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Free Day Film Festival on Dec. 7 at Pace University, Pleasantville

11/27/2013

Student-run festival is part of 50th celebration of the campus

PLEASANTVILLE – On Saturday, from residents be heading to Pace University Pleasantville for a day of fun, film and food at a day film festival celebration of the 50th of Pace’s Pleasantville campus.

 

The festival, is free and open to the public, feature iconic films from the 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s and 00s. Classic films to be shown Willy Wonka, Mary Poppins, Social Network, Saturday Night Fever, Jurassic Park, Life of Pi, Lillies of the Field, and When Harry Met Sally. The featured films were chosen they are emblematic of time and for influence and social impact decade. After the film Social Network, be a panel discussion with Pace faculty about the impact of the film and on society

 

The films be shown from 11a.m.–6:30p.m. at Pace Pleasantville, 861 Bedford , entrance 3, the Kessel Student Center, Lienhard Hall and Miller Hall.

 

The film screenings be followed by a free gala reception from 6:30p.m.–9:30p.m. the Gottesman room of the Kessel Student Center. tie is not required but guests can dress retro garb they did past, walk down a carpet and take photos with cardboard cutouts of famous actors.

 

The event is being planned, curated and run by students from Pace’s , Communication Visual Arts program. The film festival also the of the , Communications and Visual Arts department’s student-produced documentary on the history of Pace University Pleasantville.

 

Families are welcome. Seating for the films is limited and on a first come, first served basis. RSVP for the gala is required: filmfestival@pace.edu. For an updated schedule of panel discussions and film screenings, visit www.pace.edu/dyson/filmfestival2013

 

The event is sponsored by the Dyson of Arts and Sciences at Pace.

 

The public is invited to share photos on and Instagram using the #PLV50. For more 50th events at Pace, visit www.pace.edu/plv50.

 

contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu.

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P4K; Dance Marathon

11/26/2013

P4K; Dance Marathon

This past Saturday Pace University in Pleasantville held the first all night dance marathon to benefit Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla, NY. Nearly 300 members of the Pace community and friends of the hospital attended the event which raised $19,069.00 for the children’s hospital so far.

“It seems almost surreal that the dance marathon even happened,” said Caity Kirschbaum, the event organizer whose brother had life-saving surgery at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. “To see Pace students come together and make such a huge impact is so gratifying.”

Kirschbaum, a staff member at Pace and a Pace University double alumnus, thanked all who were involved after the event on her Facebook page. “You have no idea how truly grateful I am to all of you who were involved. Thank you for standing behind P4K. Thank you to the Committee! Without their hard work and dedication yesterday would not have happened. I can't believe we raised over $18,000 together! I can't wait to see how P4K will outdo itself for next year!”

Those who wish to contribute may still donate through the end of the day on Friday through the website for the event.

Although this event was held in Pleasantville, a team of five students from Pace’s New York City campus raised participated in the marathon as well. The organizers at Pace plan to make the dance marathon an annual event and anticipate increased involvement from the city campus next year.

“This weekend we created a new Pace tradition and it feels amazing,” Kirschbaum said.

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Peace Activist to Speak At Pace University Dec. 2

11/26/2013

Peace Activist to Speak At Pace University Dec. 2

 

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. - Three-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee Kathy Kelly will speak at Pace University on Monday, Dec.  2.

The lecture and discussion, which are free and open to the public, will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Gottesman Room of the Kessel Student Center, 861 Bedford Road in Pleasantville.

A longtime activist, Kelly is currently a co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence, a Chicago-based organization campaigning to end U.S. military and economic warfare.  She will be visiting Pace as a Periclean activist-in-residence. Project Pericles is a national initiative to promote social responsibility and participatory citizenship as essential elements of college and university education. During their stay, activists-in-residence work with students and give open lectures on campus.
The event is sponsored by the Center for Community Action and Research at Pace’s Dyson College.

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Pace University Dance Marathon Raises $19,000 For Children’s Hospital

11/25/2013

Pace University Dance Marathon Raises $19,000 For Children’s Hospital

 

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. - Pace University in Pleasantville held the first all-night dance marathon to benefit Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla on Friday night and into Saturday. Nearly 300 members of the Pace community and friends of the hospital attended the P4K (Pace for Kids) marathon, which has raised $19,069 for the hospital so far.

