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Jonathan Ohadi and fellow researchers at Pace University explored the use of text messaging for ongoing maintenance in romantic relationships featured in "The Vindicator"

02/12/2018

Jonathan Ohadi and fellow researchers at Pace University explored the use of text messaging for ongoing maintenance in romantic relationships featured in "The Vindicator"

The Vindicator: "Managing marriage by text message"

From the Vindicator:

...Jonathan Ohadi and fellow researchers at Pace University explored the use of text messaging for ongoing maintenance in romantic relationships. In the January issue of Computers In Human Behavior, Ohadi’s group explained that something as simple as perceiving similarity in how we text may lead to greater levels of satisfaction.

Using a sample of 205 adults in romantic relationships, they also found that we tend to feel more satisfied if we think our partner is initiating contact with us more frequently (“I miss you”). Sending a quick, unexpected text to a partner has the potential to set off similar kinds of endorphins we feel when someone likes something we’ve posted online.

Of course, initiating this contact is only a start. When all else fails, talk about how you text each other and set communication expectations for building a fulfilling relationship.

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Pace University sponsored a gala celebrating Black activism in "Workers World" featuring Monica Moorehead and Karina Ross, vice-president of Pace University’s BSU, Feb. 1

02/12/2018

Pace University sponsored a gala celebrating Black activism in "Workers World" featuring Monica Moorehead and Karina Ross, vice-president of Pace University’s BSU, Feb. 1

Workers World: "Monica Moorehead to Black students: “Become an activist”

From Workers World:

Edited from a talk given by Monica Moorehead, WWP secretariat member, at “A gala celebrating Black activism,” sponsored by the Pace University Black Student Union in New York City on Feb. 1.

When Karina told me that this program was a tribute to Black activism, I thought what might be of interest is to let you know some of my personal background. Because, as the old saying goes, in order to know where you are headed, you have to know where you come from, right?

And my personal journey has been very much influenced by political events, large and small. There is a Marxist saying that your being determines your consciousness or how you think.

My journey began with being born under racist segregation in Tuscaloosa, Ala.  My mother, Consuela Lee, a jazz pianist and composer, was raised in Snow Hill, Ala., located between Selma and Montgomery, important battlegrounds during the Civil Rights movement, and my father, Isaac Thomas Moorehead, a college basketball coach, was born in Suffolk, Va., not far from the heroic slave rebellion led by Nat Turner. My mother’s grandfather, William James Edwards, founded a school in Snow Hill for former slaves in 1893, predicated on the philosophy of Booker T. Washington.

My dad grew up under extreme poverty. It was rumored that his father, who migrated from the Virgin Islands, was lynched before my dad was born. So my grandmother was a single parent who was forced to become a domestic worker for whites all her adult life, starting at the age of 12.

When I was three years old in 1955, my parents joined the Montgomery Bus Boycott, four months after the lynching of 14-year-old Emmett Till in Mississippi.  The boycott was sparked by Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat to a white man. My parents, professors at Alabama State University, a historically Black college, were part of a tiny minority of Black people who owned cars, so they volunteered their time to drive boycotters to and from work. My parents also attended Dr. King’s church.

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Pace University chose to expand its support for the Pace Women’s Justice Center in "Westchester Magazine"

02/12/2018

Pace University chose to expand its support for the Pace Women’s Justice Center in "Westchester Magazine"

Westchester Magazine: "The Power of Women’s Collective Giving"

From Westchester Magazine:

White Plains-based Impact100 is embracing a bold new approach to philanthropy — and making a big difference to Westchester residents in need.

In some cases, Impact100 grants catalyze further support for their beneficiaries. For example, Pace University chose to expand its support for the Pace Women’s Justice Center after Impact100 helped fund construction for their new walk-in legal clinic, allowing them to serve almost 500 more people each year. “The Impact100 grant started the ball rolling and we are growing and expanding our services,” says the Women’s Justice Center’s Executive Director, Cindy Kanusher. “We are so grateful.”

