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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace University names Marvin Krislov as its eighth president"

02/17/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace University names Marvin Krislov as its eighth president"

Oberlin College President Marvin Krislov has been chosen to succeed Stephen J. Friedman as president of Pace University.

The 56-year-old Krislov takes over the post on Aug. 1. Friedman, 78, announced a year ago that he would not request reappointment after the conclusion of his current term on June 30, 2017. He served 10 years as president.

In announcing the choice on Tuesday morning, Mark M. Besca, chairman of the board of trustees, said Krislov “is the ideal person to lead Pace into a new era of growth and build on the renewal and revitalization that Pace has experienced under Steve Friedman. Marvin has demonstrated throughout his career the strong, effective, enlightened, and passionate leadership to propel Pace to a new level of impact and stature.”

Krislov, who has been president of the Ohio school since 2007, said, “I am honored to be chosen to lead Pace University during this exciting period of growth and revitalization as the University advances its position as one of the nation’s foremost institutions in fostering the leaders of tomorrow. Pace’s commitment to access and pathways to success for students inspires me.”

In addition to serving as president of Oberlin, Krislov taught advanced courses every semester on aspects of law and public policy. In November 2009, he was appointed to the advisory board of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

During his leadership, Oberlin “became more inclusive, strengthened its academic programs, improved student outcomes, created new career opportunities for faculty and staff, expanded fundraising and alumni participation and improved its campus facilities” according to a press release.

Krislov also led a fundraising campaign that exceeded its $250 million target by $68 million and achieved it 18 months ahead of schedule.

The selection process for Friedman’s successor began last March and was led by a 15-member search committee representing trustees, faculty, administrators, alumni, benefactors, and students.

Read more here.

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Inside Higher Ed: "At His Own Pace"

02/17/2017

Inside Higher Ed: "At His Own Pace"

Marvin Krislov is in for a dramatic change of scenery.

Krislov, the 56-year-old president of Oberlin College, was announced on Tuesday as the next president of Pace University, effective Aug. 1. The move will have him leaving a 3,000-student liberal arts college and conservatory in northern Ohio that’s known for sharply leaning to the left in order to lead a professionally oriented 13,000-student university with campuses in Manhattan and New York’s Westchester County.

The differences don’t stop there. Oberlin’s student body is decidedly whiter, richer and more traditional than Pace’s. While Oberlin reports that 20 percent of its student body consists of students of color, Pace says its undergraduates are 49 percent white. At Oberlin, 9 percent of first-time undergraduates received Pell Grants in 2014-15, indicating they came from low-income families. The portion of first-time undergraduates receiving Pell Grants at Pace that year was 34 percent, according to federal data. Pace also has more than 3,500 graduate students and more than 500 law students.

It’s not the typical next step for a college president in Krislov’s position. He announced in September that he would be stepping down at the end of this academic year after a decade as Oberlin’s president. But one might expect his career arc to bend more toward another liberal arts college or a widely known research institution next. He was a finalist for the president’s position at the University of Iowa in 2015.

Instead, Krislov sees Pace as an opportunity to grow personally. He hears tremendous concern right now over whether higher education is providing students with enough opportunity, he said in a telephone interview Tuesday. Krislov sees Pace as a place that has traditionally helped first-generation students, students from working-class families and immigrants.

“I think higher ed is changing,” he said. “I think Pace may be the model for the kind of college or university we’re going to need more of. I’m excited about building a different model and taking this opportunity.”

Krislov sees himself as a longtime advocate of opportunity for those who are disadvantaged and for civil rights. At Oberlin, he created an access initiative that eliminated loan requirements for Pell-eligible students. Before that, he was among the leaders of the University of Michigan’s successful legal defense of affirmative action in front of the U.S. Supreme Court when he was that university’s vice president and general counsel.

Pace’s institutional values fit with Krislov’s, he said. He also pointed out that Pace has a liberal arts core, arguing that there are similarities with Oberlin.

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Associated Press: "Oberlin's president to take over at Pace University in NYC"

02/17/2017

Associated Press: "Oberlin's president to take over at Pace University in NYC"

NEW YORK (AP) - The head of Oberlin College in Ohio will become the next president of New York's Pace University.

Pace's board of trustees announced the selection of Marvin Krislov as the university's eighth president on Tuesday.

Krislov is a lawyer and former Rhodes scholar who has been president of Oberlin since 2007. He announced his plan to leave the liberal arts college in September.

At Oberlin, Krislov presided over a selective college known for its long history of liberal activism. Controversies have erupted there in recent years over issues including free speech and inauthentic ethnic food in the dining hall.

