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Westchester County Business Journal: "Westchester coalition hosts affordable housing teach-in"

01/26/2016

Westchester County Business Journal: "Westchester coalition hosts affordable housing teach-in"

. . . Joseph Czajka, senior vice president at Pattern for Progress, the nonprofit regional planning group in Newburgh, will speak about trends in the housing market and how the increasing housing cost burden hinders economic development and efforts to attract and retain millennials.

Kevin Dwarka, an urban planner and senior fellow at the Pace University Land Use Law Center, will discuss the impact of “not in my backyard” community opposition in zoning battles and how to overcome it with best practices.

The Rev. Betty Tom, pastor of First Presbyterian Church Mount Vernon, will speak on the ethical and moral responsibility to develop affordable housing as part of a just society.

David McKay Wilson, columnist at The Journal News, will discuss the role of the press in driving change.

Housing coalition members hosting the event are DeCohen, Alexander H. Roberts, executive director of Community Housing Innovations Inc., and James Killoran, executive director of Westchester Habitat for Humanity.

Read more: http://westfaironline.com/77101/westchester-coalition-hosts-affordable-h...

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Register Today for 2nd Annual Mobile App Development Bowl

01/25/2016

2nd Annual Mobile App Development Bowl

January 14, 2016 -- So you think you can develop a mobile app? Put your skills to the test and compete against the area's best young techies in the 2nd Annual Westchester Smart Mobile App Development Bowl.

Registration is requested by Friday, Feb. 12. Register online or send an e-mail to MobileAppContest@pace.edu with your questions. There is no entry fee.

"We know Westchester has some of the brightest young minds, and we want to push them to even new heights," said County Executive Robert P. Astorino. "Last year's competition was phenomenal, with more than 150 students competing from across the tri-state area. I can't wait to see what they come up with this year."

Cash prizes, paid internships and a collection of high-tech gear are all up for grabs for the winners.

This year the contest – a partnership between Westchester County and Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems – challenges students to put themselves on the "MAAP" by creating "Mobile Apps for Aging Populations." Specifically, apps are being sought that improve an aspect of daily life for people ages 65 and older, especially in areas where their needs are neglected or underserved.

According to the United Nations, more than 21 percent of the global population will be 65 or older by 2050, compared to 11.7 percent in 2013. This means that our economies and societies must adapt to the needs of the aging population. The hope is that the contest will empower both generations to become productive and thriving members of their communities and economies.

Students must compete in teams (two person minimum). More than one team from the same school is permitted. Students may form and register independent teams without school affiliation. Students can also register as individuals, and Pace will assist them in forming a team.

Once registered, teams will be notified of important dates, including a kick-off pep rally at the Westchester County Center this winter. Guidance and support will be made available throughout the competition by Pace University, including free technical resources, instructions and workshops.

In the spring, a panel of expert judges will score and determine the top mobile apps. Winners will be announced and prizes will be awarded during an event at Pace University's Pleasantville Campus.

Last year's challenge attracted more than 150 students from high schools and colleges across the tri-state area. The focus last year was on creating apps for Alzheimer's and Dementia patients.

"Pace is proud to once again partner with Westchester County to mobilize high school and college students to help aging populations with technology and help prepare the next generation of technology leaders and innovators," said Jonathan Hill, Interim Dean of Pace's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

To learn more about sponsorship opportunities for the Mobile App Development Bowl, please contact Deth Sao at dsao@pace.edu or (914) 773-3706.

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Journal News: "County’s 2nd app contest to focus on seniors"

01/20/2016

Journal News: "County’s 2nd app contest to focus on seniors"

Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino interviews students and coaches at the Westchester Smart Mobile App Development Bowl. (Photo: Mark Lungariello/The Journal News)

Second annual Smart Mobile App Development Bowl will be held at Pace University this spring.

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/news/local/westchester/2016/01/20/westchester-looks-students-build-apps-seniors/78867142/

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Bloomberg BNA: "For Major Banks, New FASB Rules Present Welcome Change"

01/19/2016

Bloomberg BNA: "For Major Banks, New FASB Rules Present Welcome Change"

. . . Leslie Seidman, a former FASB chairman, summarized Jan. 8 the magnitude of change presented by the standards that generally become effective in 2018. She looked to the next shoe to drop on financial instruments accounting in a few months—a new FASB standard on credit impairments, which includes loan losses.

“This new standard represents some important, but fairly targeted changes for equity securities and the fair value option, rather than the overhaul that was originally proposed,” Seidman, executive director at Pace University's Center for Excellence in Financial Reporting, told Bloomberg BNA.

“There's another important change coming down the road—the accounting for loan losses—which represents a significant change for all banks and other lenders,” she wrote.

Read more: http://www.bna.com/major-banks-new-n57982066061/

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National Jurist: "Environmental, Energy law remain strong"

01/19/2016

National Jurist: "Environmental, Energy law remain strong"

While it can be a competitive field to break into, the job market for environmental and energy lawyers is looking up, according to Pace University School of Law Professor Jason Czarnezki, who directs the Environmental Law Program.

