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CBS New York: "Cuomo: Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant To Close By April 2021"

01/10/2017

CBS New York: "Cuomo: Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant To Close By April 2021"

FILE - The Indian Point nuclear power plant in Buchanan, New York. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

. . . Environmentalists suggest it wasn’t a matter of if the plant would close, but when.

“The plant had to be shut down at some point. I don’t think we should be surprised,” Todd Ommen, Pace University Law School said.

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Journal News: "New twist on EagleFest, Feb. 11"

01/09/2017

Journal News: "New twist on EagleFest, Feb. 11"

Teatown's Eaglefest will take place Feb. 11, 2017 (Photo: frankbjrphotos, Frank Becerra Jr/frankbjrphoto)

Teatown’s 13th Annual EagleFest will be taking flight with an expanded program at Westchester’s Croton Point Park in Croton-on-Hudson on Feb. 11. The annual festival gives visitors a unique opportunity to view eagles both close-up and in their natural environment. There are some new features this year including food trucks, entertainment and a screening of the award-winning documentary film “The Eagle Huntress.” It's about a young Mongolian girl becoming the first female Eagle Hunter in the 1,000-year history of her tribe. It will be shown at 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. at Wilcox Hall on Pace University’s Pleasantville campus. Discounted general admission tickets are on sale now at www.eventbrite.com. Pre-sale tickets are $17 adults (12+), $10 /children (6-11) and free for children 5 and under.  Tickets sold at the venue on the day of the event are $22, $12. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. For info, teatown.org. Rain date is Feb. 12.

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Hudson Independent: "Officials Call for Barge Plan in Hudson to be Scrapped"

01/05/2017

Hudson Independent: "Officials Call for Barge Plan in Hudson to be Scrapped"

Pace University professor John Cronin, flanked by Pace students and elected officials, spoke during a press conference at Kingsland Point Park in Sleepy Hollow. — Photo by Rick Pezzullo

Last month, several elected officials and students from Pace University’s Environmental Policy Clinic called on the U.S. Coast Guard to scrap plans to create 43 new anchorages in 10 locations along the Hudson River after it was revealed the federal agency allegedly violated its own protocol.

At a frigid press conference at Kingsland Point Park in Sleepy Hollow on December 5, Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino, state senators Terrence Murphy (R/Yorktown), David Carlucci (D/Clarkstown) and Sue Serino (R/Hyde Park), professor John Cronin from Pace University and students from the Pace Environmental Policy Clinic charged the Coast Guard was circumventing its own procedures to benefit the shipping industry with anchorages for oil barges from Yonkers to Kingston.

“This is not about politics. It is about doing the right thing for the people who live in the Hudson Valley,” said Murphy, who also asked the Coast Guard to extend the public comment period beyond December 6. Murphy’s district extends into Sleepy Hollow.

“We’re here to collectively and loudly tell the Coast Guard we’re not here to turn back decades of progress on the Hudson River,” Carlucci said. “We’re not going to stop while our Hudson River is in jeopardy. Together we will make sure we protect the integrity of the Hudson River.”

On December 5, students from Pace sent a petition to Coast Guard Admiral Paul Zukunft demanding the immediate withdrawal of the proposal based on research they had done on the Coast Guard’s July 2015 “Waterways Management Anchorage Management Tactics, Techniques and Procedures.”

The students contended, prior to publishing the proposal in the federal register in June, the Coast Guard should have completed two major studies, addressing river hazards and impacts, conducted public sessions with mariners, environmental groups and government, and provided all members of the public the opportunity to change the plan.

“How amazing is it that it took students from Pace University to shame and embarrass (the federal government)?” Astorino remarked. “The process has been trampled on. Voices need to be heard in the process that are trying to be stymied by the federal government.”