“It seems almost surreal that the dance marathon even happened,” said Caity Kirschbaum, the event organizer, whose brother had life-saving surgery at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. “To see Pace students come together and make such a huge impact is so gratifying.”
Kirschbaum, a staff member at the university and a Pace double alumnus, offered thanks on her Facebook page:  “You have no idea how truly grateful I am to all of you who were involved. Thank you for standing behind P4K. Thank you to the Committee! Without their hard work and dedication yesterday would not have happened. I can't believe we raised over $18,000 together! I can't wait to see how P4K will outdo itself for next year!”
Those who wish to contribute may still do so through the end of the day on Friday through the website for the event.
A team of students from Pace’s New York City campus came up to Pleasantville to participate in the dance marathon as well. The organizers at Pace plan to make it an annual event and anticipate increased involvement from the city campus next year.
“This weekend we created a new Pace tradition, and it feels amazing,” Kirschbaum said.

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Pace President, Rep. Lowey Host Higher Education Forum

11/17/2013

Pace President, Rep. Lowey Host Higher Education Forum

 

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. – Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman led a roundtable discussion last week of senior college administrators and Rep. Nita Lowey (D-Westchester/Rockland).

The discussion, at Pace Law School in White Plains, focused on President Barack Obama’s College Affordability Plan introduced in August as well as other areas of interest to higher education administrators such as Federal Financial Aid stability and The College Scorecard.

“I was so pleased to hear directly from experts in our region’s higher education community. Their feedback and perspective is invaluable,” said Lowey in a statement. “I look forward to continuing to work closely with our higher education leaders to ensure that a quality, affordable college education remains in reach for Lower Hudson Valley families.”

Friedman thanked Lowey for taking a leadership role in what he called an important isue.

“More than 50 percent of our student body receives some form of federal financial aid and institutional aid remains one of our largest expenses, ”he said. “Making sure that college remains accessible and affordable for everyone is something of paramount importance to all of us in this room.”

Attendees at the round-table included financial aid and admissions administrators from Long Island University, Westchester Community College, St. Thomas Aquinas College, Manhattanville College, Rockland Community College, Nyack College, SUNY Purchase, Mercy College and Dominican College.

“The intentions behind the President’s proposal are good,” said Robina Schepp, Vice President for Enrollment Management at Pace University. “It is in the implementation and the execution that the challenges arise. One of the unintended consequences might be a loosening of the requirements for graduation. This is the opposite of what the President intends. The Score Card that was rushed out was incomplete. Better information exists. Placements and earnings power information on graduates still is not there.”

Lowey and Friedman plan to submit comments and concerns from the group at large to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan at a meeting in Washington DC to be scheduled soon.

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Pace University Hosts Meeting of American Physical Society

11/15/2013

Pace University Hosts Meeting of American Physical Society

 

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. -- Pleasantville's Pace University School of Education will host the 109th Annual Meeting of the New York State Section of the American Physical Society on Saturday.

The meeting will take place in the Lienhard Lecture Hall from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The one-day conference will explore how physics can be applied to the study of nature and biology. Students will have the opportunity to attend and present a poster—on any topic—for the chance to win a cash award.

Topics that will be covered will include: Ocean physics, biophysics of small organisms, physics of living systems, teaching physics to adolescents and the state of physics education in New York State.

Click here to register for this event. 

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Ex-Presidential Adviser Tells Pace Environmentalists To Get Radical

11/13/2013

Ex-Presidential Adviser Tells Pace Environmentalists To Get Radical

 

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. - Speaking at Pace University on Saturday, a former adviser to Presidents Clinton and Carter called for  “a new environmentalism” based on “going back to the ideas of the 1960s and early 1970s, rediscovering their more radical roots, and stepping outside the system in order to change it before it is too late."

“The environment continues to go downhill, fast,” James Gustave “Gus” Speth told the annual conference of the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities. “We environmentalists can legitimately claim many victories but we are losing the struggle--losing the overall effort to pass our beleaguered planet on to our children and grandchildren. . . My hope is that you can help redesign the university's approach to environmental studies, and environmental education generally, in a way that embraces the true keys to environmental success."

Speth was presented with the Environmental Consortium's Great Work Award, in honor of Father Thomas Berry, former Riverdale resident and environmental author.

Now a professor at Vermont Law School, Speth made headlines in 2011 when he was arrested and jailed for three days following an environmental protest at the White House.

Echoing Speth’s theme, Michelle Land, director of the Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and director of the Consortium, told the 170 representatives from colleges and universities, “It is our duty in the decade ahead to use our unique resources to transform our region into a world capital of environmental research, education and knowledge. . . . Never have our collective talents and resources been more needed. And never has our duty to the future of the human and natural world been more clear.”