"The environmental law job market has significantly improved over the past few years as government agencies and non-profits, in particular, have begun hiring again,” Czarnezki said. “New environmental lawyers are needed to handle the emergence of renewable energy programs, climate regulation, and food safety legislation, in addition to more traditional air and water quality litigation."

In an effort to make students more marketable job candidates, Pace University’s Environmental Law Program encourages students to build a strong portfolio while they are still in law school.

Read more: http://www.nationaljurist.com/content/environmental-energy-law-remain-st...

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Huffington Post: "WATCH: How Two People From Different Worlds Found Love"

01/19/2016

Huffington Post: "WATCH: How Two People From Different Worlds Found Love"

. . . The video was produced by Yumeng Ji and shot/edited by Charlene Chen, students from Pace University's Media & Communications Arts Graduate School program. They are both graduate students at Pace, majoring in Communication. Yumeng decided to make a video for this romantic love story because it encourages many single people and/or long-distance couples in real life. By sharing the same passion of photography and producing videos, Yumeng and Charlene worked together to bring the real story to the screen.

Watch the video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hooplaha/watch-how-two-people-from_b_8979844.html

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E-Commerce Times: "Google Sharpens Its Virtual Reality Focus"

01/19/2016

E-Commerce Times: "Google Sharpens Its Virtual Reality Focus"

. . . Clay Bavor's appointment gives some indications about the company's VR aspirations, but there are still big questions that have yet to be answered, said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University's Lubin School of Business.

"On the surface, Google might appear to have the greatest consumer reach among tech giants due to the cumulative impact of its services," he told the E-Commerce Times, including its "browser, search engine, Play store, Gmail service and YouTube channel."

However, Google hasn't created a community that can compare favorably to rivals such as Facebook, Chiagouris noted. It's yet to be determined just how big a role social and shared experiences will play in VR, but it's hard to envision a world in which everyone enjoys it individually.

"It's challenge," according to Chiagouris, "will be to link applications of VR that are tightly linked to its service offerings."

Google will need to find ways to make synergies between its VR properties and other services, according to Chiagouris.

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Diverse: "Nursing, Health Care in Recovery Mode in Haiti"

01/14/2016

Diverse: "Nursing, Health Care in Recovery Mode in Haiti"

 ... “When I heard that the public school of nursing in Port-au-Prince collapsed on top of the faculty and students, killing many of them, I [thought], ‘We can educate nurses, we can go help,’” says Dr. Carol Roye, a former professor of nursing at Hunter College and current associate dean for faculty scholarship at the College of Health Professions at Pace University. Read more: http://diverseeducation.com/article/79686/

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The Hill’s Congress Blog: "Can mass trauma actually promote psychological adjustment?"

01/11/2016

The Hill’s Congress Blog: "Can mass trauma actually promote psychological adjustment?"

Anthony Mancini, Ph.D., is an associate professor of Psychology at Pace University and co-author (with Heather Littleton of East Carolina University and Amie Grills of Boston University) of the study, ‘Can People Benefit From Acute Stress? Social Support, Psychological Improvement, and Resilience After the Virginia Tech Campus Shootings.’

“The terror attacks in San Bernardino and Paris have ratcheted upward—once again—our collective anxieties,” Professor Mancini wrote on The Hill’s Congress Blog. “And for the survivors of these tragedies, they have raised the specter of collateral psychological damage, such as posttraumatic stress disorder. Although the risks to survivors are indeed real, the psychological impact of these tragedies is more complicated than we realize. Most survivors of traumatic events will suffer no enduring psychological harm. More startlingly, some may actually experience direct psychological benefits from it.

“How do we know this? In a study just published in Clinical Psychological Science, my colleagues, Heather Littleton and Amie Grills, and I studied 368 female survivors of the Virginia Tech campus shootings, the most deadly civilian massacre in U.S. history. These students’ anxiety and depression had been measured before the shootings as part of a separate study and again at two, six, and 12 months after them. As a result, we had a rare window into their psychological reaction to the tragedy. 

“Not surprisingly, about 20 percent of survivors saw substantial increases in anxiety or depression that continued to increase for 12 months, a reaction consistent with posttraumatic stress disorder. On the other hand, almost 60 percent had low levels of depression and anxiety and no statistically discernible uptick after the shootings, a result that confirms the human capacity for resilience. Most remarkable, though, was a group of survivors whose psychological health actually improved. About 15 percent of the sample, in fact, reported substantial reductions in anxiety or depression (or both) in the year after the shooting.” [The Hill’s Congress Blog, January 11, 2016]

 

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Guardian: "The problem with science journalism: we’ve forgotten that reality matters most"

01/06/2016

Guardian: "The problem with science journalism: we’ve forgotten that reality matters most"

There is a continued misunderstanding of what science journalism is, and how it differs from other forms of science communication. Photograph: Alamy

. . . "My opinion remains that reality matters no matter how complicated it may be," says Andrew Revkin, a writer whose blog, Dot Earth, shifted from news to the opinion section at the New York Times in 2010 and who teaches environmental communications at Pace University. "To me, it's all about transparency. If you have an agenda, state your agenda," he adds. "And if you're claiming to be objective, then demonstrate the objectivity."

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/media/2015/dec/30/problem-with-science-journa...

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