we can do as members of law enforcement, as parents, service providers and educators... We need to get the facts, raise awareness, and arm ourselves with tools for prevention.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., R.D.N., assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University is quoted in "Aaptiv" speaking about small diet changes

02/14/2018

Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., R.D.N., assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University is quoted in "Aaptiv" speaking about small diet changes

Aaptiv: "10 Small Diet Changes That Help Weight Loss

Written by Jenn Sinrich

From "Aaptiv:"

...One of the main reasons that diets generally don’t work—and that people avoid them at all costs—is because they force you to cut out foods you probably love. The good news: experts agree that that’s the entirely wrong way to achieve healthy and long-term weight loss. “When people change too much about their diet at once, they tend to give up before they reach their goals,” says Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., R.D.N., assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University. “We believe that small changes add up to big success—small changes at a time, which eventually become habits, make for lasting weight success.” So, before you toss out everything in your pantry, give these small diet changes a try.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace University's Dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law David Yassky and Professor Bennett L. Gershman are featured in "Politico Magazine" with an opinion piece on "Trump Can Fire Mueller, But Not a Grand Jury"

02/14/2018

Pace University's Dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law David Yassky and Professor Bennett L. Gershman are featured in "Politico Magazine" with an opinion piece on "Trump Can Fire Mueller, But Not a Grand Jury"

Politico Magazine: "Trump Can Fire Mueller, But Not a Grand Jury"

From "Politico Magazine:" By David Yassky and Bennett L. Gershman

President Donald Trump appears more determined than ever to fire special counsel Robert Mueller—despite White House protestations to the contrary. Americans must begin to prepare for the constitutional crisis that will ensue.

There is already considerable speculation about how Congress would react to a replay of the Saturday Night Massacre, when President Richard Nixon ordered his attorney general to fire the Watergate special prosecutor. Senators of both parties have warned the president against dismissing Mueller, some in very strong language (dismissal would cross a “red line” or be “explosive”). Members of Congress would no doubt demand an immediate, serious congressional inquiry into the matters the special counsel is investigating, if not impeachment proceedings based on the dismissal itself. But in light of the current level of intense partisan conflict, it seems more likely that Republican leaders in both houses of Congress would allow Mueller to be fired without consequence, and perhaps even defend such a firing.

However, there is another route that may well lead to a showdown between two branches of the government. For months, Mueller and his team have been presenting evidence to a federal grand jury – that grand jury has already indicted two people, and two other former Trump aides have pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. (And those are the indictments we know of – others may still be sealed.) We ordinarily think of a grand jury as a “decider of fact,” similar to a trial jury. But a grand jury is actually an investigatory body independent of the prosecutor. The grand jury here could continue its work even past the potential dismissal of Mueller and his entire staff, and indeed could draft indictments of senior White House officials or key staff of the 2016 Trump campaign.

Trump can fire Mueller, but he can’t fire the grand jury.

Under the federal rules of criminal procedure, a grand jury is empaneled by a judge and can be discharged only by that judge (or another judge, in case the empaneling judge is removed from the case or is no longer on the bench). Ordinarily, a judge’s decision to discharge a grand jury is ministerial, because the prosecutor defines the grand jury’s “scope of work” – the prosecutor asks the grand jury to issue indictments on particular charges, and the grand jury either does so or doesn’t (though it almost always does, in run-of-the-mill cases). When the grand jury has decided on the charges proposed by the prosecutor, the judge discharges the grand jury.

But that is just ordinary practice, and the events we are contemplating are not ordinary. Last August, Chief Judge Beryl A. Howell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia empaneled a grand jury to hear evidence from the special counsel. That grand jury would not automatically terminate if Mueller and his team were fired. Legally, the individual U.S. citizens currently hearing evidence from Mueller’s investigation will remain a duly constituted grand jury until Howell discharges them. And Trump does not have the power to order Howell to do so.

In the event Mueller and his team were to be fired, Howell will have a big decision to make.

f she permits the grand jury to continue, she will hardly be acting without precedent. When America’s founders wrote the Constitution, and for 150 years thereafter, it was not uncommon for so-called runaway grand juries to go beyond the prosecutor’s “instructions” in issuing indictments. These runaway grand juries became virtually extinct after the 1930s, when a new law required a prosecutor’s signature before an indictment can be issued.

A runaway jury in the modern era, in a case with these stakes, would put us in uncharted territory. But again: Nothing in the Constitution, or in any statute or rule, would prevent that grand jury from continuing to work or from issuing a report detailing its findings. The requirement that indictments bear a prosecutor’s signature would prevent the grand jury from issuing indictments on its own – but it would be legally possible, albeit wholly unorthodox, for a federal prosecutor other than Mueller (say, any of the nation’s 93 United States attorneys, whether motivated by conscience or ambition) to sign and file an indictment prepared by Howell’s grand jury.

