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Bustle: "How To Build Your Personal Brand On LinkedIn, According To Experts"

10/16/2017

How To Build Your Personal Brand On LinkedIn, According To Experts (Bustle)

...You can add keywords to your LinkedIn profile so that people searching for users with your skills or experience can find you, Jennifer Lee Magas, MA, JD, VP of Magas Media Consultants, LLC and a Clinical Associate Professor of Public Relations at Pace University, tells Bustle. Think about what words someone might enter if they want to find someone like you, and fill in all your education and work experience so nobody misses you.

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CBS New York: "Weinstein Blame Game: Manhattan DA, NYPD Point Fingers Over Handling Of Sexual Assault Allegation"

10/12/2017

Weinstein Blame Game: Manhattan DA, NYPD Point Fingers Over Handling Of Sexual Assault Allegation (CBS New York)

...The NYPD fired back, saying, “the case was carried out by experienced detectives and supervisors from NYPD’s Special Victims Unit.”

“The detectives used well established investigative techniques. The recorded conversation with the subject corroborates the acts that were the basis for the victim’s complaint to the police a day earlier. This follow-up recorded conversation was just one aspect of the case against the subject,” the statement continued. “This evidence, along with other statements and timeline information was presented to the office of the Manhattan District Attorney.”

It’s something Pace University Law professor Bennett Gershman backs up.

“You are listening to a sexual pervert ply his trade,” Gershman told CBS2’s Brian Conybeare. “It’s so easy, and for a prosecutor to say there’s no proof of say there’s not proof of criminal intent? That’s what the prosecutor Vance said, that’s just so, so wrong.”

Actress and screenwriter Luisette Geiss is the latest accuser.

“I don’t think that Harvey Weinstein comprehends how much pain and suffering this brings me and scores of other women,” she said in a Tuesday press conference.

Also Tuesday, former President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama said they were “disgusted” by the recent reports.

“Any man who demeans and degrades women in such fashion needs to be condemned and held accountable, regardless of wealth or status,” they said in a joint statement. “We should celebrate the courage of women who have come forward to tell these painful stories. And we all need to build a culture – including by empowering our girls and teaching our boys decency and respect – so we can make such behavior less prevalent in the future.”

Weinstein has been a major Democratic Party donor, as he and his family have given more than $1.4 million in political contributions since the 1992 election cycle.

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Politifact: "Fact-checking the NRA's response to proposed gun laws after Las Vegas"

10/12/2017

Fact-checking the NRA's response to proposed gun laws after Las Vegas (Politifact)

...Under President Barack Obama, the agency issued a rule that stepped up its efforts to pass the names of those who lack the mental capacity to "manage his or her own affairs" to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, which determines whether someone can legally buy a weapon.

Two disability law professors said that the mental challenges a person must have to qualify for those benefits go well beyond simply managing their money.

"You don't get to the question of can you manage your money until you get to the determination that somebody is sufficiently impaired by their illness that they can’t work," said Pace University law professor Gretchen M. Flint.

The Social Security Administration’s guidelines state that to qualify for benefits, "your mental disorder must result in ‘extreme’ limitation of one, or ‘marked’ limitation of two, of the four areas of mental functioning."

Those areas include "understand, remember, or apply information; interact with others; concentrate, persist, or maintain pace; and adapt or manage oneself."

And managing oneself includes "the abilities to regulate emotions, control behavior, and maintain well-being in a work setting.... distinguishing between acceptable and unacceptable work performance."

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Variety: "Manhattan D.A. Urges More Harvey Weinstein Victims to Come Forward"

10/12/2017

Manhattan D.A. Urges More Harvey Weinstein Victims to Come Forward (Variety)

The Manhattan District Attorney’s office, which is under fire for its handling of a sex assault allegation against Harvey Weinstein in 2015, is now urging other Weinstein victims to come forward.

In a statement, Chief Assistant D.A. Karen Friedman Agnifilo blasted Weinstein’s “pattern of mistreating women,” saying it was “disgraceful and shocks the conscience.”

“Any individual who feels that she may have been the victim of a crime by this person in Manhattan is strongly encouraged to contact our Office’s Sex Crimes Hotline at (212) 335-9373,” Agnifilo said.

