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"News12" features "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

03/14/2018

"News12" features "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

A group of Pace University journalism students plans to head to Puerto Rico in an effort to shed light on the continuing hardships residents of the island are facing following the slow recovery after Hurricane Maria.

About a dozen students are preparing to head out next Tuesday and cover what appears to be the biggest story of their fledgling careers.

But it's also going to be educational.

"Students learn how to tell a story from start to finish," says Maria Luskey, who has overseen the school's documentary program for the past 15 years.

Past trips have sent students to Costa Rica, Brazil and Cuba. The school had planned to go to Puerto Rico earlier, but the storm forced Pace to cancel those plans.

Months later, with the recovery lagging and many on the island left isolated and ignored, the school decided to try again.

"These are 3.5 million American citizens who are in a desperate and dire situation, that months after the hurricane, they still need our help," says Gabriel Rivera, a Bronx native who has relatives in Puerto Rico.

In the next two weeks, News 12's Aime Rodriguez will be following the class to Puerto Rico for updates.

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"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Haub Professor Vanessa Merton in "Westchester legislators approve Immigrant Protection Act"

03/14/2018

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Haub Professor Vanessa Merton in "Westchester legislators approve Immigrant Protection Act"

...Local community groups that work with the county’s immigrant population cheered the passage of the Act.
“Federal law enforcement is not the job of county personnel,” said Vanessa Merton, director of the Immigration Justice Clinic at Pace University. “County agencies should not be required to enforce federal immigration regulations any more than they enforce federal tax regulations.”

Carola Otero Bracco, executive director of Neighbors Link, a Mount Kisco nonprofit that assists immigrants, said the act is an important measure for the entire county.
“We are committed to our unyielding conviction to celebrate and cultivate diversity and inclusion, and the passing of this strong legislation is a key step toward that vision,” said Bracco.

The act will now head to County Executive George Latimer for his approval.

“This legislation in no way goes against federal law, and in no way will allow criminals to be harbored. To say otherwise is simply not true,” Latimer said in a statement following the vote. “This legislation goes to the heart of protecting good honest citizens in their home.”

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"Miami Herald" quoted Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Hundreds of 15-year-old brides in Missouri may have married their rapists"

03/14/2018

"Miami Herald" quoted Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Hundreds of 15-year-old brides in Missouri may have married their rapists"

...Overall, statutory rape cases come in three varieties, said Leslie Garfield Tenzer, a law professor at Pace University in New York:

“There are the sick cases,” she said, “the teacher sleeping with the child, or the 29-year-old sleeping with the child. That’s an easy case.

“Then you have the case in which the parent alerts the authorities and pushes for it. The parent is irate.” Those, too, tend to get prosecuted, she said.

But the third and thornier type is one in which the law has clearly been broken, but neither the child, partner nor parents are complaining.

“When you have a crime,” Tenzer said, “basically you’re saying that the defendant wronged society. Convicting someone gives the family of the victim some sense of retribution, it maybe rehabilitates the defendant and it is a deterrence to society: Don’t do this.

“But if you have this girl who’s in love with this guy, we really don’t need to rehabilitate them. We don’t necessarily need retribution if the parents understand that there’s love there. And the question is, ‘Do we want to take the time of prosecutors and taxpayers’ money for a case to basically send a message to the rest of the world?’”

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"WAMC North East Public Radio" quotes Haub Professor Vanessa Merton in "Westchester Legislators Pass Immigrant Protection Act"

03/14/2018

"WAMC North East Public Radio" quotes Haub Professor Vanessa Merton in "Westchester Legislators Pass Immigrant Protection Act"

The Westchester Board of Legislators approved an Immigrant Protection Act Monday night. Democratic County Executive George Latimer intends to sign the bill. A few Republican legislators say the measure puts safety on the line. And some attorneys believe Westchester will become the first county in New York to have such legislation on the books.

Democratic Westchester County Legislator Virginia Perez says the Act prevents individuals from being targeted solely because of their immigration status. Perez chairs the Legislation Committee.

“I’m an immigrant myself. And I’m the only Hispanic on the Board of Legislators. So, as a Hispanic immigrant, it means a lot to me as a resident of the City of Yonkers,” Perez says. “But as a Hispanic legislator, as an immigrant legislator, it means the world to me that I’m able to provide this for my community. Not everyone is an illegal immigrant.”