Whether to permit any of that would be up to Howell, as would a host of other decisions about how to proceed. Indeed, if Mueller turns out to be a latter-day Archibald Cox (the Watergate special prosecutor Nixon ordered fired), then Howell will be today’s counterpart to John Sirica. Sirica, who in 1974 held the same position now held by Howell, was the fiercely independent jurist who ordered Nixon to turn over recordings of Oval Office conversations – in effect, declaring that not even the president is above the law.

To follow this train of suppositions to one possible conclusion, we can envision Trump demanding the firing of a prosecutor who is actually in the process of trying one or more of the president’s close associates, on facts that could constitute an impeachable offense.

Of course, Howell’s decisions would soon be appealed to the Supreme Court, as were Sirica’s. While many pundits accuse the court of politicization, we expect that in such an extraordinary situation, the Roberts court would act to protect the Constitution, just as the Burger court did in 1974. It would then be up to Trump to either submit to a Supreme Court ruling or precipitate a true moment of national crisis.

Elected officials, and citizens, should give thought to that scenario, among others, in preparing for the perilous months ahead.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Psychologists at Pace University found that couples with similar texting styles were happier in their relationships overall than their counterparts featured in "Romper"

02/14/2018

Psychologists at Pace University found that couples with similar texting styles were happier in their relationships overall than their counterparts featured in "Romper"

Romper: "What Your Partner's Texting Style Says About Your Relationship"

From "Romper:"

The issue with texting, as we all know, is that it can be tough to figure out a person's tone. Does that lack of punctuation mean your S.O. is being curt, or are they just in a hurry? Or what if you find yourself waiting for a response longer than usual — is there trouble brewing or is your partner just stuck in meeting? In one study, psychologists at Pace University found that couples with similar texting styles were happier in their relationships overall than their counterparts, with both the content and frequency of messaging being taken into account, according to The Daily Mail. While it might seem like NBD, if your texts are constantly being misinterpreted or ignored (or the other way around), it's bound to start an argument eventually. Or a compromise: My husband, for example, knows that I interpret any text that doesn't end with an exclamation point as outright hostile. (I know, I'm a weirdo, it's just this thing I have, okay?)

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

First Tech Challenge "Lego League Tournament" Sponsored by Pace's Seidenberg School of Computer Science Featured on "News 12" and "Pleasantville Patch"

02/13/2018

First Tech Challenge "Lego League Tournament" Sponsored by Pace's Seidenberg School of Computer Science Featured on "News 12" and "Pleasantville Patch"

News12: "FIRST Tech Challenge Sponsored by Seidenberg Featured" 

News12 clip here

 

Pleasantville Patch: "Pace University to Host Lego League Tournament"

From "Pleasantville Patch:"

Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems will host the FIRST (FOR INSPIRATION AND RECOGNITION OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY)LEGO League Tournament, an annual event that encourages children to use their imagination, work with LEGOs, and learn about science and technology in a fun and exciting way. Each year, there is a different internationally announced challenge for the tournament. This year's challenge is FIRST Relic Recovery. This is Pace's 15th year as a host and organizer of FIRST robotics events.

The event will be held Sunday, Feb. 11 at Pace University, Goldstein Health and Fitness Center, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, NY. from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. with Awards Ceremony at 5 p.m.

Twenty-eight teams of children, ages 9-14, from Yonkers to Plattsburgh are participating this year. In addition to the predetermined tournament challenges that the robot will need to complete, the teams will be judged on robot design and programming, a 10-minute research presentation, and demonstrated teamwork.

The FIRST Organization, founded by inventor Dean Kamen, creator of the Segway Human Transporter, teamed up with the LEGO Company to create FIRST LEGO League.

Groups competing in the tournament include local teams: Techno Chix: Girl Scouts Heart of the Hudson, Pleasantville; Iron Devils and Mechanical Devils: Peekskill High School; The Chimera Tech, Tech Center at PNW BOCES, Yorktown; Jelly Fish: Blind Brook High School; Tech-Wise Guys: North Salem High School; Tesla Robots and STEM Flowers Riverside Eng. & Computer Design High School, Yonkers; Suffern Robotics: Suffern High School; Mamaroneck Tigers: Mamaroneck High School; Robocracy 4-H Club, Chappaqua; Robomaniacs: Neighborhood Group, Pleasantville; Indians and Metal Benders: John Jay High School, Cross River; Robo Raiders: Scarsdale High School; Garage Mechanics: Community Team, Putnam Valley.

The tournament is run completely by volunteers, including Pace students, staff and faculty, and members of the Westchester community. There will be a live webcast of the event. Details of the day can be found here and the schedule is posted here.

Read the article.