The office is taking criticism following a devastating story in the New Yorker, which detailed numerous incidents of sexual harassment and alleged rape. The story cited the case of Ambra Battilana Gutierrez, who told New York police in March 2015 that Weinstein groped her at his Tribeca office. Gutierrez agreed to wear a wire, and captured Weinstein saying “I’m used to that,” and urging her to join him in his hotel room.

Police sources cited in the story say the case could have been charged as sexual abuse in the third degree, a misdemeanor. One police source was livid that the D.A.’s office opted not to file a charge.

In the statement, Agnifilo defended the decision not to prosecute, saying police had failed to consult with prosecutors before the recorded conversation took place.

“While the recording is horrifying to listen to, what emerged from the audio was insufficient to prove a crime under New York law, which requires prosecutors to establish criminal intent,” Agnifilo said.

The statute of limitations on misdemeanors in New York is two years, meaning that even if the D.A.’s office changed its mind it would be too late to bring charges.

However, the New Yorker story also includes an allegation that Weinstein forced an actress, Lucia Stoller, to perform oral sex at his office in 2004. The story does not indicate that she went to the police. Conceivably, that could prosecuted as a criminal sexual act in the first degree, a Class B felony, which does not have a statute of limitations in New York state. The D.A.’s office declined to comment on that case.

“It could be prosecuted any time you get the evidence,” says Bennett Gershman, professor at the Pace University School of Law. “From a practical standpoint, you have all the obstacles in terms of faded memories, lack of forensic evidence… All those issues would be on the table. It’s just a question of what the facts prove and whether or not the prosecutor has enough evidence to go ahead, and whether the prosecutor wants to.”

Much of Weinstein’s alleged misconduct is said to have taken place at the Peninsula Hotel in Beverly Hills. However, no agency has submitted a complaint against Weinstein to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s office, a spokesman said.

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The Harvard Crimson: "Law School Team Helps Nuclear Disarmament Campaign Win Nobel Prize"

10/12/2017

Law School Team Helps Nuclear Disarmament Campaign Win Nobel Prize (The Harvard Crimson)

A team at the Law School chipped in on the work of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, providing legal advice as the group negotiated an unprecedented disarmament treaty.

The Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic joined ICAN in its work to pass a United Nations treaty in July asking countries to abolish their nuclear weapon programs and supplies. Fifty-three countries have so far signed the treaty, though the world’s nine major nuclear powers—including the United States—have boycotted the negotiations.

The IHRC group included four Law School students—Molly Doggett, Alice L.M. Osman, Carina M. Bentata Gryting, and Lan Mei—as well as Anna Crowe, an instructor at the clinic and Bonnie Docherty, a lecturer at the Law School.

“The treaty is a major step and a major step towards nuclear disarmament. It is not the end itself so we’d love to have nuclear states on board, but we’re not surprised and not concerned that they’re not on board,” Crowe said.

The treaty has met resistance from nations who criticize it as naive: In July, UN ambassadors for the United States, Britain, and France wrote a joint statement arguing that it “clearly disregards the realities of the international security environment.”

Crowe, however, said the treaty “sets a really high standard and stigmatizes nuclear armament”—critical first steps to reducing the world supply of nuclear weapons.

Matthew Bolton, a political science professor at Pace University who was also involved in the ICAN project, characterized the treaty as “a really good opportunity to put back on the table something that many people here in the United States and other nuclear-armed places have forgotten...which is that nuclear weapons cause tremendous harm.”

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Patch: "Experts at Cybersecurity Conference Say Government and Business Need to Work Together to Combat Cybercrime"

10/12/2017

Experts at Cybersecurity Conference Say Government and Business Need to Work Together to Combat Cybercrime (Patch)

Business, government and our major healthcare and academic institutions have not invested enough time or money in protecting the massive amounts of sensitive data they have collected, said experts gathered on October 6 at Pace University for a major conference on cybersecurity issues.

The Business Council of Westchester and Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in Pleasantville held the half-day conference entitled CyberStorm-Cybersecurity in Business: Emerging Threats & Innovative Solutions to discuss the growing threat our nation faces from cybercriminals.

