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News12: "New Pace University President"

10/31/2017

New Pace University President (News12)

The installation ceremony was held for Marvin Krislov. Krislov served as Oberlin College's President for a decade and graduated from Yale. He is the universities 8th President.

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The Journal News: "Video: Pace University president inaugurated"

10/31/2017

Video: Pace University president inaugurated (The Journal News)

Despite heavy rain, hundreds came out to Pace University in Pleasantville today, Oct. 29, 2017, to witness the inauguration of the college’s new President, Marvin Krislov. Krislov became Pace’s eighth president. Pace University/Submitted

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Tap Into: "Somers Woman Helps Guide Hispanics Through College Admissions Process"

10/24/2017

Somers Woman Helps Guide Hispanics Through College Admissions Process (Tap Into)

SOMERS, N.Y.--The Hispanic population has fewer students graduating from college than any other ethnic group in the county and one Somers resident is trying to change that.

Shirley Acevedo Buontempo, 54, is the founder and executive director of Latino U College Access, a nonprofit that helps Hispanic students get into college and supports them until they get their degree. 

Acevedo Buontempo, who left a decade-long marketing career to work with local nonprofits in Westchester for 10 years, said she was inspired to launch Latino U in 2012 while she was helping her own daughters—now 24 and 21—through the admissions process for college.

“I became very aware of how complex, competitive and expensive the process was,” Acevedo Buontempo said. “I was going to graduate school for my master’s at Pace University and was doing research on educational equity and recognized that the Hispanic community had the lowest admission rates to college of all ethnic groups.”

According to the Pew Research Center, until 2013, Hispanics were the least enrolled ethnicity in college. 
The same study showed that Hispanics are less likely to graduate with a four-year degree than other groups. In 2014, 15 percent of Hispanics ages 25 to 29 had a bachelor’s degree or higher. It was the lowest percentage among the same age group of other ethnicities.

“That gap in education and the complexity of the process was really what inspired me to say that something needed to be done. There were a lot of great kids going to local high schools in Westchester that can go to college but are not achieving their goals because of the complexity and the barriers they face in admissions and financial aid.”

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The Register Citizen: "Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities to hold graduation event Oct. 25 in Torrington"

10/24/2017

Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities to hold graduation event Oct. 25 in Torrington (The Register Citizen)

TORRINGTON — Four clients from New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, attended Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities’ team training session at Camp Wah-nee, where they were each paired with a service dog who meets their specific needs.

The people and their dogs will graduate in a special and always poignant ceremony on Wednesday, Oct. 25 at 6 p.m, at Camp Wah-nee, 126 Wahnee Road, Torrington.

In addition to the clients, this team training class included Drs. Joanne Stapleton and Lucille Ferrara from Pace University, Pleasantville, N.Y., and a representative from the DA’s office in Poughkeepsie. These three are learning what it takes to handle a facility dog, a canine whose training and temperament allows them to become a member of the staff, working in various ways with many demographics.

The DA’s office has had Bosch, an ECAD facility dog, as a member of its staff for three years. In addition to working in the courtroom when needed, Bosch also works with the Family Services department.

Pace University will now have facility dog Spirit, who was deemed the right dog for the job by Lu Picard, co-founder and director of programs of ECAD. Having a facility dog on campus will augment a program launched by the College of Health Care Professionals (CHP) in 2016. The mission of this program, of which ECAD has been an integral part, is educating interprofessional health care providers on service dogs and therapy animals to meet the palliative care needs of patients with visible and invisible disabilities.

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Erie News Now: "Pace is Ranked the Best Private University in the Nation for Upward Economic Mobility of Students"

10/24/2017

Pace is Ranked the Best Private University in the Nation for Upward Economic Mobility of Students (Erie News Now)

Pace University was ranked number one among private, non-profit, four-year institutions nationwide in a list published last week by the Chronicle of Higher Education, “Colleges with the Highest Student-Mobility Rates, 2014.”

The list is based on data from the Equality of Opportunity Project’s study, “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility” (Chetty, Friedman, Saez, Turner, and Yagan, 2017). The study compared the median parent household income for students at colleges and universities across the country with the earnings these same students achieved after graduation.

“This list reaffirms Pace’s commitment to successful outcomes for our students and that education is the path forward,” said Pace’s President Marvin Krislov.