She says the legislation is not a sanctuary bill, but defines what county law enforcement can ask about a person's citizenship or immigration status and what information the county will share with federal officials. Attorney Vanessa Merton teaches and directs the Immigration Justice Clinic at Pace University School of Law in White Plains. She helped work on the legislation and believes it is the first of its kind.

“We are not aware of any other county, Board of Legislators, or similar body that has undertaken to disentangle, clearly, to clearly disentangle county employees, county personnel, from doing the federal government’s job,” says Merton.

Perez says there is a lot of misinformation about the bill.

“Some of that misinformation that’s being spread around the community is that we have just passed a law to protect criminals,” Perez says.

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"LI Herald.com" featured Pace University in "33 New York colleges pledge prospective students will not be penalized for anti-gun violence walkout"

03/13/2018

"LI Herald.com" featured Pace University in "33 New York colleges pledge prospective students will not be penalized for anti-gun violence walkout"

With high school students on Long Island and nationwide preparing to walk out of school on Wednesday to protest gun violence, more than 200 colleges and universities have pledged students’ admission prospects will not be affected by any discipline they might face at their schools for participating.

The pledge to not hold students’ protests against their chances at admission, at press time, had been made by 33 schools in New York state, including Adelphi University in Garden City and Hofstra University in Hempstead.

According to the National Association of Admissions Counselors, other colleges in the greater metropolitan area that have made the pledge include:

• Barnard College

• City University of New York

• Columbia University

• Cornell University

• Fordham University

• Manhattan College

• New York University

• Pace University

• Sarah Lawrence College

• The New School

For a complete list of schools, including a list by state, click here

" We would not take account of school discipline in a circumstance of peaceful protest on a pressing matter of national debate,” NYU officials wrote in a statement.

The number of schools pledging their support may provide some reassurance from students on the fence about participating in the demonstration Wednesday, in which students nationwide are expected to walk out for 17 minutes in memory of the 17 people who died at the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

Students at Sanford H. Calhoun High School, in Merrick, and others across Nassau County, have indicated that they will participate in the demonstration. School districts, however, have been largely silent on how they will handle the walkouts on a policy level.

The New York State School Boards Association issued a statement on its website warning districts choosing not to discipline students who participate that they could set a precedent for other disobedience of school policies.

The NYSSBA warned districts against explicitly supporting the walkouts.

“It would be ill-advised for a school district to provide such support, based upon the established principle that school districts have no express authority to engage in political activities,” NYSSBA officials said. “Accordingly, school district sponsorship of such activities would not appear to be a viable option.”

New York State United Teachers, the statewide union, has not endorsed the March 14 walkout, but is encouraging educators to wear orange that day. Orange is the color of National Gun Violence Awareness Day. 

Read the article.

 

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"News12" featured "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

03/13/2018

"News12" featured "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

A group of Pace University journalism students plans to head to Puerto Rico in an effort to shed light on the continuing hardships residents of the island are facing following the slow recovery after Hurricane Maria.

About a dozen students are preparing to head out next Tuesday and cover what appears to be the biggest story of their fledgling careers.

But it's also going to be educational.

"Students learn how to tell a story from start to finish," says Maria Luskey, who has overseen the school's documentary program for the past 15 years.

Past trips have sent students to Costa Rica, Brazil and Cuba. The school had planned to go to Puerto Rico earlier, but the storm forced Pace to cancel those plans.

Months later, with the recovery lagging and many on the island left isolated and ignored, the school decided to try again.

"These are 3.5 million American citizens who are in a desperate and dire situation, that months after the hurricane, they still need our help," says Gabriel Rivera, a Bronx native who has relatives in Puerto Rico.

In the next two weeks, News 12's Aime Rodriguez will be following the class to Puerto Rico for updates.

Watch News12.

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"The Kansas City Star" quoted Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Hundreds of Missouri’s 15-year-old brides may have married their rapists"

03/13/2018

"The Kansas City Star" quoted Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Hundreds of Missouri’s 15-year-old brides may have married their rapists"

...Overall, statutory rape cases come in three varieties, said Leslie Garfield Tenzer, a law professor at Pace University in New York:

“There are the sick cases,” she said, “the teacher sleeping with the child, or the 29-year-old sleeping with the child. That’s an easy case.

“Then you have the case in which the parent alerts the authorities and pushes for it. The parent is irate.” Those, too, tend to get prosecuted, she said.

But the third and thornier type is one in which the law has clearly been broken, but neither the child, partner nor parents are complaining.