National experts such as Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., and Information Systems expert Brigadier General Timothy T. Lunderman, as well as IT experts from major corporations like IBM, Johnson & Johnson and Mastercard weighed in on this complex topic.

Lunderman, who has many years of experience in Air Force intelligence, likened the current state of affairs to a war where the combatants are increasingly skilled at attacking vulnerabilities that are not being well protected. He said as in war, the defenders need to determine the “key terrain” and protect that rather than focus on protecting all their data because there is so much.

“If I was a bank, the money might be the key terrain,’’ said Lunderman, who currently serves as Special Assistant to the Director of Air National Guard for Headquarters Air Force, Chief Information Dominance and Chief Information Officer. “Focus on what makes the business run.’’

Vance, who has rapidly established his office as a national leader in the fight against cybercrime and identify theft, described the rise in cybercrime as “staggering,” accounting for more than a third of all felony cases handled by his office. “The way we used to deal with cybercrime is not going to cut it anymore,” he said, noting that his office is placing greater emphasais on prevention of cyber crime. As Manhattan DA, Vance opened a $10 million cyber lab last year where more than 75 prosecutors, investigators and analysts work together sharing information with law enforcement offices in London and Paris. Vance is also co-founder of the Global Cyber Alliance, a non-profit, cross sector coalition focused on reducing digital vulnerablity. The Alliance has grown to include 170 partners in more than 20 countries. “I’m not sure our country understands how serious this threat is,” he warned.

Marsha Gordon, President and CEO of the Business Council of Westchester, said the BCW teamed up with Pace to hold the conference because cybersecurity is of growing concern to its business membership. “We hear from businesses all the time about cybersecurity threats,’’ said Gordon.

Jonathan Hill, dean of Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems Hill said Pace University held the conference to highlight its position as one of the top schools in the nation for training experts to detect and eliminate incursions that are threatening to derail governments and industry. Pace University’s Seidenberg School was designated a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security, one of only two Centers in the New York metropolitan area.

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HVNN: "Experts Government Business Work Together Combat Cybercrime"

10/12/2017

Experts Government Business Work Together Combat Cybercrime (HVNN)

Business, government and our major healthcare and academic institutions have not invested enough time or money in protecting the massive amounts of sensitive data they have collected, said experts gathered recently at Pace University for a major conference on cybersecurity issues.

The Business Council of Westchester and Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems held the half-day conference entitled CyberStorm-Cybersecurity in Business: Emerging Threats & Innovative Solutions to discuss the growing threat our nation faces from cybercriminals.

National experts such as Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr., and Information Systems expert Brigadier General Timothy T. Lunderman, as well as IT experts from major corporations like IBM, Johnson & Johnson and Mastercard weighed in on this complex topic.

Lunderman, who has many years of experience in Air Force intelligence, likened the current state of affairs to a war where the combatants are increasingly skilled at attacking vulnerabilities that are not being well protected. He said as in war, the defenders need to determine the “key terrain” and protect that rather than focus on protecting all their data because there is so much.

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Cheatsheet: "Important Rights You Have When You’re Working for Someone Else"

10/12/2017

Important Rights You Have When You’re Working for Someone Else (Cheatsheet)

7. Privacy

Although it might not feel like it at times, you do have some privacy rights in the workplace. You don’t have to feel obligated to share personal information, such as your family plans or health status, said Jennifer Magas, vice president of Magas Media Consultants and clinical associate professor at Pace University.

Your privacy rights begin even before you get the job. Magas told The Cheat Sheet that hiring managers cannot ask personal questions, such as your marital status or age. “They are basically not allowed to ask anything that could be later used to argue that a hiring decision was made based on bias or prejudice,” Magas said.

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Good Call: "Should You Work for the Family Business to Gain Experience?"

10/10/2017

Should You Work for the Family Business to Gain Experience?m (Good Call)

For college students looking for experience, working for the family business might seem like a no brainer. But, is it a good idea? Can family members be objective enough to provide honest feedback? And will recruiters or hiring managers view working for your family as “real” experience?

Less than half of college seniors feel very prepared for a career, and if you’re considering this type of work arrangement to bolster your resume, consider the following factors:

When The Goal Is To Gain Experience

According to Helen Cruz, director of career counseling at Pace University, there’s no one-size-fits-all answer, so the school advises students on a case-by-case basis.

