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Journal News: "NY bill passes: Elephants out as entertainment"

06/12/2017

Journal News: "NY bill passes: Elephants out as entertainment"

Elephants would be banned from circuses and other performances in New York within two years under a bill the state Legislature recently approved.

The measure will now head to Gov. Andrew Cuomo's desk for review. The bill was praised by animal-rights groups and advocated for by students at Pace University in Westchester County.

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Hudson Valley News Network: "Kuh Named First Haub Professor of Environmental Law"

06/08/2017

Hudson Valley News Network: "Kuh Named First Haub Professor of Environmental Law"

WHITE PLAINS – Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law announces that Katrina Fischer Kuh will join the Law School’s faculty as the first Haub Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law.

An accomplished scholar with extensive experience working in the government and private sectors to protect the environment and natural resources, Professor Kuh will begin her role as a full time faculty member teaching classes in the fall of 2017.

“We are so pleased to welcome Katrina Kuh to Pace Law as the Haub Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law,” said Dean David Yassky. “Our Environmental Law Program is nationally recognized, and the addition of Professor Kuh and her environmental law and teaching expertise, along with her experience working in environmental litigation only bolsters the program. Professor Kuh is a tremendous addition to the Law School.”

“Professor Kuh’s cutting edge research offers new and creative approaches to deal with climate change,” said Jason Czarnezki, Associate Dean and Kerlin Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law.  “Her addition further strengthens our world renowned environmental faculty.”

“I’m humbled and excited to join one of the country’s most respected and innovative environmental law programs,” offers Professor Kuh.  “Pace faculty, alumni and students have long been at the forefront of developing law and policy to protect the environment and promote sustainability.  I look forward to contributing to this important work and thank the Haub family for the opportunity.”

Professor Kuh comes to the Elisabeth Haub School of Law from the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University where she taught Environmental Law, International Environmental Law, Global Climate Change and U.S. Law, Administrative Law, and Torts.  Her scholarship, which focuses on climate change, sustainability, and second generation environmental challenges, has been widely published. Professor Kuh is also the co-editor of “The Law of Adaptation to Climate Change: United States and International Aspects” and Co-Chair of the International Bar Association Working Group on the Legal Aspects of Climate Change Adaptation.

Prior to her work in academia, Professor Kuh worked in the environmental and litigation practice groups in the New York office of Arnold & Porter LLP and served as an advisor on natural resource policy in the United States Senate.  She received her law degree from the Yale Law School and served as a law clerk to Judge Charles S. Haight of the District Court for the Southern District of New York and Judge Diana Gribbon Motz of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.

Pace Law’s environmental law program is nationally recognized and is ranked third in the country by “US News & World Report.” As previously announced, funding for the Haub Professor of Environmental Law was made possible by a gift from the Haub family.

http://hudsonvalleynewsnetwork.com/2017/06/07/kuh-named-first-haub-professor-environmental-law/

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Journal News: "Suffer the children: When broken romance turns deadly"

06/08/2017

Journal News: "Suffer the children: When broken romance turns deadly"

Photo: New Rochelle Police Commissioner Patrick Carroll talks about the arrest of Neil White in the alleged suffocation death of his 7-year old daughter Gabrielle White, during a press conference in New Rochelle, June 7, 2017.

. . . “In any family, children are associated with their parents and in any divorce situation it’s likely that children are used as pawns," said Linda Fentiman, an author and professor of criminal law and health law at Pace University Law School in White Plains.

Fentiman noted that it is more common for men, and not women, to target their own children to hurt their female partner. 

“There are certain kinds of domestic violence, sometimes called intimate terrorism, in which the partner deliberately targets the children as a way of getting at the mother," she said. "So, a lot of domestic violence is both physical and psychological."

Fentiman said that 30 to 60 percent of instances of child abuse also involve domestic violence, and vice versa.

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New York State Legislature Votes to Ban Elephants in Entertainment

06/07/2017

New York State Legislature Votes to Ban Elephants in Entertainment

Bill Sponsored by Senator Murphy and Assemblywoman Paulin Originated With Pace Environmental Policy Clinic Students

PLEASANTVILLE, NY -- June 7, 2017 – A bill that bans the use of elephants in circuses and other forms of entertainment is headed to Governor Andrew Cuomo for his signature following passage in both houses of the New York State legislature. The “elephant protection act,” originated and lobbied by students of the Pace University Environmental Policy Clinic, supported by The Humane Society of the United States, and sponsored by State Senator Terrence Murphy (R-40) and Assemblywoman Amy Paulin (D-88), cites the “physical  and  psychological harm  due  to  the  living  conditions  and  treatment to which [elephants] are subjected.”