Land said there are 130 colleges and universities in this region, with 870,000 students and 93,000 faculty and staff. All together they occupy more than 40,000 acres of land and consume more than 20 billion gallons of water annually. “Collectively, we are the largest community in the Hudson-Mohawk watershed, and the second largest community in the state of New York,” she said.

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Pace University President Friedman & Congresswoman Lowey Host Higher Education Roundtable Discussion

11/12/2013

Pace University President Friedman & Congresswoman Lowey Host Higher Education Roundtable Discussion

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Senior Administrators from area Westchester colleges and universities convened on Friday, November 8th to take part in a roundtable discussion co-hosted by Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-Westchester/Rockland).  Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman led the discussion at Pace Law School in White Plains which focused on President Obama’s College Affordability Plan introduced in August as well as other areas of interest to higher education administrators such as Federal Financial Aid stability and The College Scorecard. (President Obama’s proposal)

“I was so pleased to hear directly from experts in our region’s higher education community. Their feedback and perspective is invaluable,” said Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-Westchester/Rockland). “I look forward to continuing to work closely with our higher education leaders to ensure that a quality, affordable college education remains in reach for Lower Hudson Valley families.”

“I want to thank Congresswoman Lowey for taking a leadership role on this important issue.  More than fifty-percent of our student body receives some form of federal financial aid and institutional aid remains one of our largest expenses. ” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “Making sure that college remains accessible and affordable for everyone is something of paramount importance to all of us in this room.”

Attendees at the round-table included financial aid and admissions administrators from Long Island University, Westchester Community College, St. Thomas Aquinas College, Manhattanville College, Rockland Community College, Nyack College, SUNY Purchase, Mercy College and Dominican College.

“The intentions behind the President’s proposal are good,” said Robina Schepp, Vice President for Enrollment Management at Pace University. “It is in the implementation and the execution that the challenges arise. One of the unintended consequences might be a loosening of the requirements for graduation. This is the opposite of what the President intends. The Score Card that was rushed out was incomplete. Better information exists. Placements and earnings power information on graduates still is not there.”

Congresswoman Lowey and President Friedman plan to submit comments and concerns from the group at large to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan at a meeting in Washington DC to be scheduled soon.

 

 

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Former Clinton Adviser Tells Colleges to Get Radical and Work Outside the System

11/11/2013

Former Clinton Adviser Tells Colleges to Get Radical and Work Outside the System

 

PLEASANTVILLE – In a speech marked by pointed criticism of American environmentalism, James Gustave “Gus” Speth told regional colleges this weekend “It’s time for a new environmentalism” and for “going back to the ideas of the 1960s and early 1970s, rediscovering their more radical roots, and stepping outside the system in order to change it before it is too late.”

Speaking at Pace University, the former adviser to Presidents Clinton and Carter and former Yale University Dean pulled no punches with the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities.

“The environment continues to go downhill, fast,” he told the group. “Bottom line:  a specter is haunting U.S. environmentalists — the specter of failure.”

Now a professor at Vermont Law School, Speth made headlines in 2011 when he was arrested and jailed for three days following an environmental protest at the White House.

Echoing Speth’s theme, Michelle Land, Director of the Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and Director of the Consortium, told the 124 representatives from colleges and universities, “It is our duty in the decade ahead to use our unique resources to transform our region into a world capital of environmental research, education and knowledge. . . Never have our collective talents and resources been more needed. And never has our duty to the future of the human and natural world been more clear.”

Land stunned the audience with an assessment of the size and impact of the region’s colleges and universities which she said number 130, and teach 870,000 students, employ 93,000 staff and faculty, occupy more than 40,000 acres of land and consume more than 20 billion gallons of water annually.

“Collectively, we are the largest community in the Hudson-Mohawk watershed, and the second largest community in the state of New York,” she said.

Speth was presented with the Environmental Consortium’s Great Work Award, in honor of Father Thomas Berry, former Riverdale resident and environmental author, and delivered his keynote address on Saturday.

Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace, John Cronin, said, “Professor Speth is calling on us to radicalize or face environmental failure. He sees higher education as an institution that has the talent, knowledge and influence to lead society to success.”

Speth’s message to teachers and students was clear on that point: “We environmentalists can legitimately claim many victories but we are losing the struggle–losing the overall effort to pass our beleaguered planet on to our children and grandchildren. . . My hope is that you can help redesign the university’s approach to environmental studies, and environmental education generally, in a way that embraces the true keys to environmental success.”

