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San Diego Union-Tribune: "What FBI, police are doing to prevent terror attacks"

12/14/2015

San Diego Union-Tribune: "What FBI, police are doing to prevent terror attacks"

An FBI dive team prepares to search Seccombe Lake for evidence in connection with last week's fatal shooting at Inland Regional Center , Friday, Dec. 11, 2015, in San Bernardino, Calif.  Jae C. Hong/AP PHOTO

. . . The new generation of terrorists have also frustrated investigators’ classic wiretap techniques by foregoing standard phone calls in favor of highly-encrypted third party apps, some which are run out of countries without U.S. jurisdiction, said Darren Hayes, director of cyber security and an assistant professor at Pace University in New York. For instance, one of those apps, Telegram, was used by the terrorists in the Paris massacre.

Read more: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2015/dec/12/fbi-law-enforcement...

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SC Magazine: "Comey calls encryption a business model issue, raises hackles of privacy advocates"

12/14/2015

SC Magazine: "Comey calls encryption a business model issue, raises hackles of privacy advocates"

. . . computer forensics and security expert Darren Hayes, an assistant professor and director of cybersecurity at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York, told SCMagazine.com, that by moving to place encryption keys locally on user devices as Apple and Android have done rather than leaving the keys on servers puts the country “at risk.” Hayes said his research showed that post-Snowden and WikiLeaks jihadists are increasingly placing importance on encryption.

And he noted that currently the Manhattan DA's office currently has more than a 100 cases pending that it can't prosecute because it is unable to get to encrypted information.

Read more: http://www.scmagazine.com/comey-calls-encryption-a-business-model-issue-raises-hackles-of-privacy-advocates/article/459404/

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Agence France-Presse: "Data encryption in sharp focus after deadly attacks"

12/14/2015

Agence France-Presse: "Data encryption in sharp focus after deadly attacks"

Investigators look at the vehicle involved in a shootout between police and two suspects in San Bernardino, California, on December 3, 2015 ©Patrick T. Fallon (AFP)

. . . Darren Hayes, a professor of computer science forensics at Pace University in New York, said one helpful move would be for Apple and Google to roll back their encryption to the level of a year ago to enable access to smartphones with a warrant or court order.

"It worked very well, but Apple somewhere along the line decided it didn't make business sense," he said, adding that tech firms are conscious of their public image and don't want to be seen as tools of law enforcement or the National Security Agency.

At the same time, he said, in New York "there are more than 100 investigations stopped in their tracks because there are phones that can't be analyzed. These are murderers, rapists, pedophiles who are not being prosecuted."

Hayes said that in the current environment, tech firms are not likely to voluntarily make changes to help law enforcement.

"The only way they would be persuaded is through legislation," he said.

Read more:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/afp/article-3357166/Data-encryption-sha...

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Washington Post: "You’re worried about Trump? In 100 years, robots might be running for president."

12/10/2015

Washington Post: "You’re worried about Trump? In 100 years, robots might be running for president."

. . . What is a "person"?

The Constitution does not stipulate that the president must be a human. It does, however, stipulate that no person except those that are natural-born citizens can be president, suggesting that one must at least be a person. But "person" and "human" are not necessarily the same.

"The answer to the question depends on for what purpose you want to define a person," said Michael Dorf, professor of constitutional law at Cornell University, when we spoke to him by phone on Wednesday. "The answer might be different for different purposes." He pointed to corporations, which are granted personhood in some contexts (remember Mitt Romney?). "The U.S. Code defines them that way, so that when the U.S. Code uses the word 'person,' it presumptively includes corporations," Dorf said.

"Personhood is simply an amorphous concept," said Prof. David Cassuto of Pace Law School. Cassuto specializes in issues of personhood, particularly as they might apply to animals. Something with personhood is "either a being that has rights, or it's the thing that one becomes when one gets rights," he said. "It's not clear that you need to have rights to be a person, or be a person to have rights."

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/12/10/can-a-robot-run-for-president-seriously/

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Diverse: Issues In Higher Education: "Nursing Faculty Emphasize Culturally Competent Health Care"

12/10/2015

Diverse: Issues In Higher Education: "Nursing Faculty Emphasize Culturally Competent Health Care"

With today’s nurses working in a rapidly changing health care landscape, emerging faculty educate their nursing students about issues that impact patient care and bring health care to underserved communities.

One of Dr. Kyeongra Yang’s goals in the community health courses she teaches is to guide her students to be more culturally competent in providing care to underserved minority populations. She says she’s noticed that, while students are well aware of what culturally competent care is from an intellectual perspective, some of them don’t achieve it in practical application.

“I should acknowledge that I would be more sensitive because I myself am a minority; however, I often notice that some of their communication styles are not sensitive enough to respect others and still reflect some biased views on different cultures,” says Yang, an assistant professor at the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University.

“I hope my nursing students can learn that culturally competent care is not about knowledge, but more about a matter of attitude,” she adds. “I want to be a facilitator and good role model.”

Technology in the workplace

The students in Yang’s community health nursing course are seniors who are about to graduate and are very focused on where to start their careers. She realizes many think community health nursing is not for them, rather seeing themselves in a hospital setting. She tries to provide opportunities for students to think about practicing nursing in various settings beyond hospitals.