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Bennett Gershman, Professor of Law, is featured in "Law & Crime" with an opinion piece on "Star Prosecutor Turned TV Commentator Just Got Caught Doing Some Dirty Tricks"

02/13/2018

Bennett Gershman, Professor of Law, is featured in "Law & Crime" with an opinion piece on "Star Prosecutor Turned TV Commentator Just Got Caught Doing Some Dirty Tricks"

Law & Crime: "Star Prosecutor Turned TV Commentator Just Got Caught Doing Some Dirty Tricks"

From "Law & Crime":

Anna-Sigga Nicolazzi, a tough, seasoned Brooklyn prosecutor claimed she tried over 50 cases and never lost.  She was chief of the Homicide Bureau when she left the office to become a celebrity TV commentator on the Discovery channel. The network blurb promotes her as having a “flawless reputation for exposing the truth.”

One of Nicolazzi’s most sensational trials was a 2005 murder case, styled by the media the “Grid Kid Slaying,” in which two young men, John Giuca and Antonio Russo, alleged members of a Brooklyn street gang, were charged with killing a young college football player, Mark Fisher, after a night of drinking and partying in the city. Russo was the actual shooter and the proof against him was strong. The case against Giuca was weak.  It rested in part on the testimony of two friends who claimed he told them he put Russo up to it and gave Russo the gun, but their stories contradicted each other’s, their credibility was suspect, and Nicolazzi, had to change her theory of the case several times to accommodate their shifting accounts. One of these witnesses has since recanted, claiming that if she did not give the prosecution what it wanted they would destroy her career.

It was the third witness, John Avitto, a drug addict with a long criminal record who faced seven years on a burglary charge, whose dramatic testimony convicted Giuca.  Nicolazzi called him at the last minute without any notice to the defense.  Avitto testified that while he and Giuca were in jail together in Rikers Island, Giuca told him he killed Fisher. Avitto’s story was bizarre, and strikingly at odds with the testimony of the other witnesses. According to his testimony Giuca said he killed Fisher. Avitto, at Nicolazzi’s urging, told the jury that he did not receive any benefits for his testimony and just wanted to do the right thing for the first time in his life.  Avitto has since recanted his testimony, claimed he testified because Nicolazzi interceded for him and helped him stay out of jail, and he apologized to Giuca, but the harm was done.  

Now, after over a dozen years fighting for his freedom, Giuca has been awarded a new trial by the appellate division in Brooklyn. The unanimous decision found that Nicolazzi engaged in flagrant misconduct by hiding substantial evidence that likely would have changed the jury’s verdict. As the court’s opinion meticulously describes, Nicolazzi failed to disclose evidence to the defense that Avitto had violated conditions of his drug program; that a warrant had been issued for his arrest; that he had violated the conditions of his plea agreement; and that he met with Nicolazzi and the investigating detectives several times during which they tacitly agreed that if Avitto helped the prosecutor convict Giuca, the prosecutor would help Avitto stay out of jail.

In her jury summation, Nicolazzi not only reinforced Avitto’s false testimony but compounded his lies by representing to the jury that Avitto received no benefits for his testimony and acted selflessly in contacting the authorities because, as she argued to the jury, “for once he tried to do something right.”  

Why did it take so long for the truth to come out? How is it possible that Nicolazzi for so many years could have lived with the knowledge that she had violated her legal and ethical duty and deprived Giuca of a fair trial? And how is it possible that the Brooklyn District Attorney’s prominent unit that reviews questionable convictions, and has already exonerated over twenty defendants convicted under the tenure of District Attorney Charles Hynes, failed to flag this case, even though Giuca and his dogged defense team repeatedly pleaded with the office to review the case? Is it because that unit did not want to taint the reputation of the office’s star prosecutor?

What Nicolazzi did in hiding favorable evidence from the defendant might shock some people unfamiliar with criminal prosecutions. But in fact such conduct is commonplace. One federal judge characterized the practice of prosecutors hiding favorable evidence from defendants as an “epidemic.” The national registry of exonerations has documented thousands of  wrongful convictions since 1989, and a substantial number of those convictions involve prosecutors hiding favorable evidence that would have proved the defendants’ innocence.  New York State ranks second in the nation, just behind Texas, in convicting innocent persons. Indeed, an organization that exposes wrongful convictions, “It Could Happen to You,” has listed nearly forty cases in New York State since 2010 in which appellate courts have vacated convictions because of pervasive prosecutorial misconduct, typically involving inflammatory summations and hiding evidence. And a critical but often ignored point, the tally of the financial costs of litigating cases of prosecutorial misconduct is staggering. The eleven most recent reversals alone cost New York taxpayers over $118 million dollars.

