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Journal News: "Residents, officials join resistance rally against Trump"

02/06/2017

Journal News: "Residents, officials join resistance rally against Trump"

WHITE PLAINS - Another rally was held Saturday as hundreds gathered to sing and shout against the policies President Donald Trump has revealed during his short time in office.

The Westchester Resistance Rally was at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, home to the Immigration Justice Clinic. Westchester residents held signs regarding the president's stances on education, women's rights and his executive order barring people from seven Muslim-majority nations from entering the U.S.

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AARP: "6 Questions to Ask Before You Go Back to School"

02/03/2017

AARP: "6 Questions to Ask Before You Go Back to School"

Assistant Principal Sheelah Brown, 83 (with students at Miller-Driscoll School in Wilton, CT) got her Ph.D. in edcuation at 64. — Robyn Twomey

...Claire Keyles, 61, used the Pace University Encore Transition Program in New York to switch from a successful career as a corporate lawyer into a part-time position as a deputy compliance officer at a nonprofit that helps those who were previously incarcerated.

The Pace program costs about $800 and consists of three evening workshops designed to help older adults transition into working for nonprofits. "Not only can people not afford to retire, but a good many don't want to retire, so people are looking for ways to stay active and engaged," says Joan Tucker, director of the program.

There are many similar programs around the country. The Encore Hartford Program at the University of Connecticut, for one, prepares seasoned corporate professionals and managers to transition to the nonprofit sector, offering coursework and an eight-week fellowship at a host nonprofit for about $3,000. According to program statistics, 9 in 10 graduates from the classes of 2010 to 2014 are employed, and 70 percent hold full-time positions. (AARP is among the program's sponsors.)

Read more: http://www.aarp.org/work/job-hunting/info-2016/should-you-go-back-to-school-after-50.html#slide1

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Westchester mobile apps contest to begin on Friday"

02/03/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Westchester mobile apps contest to begin on Friday"

More than 275 high school and college students in the tristate region will compete in this year’s Westchester Smart Mobile App Development Bowl.

The contest will begin on Friday at Westchester County Center, White Plains, with a pep rally and workshops.

Students will be challenged to develop mobile apps that improve some aspect of life for people who are at least 65 years old.

Students will compete on teams, and those who have registered for the event individually will be assigned to a team.

On March 3, teams will present their apps at Pace University to evaluators from academia and industry who have content and technical expertise.

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New York Daily News: "Private colleges need state help too: A local university president urges Gov. Cuomo to help students at more schools"

02/02/2017

New York Daily News: "Private colleges need state help too: A local university president urges Gov. Cuomo to help students at more schools"

This month, Gov. Cuomo pledged that New York State would cover tuition costs at state and city universities for students whose families earn less than $125,000 per year, writes Pace University president Stephen J. Friedman. I applaud the governor for this initiative.

At a time when people around the country are questioning the value of higher education and student debt continues to climb, this will offer many more New Yorkers the chance to access a college education and unlock new career opportunities.

The program, though, should go further. To have a greater impact for New York families, aid should be available not just for students of public universities but also for students at private nonprofits, which have a proven track record of elevating graduates’ earning power, irrespective of their socioeconomic status.

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Sports Illustrated: "Go inside the QB’s helmet for a look at the Patriots and Falcons’ signature plays"

02/02/2017

Sports Illustrated: "Go inside the QB’s helmet for a look at the Patriots and Falcons’ signature plays"

The Patriots and Falcons rode two of the NFL’s best—and most sophisticated—offenses this season to Super Bowl LI on Sunday night in Houston. In order to better understand the intricacies of the two teams’ schemes, SI set out to capture a signature play from each team using a new approach, filming the plays using a 360-degree camera. Bill Belichick and Dan Quinn’s squads were understandably busy last week, so SI enlisted Pace University’s football team to act as a scout team.

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The Hill: "Trump's travel ban could hamper US tourism, business"

01/31/2017

The Hill: "Trump's travel ban could hamper US tourism, business"

President Trump's ban on travelers from seven majority-Muslim countries could have a chilling effect on U.S. tourism, global business and enrollment in American universities, say a cross-section of legal experts and travel advocates.

While the orders are temporary, these voices say the policy could have a long-term impact.

“There’s a real potential negative impact, even after the 90- or 120-period is over, from a travel point of view,” said Thomas M. McDonnell, a professor at Pace University’s law school, who is an expert in international law.  “If you were a Muslim from Saudi Arabia, which is not included in the list, you might say, ‘Gee, should I really go to the U.S. with Trump as president? Who knows what might happen.’”