Pace is a different type of institution, with many students who are the first in their family to attend college. It has campuses in lower Manhattan and in New York City's suburbs.

http://www.usnews.com/news/new-york/articles/2017-02-14/oberlins-president-to-take-over-at-pace-university-in-nyc

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Wall Street Journal: "Oberlin’s Krislov Named President of Pace University"

02/17/2017

Wall Street Journal: "Oberlin’s Krislov Named President of Pace University"

Marvin Krislov at the ceremony inaugurating him as the 14th president of Oberlin College in 2007. Photo: Gus Chan/The Plain Dealer/Associated Press

Marvin Krislov, president of Oberlin College since 2007, has been tapped to be the eighth president of Pace University as the New York City school prepares a major expansion.

In August he will succeed Stephen Friedman, 78 years old, who has been in the post for a decade, and said last year that he would step down.

The board of trustees at Pace announced Mr. Krislov’s appointment Tuesday morning, noting his efforts to make Oberlin more diverse and enroll more high-qualified, low-income students. During his tenure, Oberlin established a fundraising campaign that raised $318 million, attracted more science grants and built a new jazz studies building and stadium.

Mr. Krislov, 56, will steer Pace at a time when it has ambitious expansion plans. Last week, university officials announced a $190 million plan to renovate and expand its lower Manhattan campus. The century-old private institution has about 13,000 students in undergraduate and graduate programs.

“I am honored to be chosen to lead Pace University during this exciting period of growth and revitalization,” Mr. Krislov said in a news release. “Pace’s commitment to access and pathways to success for students inspires me.”

Read more here.

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Citing Cruelty, Pace University Students Move Their Bill to Ban Elephants in NY Entertainment

02/17/2017

Citing Cruelty, Pace University Students Move Their Bill to Ban Elephants in NY Entertainment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Citing Cruelty, Pace University Students Move Their Bill to Ban Elephants in NY Entertainment

State Senator Murphy and Assemblywoman Paulin Join with Pace Environmental Policy Clinic

PLEASANTVILLE, February 17 – A statewide ban on the use of elephants in circuses and other forms of entertainment is the subject of legislation originated by students of the Pace University Environmental Policy Clinic, which was introduced in the New York State legislature by State Senator Terrence Murphy (R-40) and Assemblywoman Amy Paulin (D-88). Clinic students say they will devote their spring semester to assuring passage of the Elephant Protection Act.

“A tamed elephant is a tortured elephant,” said student clinician David Paulstich, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences major, speaking on behalf of the Clinic during a news conference with Murphy and Paulin at Pace yesterday. He described a circus elephant’s life of stabbings with bull hooks, food deprivation, and long hours chained during transportation from one town to the next. “Our generation is not interested in watching tortured elephants perform unnatural tricks for the sake of human entertainment,” he said.

According to the Pace students, the cruel methods used to train elephants has a direct impact on the survival of the species.

“In recent years, elephants have become an issue of worldwide concern,” said Michelle Land, co-faculty of the Pace Environmental Policy Clinic. “Their use in entertainment promotes values contrary to a global ethic necessary to ensure their survival in the wild.  The Elephant Protection Act will make New York State a national leader in the conservation of elephants.”

“Thank you for being a voice for the elephants that did not have a voice,” said Senator Terrence Murphy, a lead sponsor of the bill. “Let’s get this passed, get the governor to sign it and we can come back to Pace University and present you with a signed bill.”

“In New York State animal cruelty is not acceptable,” said Assemblywoman Amy Paulin.  “Our generation has to understand that it’s your generation we need to listen to on this issue.”

If enacted into law, the Elephant Protection Act would make New York the first state to ban the exhibition of elephants in entertainment venues. The announcement comes as traditional circus season arrives in the region. This weekend the Royal Hanneford Circus will bring its elephants to the Westchester County Center in White Plains. Reflecting the opinion of the Pace Clinic, Paulstich said students “don’t want our future children to think this is the value society places on elephants.”

The Pace Environmental Policy Clinic trains undergraduate students through a program of learning and service that encourages students to apply their Pace University education to the solution of real-world problems in the professional world. The Clinic is a course within the Dyson College Department of Environmental Studies and Science. 

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences:  Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements.  The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

 

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Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

 

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Journal News: "Immigration ban counter to American values: View"

02/16/2017

Journal News: "Immigration ban counter to American values: View"

"President Donald Trump’s immigration ban risks national security by helping ISIS and Al-Qaeda recruitment," writes David N. Rahni, professor of chemistry and Faculty Council chair at Pace University.

"Since 2011, we have had the strictest vetting for entry into the U.S. The tedious, taxing and costly process can drag as long as three to five years for temporary visas and refugees, and up to 20 years for permanent residency extended to family members of U.S. citizens if they wish to emigrate.

"Trump’s executive order on immigration is essentially the same as the current policy, except with the added element of racism against Muslims, and anyone perceived as Muslim.