“They may see their patients only at a hospital, but their patients’ lives do not end there and must go on with health conditions at their real world, such as home, occupational setting, etc.,” says Yang, whose research includes prevention and management of diabetes and underserved and minority populations. “I hope I can help broaden our students’ perspective on nursing, care coordination and public health.”

Read more: http://diverseeducation.com/article/79426/

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Publishers Weekly: "Children's Publishing in China: Highlights from the First GKC China Deep Dive"

12/09/2015

Publishers Weekly: "Children's Publishing in China: Highlights from the First GKC China Deep Dive"

Xiaoyan (Renee) Huang at the half-day China Deep Dive intensive. Photo credit: Sandra Price

Children’s books play a leading role in the fragmented and state-controlled publishing industry in China, and titles in translation are an important part of the mix, according to speakers at an intensive half-day China Deep Dive sponsored by Publishers Weekly and the Bologna Children’s Book Fair. The event took place in association with the inaugural Global Kids Connect Conference in New York City, and was hosted by Pace University’s M.S. in Publishing Program and its chair, Professor Sherman Raskin.

Read more: http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/childrens/childrens-industry-news/article/68894-children-s-publishing-in-china-highlights-from-the-first-gkc-china-deep-dive.html#path/pw/by-topic/childrens/childrens-industry-news/article/68894-children-s-publishing-in-china-highlights-from-the-first-gkc-china-deep-dive.html

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Journal News: "Pace University wins national economics competition"

12/09/2015

Journal News: "Pace University wins national economics competition"

For the second consecutive year, a team from Pace University has won the prestigious College Federal Reserve Challenge, a national competition testing students' knowledge and understanding of the U.S. economy, monetary policy and the role of the Federal Reserve system.

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/news/local/westchester/2015/12/09/pace-univer...

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace students again win national Federal Reserve contest"

12/07/2015

Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace students again win national Federal Reserve contest"

An undergraduate team from Pace University last week won the national College Fed Challenge for the second consecutive year at the annual competition in Washington, D.C. The event tests students’ understanding of the U.S. economy, monetary policymaking and the role of the Federal Reserve System.

Five teams competed at the national level in the 12th annual challenge after winning Federal Reserve district competitions around the country. The Pace University team in November won New York’s regional competition for the fourth year in a row, according to a university spokesman.

Pace’s 2014 win in the national competition was the first for the New York Federal Reserve District in the history of the College Fed Challenge.

All seven members of this year’s Pace team are economics and business economics students in the university’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. They are Katherine Craig, Daniella Gambino, Omar Habib, Jozef Lampa, Melissa Navas, Jonathan Okane and Yuliya Palianok. Pace professors Greg Colman and Mark Weinstock served as the team’s advisers.

Read more: http://westfaironline.com/76181/pace-students-again-win-national-federal-reserve-contest/

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Telehealth program expands in Westchester"

12/07/2015

Westchester County Business Journal: "Telehealth program expands in Westchester"

Pam Leichtweis, a resident at the Low-Savin/Soundview Apartments at United Hebrew in New Rochelle, has her vitals taken just about every Friday. Twice a week, a Pace University student sets up a space in the community’s activity room for routine medical tests: blood pressure, blood-oxygen level, pulse and weight.

The student puts the information into an online portal that is accessed by a team of nurses working remotely who regularly monitor the participants’ health levels.

For the last two years, this has been a part of Leichtweis’ weekly routine and a chance to mingle with some of the other 50 Soundview residents who participate in the Telehealth Intervention Programs for Seniors, or TIPS, initiative.

It never occurred to Leichtweis that one day these routine tests would be life-saving.

“One day I came down for the vitals, and my whole my body was swollen and I couldn’t understand why. So they took my vitals and they said ‘You have to call the doctor, your blood pressure is very low,’” Leichtweis said, adding that she had been warned for weeks by the TIPS nurses to call her doctor.

When she eventually did call, she said, the doctor told her to call 911. The emergency room doctor noticed the low blood pressure and detected that Leichtweis had an irregular heartbeat.

“They kept me there for a couple of days and they put me on medicine. I’m still on the medicine and I still run low (blood pressure), but not as low as it was,” she said. “If TIPS didn’t tell me what to do, I probably would have been gone, but TIPS helped me a lot to realize that I do have to call the doctor and I have to follow up on everything.”

TIPS was developed out of a pilot program that was in part started at Soundview in 2013 between Pace University and Vital Care TeleHealth Services LLC, a White Plains-based company.

Read more: http://westfaironline.com/76091/telehealth-program-expands-in-westchester/

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Homeland Security Today: "ANALYSIS - New Legislation Needed to Address Terrorists’ Use of Phone Encryption"

12/03/2015

Homeland Security Today: "ANALYSIS - New Legislation Needed to Address Terrorists’ Use of Phone Encryption"

France maintains one of the most sophisticated telecommunications programs in the world, yet they failed to recognize the recent coordinated terrorist attacks in Paris, writes Darren Hayes, Assistant Professor and Director of Cybersecurity at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York. These horrific events are a wake-up call for the US public and lawmakers. Smartphones are undoubtedly the most important sources of digital evidence today, but law enforcement and counterterrorism agencies can no longer perform their jobs effectively.

Read more: http://www.hstoday.us/briefings/daily-news-analysis/single-article/analysis-new-legislation-needed-to-address-terrorists-use-of-encryption/a4a07aadabf6fa2417b4c411ab56d755.html

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