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Westchester County Business Journal: "WCA to recognize five Women in Tech award winners"

10/03/2016

Westchester County Business Journal: "WCA to recognize five Women in Tech award winners"

Five accomplished women from STEM fields will be recognized by the Westchester County Association on Oct. 20 as part of its third annual “Women in Tech” awards.

The WCA launched the awards in 2014 to recognize women for accomplishments while working in STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

This year’s winners will be recognized at an 11 a.m. reception at the Tappan Hill Mansion in Tarrytown.

The 2016 honorees are:

• Jean F. Coppola: Award-winning educator, author and professor of gerontechnology at Pace University. Coppola has won multiple national awards for her work researching the effects of technology on older adult life quality, attitudes toward aging and cognitive functioning.

Karen D’Ambrosio: Senior director of clinical systems for Montefiore Information Technology, a subsidiary of Montefiore Health System. During a 10-year career with Montefiore, D’Ambrosio has led a team of more than 200 information technology professionals to design and maintain the health system’s IT systems. She has worked in the information technology field for more than 30 years.

Theodora Diamantis: Building project director for Skanska USA. An engineer and architect, Diamantis has led multiple high-profile, multimillion-dollar projects in health care, higher education, retail, commercial and research laboratories. Most recently, she was part of the leadership team that completed the $600 million City University of New York Advanced Science Research Center.

Rebecca Jones: Assistant professor in the psychiatry department at NewYork- Presbyterian Hospital Center for Autism and the Developing Brain. Jones studies the development of the social brain and how and why it differs with autism spectrum disorders. She uses a variety of technologies in her research, including wearable devices, eye tracking and functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine variations in social behavior in children, adolescents and adults.

Rong Xu: Principal research scientist at Profectus BioScience Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine development company in Tarrytown. Xu leads the immunology team in performing preclinical and clinical studies. She previously worked as the senior research scientist at Pfizer Vaccine Research and as a research associate at the Seattle Biomedical Research Institute.

The luncheon will also recognize two students for achievements and passion in STEM fields: Lucie LeBlanc, a senior at Mamaroneck High School, where she created her school’s Code Club in partnership with The Flatiron School, and Esmeralda A. Michaca, a mathematics and computer science major at Purchase College.

Tickets are $125 for WCA members and $150 for non-members. To purchase tickets, visit www.westchester.org.

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Journal News: "The grades are in and Hillary won debate, experts say"

09/27/2016

Journal News: "The grades are in and Hillary won debate, experts say"

. . . Here’s what the judges said:

DAVID A. CAPUTO: (president emeritus and professor of political science at Pace University)

Clinton: Grade A

Trump: Grade D

Summary: Trump started well on trade but fell apart on birther and tax issues. Lacked foreign policy knowledge; poor on specifics; visually “impatient and disrespectful.” Interrupted too much.

Clinton was clear winner. Scored on defending her stamina and overall was well prepared. Worst moment was on the Trans Pacific Partnership, which she was for until she was against it. “Now the question is whether it will have major impact with the voters.”

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/opinion/columnists/phil-reisman/2016/09/27/reisman-grades-clinton-trump/91174094/

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Associated Press: "The tale of the tape: when should police videos be released?"

09/23/2016

Associated Press: "The tale of the tape: when should police videos be released?"

Photo: A protester walks in front of a line of police officers blocking the access road to I-277 on the third night of protests in Charlotte, N.C. Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, following Tuesday’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. (Chuck Burton/Associated Press)

Two police shootings, both recorded by police. In one city, the police recordings were released almost immediately and protests remained calm. In the other, the chief has so far refused to provide the videos to the public and violent protests have wrought destruction in the heart of the city. Two different outcomes that raise some key questions: How soon are police obligated to release the recordings and why might they keep a lid on it?

In this era of a 24/7 cycle of citizen journalists and live video feeds, civil rights activists are saying the refusal to release video almost immediately underscores the fractured relationship between police and the community they serve.

“There’s a knee jerk reaction on the part of police departments. We used to call it the blue wall of silence,” said Randolph M. McLaughlin, a civil rights attorney and professor at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University. “Now it’s just a blue wall.”

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/the-tale-of-the-tape-when-should-police-videos-be-released/2016/09/23/4023052c-815c-11e6-9578-558cc125c7ba_story.html

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Associated Press: "3rd Night of Charlotte Protests Stays Largely Peaceful"

09/23/2016

Associated Press: "3rd Night of Charlotte Protests Stays Largely Peaceful"

Photo: Police fire teargas as protestors converge on downtown following Tuesday's police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. Protesters have rushed police in riot gear at a downtown Charlotte hotel and officers have fired tear gas to disperse the crowd. At least one person was injured in the confrontation, though it wasn't immediately clear how. Firefighters rushed in to pull the man to a waiting ambulance.(AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

. . . Experts who track shootings by police noted that the release of videos can often quell protest violence, and that the footage sometimes shows that events unfolded differently than the official account.

"What we've seen in too many situations now is that the videos tell the truth and the police who were involved in the shooting tell lies," said Randolph McLaughlin, a professor at Pace University School of Law. He said it is "irresponsible" of police not to release the video immediately.

