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U.S. News & World Report: "Trump, Handsy Aide Still Could Lose Defamation Lawsuit if Reporter Sues"

04/15/2016

U.S. News & World Report: "Trump, Handsy Aide Still Could Lose Defamation Lawsuit if Reporter Sues"

Photo: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at his Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla., on March 15, 2016, alongside campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, left.

. . . Pace University School of Law professor Leslie Garfield says it’s possible for Michelle Fields to win a large award if she can show any financial harm, even if her national profile was enhanced by the controversy. A jury award would feature actual damages plus punitive damages.

Fields, a frequent contributor on Fox News, left her job at Breitbart News as Lewandowski’s grab shook the ranks of the generally Trump-friendly news outlet, prompting several other staffers to jump ship.

Garfield, like other experts, says Fields’ status as a public figure makes a defamation lawsuit more difficult but says the sustained attack by Trump and Lewandowski on Fields’ credibility could cut against the men in a courtroom, with innuendo also possible to be considered defamation.

“Trump saying she changed her story is even more offensive [than Lewandowski's false denial of the grab], because through innuendo ... that suggests she, in fact, is a liar,” Garfield says. “The most troubling statement to me that would make it through to a jury is Trump saying she changed her story. … That sounds like a statement that person is a liar.”

Garfield says Fields’ account will have to be flawlessly consistent for her to have a shot at the billionaire vying for the presidency.

"I think there is a chance she could win," Garfield says, provided she's able to show some financial damages or that her professional reputation has been sullied by false allegations of deceit.

“The more vicious and the greater the vitriol, the more likely a jury is going to find malice,” she says.

Read more: http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-04-14/trump-handsy-aide-still-could-lose-defamation-lawsuit-if-michelle-fields-sues

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Poughkeepsie Journal: "NY Harbor getting cleaner, 1 oyster at a time"

04/14/2016

Poughkeepsie Journal: "NY Harbor getting cleaner, 1 oyster at a time"

Editor’s note: The following is a question-and-answer interview by Hudson River environmentalist John Cronin with Billion Oyster Project (BOP) Co-Founder Murray Fisher. Since 2011, BOP has planted 16.5 million oysters in New York Harbor with the help of more than 100 partners and thousands of kids. Fisher, who also founded the New York Harbor School on Governors Island, will share his stories and oyster science April 21 at The Hop bar/restaurant to launch Beacon Institute’s new Science Café Series.

Hudson River environmentalist John Cronin is Beacon Institute’s Founding Director and editor of its Watermark blog. He is Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs at Pace University’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment, and was the first full-time Riverkeeper, serving from 1983-2000.

I was raised a city kid and have never warmed up to the idea that city kids must be removed to the woods to learn why they should care about the environment. Sometimes I think it can have the opposite effect. Does the Billion Oyster Project have the answer?

One of the failures of the modern environmental movement has been its inability to engage meaningfully the huge numbers of people — mostly young and non-white — who live in our biggest cities. After a dozen years of experience, the folks at the New York Harbor School created the Billion Oyster Project (BOP), which provides students in public schools — numbering 1.1 million kids —the tools and curriculum necessary to participate in the restoration of New York Harbor. Oysters disappeared from the harbor and lower Hudson due to overharvesting and pollution. One billion oysters, successfully restored to NY Harbor by our project, its students and teachers, will filter the polluted waters of the harbor every three days. BOP has already engaged over 50 schools and is adding a new school every week.

What have they tapped into? One of the most vexing problems facing public school teachers and administrators is the ‘engagement’ problem: Kids don’t care. Too often environmental education programming is geared toward minimizing kids negative impact on the planet — recycling, water usage, electricity usage — which is important but not necessarily inspirational. A project, however, that allows you to participate in maximizing your positive impact on the planet can be transformational. Young people in New York City are leading an effort to re-wild the waters that surround them. They can actually picture a harbor that is once again swimmable, ringed by massive oyster reefs and teaming with hundreds of species of fish and dozens of species of marine mammals. For most of them, New York Harbor will be the closest thing to wilderness that they will experience locally, so it is in their best interest to make it as accessible, bountiful, beautiful and abundant as possible.

Read more: http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/tech/science/environment/2016/04/14/valley-environment-beacon-institute-oysters/83027786/

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Journal News: "Experts discuss who is moving to Westchester and why"

04/14/2016

Journal News: "Experts discuss who is moving to Westchester and why"

(Photo: Carucha L. Meuse/The Journal News)

Who are millennials and empty-nesters? What do they want? How do they behave? And will they ever come to Westchester?

Those two demographics, separated by age but connected through a taste for urban living, have become a coveted market for the rush of developers seeking to reshape the downtowns of Westchester.

Understanding the effect both groups could have on the county was the subject of a Westchester Municipal Planning Federation forum, held at Pace Law School Wednesday evening.

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/news/local/westchester/2016/04/13/empty-neste...

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CRM Buyer: "Marketers Poised to Run the Customer Experience Show, Survey Says"

04/14/2016

CRM Buyer: "Marketers Poised to Run the Customer Experience Show, Survey Says"

. . . "Just because a consumer's refrigerator or dishwasher is connected to the Internet does not mean the consumer has a relationship with the brand that produces the appliance," observed Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

"Most consumers will ignore much of the connectivity until real benefits are delivered to them via the Internet and the things concerned," he told CRM Buyer.