“At Pace, we have many students whose families own businesses both in the U.S. and overseas.”

Cruz believes that working in the family business can help students develop and practice the types of skills needed to succeed in a career.

Monique Frost, associate director of career and professional development at the Farmer School of Business at Miami University, believes that it can be beneficial to work for the family, but she also thinks it would be helpful to work for someone who might fire them.

“It is best if a student interns or volunteers with their family business early in their career exploration journey if possible.” She explains, “This will allow students to gain insight and knowledge about that particular industry, as well as the dynamics surrounding working with family members.”

However, Frost also thinks students can benefit from interning/working at other companies.

“Learning from others can add tremendous value to a student’s or new grad’s ability to collaborate with constituents outside of their current network, receive open and honest feedback – without family bias – and gain insights and perspectives from a diverse range of people.”

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Huffington Post: "Puerto Rico After Maria: When Resiliencia Humana Is The Only Resilience That Remains"

10/10/2017

Puerto Rico After Maria: When Resiliencia Humana Is The Only Resilience That Remains (Huffington Post)

In the days leading up to and after Hurricane Maria, Sarah Gabriella Pereira lived by her cell phone. She had learned the hard way that a even a moment’s hesitation might disconnect her from home, thanks to Puerto Rico’s now frail cellular system. She abruptly left her Pace University classes without warning to talk to her mother. “Sometimes, I’d see I had a missed call, and I would start crying. On my birthday, the day before Maria landed, I received none of my usual family calls.” They were anxiety-filled days.

“Resiliencia” is hand-engraved into the silver ring that every day adorns the left hand of the international management major at the university’s Lubin School of Business. She was unfamiliar with the word when she found the ring a year and a half ago in a display of homemade jewelry back home in the city of Caguas. “It captured my attention,” she said. “When I learned what it meant, I understood. I identify with it.”

Caguas, in the central eastern part of Puerto Rico, endured more than three feet of rain during the historic storm that began hammering the island on Sept. 20 with 155-mph wind gusts. Shortages and ruined services made living conditions dire. Power outages are the norm. Like the rest of the island, the local supply chain was crippled by fuel shortages, damaged highways and logistical confusion.

Keeping up with the purchase of everyday necessities is a challenge. In the aftermath, Sarah’s mother, named Sarah as well, could only withdraw $100 at a time from the local bank teller or the ATM, if it were operational. Bank lines were long and she had to make money last. Food is still dear and neighbors take turns preparing meals for each other. “It is economical. They never know when the money is going to run out. My mom said she has been eating cereal. They can’t even eat ham and cheese sandwiches because there is no place to store ham or cheese ― ice is necessary. They have to stand in line for ice.

Sarah says resiliencia is integral to Puerto Rican culture and her upbringing, the reason the island and its people will survive and thrive. “We are literally a hopeful and happy people. Obviously, many back home are desperate now and they have reason to be. But we will do the impossible and have a Puerto Rico that is even better.”

Resilience is also a favored word among climate and security experts, but cold and technical in its application. It is discussed at a distance from disasters ― in conferences, meeting rooms, and agency strategy sessions. Resilience is about models that theoretically assure systems are securely in place, responders are prepared to mobilize, and resources are at the ready. That is, until a weather bomb like Hurricane Maria explodes in people’s lives, leaving only human resilience to stand and fight.

The Department of Homeland Security says resilience requires “the shared responsibility of all levels of government, the private and nonprofit sectors, and individual citizens.” But what happens when government and the private and nonprofit sectors fail in their shared responsibility, are rendered as helpless as the family short on food because it hasn’t access to its own money?

“No matter how much we plan, without human resilience we don’t survive,” said Professor Joseph Ryan, chair of Pace University’s masters program in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals. “When Tom Ridge [Secretary of Homeland Security under President George W. Bush] spoke at Pace University’s first resiliency conference about the 2010 National Security Strategy, he said we will achieve resilience through public private partnerships. The private sector has 90% of the resources and no authority. Government has few resources and all the authority. They have no idea what a public private partnership is. And if we are really going to achieve resilience, we need to work together.”

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