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New York Times: "On Fake Instagram, a Chance to Be Real"

11/19/2015

New York Times: "On Fake Instagram, a Chance to Be Real"

. . . More than half of the 92 percent of teenagers ages 13 to 17 who go online daily use Instagram. While young people of every generation have struggled with how to project their identities onto the greater world, teenagers of 2015 arguably have it worse. Given the pervasiveness of social media, the feedback mechanism never shuts down.

“Before, while you were sleeping, you were sleeping,” said Leora Trub, an assistant professor of psychology at Pace University and a clinical psychologist who works with adolescents and young adults. “Nobody was judging you, and you weren’t waking up to an entire other self that existed in this online space that’s being commented on.”

Dr. Trub supervised the research on a study that found a link between the number of strangers that Instagram users follow and the possibility that they experience depressive symptoms, such as fearfulness, loneliness or fatigue.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/19/fashion/instagram-finstagram-fake-acco...

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Computerworld: "U.S. may be financing encryption apps to stay ahead of terrorists"

11/19/2015

Computerworld: "U.S. may be financing encryption apps to stay ahead of terrorists"

The U.S. government's financial support for the development of smartphone encryption apps doesn't surprise security experts.

U.S. intelligence agencies are probably involved in funding commercial encryption apps through the government's Open Technology Fund to stay on top of terrorists and organized criminals that use encryption to cloak their communications, several security experts said Wednesday.

"It would not surprise me if federal agencies were funding encryption apps because it is possibly the only option available to monitor terrorism and organized crime," said Darren Hayes, assistant professor and director of cybersecurity at Pace University. "ISIS members have been actively pushing potential recruits to move to encrypted communications."

Read more: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3006270/encryption/us-may-be-financ...

 

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U.S. News: "Determine How Long It Will Take to Earn an Undergrad Degree Online"

11/19/2015

U.S. News: "Determine How Long It Will Take to Earn an Undergrad Degree Online"

. . Figure out if any college credit can be applied toward the degree: Students will need to go through a transfer credit evaluation to determine if any previous college coursework will be accepted at the new institution, says Christine Shakespeare, assistant vice president of continuing and professional education at Pace University.

And there may be a limit on the amount of credits that can be applied, she says.

Read more: http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2015/11/18/determine-how-long-it-will-take-to-earn-an-undergrad-degree-online

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CNBC: "Square's place in a crowded mobile payments market"

11/19/2015

CNBC: "Square's place in a crowded mobile payments market"

. . . requiring additional hardware to transfer funds could limit companies' expansion as payments processors, said Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York.

Case in point: Apple is reportedly in talks with banks about its own person-to-person payments system, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal.

"The fact that there is no additional hardware with Apple's new [person-to-person] payment system will make it more attractive than other payment systems, like Square," Hayes said.

Read more: http://www.cnbc.com/2015/11/17/squares-place-in-a-crowded-mobile-payments-market.html

 

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The Hill: "Feds fight to end phone secrecy after Paris attacks"

11/19/2015

The Hill: "Feds fight to end phone secrecy after Paris attacks"

 . . . Apple, Google and other corporations have stood firm against pressure to either decrypt data or install a back door for law enforcement.

Representatives for several companies declined to speak to The Hill for this story, reflecting the sensitivity of the issue.

But sources in the technology sector generally took a dim view on suggestions that the Paris attacks would cause tech companies to shift their positions.

They said that the companies have too much at stake to bend on allowing law enforcement access to their customers’ data and that many hope the debate will eventually cool.

“It’s all about PR,” said Darren Hayes, director of cybersecurity at Pace University.

Read more: http://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/260537-feds-fight-to-end-phone-secrecy-after-paris-attacks

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CFO: "The Reform We Need Is Unlikely to Occur"

11/17/2015

CFO: "The Reform We Need Is Unlikely to Occur"

Politicians complain about the Internal Revenue Code, writes Philip G. Cohen, an associate professor of taxation at Pace University Lubin School of Business and a retired vice president of tax and general tax counsel at Unilever United States. They grumble about how the tax rules are far too complex and that the statutory rates, at least on the corporate side, are far too high, dwarfing those of our trading partners.