Students of Pace’s Environmental Policy Clinic devoted their spring semester to assuring passage of the legislation which would make New York the first state in the nation to institute such a ban. They maintain that the methods used to train elephants have a direct impact on the survival of the species.

“The elephant protection act reflects the values of my generation, who don’t want animals to suffer for the sake of human entertainment,” said Paola Idrovo, a student in Pace’s Environmental Policy Clinic. “Through the experience of writing and lobbying for the bill, we gained a first-hand understanding about the cruelty to which entertainment elephants are subjected and how that threatens the entire species.”

“A performing elephant is a tortured elephant,” said Michelle Land, Pace clinical professor of environmental law and policy. “Given the global controversy about elephants in the wild, New York State has a duty to end these practices that foster false values and misinformation about the species. We believe New York’s leadership will embolden other states to prohibit performing elephants, and put an end to this barbaric relic of a bygone era.”

Senator Terrence Murphy said, “It is a fact that elephants used for entertainment purposes suffer irreparable physical and psychological harm that shortens their lifespans. They spend a significant portion of their lives crammed inside trucks, trains or trailers, and then they are poked, prodded or shocked into performing tricks. Thankfully, we have come to our senses as a society and we no longer tolerate the abuse of performing elephants. We have taken a bold step as the first state to pass legislation outlawing elephants having to suffer for our amusement. Let us hope it starts a national and international trend.”

“Performance elephants have been exploited and abused for too long,” Assemblywoman Amy Paulin said. “We can no longer ignore the cruelty that they have endured for our amusement. Confinement, torture and unhealthy living conditions have led to early death for these intelligent, gentle animals.”

“Elephants are a treasured species, and there is growing popular support for their protection,” said Brian Shapiro, New York state director for The Humane Society of the United States. “We applaud Senator Murphy and Assemblymember Paulin for their leadership, and respectfully urge Governor Cuomo to sign this historic bill into law.”

The Pace Environmental Policy Clinic trains undergraduate students through a program of learning and service that encourages students to apply their Pace University education to the solution of real-world problems in the professional world. This interdisciplinary course, housed within Dyson College, is an example of the “Pace Path,” where students apply classroom theory directly to a real-world experience, and is co-taught by Professors John Cronin and Land.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences:  Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

 

###

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

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Agence France-Presse: "Bloomberg leads mass coalition declaring support for Paris climate deal"

06/05/2017

Agence France-Presse: "Bloomberg leads mass coalition declaring support for Paris climate deal"

Former New York mayor, Michael Bloomberg, seen here meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron and Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo, leads a group of US business and government leaders pledging continued support for the Paris climate accord (AFP Photo/CHRISTOPHE PETIT TESSON)

. . . Darren Rosenblum, law professor at Pace University in New York, says the business community is coming together to address the most direct threat posed by a US pullout -- loss of competitiveness as the rest of the world barrels toward a greener economy.

"I do think that in the end, the effect is a positive one," he said.

"It starts to put in place the mechanisms for US companies and local governments to follow international norms."

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Journal News: "Trump budget will have negative effect on the nursing workforce: View"

06/05/2017

Journal News: "Trump budget will have negative effect on the nursing workforce: View"

"On the heels of the announcement of President Trump’s proposed federal budget, the public is beginning to visualize what the world may look like after the Trump administration is through with it," writes Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean and Professor, College of Health Professions, Pace University. "Those of us in the health care industry are concerned for the future health of an already aging and ailing population.

"At the College of Health Professions at Pace University in New York, we prepare future health care professionals to enter the workforce. Reacting to President Trump's proposed budget, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the National League for Nursing expressed alarm at the negative impact that the budget will likely have on the nursing workforce, nursing research, and the nation's access to high-quality nursing care. I echo their concerns.

"Their concern is in response to the budget’s near elimination of funding for programs that help educate aspiring nurses and nurse educators. For more than 50 years, Health Resources and Services Administration's Title VIII Nursing Workforce Development Programs have improved access and quality of health care in under-served communities. This funding strengthens educational programs, faculty recruitment and retention, clinical lab enhancements, loans, scholarships, and services that assist students in completing their nursing education. Many students have benefited from workforce funding over the years, including myself in pursuit of baccalaureate and master’s degrees in nursing. Because of this support, I have given back a hundred fold over nearly 50 years of clinical practice and higher education, as have many of my colleagues.

