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The Examiner: "Pace Economics Team Captures Second Fed Reserve College Title"

12/23/2015

The Examiner: "Pace Economics Team Captures Second Fed Reserve College Title"

. . . All seven members of this year’s Pace team are economics majors in Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. Team members are Katherine Craig, Daniella Gambino, Omar Habib, Jozef Lampa, Melissa Navas, Jonathan Okane and Yuliya Palianok. Mark Weinstock and fellow economics professor Greg Colman serve as advisers, training the team during the year and helping them prepare their presentation.

“We go through, literally, hundreds and hundreds of questions and responses to make sure they are prepared with all the different nuances of what they need to know,” Weinstock said.

Students are also expected to read The Wall Street Journal and The Economist as well as speeches and research papers by economists, bank presidents and governors.

Pace Economics Department Chairman Joseph Morreale said creativity and teamwork are crucial.

“Many of the teams that compete don’t operate in such a teamwork fashion,” he said. “I think that’s a benefit of having two faculty working with them for so long. They usually spend five or six months preparing them. It’s a long haul that starts in the summer.”

The Pace Economics Department has grown in popularity in recent years and now has about 200 economics majors, Morreale said. Students can specialize in business economics, public economic policy and Chinese Economic Studies, which includes travel courses to China. Students are required to prepare a senior thesis.

Economics majors often seek jobs in financial institutions, healthcare organizations or the nonprofit sector, while some have accepted positions in the Federal Reserve itself, Morreale said. Starting salaries for graduates range from $60,000 to $80,000 a year, he added.

Students looking to major in economics should take a math sequence, including pre-calculus and calculus, and the Advanced Placement macroeconomics and microeconomics half-year classes. Students who achieve at least a 3 of 5 on the AP test earn college-level credit, Morreale said.

“I’ve always argued that they should also take world history because they have to understand the new economy of the world. It’s not just being a national economy anymore,” he said.

Read more: http://www.theexaminernews.com/pace-economics-team-captures-second-fed-reserve-college-title/

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Journal News: "Taxpayers spend millions on outsourced lawyers"

12/23/2015

Journal News: "Taxpayers spend millions on outsourced lawyers"

Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino's administration outsourced nearly $2 million in legal work to private law firms last year - and likely more. (Photo: File photo by Seth Harrison/The Journal News)

. . . In all, Westchester, Rockland and Putnam counties paid private attorneys $15.5 million between 2009 and 2014, outsourcing even basic civil lawsuits despite having assistant county attorneys already on the public payroll. Westchester County, for instance, has a stable of 66 in-house lawyers who made $7.3 million in salaries in 2014.

Instead, much of the legal work went to attorneys and firms with political ties to county leaders, who contribute generously to election campaigns, or who increase their chances to land county contracts by hiring influential retired judges and other former government officials — including some who have had brushes with controversy.

“It is a necessary evil," said Jay Carlisle, a professor at the Pace University School of Law who specializes in civil procedure and legal ethics. "Unfortunately, municipalities don’t have, on occasion, the expertise, or lawyers with the experience, or just plain lawyers, to handle a matter. They’re forced to turn to outside counsel. The real question is, when they do, who do they turn to? Do they turn to someone with political affiliations? To a friend of the county attorney?

“The potential for abuse is ever present," Carlisle said. "Constant scrutiny is necessary.”

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/news/investigations/2015/12/23/outsourced-lawyers-westchester/76576688/

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Riverkeeper threatens two environmental lawsuits against Tappan Zee builders"

12/22/2015

Westchester County Business Journal: "Riverkeeper threatens two environmental lawsuits against Tappan Zee builders"

The Riverkeeper says this aerial photo taken shows how Tappan Zee Bridge project activities have caused the resuspension of bottom sediments, causing plumes of turbid water, in clearly visible contrast to the natural conditions of the Hudson River estuary. Lee Ross/Riverkeeper

Riverkeeper Inc. has informed the state Thruway Authority and the group of contractors designing and building the new Tappan Zee Bridge of its intent to sue them for violating federal laws, according to two letters penned by the environmental organization Dec. 16.