About the Conference

Other conference highlights included the opening keynote by David Hales, President, Second Nature, on Friday. Hales spoke about living sustainably in the future climate. He believes that while evidence of climate change mounts, colleges and their communities are not prepared and have not assessed the impacts of climate on their missions, curriculum, infrastructure, operations, students, workforce, investments, and endowments.

“Institutions of higher education have a responsibility to create research-based knowledge aimed at assessing and responding to climate impacts and to prepare themselves and help others prepare,” said Hales.

Plenaries included “Preparing our Campuses for an Uncertain Future” (Fri.) moderated by Andrew Revkin, New York Times Dot Earth blogger and Senior Fellow of Environmental Understanding at Pace; and “The Middlebury Campus as a Learning Laboratory via the Classroom and the Boardroom” (Sat.) moderated by Jack Byrne, Director of Sustainability Integration at Middlebury College.

Revkin pointed out at the end of his panel that it is important to know your audience when framing discussions of climate resilience, because – in the business world particularly — “Not everyone believes climate change is a clear and present danger” but almost everyone agrees that it’s a bad idea to build in harm’s way.

Breakout sessions included discussions of various topics on sustainability in higher education. On Friday afternoon, Professor Ghassan Karam, a Pace University environmental economist, led a spirited discussion of limits to growth in which Liu Mingming, a visiting associate professor of environmental law from Shandong University of Science and Technology, took the stance that developing countries cannot be denied the right to advance their economies. There was wide agreement that the status quo is not sustainable and that universities play a vital role in testing new ideas.

There was also an exhibitor expo and musical performance by Revkin’s Breakneck Ridge Revue.

Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities:

The Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities was established in 2004 to advance our understanding of the cultural, social, political, economic and natural factors affecting the region, and currently has 60 member institutions. By promoting collaboration among its members, the Consortium works to provide ecosystem-based curricular and co-curricular programming aimed at improving the health of the regional ecosystem. The mission of the Environmental Consortium is to harness higher education’s intellectual and physical resources to advance regional, ecosystem-based environmental research, teaching, and learning with a special emphasis on the greater Hudson-Mohawk River watershed.

Spearheaded and hosted by Pace University, the Consortium’s headquarters is situated within the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in Pleasantville, New York.  Among Pace Academy’s stated goals is to externally apply the university’s strengths to local and global environmental problems. As a testament to its commitment to interdisciplinary pedagogy, scholarship and service, the Academy provides essential administrative support that grounds the Consortium’s programs.

Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies: Pace Academy is the first of several centers envisioned by Pace University’s President, Stephen J. Friedman, to promote high-level collaborative and interdisciplinary programming in key thematic, academic areas throughout the University. The Academy is a freestanding institute that renews and deepens the University’s long-standing commitment to environmental research, scholarship, and service.

Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies builds on its predecessor, the Pace Academy for the Environment, created in 2002 and known for regional leadership spearheading the formation of the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities and serving as the incubation office for the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, which concentrates on applied technological innovation.

The current breadth and depth of Pace University’s environmental programming is evidenced by globally recognized undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs augmented by related curricular, co-curricular, experiential, and service programs centered on the environment.

Contact: Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu.

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Pace University To Unveil New Labs For Nursing Students

11/08/2013

Pace University To Unveil New Labs For Nursing Students

 

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. - Pace University will formally unveil its new Clinical Education Labs at a grand opening reception on Friday, Nov.  8.

Every day, nurses make countless decisions that affect patient care and ultimately save lives. How do they know they are making the right decision?  They have been taught by experts in the field and have developed crucial skills such as clinical reasoning and critical thinking, and they’ve had hands-on experience.
One way they get that experience is through simulation.
The new labs at Pace’s College of Health Professions allow students to take part in simulations that expose them to a range of scenarios so they know exactly what to do when faced with these situations in real life. The labs also enable students to familiarize themselves with electronic medical records and prepare medications using computerized systems to reduce the chance of error.

The labs have the latest generation of human patient simulators (HPS), along with a video capture and playback system, so faculty members can evaluate students on their performance.
Feedback from students has been extremely positive so far. “They look forward to practicing in the labs,” says Clinical Instructor Joanne Knoesel, RN. “A mistake made and learned from in the lab today under the watchful guidance of a faculty member could help save a life tomorrow in a real clinical setting.”
Hospitals and other health care organizations seek out students with simulation on their resumes, according to Associate Dean Gerrie Colombraro, PhD, RN, “Our students have a competitive advantage when they graduate because they’ve done simulation. It shows potential employers that they’ve worked in teams to solve problems and that they’ve been exposed to complicated or high risk scenarios.”

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