New York is a national leader in this arena. Six of the top 10 private four-year institutions for economic mobility are located in New York State, while seven CUNY campuses are ranked in the top 10 four-year public colleges.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, median annual earnings for Americans with less than a high school degree amounts to $25,636 while the unemployment rate for the same population is 8 percent, the highest of any of the educational categories. Workers with a high school diploma achieve a median income of $35,256 per year while experiencing an unemployment rate of 5.4 percent. Americans with a bachelor’s degree earn significantly higher with median annual income of $59,124 per year and face a much lower unemployment rate at 2.8 percent. Median annual earnings continue to rise with advanced and professional degrees. In 2012, New York residents with a bachelor's or post-graduate degree earned a median annual income of approximately $70,700, which ranks among the highest in the nation. (New York Building Congress, 2014).

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. http://www.pace.edu.

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FIOS1: "Will voters choose to change the NY constitution on Election Day?"

10/20/2017

Will voters choose to change the NY constitution on Election Day? (FIOS1)

Every election is important, but on Nov. 7, voters in New York will have the chance to open up the state's constitution and change it.

The constitutional convention is on the ballot once every twenty years, and hasn't been rewritten since 1938. 

"Most academics that look at this say we need a constitutional convention," said Dean David Yassky of the Pace School of Law. "They say it because there is a feeling that the state government is broken. Corruption scandal after corruption scandal, and inability to address fundamental issues that New Yorkers care about the most, and the only way we are going to get a government that is more responsible to New Yorkers is by changing the way it is set up."

Yassky says that state-wide proposals will be listed on the back of the ballot, including the use of forest preserve land for specified purposes and the complete or partial forfeiture of a public official's pension.

"Today, if a state legislator or an elected official convicted of taking bribes or stealing from the government, they are still going to collect their pension. I think most New Yorkers would say that's just wrong. A convention can fix that, but the regular process can't."

If voters say "No" in November, there will be no convention and the constitution will remain in place. Voters rejected a convention the last two times it appeared on the ballot.

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Earth Desk:"Pace Environmental Clinic’s Elephant Protection Act Becomes Law"

10/20/2017

Pace Environmental Clinic’s Elephant Protection Act Becomes Law (Earth Desk)

“It is time society put an end to this barbaric relic of another age.” ~ Pace Professor Michelle D, Land

Forcing elephants to perform in circuses and other entertainment venues has been relegated to a bygone era under legislation originated by students of Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Environmental Clinic and signed into law by New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo.

The Elephant Protection Act, sponsored by state Senator Terrence Murphy and Assemblywoman Amy Paulin, makes New York State the first in the nation to implement an outright ban on the use of elephants in entertainment.  Pace students first brought the idea for the bill to the legislature in 2016 and spent the next two legislative sessions lobbying for its passage. The Clinic is co-taught by Michelle D. Land, Pace clinical professor of environmental law and policy, and John Cronin, senior fellow in the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment. 

“It is time society put an end to this barbaric relic of another age,” said Michelle Land, clinical professor of environmental law and policy at Pace. “Wild elephant populations are in dire straits globally. By recognizing its duty to end entertainment acts that perpetuate misinformation and false values about the species, New York State is setting an example today that we believe other states will follow”

Once again, New York State is proving to be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves.” ~ New York State Senator Terrence Murphy.

The student clinicians, who actively lobbied in Albany and collected 1,100 student signatures in support of the bill, wrote to the governor, “The contention of circuses, trainers and managers that performing elephants are ‘educational’ is demonstrably false — one has only to attend a performance to understand. Silly tricks such as headstands, balancing on stools, and parading in foolish costumes undermine a child’s appreciation and understanding of wildlife.”

The training of elephants to perform tricks for audiences has come under fire for years, even forcing the Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus out of business. New York State law now recognizes that ordinary animal welfare laws cannot protect elephants from an industry whose practices are inherently cruel. At present, as many as nine circuses bring elephants through New York State annually. 

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Governor Cuomo Signs Elephant Protection Act Pace University Students Make New York First to Ban Performing Elephants

10/19/2017

Governor Cuomo Signs Elephant Protection Act Pace University Students Make New York First to Ban Performing Elephants

NEW YORK -- Forcing elephants to perform in circuses and other entertainment venues has been relegated to a bygone era under legislation originated by students of Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Environmental Policy Clinic and signed into law today by New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo.