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CBSNewYork: "Rockland Community Reacts To Call For Clemency In Brinks Robbery Case"

01/05/2017

CBSNewYork: "Rockland Community Reacts To Call For Clemency In Brinks Robbery Case"

Inside the courtroom by sketch artist Marilyn Church. (credit: Marilyn Church)

. . . There now stands a memorial where the two officers were killed — a thruway entrance roadblock that was ambushed by the gang as they tried to escape. Judith Alice Clark didn’t fire a weapon, but as a driver in one of the vehicles she was ruled criminally liable and convicted.

The governor believes she deserves a measure of mercy.

“She talked about her sorrow and her complicity and why she did it,” he said earlier this week. “I found her very impressive overall and I think she’s going to be impressive to the parole board.”

Robert Van Cura was police chief in South Nyack that day.

“I think she’s done some good things in prison and I think that earns her some form of mercy and starts to pay back the debt that she owes to our society,” he said. “But I don’t think letting her our of prison is in the cards.”

Thanks to the governor, she has a chance at release she didn’t have before.

“It’s a courageous act by the governor,” Pace Law School Professor Bennet Gershman told CBS2. “I have to say, because there’s no question that what she did in killing law enforcement officials in the line of duty was horrible.”

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Journal News: "Injuries put athletes' families in financial bind"

01/03/2017

Journal News: "Injuries put athletes' families in financial bind"

In this file photo, Chris DiCintio talks with his players from Rye High School during a time out in the Class A boys semifinal game of the Section 1 basketball championships at the Westchester County Center on Mar. 1, 2006. (Photo: File Photo by Matthew Brown/The Journal News)

. . . Postgame Solutions, a start-up business in Massachusetts, has tried to help erase some of those gray areas and fill what president Jeff Lerner believes is a void in the marketplace.

Lerner founded his business early this year to help handle the complicated finances of expansive youth sports organizations. Chief among the products he offers is Season Interruption Insurance, which provides families reimbursement based on time lost to injury.

Lerner, a father of two, was inspired after watching his daughter miss three-quarters of a club soccer season that has cost him $3,000.

"My daughter suffered a high-ankle sprain in the first half of the first game of the season," Lerner said. "I don't think the ink had dried on the check. I had written the check and thrown out about $2,250 and there was nothing I could do."

Lerner found an insurer, Crum & Forster, to underwrite policies. They are sold to the club organizations — not directly to families — to and those organizations will, in theory, roll the cost of a premium (2.5 percent) into their participation fee. Families covered by the insurance are eligible to file a claim that will reimburse them for 90 percent of what they paid for that portion of the season.

"You would have to get a buy-in from the club overall, which means that you must get a buy in from the parents," said Paul Kurnit, a clinical professor of marketing at Pace University's Lubin School of Business. "The idea is interesting because of the legitimate fears from the parents and kids that you might get hurt. The level of play at every level is so much higher than it was 20 years ago. ... The issue of injury is much more center stage."

Lerner's product has been approved in seven states, and he hopes to add New York to that list soon.

"Parents are spending a tremendous amount of money in an uncontrolled environment," he said. "There's a ton of money being passed around and nobody's monitoring it."

Yet even with few safety nets in place, athletes and their parents are willing to take what can be serious a financial leap.

"These are kids who are the best athletes and many of them are looking at club sports as an oppotunity to do the best they can," Kurnit said. "They are looking to their futures, to trying to get college scholarships, which are a really big business. Many will jump in and pay the freight even though it's high risk."

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U.S. News & World Report: "Supreme Court Faces Its Own Campaign Season"

01/03/2017

U.S. News & World Report: "Supreme Court Faces Its Own Campaign Season"

Photo: The U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. (RandyHarris/iStockphoto)

. . . ideally, experts say, the high court will serve the role it is intended to serve, that of an independent arbiter which calms the emotions whipped up by campaigns and elections. "Some would argue that the court did put their hands on the scale and tipped it," says Randolph M. McLaughlin, professor of law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University and co-chair of the civil rights practice at Newman Ferrara LLP in New York. But "the court could put some of these divisive issues to rest."