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Journal News: "Residents rally against Trump's immigration orders"

01/30/2017

Journal News: "Residents rally against Trump's immigration orders"

. . . Vanessa Merton, a professor and director of the Immigration Justice Clinic at Pace University School of Law, called Trump's assertions that his executive order would help protect the nation unfounded and unethical.

“The assumptions and the statements are right up there with ‘my inauguration was the biggest inauguration ever,’” Merton said. "They’re just complete untruths that anybody who’s spent 10 minutes examining immigration issues in this country would know."

Merton said Saturday's rally was held to educate people about immigrant resources and how to get more involved, such as joining community forums and contacting state and federal officials. She said rallies and marches must continue to be held to try to reign in Trump's lies.

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Washington Post: "Endangered animals are already cut off by a border wall. Trump wants it much bigger."

01/27/2017

Washington Post: "Endangered animals are already cut off by a border wall. Trump wants it much bigger."

Photo: A Mexican jaguar dubbed “The Boss” seen in Tucson. (USFWS/European Pressphoto Agency)

. . . A 2008 study mentioned the decline of carnivores, such as the grizzly bear and gray wolf, at the U.S.-Mexico border and renewed interest in protecting Neotropical cat species there. “In the U.S.A., there are no known breeding populations of jaguars and only two … populations of ocelots,” according to the study by scientists at Pace University in New York and the Universidad Autonoma de Quenretaro in Mexico.

The cats “are threatened by land development and land conversion, predator control by cattle growers, an increase in disease exposure, construction of highways, international bridges and immigration-control infrastructure,” meaning border walls. More walls would greatly magnify the threat, the researchers said.

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WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "Reactions Vary To Reported Orders At EPA"

01/27/2017

WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "Reactions Vary To Reported Orders At EPA"

Agencies and organizations that rely upon federal funding from the Environmental Protection Agency wonder if their funding streams will be cut off. This comes amid reports Tuesday that the Trump administration would ban the EPA from awarding new contracts or grants as well as bar employees from providing updates on social media or to reporters.

John Cronin is senior fellow for environmental affairs at the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment at Pace University.

“I’ve spoken to a contact I have inside the EPA at the regional level. Region 2 is New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands,” Cronin says. “And the word is slowly spreading through the region that they’re to speak to nobody, not the press and not the public and that an as yet unnamed person is going to take control of their social media and of their communications.”

Judith Enck, who was EPA Region 2 administrator recently left the post and is a visiting scholar at Pace University. Her position has not been filled. Cronin says it is unclear which projects might be affected by a ban on new EPA contracts and grants.

“Here in New York state, one of the largest groundwater contamination sites in the country is in Cayuga County. It’s almost five square miles, and it’s the subjects of EPA grants and contracts for a cleanup,” Cronin says. “It’s unclear whether this new order which gags EPA officials and brings a halt to contracts is going to affect something like that groundwater cleanup, and nobody’s allowed to talk to anybody about it.”

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Neighbors Link merges Pace Community Law Practice to provide immigration legal help"

01/27/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Neighbors Link merges Pace Community Law Practice to provide immigration legal help"

At a time of uncertainty and anxiety in immigrant communities here and across the nation, a merger between Neighbors Link in Mount Kisco and the Pace Community Law Practice in White Plains will formalize a partnership between two nonprofit service organizations with overlapping missions.

Neighbors Link focuses on helping immigrants integrate into communities in Westchester County through efforts that include educational and employment programs. Pace Community Law Practice, founded in 2012, employs a staff of two lead attorneys, student fellows and volunteers to provide low-cost legal services. The two organizations began working together in 2014 on immigrant legal services, including naturalization and deferred action on cases involving undocumented juvenile immigrants to exempt them from deportation. 

By merging the Pace practice into the operations of the immigrant community center in Mount Kisco, Neighbors Link Executive Director Carola Bracco said the organization can add an additional component to its offerings. “We have a very holistic approach to the services we offer and legal services was the last thing missing,” she said.

The legal service has been renamed the Neighbors Link Community Law Practice, though its office will remain at 33 Crane Ave. near the Pace law school campus in White Plains. The practice will also continue to work on cases taken outside of the Neighbors Link partnership.

Karin Anderson Pozner, executive director of the community law practice, said the need for immigrant legal services in the county has continually grown.

“The Pace Community Law Practice has really expanded and been so successful in providing legal services to immigrants because the need has been so great,” she said. The merger “was the best way forward for us to continue to expand the work we were doing.”

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