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Westchester Magazine: Westchester County App Bowl Searches For Health Solutions

03/19/2015

Westchester Magazine: Westchester County App Bowl Searches For Health Solutions

Westchester Magazine interviewed Jean Coppola about Seidenberg's partnership with Westchester County on the Westchester Smart Mobile App Development Bowl.

From Westchester Magazine:

Westchester County and Pace University, with the David and Minnie Berk Foundation, are holding the first ever Westchester Smart Mobile App Development Bowl.

Teams of high school and college students will build apps to assist in the treatment of Alzheimer’s patients. The teams will compete for cash prizes and paid county government internships. Additional prizes are still being decided.

Apps in the competition can range from simple “busy body” games to help keep Alzheimer’s patients’ minds engaged, to apps with complex AI that can track a patient’s activity and alert doctors to noticeable changes in their device use patterns or internet searches that would indicate panic or worry.

Jean Coppola, associate professor of information technology and director of the gerontechnology program at Pace, had been working with students and geriatric facilities for 10 years. She began working with students to assist the elderly with technology in 2005, which she called a huge success—that program received press coverage and sponsorship from IBM. Since then she has taught a class called "intergenerational computing," which focuses on gerontechnology and challenges students to make a lasting difference in their communities.

“Now fast forward, we have over a dozen community partners and have built over a dozen computer labs with donated resources and grants to infuse technology to the elderly so they are not left behind,” Coppola said.

The contest was conceptualized after Pace alumni visited Coppola’s students working at a local assisted living facility and came to Coppola with a grant from the Berk Foundation. The Westchester Department of Social Services also matched the grant after being contacted by Deth Sao, the director of development at Pace Unversity's Seidenberg School of Computer Science & Information Systems.

Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino says the competition is being held to encourage youth who are interested in technology to stay in the county.

“There is no limit on the creativity that students can apply to the apps," Astorino said in a press release, "This is a chance for students to showcase their talents."  

A kick off event will happen February 27. All registrants are invited to attend and stay for the workshop immediately afterwards to go over rules and help teams prepare. Pace will provide guidance and support throughout the competition with free technical resource, instruction, and workshops. The apps will be presented and judged on April 17 at Pace University.

Read the original article here.

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Wall Street Journal: "Private Law Program to Match State School Rates"

03/19/2015

Wall Street Journal: "Private Law Program to Match State School Rates"

More law schools are slashing tuition to lure price-sensitive students amid a decline in applicants. One New York school is taking the discounting to a new level.

Starting next academic year, Pace University School of Law, a private school north of New York City, will let students earn a degree while paying the tuition rate of the lowest-cost public law school in their home states.

Read more: http://www.wsj.com/articles/private-law-program-to-match-state-school-rates-1426721921

 

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Pace Law School Launches First-in-the-Nation Tuition Matching Program

03/18/2015

Pace Law School Launches First-in-the-Nation Tuition Matching Program

Initiative makes legal education more affordable and expands Pace Law’s national recruitment

Pace Law also announces tuition freeze for 2015/16 academic year

White Plains, NY – Pace Law School today unveiled a first-in-the-nation tuition matching program designed to make legal education more accessible to students across the country. The program, which will save students tens of thousands of dollars, enables qualified students from throughout the United States to enroll at Pace Law at the in-state tuition rate of their home state. This will allow those students for whom a legal education in New York might be out of reach to benefit from Pace Law’s pioneering and cutting-edge legal education, clinics and externships in the New York City, Westchester County and Southern Connecticut marketplaces. The new tuition matching program will begin with the 2015/16 academic year.

“The affordability of education has become a critical issue and this program is a unique approach to making a first-rate legal education more accessible to students across the country,” said Pace Law School Dean David Yassky. “Law school enrollment has declined in recent years even as complex legal issues are becoming an increasingly common part of today’s business environment. This initiative will provide a broader population of students with a roadmap for successfully entering the legal field without the crushing weight of unmanageable debt.”

In addition to the many school-specific advantages to a Pace Law School education, attending a New York City-area law school gives students a unique set of opportunities. New York is the largest legal community in the country. Attending law school here gives students a chance to broaden their education by working at a New York firm during their three years. Separately, it provides a head start to securing employment in New York after graduation. Pace’s new tuition match program will make a New York City legal education accessible to students who might not otherwise have that opportunity.

The school also announced today that it will institute a tuition freeze for the 2015/16 academic year, meaning that tuition will remain the same next year. Pace Law’s full-time tuition this year is $45,376.

The in-state tuition rate at public law schools across the country is lower (due largely to the unavoidable costs associated with operating an institution in the New York City area). For example, this year’s tuition at the University of Arkansas’ Law School is $14,508. Using those numbers, a qualified student from Arkansas entering Pace Law School would be saving just over $30,000 per year. In-state resident tuition for public law schools in states such as Florida, Texas, and Massachusetts are $22,230, $33,162, and $18,402 respectively.

Pace Law School is already one of the most affordable private law schools in the New York City area. Furthermore, the School has taken several steps recently to help students with the rising cost of higher education. Pace Law has significantly increased its scholarships and grants, begun offering accelerated degree programs that decrease the traditional three-year commitment and increased resources in career and professional development. The School also allows loan forgiveness for qualifying graduates who work in public service.