"Eliminating $146 million in Title VIII nursing program funding seems in direct opposition to the President's stated goal of increasing access and reducing costs. Private and state funding will not be sufficient to meet current and future nursing and nurse educator demands. Nurses are critical contributors to a healthy population. Without sufficient providers, who will address the growing health care needs of our nation?

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WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "NY Congressman's Amendment To Slow Anchorage Site Proposal Advances"

05/25/2017

WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "NY Congressman's Amendment To Slow Anchorage Site Proposal Advances"

. . . John Cronin is senior fellow for environmental affairs at Pace University’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment.

“I think the amendment that Congressman Maloney proposed for the Coast Guard project is a good one,” says Cronin. “I don’t think it goes far enough.”

Democratic Congressman Jerrold Nadler sits on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. Cronin, who also is managing faculty of the Pace Environmental Policy Clinic, says he has spoken with Nadler’s staff about the following proposal.

“The Environmental Policy Clinic at Pace has also proposed an amendment to the annual Coast Guard authorization that would make the Coast Guard proposal for the Hudson a major federal action — that’s a designation — a major federal action under the National Environmental Policy Act, which would then require the Coast Guard to follow the rules of the National Environmental Policy Act in writing an extensive Environmental Impact Statement,” Cronin says. “This would also require hearings, it would require another public comment period, it would involve additional federal agencies and all stakeholders and would launch a process that would probably have gone for at least three years, not one year.”

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Mid-Hudson News: "State may ban elephant acts"

05/25/2017

Mid-Hudson News: "State may ban elephant acts"

ALBANY – The state Senate passed legislation that would outlaw the use of elephants in circuses, fairs, TV, movies and any other form of entertainment. 

The bill was written by students at Pace University.  They were in Albany on Wednesday with their faculty members, John Cronin and Michelle Land.

Cronin, a resident of Cold Spring and the senior fellow for environmental affairs at Pace, noted the only way to get an elephant to perform is to torture it and make it afraid to disobey.

“This is done with something called bull hooks," Cronin said. "It is done by depriving them of food, by chaining their legs. In addition to that they spend hours on end in trucks and train cars. It’s totally inhumane.”

It is expected that the Assembly will take up the bill in the coming weeks. If approved and signed by the governor, New York would become the first state in the union to ban the use of elephants in entertainment.

The action comes, coincidentally, days after Ringling Brothers Circus ended 146 years of performances with a final show on Long Island.  The circus retired its elephants a year ago.

http://www.midhudsonnews.com/News/2017/May/25/NY_elephant_ban-25May17.html

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Documentary by Pace students premieres"

05/22/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Documentary by Pace students premieres"

A documentary created by students at Pace University, which examines the impact of development on Florida’s ecosystem had its premier at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville on May 10. In addition, the film has been released for worldwide viewing on YouTube. The title is “Ridge to Ranch to River to Reef: Florida’s Conservation Connections.”

Students in the documentary film class spent their spring break filming in Florida, and covered various parts of the state from the Gulf Coast to the interior. The film looks at the continuing population increase in Florida, with about 1,000 people moving there every day, and about 175,000 acres undergoing new development each year. 

Pace students Shakira Evans, Nicholas Farris, Allison Fennik, Camilla Klævold, Zhenming Liu, Megan Meyer, Felicia Robcke, Rachel Weiss and Kelly Whritenour worked on the film in the course taught by Maria Luskay.

https://westfaironline.com/89535/documentary-pace-students-premieres/

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Los Angeles Times: "NAACP will oust its president and revamp to better combat 'an uncertain era' under Trump"

05/22/2017

Los Angeles Times: "NAACP will oust its president and revamp to better combat 'an uncertain era' under Trump"

Photo: Cornell W. Brooks, president of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, speaks regarding the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, on Aug. 11, 2014, in Jennings, Mo. (Michael B. Thomas / Getty Images)

. . . Randolph M. McLaughlin, a law professor at Pace University who has studied civil rights movements, said he hoped the organization — founded in 1909 when Jim Crow was still rampant throughout the South — would thrive.

“It is critical that the NAACP has the most dynamic and creative activist leadership during the Trump era,” said McLaughlin. “The threats to civil rights and civil liberties demand no less from the oldest civil rights organization in the United States.”

Read more here.

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