“When you have a crime,” Tenzer said, “basically you’re saying that the defendant wronged society. Convicting someone gives the family of the victim some sense of retribution, it maybe rehabilitates the defendant and it is a deterrence to society: Don’t do this.

“But if you have this girl who’s in love with this guy, we really don’t need to rehabilitate them. We don’t necessarily need retribution if the parents understand that there’s love there. And the question is, ‘Do we want to take the time of prosecutors and taxpayers’ money for a case to basically send a message to the rest of the world?’”

In Idaho, the judge sent exactly that message. Heather Strawn’s marriage to Aaron meant nothing.

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"Daily News" featured Haub Visiting Scholar Delcianna Winders piece "Why is it so hard for President Trump to flatly forbid trophy hunting imports?"

03/13/2018

"Daily News" featured Haub Visiting Scholar Delcianna Winders piece "Why is it so hard for President Trump to flatly forbid trophy hunting imports?"

Written by: Delcianna Winders

Winders is the PETA Foundation’s vice president and deputy general counsel for captive animal law enforcement and a visiting scholar at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University.

It’s been three years since the world erupted in outrage when Cecil the lion was selfishly and ineptly hunted down by Minnesota dentist Walter Palmer. The callous killing of Cecil threw a harsh spotlight on the slaughtering of animals for their body parts — “trophies” — so they can be stuffed and hung up on walls in macabre tableaux mounted by insecure men. (Yes, it’s almost exclusively men who participate in this so-called sport.) It’s time for our government to stop being complicit in this indefensible horror.

Earlier this week, the Trump administration announced that the import of body parts of African elephants shot for sport could be allowed on a case-by-case basis. This news came only a few months after the President spoke out against the practice and put the decision on hold. Back in November, President Trump tweeted, “Big-game trophy decision will be announced next week but will be very hard pressed to change my mind that this horror show in any way helps conservation of Elephants or any other animal.”

He was right then and if he meant it, he needs to direct his agency, the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), to do its job and protect wildlife, not trophy hunters.

Importing elephant “trophies” is currently illegal unless a government agency allows an exception to the law that is supposed to protect endangered species, and there is no legitimate basis for allowing the body parts of imperiled animals to be imported into our country.

New reports detail Cecil’s last hours. According to the forthcoming book “Lion Hearted: The Life and Death of Cecil & the Future of Africa’s Iconic Cats,” By biologist Andrew Loveridge, after deliberately luring him outside the confines of a national park in order to skirt regulations, Palmer shot Cecil with his first steel arrow but missed his vital organs and major arteries. The majestic lion suffered for 10 to 12 excruciatingly painful hours before finally being “dispatched” with a second arrow from a compound bow.

Read the full article.

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"Broadly" featured Pace Health Professor Dr. Erica Gollub in "Will Americans Ever Actually Use the Female Condom?"

03/13/2018

"Broadly" featured Pace Health Professor Dr. Erica Gollub in "Will Americans Ever Actually Use the Female Condom?"

...Dr. Erica Gollub, a health professor at Pace University who has researched female condom use for decades and was involved the product’s initial FDA approval hearings, agrees. “The overriding justification for easing regulatory burdens on this very safe device is clear: to provide another choice in protection against STI/HIV and unplanned pregnancy to both the insertive and the receptive partner in vaginal or anal intercourse,” she says.

“When you look at the package of a female condom, it’s all vaginas all the time.”

Advocates hope that the reclassification will have practical benefits, too. The idea is that once the paperwork and conditions become less onerous, more manufacturers will start producing internal condoms—and, hopefully, producing different kinds of internal condoms, such as models that come with tampon-like applicators for the more squeamish. The greater competition might then drive down prices.

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Statement from President Marvin Krislov on the passing of Erivan Haub

03/12/2018

Statement from President Marvin Krislov on the passing of Erivan Haub

“On behalf of the trustees, students, faculty, and staff of Pace University, I mourn the passing of Erivan Haub, a longtime friend and philanthropic supporter of Pace and especially our law school,” said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “Erivan’s passion for the United States and for the environment, inspired by his mother, Elisabeth, led to the Haub family’s long and successful partnership with Pace. We present the annual Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy, and in 2016 we were honored to name our law school the Elisabeth Haub School of Law, in recognition of our long partnership and a generous gift from the Haub family. We send our deepest condolences to the Haub family, and most of all to Liliane Haub, Erivan’s daughter-in-law, who serves as a Pace trustee. Erivan’s leadership, friendship, and generosity will not be forgotten.”

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