Students interested in learning more about Pace Law School and the tuition-match program should visit www.law.pace.edu or contact by email admissions@law.pace.edu.

About Pace University School of Law

Founded in 1976 and located in White Plains, New York, Pace University School of Law has graduated more than 8,300 alumni and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top programs in environmental and public interest law. It offers full- and part-time day Juris Doctor programs, Master of Laws degrees in Environmental Law and Comparative Legal Studies, a Doctor of Laws (S.J.D.) in Environmental Law, certificates in Environmental Law and International Law, and eight joint degree options with Pace and Yale universities and Bard and Sarah Lawrence colleges. Pace Law School is one of six schools and colleges comprising Pace University, a comprehensive, independent, and diversified university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. www.law.pace.edu

Media contact: Joan Gaylord, Pace Law School, (914) 422-4389, jgaylord@law.pace.edu

 

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FOXBusiness: "Erin Go Bragh! American Companies See Green in Ireland"

03/17/2015

FOXBusiness: "Erin Go Bragh! American Companies See Green in Ireland"

. . . How does Ireland attract U.S. businesses? It’s not just the luck of the Irish. For one, the nation has some of the lowest taxes in Europe.

Ireland’s corporate tax rate of 12.5%, compared to a 21% rate in the U.K. Both countries are far below the U.S. federal rate of 35%.

“As long as you don’t bring those earnings back, you get the advantage of low taxes,” Philip Cohen, a professor of legal studies and taxation at Pace University said.

Read more: http://www.foxbusiness.com/economy-policy/2015/03/16/erin-go-bragh-american-companies-see-green-in-ireland/

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E-Commerce Times: "Samsung Offers Free Milk to All"

03/13/2015

E-Commerce Times: "Samsung Offers Free Milk to All"

. . . "Samsung cannot afford to cede content and hardware integration to Apple, and so it has to offer Milk and new content services like it," said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University.

Should they become ubiquitous, Samsung "will likely find additional ways to monetize the user base and, at a minimum, cross-promote its products and services," Chiagouris told the E-Commerce Times.

There is a risk of failure, but "that's small in comparison to allowing Apple to own the content/hardware integration story," he said.

Read more: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/Samsung-Offers-Free-Milk-to-All-81808.html

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San Jose Mercury News: "Toddler tech: Is all that YouTube good for them?"

03/12/2015

San Jose Mercury News: "Silicon Valley aims for toddler tech"

. . . Parental acceptance invites more children to freely swipe tablet and phone screens in search of shows and games, making the mobile Internet as indispensable for families as television sets once were, said Paul Kurnit, professor of marketing at Pace University and CEO of consulting firm KidShop.

"Kids are a huge market," Kurnit said. "They are the digital natives -- they take to digital devices like fish to water."

They are also one of the last groups not yet captured by the tech industry's ongoing quest to build a bigger global audience, he said.

Read more: http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_27693183/silicon-valley-aims-toddler-tech-but-is-all

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The Journal News: "5 Questions with Sr. Delany on literacy, the brain"

03/12/2015

5 Questions with Sr. Delany on literacy, the brain

From The Journal News by Elizabeth Ganga: The Center for Literacy Enrichment at the Pace University School of Education in White Plains recently held a symposium titled "Unlocking the Puzzle of the Brain and Reading" to try to answer questions for educators and others on what is going on in a child's brain when they learn and how kids with learning disabilities such as ADHD learn differently.

Sister St. John Delany, the director of the center, answers questions on her motivation for bringing brain science into the discipline of teaching reading.

Q: How important is it for educators to understand the brain research going on?

A: Truthfully, I think it's tremendously important. Especially for teachers who are teaching very young children. Everybody can't learn the same way. I just think people need to understand what is going on in the brain, how it functions, where the different parts of the words come from, if you will, the sounds. If children are not using their brains properly then how do we help them?

Q: Can you summarize what you've learned and what the research shows at this point about the brains of children with learning disabilities?

A: Number one, the research shows that people who have problems with reading do not use their brain properly. They're using the wrong parts of their brain to produce words and to produce ideas. One can make that determination by doing neuroimaging. I would like all of us to become familiar with an approach to really helping these struggling readers.

Q: If you know the wrong part of the brain is being used, the how do you help them?

A: The literature says by repetition, repetition, repetition. But not always the same kind of repetition. You're going to ask them to read this book today and that book tomorrow. Which is actually what we do. We don't ever have them do the same thing over and over and over again.

Q: What else do you need to understand?

A: Number one, everybody has to understand every child is different. So you have a group of fifth graders, every one of those children is different. And parents bring to their children what they have. And if they haven't been well educated or if they're not aware of the fact that you should speak to children, that you should help them improve their vocabulary, it's to the child's detriment, to be truthful. I think that parents want to help and I think they don't really know how to help.

Q: Tell me about the center.

A: We began 42 years ago as a developmental reading program and my students were the tutors. Children came mostly from White Plains, and then, little by little, particularly in the summer, we would get children with more severe problems. We have only certified teachers here now. Over the years we have gotten children from Cortlandt, Mahopac up north, Rye, Port Chester, Eastchester, Yonkers, New Rochelle. And they come with different kinds of needs. But we do reading and writing and math and some science and we work with children from the age of 5, because I firmly believe that's where it all should begin.

View the original article here.

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