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Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RDN, assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University is quoted in "Reader's Digest" about Cooking Mistakes

02/12/2018

Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RDN, assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University is quoted in "Reader's Digest" about Cooking Mistakes

Reader's Digest: "11 Cooking Mistakes That Can Make Your Food Toxic"

From the Article in Readers' Digest":

...While raw or undercooked meat can pose health hazards, so can overcooked or charred meats. "Cooking meats above 300°F, which usually results from grilling or pan frying, can form compounds called HCAs (heterocyclic amines) and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), that may be harmful to human DNA," warns Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RDN, assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University. "Some research suggests that when metabolized, these compounds may activate enzymes linked to cancer risk." While the research is limited, Cooper believes there's enough evidence to recommend reducing your exposure to these chemical compounds. "Avoid cooking foods for any length of time over an open flame or hot metal surface, turn meat frequently during cooking, and cut away charred portions of meat," she says.

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Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., RD, the director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at Pace University’s College of Health Professions is quoted in "Men's Health" about healthful shopping at the best prices

02/12/2018

Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., RD, the director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at Pace University’s College of Health Professions is quoted in "Men's Health" about healthful shopping at the best prices

Men's Health: "I Tried to Eat Vegan for a Week on $57, and It Was a Colossal Failure"

From the Article in Men's Health:

Veganism is slowly becoming mainstream. While we used to consider vegans a fairly small niche, the vegan population is rapidly growing: according to a 2017 consumer report, 6% of Americans self-identify as vegans, as opposed to one percent in 2014. Even some professional athletes are now going vegan.

There are a few reasons why veganism is so buzzy right now: some believe a vegan diet has environmental benefits, while others (perhaps mistakenly) believe it'll help them lose weight. But regardless of the motives, the truth is that going vegan can get tricky. Not getting enough protein is a problem, as is not getting enough B12 or other vitamins. Plus, many have argued that veganism is way too expensive to be a viable dietary option for those at the lower or even middle end of the economic spectrum.

“It takes vigilance and knowledge about healthful shopping in order to obtain the nutrient-dense foods at the best prices,” says Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., RD, the director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at Pace University’s College of Health Professions.

Cooper also notes that veganism is much harder if you live in a food desert, where there isn’t easy access to a supermarket or a large grocery store.“While it’s easy to say that ‘anyone can eat healthfully if they try hard enough,’ many Americans lack access to healthful, fresh foods. Many of these folks end up getting fewer nutrients and more empty calories dollar for dollar," she says.

Although I am a proud carnivore, I wanted to see for myself whether veganism is only a choice available to the privileged, or if it was possible to do so on a limited budget. That's why I tried to go vegan for a week on a little over $50.

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Journal News: "Be aware that sex traffickers are 'grooming' and ensnaring kids: View"

02/08/2018

Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law Professor Mimi Rocah is featured in the Journal News regarding child sex trafficking

The horrific crimes of Larry Nassar vividly demonstrate what law enforcement and service providers working with children know all too well, that sex offenses against children are perpetrated by predators from all walks of life — gang members, drug traffickers, and also doctors, teachers, coaches, members of clergy and other seemingly upstanding members of society. These predators are master manipulators of children’s inherent innocence, insecurities and trust of authority. So many of the more than 200 survivors who gave brave and powerful statements in Michigan courts in the Nassar case spoke about this deception. 

As a federal prosecutor, I have seen so many cases where predators, aided by the anonymity and reach of the internet, targeted children, commonly 10-15 years old, who were most susceptible to flattery, affection, refuge from typical familial problems, and even promises of material goods like phones and jewelry. This practice of gaining a child’s trust by establishing an emotional connection is known as “grooming.” Once their trust is gained, victims are persuaded or coerced into sexual exploitation and sexual abuse over the internet or in person, often so that the trafficker can receive money or drugs. This is sex trafficking and it is happening right here in our backyards.    

What can be done to help curb these horrible crimes against children?  First, we need to spread the message that these are crimes of deception and manipulation. We need to teach well-meaning parents and adults who work with children, and even children themselves (in age-appropriate ways), how to recognize grooming tactics.