Read more: http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/2nd-night-violent-protests-charlotte-police-shooting-42269243

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Associated Press: "Time Gap in Offering Aid After Police Shooting Stirs Concern"

09/21/2016

Associated Press: "Time Gap in Offering Aid After Police Shooting Stirs Concern"

A frame grab from video released by the Tulsa Police Department shows Terrence Crutcher walking with his hands in the air as he is confronted by police on Sept. 16 2016. (Photo: Tulsa Police Dept./EPA)

. . . "When the police take actions that result in injury to you and then leave you on the ground to die, well, I think that's a constitutional violation," said Randolph M. McLaughlin, a civil rights attorney and professor at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2016/09/21/us/ap-us-police-shootings-medical-help.html

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Dallas Morning News: "45 years after Attica, America's inmates are protesting again, but not in Texas — yet"

09/16/2016

Dallas Morning News: "45 years after Attica, America's inmates are protesting again, but not in Texas — yet"

On Sept. 10, 1971, inmates of Attica State Prison voiced their demands during a negotiating session with New York's prison Commissioner Russell Oswald. Photo: Associated Press

. . . "A lot of attention is now beginning to be focused on our prison system," said Micahel B. Mushlin, professor of law at the Elisabeth Haub School of law at Pace University and author of Rights of Prisoners, a four-volume treatise on prisoner-rights laws.

"That's a healthy development. And that's coming from both the left and the right. We really have a problem in our prisons and this is reflective of that."

Mushlin said he doesn't know "the conditions in every prison specifically in the U.S. but speaking nationally, we really do have a problem operating prisons to the standard we should have."

He said prisons should be places where inmates can be "productive," safe and respected by those overseeing them.

"That doesn't happen in many places," he said.

Read more: http://www.dallasnews.com/news/headlines/20160915-45-years-after-attica-america-s-inmates-are-protesting-again-but-not-in-texas---yet.ece

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Journal News: "Women’s Bar Assoc. awards scholarship"

09/16/2016

Journal News: "Women’s Bar Assoc. awards scholarship"

Julie Kattan, left, presents its Justice Sondra M. Miller Scholarship to Erica Danielson. (Photo: MFox)

Bar Association awards scholarship

HARTSDALE - The Westchester Women’s Bar Association Foundation, the charitable arm of the Westchester Women’s Bar Association, recently presented its Justice Sondra M. Miller scholarship to Erica Danielsen. The WWBAF gives the annual scholarship to a deserving Pace Law School student and supports other organizations by awarding grants to not-for profit organizations that provide programs that serve the community.

http://www.lohud.com/story/money/business-in-the-burbs/2016/09/13/rockla...

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New York Law Journal: "Exoneree Pursues Law Degree to Fill Criminal Justice 'Gaps'"

09/16/2016

New York Law Journal: "Exoneree Pursues Law Degree to Fill Criminal Justice 'Gaps'"

Jeffrey Deskovic, who served 16 years in prison for a murder he did not commit, has done everything he can in the years since his release to fight for the freedom of the wrongfully accused.

He started a nonprofit foundation to help prisoners with their cases. He writes about injustice, shares his experiences publicly and lobbies for reforms.

Now he's working to become what he considers the ultimate advocate—a lawyer—by going to law school to obtain a J.D.

"I want to be the attorney of record," he said.

Deskovic, 42, began classes this semester at Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law in White Plains, just nine blocks from the courthouse where he received his conviction.

He's taking four classes this semester: criminal law, torts, legal skills and—his favorite so far— civil procedure, which is taught by Michael Mushlin, a leading advocate for prison reform.

"He's a man after my own heart," Deskovic said of Mushlin.

But while he's finding some appeal in the civil side of the law, he is fully committed to practicing criminal defense.

"There is not enough lawyers who are zealous advocates who are working to exonerate people who are wrongfully convicted," he said.

Deskovic's experience with the criminal justice system has given him the chance to see the "gaps in the system" and that a J.D. will help him push for policy changes.

Read more: http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/id=1202767297141?keywords=deskovic&publ...

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The Atlantic: "The Trouble With Double Jeopardy"

09/14/2016

The Atlantic: "The Trouble With Double Jeopardy"

. . . Professor Lissa Griffin of Pace Law School has written extensively on the “mixed verdict” problem in double jeopardy law. She notes that one underlying concern of the cases is that both sides—prosecution as well as defense—have one “full chance” to present their theories and evidence and get a result. That did happen in this case, although the conviction was reversed for error.  She also echoes the NAPD brief’s concerns: “One of the reasons we’re dealing with mixed verdicts is how many statutes there are,” she said in an interview. In some cases, “the proliferation of charges is outrageous.”  Where the government chooses to charge a defendant with violating several different statutes, mixed verdicts are a real possibility.  

The government relies heavily on one case, Powell—the case where a jury convicted the defendant of using the phone to commit a crime for which the jury found her not guilty. That seemingly inconsistent verdict stood.  But Griffin  pointed out that the Powell decision didn't  permit the government to prosecute Powell twice. It had its conviction and kept it; “successive prosecution is a very different double jeopardy issue” than inconsistent verdicts reached at the same time, she said.

Read more: http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/09/the-trouble-with-double-jeopardy/499730/

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Associated Press: "Group to vote on urging countries to close ivory markets"

09/13/2016

Associated Press: "Group to vote on urging countries to close ivory markets"

. . . "We're talking about the extinction of elephants," said Joseph Moravec, law student at Pace University and voting member of the conservation congress. "Ivory markets are going to close one way or the other, whether it's us closing them when the elephant is still alive, or they're going to close in a few years when these species are still extinct and there's no more ivory left."

Read more: http://www.usnews.com/news/news/articles/2016-09-09/group-to-vote-on-urg...

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