The separate citizen lawsuit threats – both directed at the Thruway Authority and the consortium building the bridge, Tappan Zee Constructors LLC – are related to Riverkeeper’s allegations that the construction of the new bridge has contributed to the increase of sturgeon mortality and sediment pollutant that has surfaced from the bottom of the Hudson River, violations of the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act, respectively.

In a prepared statement, the Thruway Authority responded that it has taken “unprecedented measures” to protect all aquatic life and reduce resuspension of sediments in the Hudson River where the construction for the bridge connecting Westchester and Rockland counties is taking place.

With the letter, the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, an attorney group with Pace University School of Law that represents Ossining-based Riverkeeper, gives the bridge builders a 60-day notice to either come to the table and discuss potential remedies as part of a settlement, or be sued.

Read more: http://westfaironline.com/76508/riverkeeper-threatens-two-environmental-...

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Journal News: "Riverkeeper to sue Thruway Authority over fish deaths"

12/22/2015

Journal News: "Riverkeeper to sue Thruway Authority over fish deaths"

The Riverkeeper says this aerial photo taken shows how Tappan Zee Bridge project activities have caused the resuspension of bottom sediments, causing plumes of turbid water, in clearly visible contrast to the natural conditions of the Hudson River estuary. Lee Ross/Riverkeeper

. . . The feds got involved in July when The Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, which is representing Riverkeeper, filed a petition with the National Marine Fisheries Service.

The notice of intent to sue gives the New York State Thruway Authority and Tappan Zee Constructors LLC 60 days to comply with the law before the Riverkeeper moves forward with a lawsuit.

The bridge is set to be completed in 2018.

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/news/local/tappan-zee-bridge/2015/12/19/riverkeeper-sue-thruway-authority-over-fish-deaths/77624856/

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New York Times: "Reviving Downtown White Plains With New Places to Live and Linger"

12/22/2015

New York Times: "Reviving Downtown White Plains With New Places to Live and Linger"

A skateboarder on Mamaroneck Avenue, the main shopping area in White Plains. Photo Credit: Gregg Vigliotti for The New York Times

WHITE PLAINS — As rents in Brooklyn and Manhattan continue a relentless ascent, New Yorkers are searching farther afield for reasonably priced housing. A flurry of construction in White Plains suggests that the city is hoping to draw new residents into its suburban confines.

In three to five years, an anticipated $2 billion in new construction, the most in White Plains since the housing market collapsed in 2008, could reshape the city’s downtown, adding about 2,000 units of housing.

The activity is intended to draw New York City commuters, particularly the much-sought-after millennials, to White Plains, which is a 35-minute train ride to Grand Central Terminal. Construction began in November at 55 Bank Street, two 16-story residential towers totaling 561 apartments. The first building, with 288 units and ground-floor retail space, will open in 2017.

White Plains, the Westchester County seat, has tried sprucing up its downtown before, adding shopping malls, hotels, housing and restaurants in the early 2000s. Many of those projects catered to daily shoppers and office workers who leave in the evening. According to the office of Mayor Thomas M. Roach, the city’s population of 58,000 swells to 200,000 during the day with county workers and employees of businesses like Pace Law School and Bank of New York Mellon.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/23/realestate/reviving-downtown-white-plains-with-new-places-to-live-and-linger.html

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Computerworld: "To break terrorist encryption, pay off Apple and Google, expert urges"

12/18/2015

Computerworld: "To break terrorist encryption, pay off Apple and Google, expert urges"

To break encrypted smartphone messages used by terrorists, tech companies such as Apple and Google need to be paid by law enforcement, an expert urged Thursday.