Recently, the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University hosted a conference aimed at educating people about this issue. Attendees heard from a young woman who was lured into a relationship by people who groomed her and then sold her for sex on Backpage.com when she was 15 years old.  Attendees also heard about the federal prosecution of Mark Castagnetta of New Paltz, who met two minor victims through an adult fetish website and enticed them to his home to engage in a sexually abusive “relationship.” Castagnetta supplied them with illegal drugs and induced them to engage in sexual conduct with others in exchange for drugs and money.  Castagnetta was eventually convicted of the federal crime of sex trafficking and sentenced to 18 years in prison. 

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MSNBC: "Pace University's Law Professor Mimi Rocah talks with Brian Williams about possible interview of President Trump"

02/07/2018

Pace University's Law Professor Mimi Rocah talks with Brian Williams on MSNBC about possible interview of President Trump by the Special Counsel and how prosecutors plan for interviews by knowing their facts & witnesses

Mimi Rocah, a distinguished fellow and criminal justice at Pace University School of Law is a former assistant US attorny for the Southern District of NY.  Professor Mimi Rocah talks with Brian Williams on MSNBC about possible interview of President Trump by the Special Counsel and how prosecutors plan for interviews by knowing their facts & witnesses.

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Daily Voice: "Neurobiologist Picked As New Provost At Pace University"

02/06/2018

Pace University President Marvin Krislov has announced that Vanya Quiñones, Ph.D., a neurobiologist and biopsychologist will assume the role of Provost of Pace, effective July 1 featured in Daily Voice

Pace University President Marvin Krislov has announced that Vanya Quiñones, Ph.D., a neurobiologist and biopsychologist who serves as Associate Provost for Student Success and Retention at CUNY’s Hunter College, will assume the role of Provost of Pace, effective July 1.

Quiñones brings to Pace decades of experience in scientific research, academic administration, program- and research-focused fundraising, and a long record of working to improve diversity in science and the arts.

As a young researcher at The Rockefeller University, Quiñones realized that she saw few who looked like her. This led to her career-long focus on creating opportunities for underrepresented students across scientific disciplines and within the arts. Quiñones holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and master’s in cell biology from the University of Puerto Rico and a doctorate in neurobiology and physiology from Rutgers University.

“We were looking for a creative and inspiring provost,” Krislov said. “We found one in Dr. Quiñones. She has a compelling vision for our academic program, and she shares our commitment to diversity and inclusion. She’s an impressive academic, an inspirational leader and a champion of student success. Most important, she is a tireless advocate for the transformative impact of an education.”

“Pace University routinely demonstrates how higher education can change lives,” Quiñones said. “I have dedicated my career to improving minority representation in STEM and the arts, and Pace is the perfect place for me to build on that work. I’m honored to have been selected as provost and will work tirelessly to help faculty and students maximize their potential.”

Pace Board of Trustees Chairman Mark Besca added, “There has never been a more exciting time at Pace University. . . . I’m confident that with Dr. Quiñones serving as our new provost, Pace will build on its strong foundation of academic excellence and student achievement.”

Quiñones will succeed Interim Provost Nira Herrmann, Ph.D., who will reassume her role as dean of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace. Herrmann has served as interim provost since July 2017, and will continue in that role for the remainder of this academic year.

This appointment follows an exhaustive national search that included exceptional candidates from across the country.

Quiñones joined Hunter College in 1997 as an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology. As a tenured professor, she went on to lead its biopsychology and neuroscience doctoral graduate sub-program before assuming the role of department chair. During her 20 years at Hunter she has held numerous positions culminating in her current role as associate provost for student success and retention. A few highlights from her distinguished career include:

● Published more than 70 peer-reviewed articles and given over 200 presentations, monographs or invited papers.

● Brought more than $25 million in funding for Hunter from the NIH, private foundations, the Department of Education, among others grants. Many of the grants were to support underrepresented minorities, including the NIH’s Career Opportunities in Research and Enhancing Neuroscience Diversity through Undergraduate Education Experiences (ENDURE) programs.