What they grumble far less about is that our tax laws are, in their present condition, teeming with provisions benefiting various special interests — not by accident, but by design.

Many in Congress crave seats on their respective chambers’ tax-writing committees. Is it because of an academic interest in tax policy? Because of the desire to enact tax laws in the best interest of the American people? Unfortunately, I think the answers are no and no, in many instances. Legislators yearn for these assignments because it opens the campaign-contribution spigots. Donors generally fund politicians because they want some quid pro quo. This often takes the form of a tax provision advancing the interests of the supporter.

Read more: http://ww2.cfo.com/tax/2015/11/the-tax-reform-we-need-is-unlikely-to-occur/

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ESPN: "Intro to Pace salary projection series"

11/17/2015

ESPN: "Intro to Pace salary projection series"

Pace Law School in White Plains won the sixth-annual Tulane National Baseball Arbitration Competition in New Orleans in 2013. This week, Dan Masi (Pace '14), Steven Stieglitz (Pace '16), W. Paul Alvarez (Pace ’16) and Bryan Kelly (Pace ’17) offer salary projections for the New York Mets' arbitration-eligible players, including detailed analyses for Matt Harvey, Lucas Duda, Jeurys Familia and Addison Reed.

The Pace team will explain MLB’s arbitration process and predict the salaries for these players using the same methods agents and team officials employ.

Here's the Pace team's primer on the arbitration process:

Read more: http://espn.go.com/blog/newyork/mets/post/_/id/113323/intro-to-pace-salary-projection-series-3

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Computerworld: "Apple's P2P mobile payment service would 'create a shockwave' in the industry"

11/17/2015

Computerworld: "Apple's P2P mobile payment service would 'create a shockwave' in the industry"

. . . An Apple P2P mobile payment service "could be a viable model in other countries," added Darren Hayes, an assistant professor and director of cybersecurity at Pace University.

"P2P payments have been around for many years in certain countries where credit cards aren't trusted," Hayes said. Also, PayPal isn't available in every country, which could give Apple a potential advantage.

Apple's iPhones are highly secure and users are likely to trust them for P2P as they have for Android Pay, Hayes said.

Hayes said he is often called as an expert witness in courtrooms where he provides smartphone forensics testimony, after working with law enforcement agencies to break down confiscated smartphones to find critical data needed for investigations. He said iPhones are the most difficult smartphones to break into.

Given Apple's high level of security with the iPhone and Apple Pay, it would likely "engender trust for people who are looking for alternatives to pay, as well as for using something other than a credit card," Hayes said. "It's just a logical step for Apple to move to P2P."

Read more: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3005212/mobile-payments/apples-p2p-mobile-payment-service-would-create-a-shockwave-in-the-industry.html

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CNBC: "Data encryption a 'matter of national security': Expert"

11/17/2015

CNBC: "Data encryption a 'matter of national security': Expert"

In the wake of the terrorist attacks in Paris, major tech companies should revisit the way they encrypt private data, Pace University's Darren Hayes told CNBC on Tuesday.

Currently, most consumer data is encrypted to prevent outside access to personal information, which can be used with malicious intent, but companies should allow government agencies to access that data when they have a warrant, said Hayes, assistant professor and cyber-security director at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

See the video: http://www.cnbc.com/2015/11/17/data-encryption-a-matter-of-national-security-expert.html

 

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Computerworld: "Paris attacks demand 'wake-up call' on smartphone encryption"

11/17/2015

Computerworld: "Paris attacks demand 'wake-up call' on smartphone encryption"

. . . "A lot of people in these terror groups have developed encryption techniques, and France has one of the most sophisticated systems for monitoring communications. If France didn't pick up this attack in advance, it's a wake-up call for all of us," said Darren Hayes, assistant professor and director of cybersecurity at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3005426/mobile-security/paris-attacks-demand-wake-up-call-on-smartphone-encryption.html

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