The violation by New York prosecutors of their legal and ethical duty to disclose favorable evidence prompted New York State’s chief judge, Janet DiFiore, to issue an order last year directing trial judges to warn prosecutors before any trial of their obligation to disclose favorable evidence to the defense. Judge DiFiore’s order is a laudatory effort to make criminal trials more fair. But New York State prosecutors are well aware of their professional responsibilities. The state district attorneys manual, “The Right Thing,” reminds prosecutors of their legal and ethical duty to disclose favorable evidence. Indeed, to remind ethical prosecutors of their duty to behave ethically is unnecessary. And anyone who believes that admonishing unethical prosecutors to do the right is kidding himself.  Nicolazzi was one of the most experienced and high-profile prosecutors in her office. She knew the rules better than anyone. If she could violate the rules and get away with it, what prosecutor could not?

Ordering prosecutors to divulge favorable evidence to defendants in advance of trial allows the trial judge to hold a prosecutor in contempt who is caught hiding evidence. But that possibility is remote. First, prosecutors who hide evidence are rarely caught; much of the undisclosed evidence lies buried in files of prosecutors and police officials. Second, prosecutors are notorious for coming up with all sorts of excuses – mistake, inadvertence, oversight, lack of knowledge of the existence of the evidence, insistence it is not favorable  – to refute a charge of deliberate wrongdoing or bad faith. Nicolazzi claims she did nothing wrong, and that Avitto is a liar.  But ironically, she lauded Avitto when he helped her get Giuca’s conviction, and the appellate division found unanimously that her zeal to win a big case obscured her duty to serve justice and truth.

Probably the most troubling obstacle to preventing prosecutorial abuses is the almost complete lack of discipline for prosecutors. Prosecutors are exempt from being sued for their misconduct, a judicial reversal is meaningless because it does nothing to punish the prosecutor, and the disciplinary system for prosecutors nationwide and in New York is unworkable and an embarrassment. New York’s legislature is presently considering a bill (S.2412, A.5285) to establish a commission to investigate and impose discipline for prosecutorial misconduct similar to the forty-year-old New York commission that reviews judicial misconduct. Every profession has a system of professional accountability, every profession, that is, except for prosecutors.

The Giuca case is over. Thanks to an appellate court he will regain his freedom many years after his tainted trial.  Sadly, though, there are many John Giucas sitting in jail cells throughout the country whose convictions will not be reversed, and whose prosecutors are probably indifferent to the harm they have caused the defendant, his family, and the system of justice.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Cindy Kanusher, executive director of the Pace Women’s Justice Center at Pace University Law School is featured in "Westchester Magazine" about sexual harassment

02/13/2018

Cindy Kanusher, executive director of the Pace Women’s Justice Center at Pace University Law School is featured in "Westchester Magazine" about sexual harassment

Westchester Magazine: "#MeToo — Here, Too?"

Cindy Kanusher, executive director of the Pace Women’s Justice Center at Pace University Law School is featured in "Westchester Magazine" in an article by David Levin on about sexual harassment.

From "Westchester Magazine:"

...In a year filled with more relentless political and social upheavals than at any time in recent history, TIME magazine saw fit to make sexual harassment the most important news event of 2017. In naming “the silence breakers” its persons of the year, TIME put this issue above not only Kim Jong-Un’s nukes and Vladimir Putin’s election tampering but also healthcare replacement, tax overhaul, the refugee crisis, immigration policy — even above the Trump presidency.

And it is hard to discredit that choice.

Ever since the allegations against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein surfaced, a seemingly daily perp walk of sexual predators has (dis)graced the front pages of newspapers around the globe. Closer to home, it was revealed that former Fox News star Bill O’Reilly paid out the biggest sexual-harassment settlement on record — a stunning $32 million — to Lis Wiehl, a former federal prosecutor and Fox News commentator who resides in Westchester. Sexual harassment is pervasive under the media radar, as well, and the 914 is not immune. “Here in Westchester, I believe it’s no different than the rest of the country,” says Cindy Kanusher, executive director of the Pace Women’s Justice Center at Pace University Law School. “It happens here at the same rate as everywhere.”

“The only good thing coming out of this is people are getting the message that it is okay to talk about it.”

—Cindy Kanusher, Executive Director, Pace Women’s Justice Center

It’s hard to come up with statistics on sexual harassment in Westchester, she says. “There may not be a place where this information is being collected or stored or even looked at,” Kanusher explains. The county’s Department of Human Rights requires a Freedom of Information request to get its data — but even those numbers are likely not representative of what’s really happening, as far more cases of sexual predation are not reported than are. No matter what any official stats may show, the reality that the world is being forced to acknowledge is that sexual harassment occurs with unsettling frequency. “The only good thing coming out of this is people are getting the message that it is okay to talk about it,” Kanusher says. “You don’t need to be ashamed or afraid. People will believe you. The whole Me Too movement shows the breadth of what has been happening for years. This is not just a Hollywood story.”

Read the full article.

 

Pages