● Supported cross-departmental infrastructure projects at Hunter, including renovating the Baker Theater Building and Library Learning Centers, developing a STEM flex laboratory, and design/renovation of the Online Technology Center.

● Increased department funding by $3.4 million during her six years as chair of Psychology (Hunter’s largest and highest extramurally funded department).

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace University’s new ‘Opportunity Scholarship’ responds to free public college tuition"

02/06/2018

Pace University’s new ‘Opportunity Scholarship’ for students from New York entering its Pforzheimer Honors College responds to free public college tuition featured in Westchester County Business Journal

Pace University announced a new scholarship for students from New York entering its Pforzheimer Honors College. The Opportunity Scholarship offers additional aid to students under similar terms to a state program that offers free in-state tuition at public colleges.

The donor-funded scholarship will offer up to $5,000 to students who are New York state residents and come from a family with a gross income of $125,000 or less.

Those qualifications are similar to the terms of the Excelsior Scholarship, the state program championed by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo that offers free in-state tuition at all SUNY and CUNY colleges for students from families making $125,000 or less. The scholarship provides qualifying students with additional funds to cover the cost of tuition left over after state and federal financial aid grants.

The program was adopted in last year’s state budget, despite the protests of private colleges that said it would create an uneven playing field.

Related: Colleges weigh uncertain impact of state’s Excelsior Scholarship debut

The new Opportunity Scholarship would be in addition to existing scholarships for honors students, the school said. Pace noted that 92 percent of all its students receive some form of financial aid.

Pace is one of the relatively few private colleges participating in the state’s new Enhanced Tuition Awards program, which provides up to $6,000 in aid to students from New York attending participating private colleges and universities. The program was created partly in response to the concerns private colleges had with the Excelsior Scholarship, but only about a third of the state’s private institutions are participating.

Pace expects that about 20 percent of students entering its honors college will be eligible for the Opportunity Scholarship. Students need to be enrolled in the Honors College at Pace in their freshman year to qualify and can renew the scholarship each year by remaining in good standing with a grade point average above 3.0.

Pace enrolls about 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs across campuses in Westchester County and lower Manhattan.

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Press Release: Pace University Hires Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld

02/06/2018

Press Release: Pace University Hires Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld

Seasoned communications strategists to support Pace President Marvin Krislov and highlight University successes

NEW YORK, NY, FEBRUARY 6—Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications, respectively.

Ternes comes to Pace from DKC, a public relations firm consistently named one of the most influential public relations companies in the United States, where she served as executive vice president. Her client list included Fortune 50 companies, tech start-ups, biotech firms, and real estate leaders. Prior to that she worked as Chief of Staff to former Congressman Anthony Weiner in New York and Washington, D.C. As Executive Director of Media Relations, she will sharpen the University’s focus on press engagement and help tell the story of the nation’s most upwardly mobile private nonprofit university.

Oxfeld began his career as a journalist and has more recently worked in marketing communications. He was an editor at “New York Magazine” and the theater critic for the “New York Observer.” He has been a copywriter at Ogilvy and the director of content at Vox Creative, Vox Media’s content studio. He has also worked on speechwriting and editorial projects for several political communications firms. In his new role reporting to President Marvin Krislov, Oxfeld will develop presidential communications and work closely with the university’s media relations and editorial staff to ensure consistent messaging that strengthens Pace’s position as a leading private educational institution.

“Pace has an impressive story of student success, and more than any other private university we demonstrate the transformational impact of an education,” said Krislov. “We are a well-kept secret that needs to be less well-kept. I know Marie and Jesse will use their skills and expertise to shine a bright spotlight on the important work that we do.”

“With President Krislov at the helm, there has never been a more exciting time to be at Pace,” said Ternes. “Every day Pace is creating transformational opportunities for its students and I couldn’t be more thrilled to be a part of that.”

“Pace does important, meaningful work, and not enough people know about it,” said Oxfeld. “I’m excited to help President Krislov tell that story.”

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its College of Health Professions, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

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