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Kiplinger's Retirement Report: "Join a Nonprofit as An Encore Career"

02/13/2017

Kiplinger's Retirement Report: "Join a Nonprofit as An Encore Career"

SUZANNE ARMSTRONG THRIVED IN THE CORPORATE world, working for American Express and later consulting for Citibank, Deloitte and other behemoths. Her expertise: helping leaders build support for major change in a company’s vision or systems.

Several years ago, Armstrong went through her own transformation. She left big business and now taps her “change leadership” know-how as a consultant for non-profits, splitting her time between Miami and Toronto.

When the Miami Art Museum was planning to move to a new location and expand its mission in 2012, the museum’s director asked Armstrong, who was a donor, to work with the leadership team to ensure a smooth transition for employees. (The museum changed its name to Pérez Art Museum Miami after the move.) Armstrong also found work at United Way, where she coaches executives at the organization. “I am tremendously fulfilled,” says Armstrong, 69. “It’s great to continue to do the same kind of work—and make a difference.”

For someone at Armstrong’s level of experience, the pay is nominal—about $20 an hour for about 15 to 20 hoursa week. She is paid through the South Florida affiliate of ReServe, which places professionals ages 55 andolder in part-time positions with nonprofit organizations and government agencies.

Like Armstrong, many baby boomers with long careers in the business world are now eyeing work in the nonprofit sector. About 21 million adults between the ages of 50 and 70 report that they would like to seek jobs that address social needs, particularly in education, health care, human services and the environment, according to a 2014 study by Encore.org and market research firm Penn Schoen Berland.

These second-act, social-impact jobs are known as encore careers, and the survey found that most who seek these jobs want work that will help them feel worthwhile. Facing perhaps decades in retirement, “it’s so incredibly important to make these extra years meaningful, useful and productive,” says Joan Tucker, director of the Encore Transition Program at Pace University, in New York City. The program’s continuing education workshops help boomers figure out how to create a purposeful retirement.

 

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Journal News: "First Tech Challenge: High schools battle in robotics competition"

02/06/2017

Journal News: "First Tech Challenge: High schools battle in robotics competition"

Video: Pace University professor Rick Kline talks about the FIRST Tech Regional Championship at Pace University, Feb. 5, 2017 in Pleasantville. Tania Savayan/lohud

PLEASANTVILLE - Student Gregory Salguero sounded happy Sunday afternoon that his robotics team from Putnam Northern Westchester BOCES school was vying for the lead in the Hudson Valley NY FIRST Tech Challenge regional contest.

Salguero, of Mahopac, said his parents work in the engineering field and that he would be interesting in pursuing that field as well someday.

The team from Putnam Northern Westchester BOCES, which is in Yorktown Heights, goes by the moniker Dead Voltage.

One of the Putnam Northern Westchester BOCES coaches, Gerry Markel, said it gets a new group of students ever year. "They've got to be quick learners," he said.

Twenty-eight teams of students participated in the regional event held at Pace University. Each match features four robots; one team's robot teams up with another's, and they face off against another alliance of robots.

Watch the video.

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Journal News: "Residents, officials join resistance rally against Trump"

02/06/2017

Journal News: "Residents, officials join resistance rally against Trump"

WHITE PLAINS - Another rally was held Saturday as hundreds gathered to sing and shout against the policies President Donald Trump has revealed during his short time in office.

The Westchester Resistance Rally was at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, home to the Immigration Justice Clinic. Westchester residents held signs regarding the president's stances on education, women's rights and his executive order barring people from seven Muslim-majority nations from entering the U.S.

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AARP: "6 Questions to Ask Before You Go Back to School"

02/03/2017

AARP: "6 Questions to Ask Before You Go Back to School"

Assistant Principal Sheelah Brown, 83 (with students at Miller-Driscoll School in Wilton, CT) got her Ph.D. in edcuation at 64. — Robyn Twomey

...Claire Keyles, 61, used the Pace University Encore Transition Program in New York to switch from a successful career as a corporate lawyer into a part-time position as a deputy compliance officer at a nonprofit that helps those who were previously incarcerated.

The Pace program costs about $800 and consists of three evening workshops designed to help older adults transition into working for nonprofits. "Not only can people not afford to retire, but a good many don't want to retire, so people are looking for ways to stay active and engaged," says Joan Tucker, director of the program.

There are many similar programs around the country. The Encore Hartford Program at the University of Connecticut, for one, prepares seasoned corporate professionals and managers to transition to the nonprofit sector, offering coursework and an eight-week fellowship at a host nonprofit for about $3,000. According to program statistics, 9 in 10 graduates from the classes of 2010 to 2014 are employed, and 70 percent hold full-time positions. (AARP is among the program's sponsors.)

Read more: http://www.aarp.org/work/job-hunting/info-2016/should-you-go-back-to-school-after-50.html#slide1

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