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NBC News' TODAY: "Professor explains why students should leave their laptops at the door"

01/03/2017

NBC News' TODAY: "Professor explains why students should leave their laptops at the door"

Darren Rosenblum, a professor at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, won't allow laptops in classrooms, saying that the devices are a distraction, and that the new lack of technology is helping him to build a better human connection with his students.

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New York Times: "Leave Your Laptops at the Door to My Classroom"

01/03/2017

New York Times: "Leave Your Laptops at the Door to My Classroom"

"When I started teaching, I assumed my 'fun' class, sexuality and the law, full of contemporary controversy, would prove gripping to the students," writes Darren Rosenblum, a professor at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University. "One day, I provoked them with a point against marriage equality, and the response was a slew of laptops staring back. The screens seemed to block our classroom connection. Then, observing a senior colleague’s contracts class, I spied one student shopping for half the class. Another was surfing Facebook. Both took notes when my colleague spoke, but resumed the rest of their lives instead of listening to classmates.

"Laptops at best reduce education to the clackety-clack of transcribing lectures on shiny screens and, at worst, provide students with a constant escape from whatever is hard, challenging or uncomfortable about learning. And yet, education requires constant interaction in which professor and students are fully present for an exchange.

"Students need two skills to succeed as lawyers and as professionals: listening and communicating. We must listen with care, which requires patience, focus, eye contact and managing moments of ennui productively — perhaps by double-checking one’s notes instead of a friend’s latest Instagram. Multitasking and the mediation of screens kill empathy.

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North Country Public Radio: "Is SLC a black hole for aspiring prosecutors?"

12/20/2016

North Country Public Radio: "Is SLC a black hole for aspiring prosecutors?"

. . . The legal job market has finally bounced back from the recession in New York State and around the country. "Offices in and closer to the cities have been doing more hiring than they were in the five years before," said Jill Backer, an assistant dean at Pace University. "So they are absorbing more of the population willing and wanting to get into the criminal defense and prosecution areas."

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Connecticut Law Tribune: "5 Questions With Small Law Blogger Adrian Baron"

12/13/2016

Connecticut Law Tribune: "5 Questions With Small Law Blogger Adrian Baron"

As a law student, New Britain's Adrian Baron aimed to work for a large corporate law firm. But his career plans changed after he went to work for an environmental litigation clinic run by Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Baron, now an attorney at the three-lawyer Podorowsky Thompson & Baron, came away with the belief that working for a smaller firm would mean more flexibility and more opportunity to tackle important issues. It's also allowed him to work with a broad range of clients. "What I like about the small law firm I work for is I was thrown into it and had the opportunity do different types of law," said Baron. "I have a friend who worked for a large law firm and he wasn't allowed to have much contact with clients and the only time he was in court was for his own divorce."

Baron recently sat down with the Connecticut Law Tribune to discuss his mixed practice of criminal defense, personal injury and real estate matters, life in small law and his legal blog, "The Nutmeg Lawyer."

You had planned a corporate career in law but then began working for Robert F. Kennedy Jr., son of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy. How did that experience change your focus?

I began working for the litigation clinic at the Pace University School of Law. Because it was a full-time job, I took law classes in the evening. Working at the clinic provided a tremendous education for me. I served as an assistant to the co-directors Karl Coplan and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Karl had come from a white-shoe law firm and had once clerked for the Supreme Court. Bobby came from the Kennedy dynasty and was a nationally recognized environmental law expert. Both men seemingly had their pick of Manhattan's most prestigious law firms. Despite this, they decided to teach law in the suburbs.

Each semester they would take on 10 law students to teach them the craft of litigation. Their environmental clinic primarily defended working-class fishermen against corporations that were polluting the Hudson River. Bobby and Karl devoted their lives to helping the little guy and I really admired that about them. I realized that with a law degree, you have many avenues open to you. Why not use those skills to help those in need? When I moved back to Connecticut, I began working for attorney David Thompson. He was the son of the former Wisconsin attorney general and came from a long line of successful attorneys. Like Kennedy and Coplan, Dave seemed to follow the path of helping the little guy. I decided to stay with the firm and was lucky enough to make partner a few years later.

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