The Elephant Protection Act, sponsored by state Senator Terrence Murphy and Assemblywoman Amy Paulin, makes New York State the first in the nation to implement an outright ban on the use of elephants in entertainment.  Pace students first brought the idea for the bill to the legislature in 2016 and spent the next two legislative sessions lobbying for its passage.

“It is time society put an end to this barbaric relic of another age,” said Michelle Land, clinical professor of environmental law and policy at Pace. “Wild elephant populations are in dire straits globally. By recognizing its duty to end entertainment acts that perpetuate misinformation and false values about the species, New York State is setting an example today that we believe other states will follow”

The student clinicians, who actively lobbied in Albany and collected 1,100 student signatures in support of the bill, wrote to the governor, “The contention of circuses, trainers and managers that performing elephants are ‘educational’ is demonstrably false -- one has only to attend a performance to understand. Silly tricks such as headstands, balancing on stools, and parading in foolish costumes undermine a child’s appreciation and understanding of wildlife.”

The training of elephants to perform tricks for audiences has come under fire for years, even forcing the Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus out of business. New York State law now recognizes that ordinary animal welfare laws cannot protect elephants from an industry whose practices are inherently cruel. At present, as many as nine circuses bring elephants through New York State annually. 

“We are so pleased that this important legislation came out of the work of the students and faculty of the Pace Environmental Policy Clinic," said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “Dealing with real world issues and making a community impact is what a Pace education is all about.” 

Senator Terrence Murphy said, "Thanks to the advocacy of the students, staff and faculty of the Pace University Environmental Clinic, New York State has now passed significant legislation that will protect elephants from cruel and inhumane treatment.  Once again, New York State is proving to be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves."

“Elephants have been exploited and abused in entertainment acts for too long,” Paulin said. “Confinement, torture and unhealthy living conditions have led to early death for these intelligent, gentle animals. Today, New York has become the leader in ending this horrible practice. Elephants will no longer be subjected to cruel treatment for our amusement.”

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences:  Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

 

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GOVERNOR CUOMO SIGNS LEGISLATION TO PROTECT ELEPHANTS

10/19/2017

GOVERNOR CUOMO SIGNS LEGISLATION TO PROTECT ELEPHANTS

For Immediate Release: 10/19/2017                                                       FROM GOVERNOR ANDREW M. CUOMO

GOVERNOR CUOMO SIGNS LEGISLATION TO PROTECT ELEPHANTS

'Elephant Protection Act' Prevents the Use of Elephants in Entertainment, Including Circuses, to Protect them from Physical Harm and Abuse

Entertainment Elephants Live Half as Long as Wild Elephants Due to Abusive Treatment

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today signed legislation prohibiting the use of elephants in entertainment acts. Under the Elephant Protection Act (S2098B/A464B) no person or entity can use elephants in entertainment acts, which include circuses, carnivals, parades or trade shows.

"The use of elephants in these types of settings is dangerous to their health and potentially abusive," Governor Cuomo said. "The Elephant Protection Act furthers this administration's efforts to fight animal cruelty, and create a stronger, more humane New York." 

The legislation aims to prevent performance tricks that are never executed by elephants in the wild and that are stressful or harmful to the animal. Elephants used for entertainment purposes often suffer physical and psychological harm due to the living conditions and treatment to which they are subjected, resulting in increased mortality with life spans only one-half as long as wild elephants. A civil penalty of up to $1,000 can be assessed per act that violates the law.

Senator Terrence Murphy said, "Thanks to the advocacy of the students, staff and faculty of the Pace University Environmental Clinic, New York State has now passed significant legislation that will protect elephants from cruel and inhumane treatment.  Once again, New York State is proving to be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves."

Assemblywoman Amy Paulin said, "Elephants have been exploited and abused in entertainment acts for too long. Confinement, torture and unhealthy living conditions have led to early death for these intelligent, gentle animals. Today, New York has become the leader in ending this horrible practice. Elephants will no longer be subjected to cruel treatment for our amusement."

 

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Financial Advisor: "State Fiduciary Laws Seen Adding to Chaos, Confusion"

10/19/2017

State Fiduciary Laws Seen Adding to Chaos, Confusion (Financial Advisor)

...Jill Gross, a law professor at Pace University, said at the Practicing Law Institute conference last month that she believes “any state law that tries to outlaw in any shape or form mandatory arbitration in customer agreements will be preempted by the FAA.”

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