Read more: http://www.crmbuyer.com/story/83356.html

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Inc.: " What You Can Learn From Olive Garden's Breadstick Battle"

04/14/2016

Inc.: " What You Can Learn From Olive Garden's Breadstick Battle"

. . . "When you talk about a company or an industry with very thin margins, tiny changes can have an enormous impact," says Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical professor of management at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.inc.com/jeremy-quittner/olive-garden-battle-over-breadsticks-...

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New York Times: "Unlocking the Truth About the Clinton Crime Bill"

04/12/2016

New York Times: "Unlocking the Truth About the Clinton Crime Bill"

AT a campaign event in Philadelphia last week, former President Bill Clinton was interrupted by protesters incensed about his 1994 crime bill, writes David Yassky, the dean of Pace University School of Law. Mr. Clinton did not hold back: “Because of that bill we had a 25-year low in crime, a 33-year low in the murder rate, and because of that and the background-check law, we had a 46-year low in deaths of people by gun violence,” he said.

It is undeniable that two decades of mass incarceration have inflicted grievous harm on African-American men and their families. And yet Mr. Clinton was right to defend his policies (and, by extension, Hillary Clinton’s support for those policies at the time).

As counsel to the House Subcommittee on Crime led by Charles E. Schumer, then a representative, I spent 18 months helping to draft and negotiate the 1994 crime bill. Anyone who thinks the bill was just about locking people up is simply wrong.

If the battle over the 1994 bill was just campaign noise, we could shrug it off, but what’s really at stake is the future of crime policy. If we are going to move forward thoughtfully — keeping our neighborhoods safe without consigning huge segments of the population to life behind bars — we must understand how we got here.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/10/opinion/campaign-stops/unlocking-the-t...

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PIX11: "U.S. Marine Veteran given chance to pursue academic dreams, continues to give back around the world"

04/11/2016

PIX11: "U.S. Marine Veteran given chance to pursue academic dreams, continues to give back around the world"

Watch the video: http://pix11.com/2016/04/06/u-s-marine-veteran-given-chance-to-pursue-academic-dreams-continues-to-give-back-around-the-world/

Life changing is how Matt Mainzer, a U.S. Marine, describes his five years serving our country.

“I did mature a lot, I've come a long way," Mainzer said. "Most importantly, I met a lot of people I never would have met, and I went to places like Afghanistan. It really changed me, being exposed to abject poverty like that,” said the 27-year old who grew up on Long Island.

He was deployed twice to Afghanistan. His mission was to gather intelligence, and brief infantry and reconnaissance units. After saying goodbye to Camp Pendleton in California, Mainzer embarked on a month-long road trip, before returning home for good in the fall of 2013.

“It was freeing, liberating and it was exciting to think of all the possibilities,” he remembered. “ I was excited about the opportunities, like going to school.

Mainzer chose veteran-friendly Pace University as the place that would put him on the right path to reaching his goals.  He’s considering going to graduate school to study international relations, with hopes of one day working for the State Department.

"Here at PACE we're invested in that not only Veterans transition from combat to classroom seamlessly but equally as important that they transition from the classroom to their respective meaningful careers, " Rob Rahni, Assistant Director of Veteran Affairs at Pace University, explained.

The second semester junior has full coverage under the post-9/11 GI bill.  It includes Pace’s unlimited Yellow Ribbon Program which pays his entire tuition and fees.  And he’s taking full advantage of this opportunity, by pursuing a BA in Economics and Political Science.

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Law360: "Earnings-Stripping Regs Test Limits Of Treasury's Authority"

04/11/2016

Law360: "Earnings-Stripping Regs Test Limits Of Treasury's Authority"

. . . “I expect somebody will challenge it,” said Philip G. Cohen, a professor in the legal studies and taxation department of Pace University's Lubin School of Business.

Read more: http://www.law360.com/articles/782256/earnings-stripping-regs-test-limits-of-treasury-s-authority

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CFO Magazine: "Rethinking Disclosure"

04/11/2016

CFO Magazine: "Rethinking Disclosure"

. . . Top executives are just as frustrated as investors with the opacity of their reports. Leslie Seidman, a former chairman of FASB, moderated a panel during a forum on disclosure effectiveness last fall. “Many companies said that their own senior executives had got to the point where they didn’t understand what the key messages were in their own financial statements,” says Seidman, now executive director of the Center for Excellence in Financial Reporting at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

Read more: http://ww2.cfo.com/disclosure/2016/04/rethinking-disclosure/

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Financial Times: "Ted Cruz starts to broaden his appeal"

04/11/2016

Financial Times: "Ted Cruz starts to broaden his appeal"

Photo © Bloomberg

. . . "Cruz captured just about every demographic group including those rural and small town, males and all age groups which were part of Trump's base support," said David Caputo, a politics professor at Pace University. "Now if Wisconsin voters are the canary in the coal mine, the Trump candidacy is in serious difficulty."

Read more: https://next.ft.com/content/1e91b2ea-fc15-11e5-a31a-7930bacb3f5f

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