"If there were a financial incentive for Google and Apple to assist law enforcement, then they would be more willing to change their encryption technology to facilitate law enforcement in possession of a warrant," said Professor Darren Hayes, director of cybersecurity at Pace University, in an interview.

Tech companies and wireless carriers currently get reimbursed "quite nicely," he said, for their time and help when faced with a court warrant under the 1994 Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), a wiretap law that allows the FBI and others access to some communications, but not encrypted data.

Apple and others "are in the business to make money, so you have to make a business case for them to cooperate," Hayes added.

Read more: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3016665/security/to-break-terrorist-encryption-pay-off-apple-and-google-expert-urges.html

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace’s SWAG participants showcase water robots"

12/15/2015

Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace’s SWAG participants showcase water robots"

A fall semester of designing, engineering, constructing and hack-proofing water robots concluded with a showcase this weekend featuring presentations from 30 high school girls who participated in the workshop at Pace University.

Called STEM Women Achieve Greatness, or SWAG, the nine-week program enlisted girls interested in science, technology, engineering and math from high schools in Westchester and Fairfield counties to work with faculty from Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Read more: http://westfaironline.com/76363/paces-swag-participants-showcase-water-robots/

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The Chronicle Review: "Moral Meals"

12/14/2015

The Chronicle Review: "Moral Meals"

America, as everyone knows, is the land of the free and the brave and the well fed.

Yet for a people who have loudly broadcast both their independence and their national abundance, Americans have an unusually long history of dietary reformers trying to change what everyone else eats and drinks. From 19th-century teetotalers to tofu-and-brown-rice-eating hippies to contemporary weight-loss evangelists, reformers’ efforts have always been about more than health. In fact, the promise of life-changing transformation implicit — and sometimes explicit — in those reform efforts has been a major part of their appeal. Digging into the motives of diverse reformers, E. Melanie DuPuis’s Dangerous Digestion: The Politics of American Dietary Advice expands the discussion in both time and scope. By starting her examination in the late 18th century, DuPuis, a professor of environmental studies and science at Pace University, usefully pushes back the chronology of didactic food reform, revealing a long and complicated discourse around self-discipline, purity, and freedom.

Read more: http://chronicle.com/article/Moral-Meals/234540

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San Diego Union-Tribune: "What FBI, police are doing to prevent terror attacks"

12/14/2015

San Diego Union-Tribune: "What FBI, police are doing to prevent terror attacks"

An FBI dive team prepares to search Seccombe Lake for evidence in connection with last week's fatal shooting at Inland Regional Center , Friday, Dec. 11, 2015, in San Bernardino, Calif.  Jae C. Hong/AP PHOTO

. . . The new generation of terrorists have also frustrated investigators’ classic wiretap techniques by foregoing standard phone calls in favor of highly-encrypted third party apps, some which are run out of countries without U.S. jurisdiction, said Darren Hayes, director of cyber security and an assistant professor at Pace University in New York. For instance, one of those apps, Telegram, was used by the terrorists in the Paris massacre.

Read more: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2015/dec/12/fbi-law-enforcement-counterterrorism-protection/

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SC Magazine: "Comey calls encryption a business model issue, raises hackles of privacy advocates"

12/14/2015

SC Magazine: "Comey calls encryption a business model issue, raises hackles of privacy advocates"

. . . computer forensics and security expert Darren Hayes, an assistant professor and director of cybersecurity at Pace University's Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York, told SCMagazine.com, that by moving to place encryption keys locally on user devices as Apple and Android have done rather than leaving the keys on servers puts the country “at risk.” Hayes said his research showed that post-Snowden and WikiLeaks jihadists are increasingly placing importance on encryption.

And he noted that currently the Manhattan DA's office currently has more than a 100 cases pending that it can't prosecute because it is unable to get to encrypted information.

Read more: http://www.scmagazine.com/comey-calls-encryption-a-business-model-issue-raises-hackles-of-privacy-advocates/article/459404/

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