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New York Times: "Group Petitions to Save a Prehistoric Fish From Modern Construction"

07/24/2015

New York Times: "Group Petitions to Save a Prehistoric Fish From Modern Construction"

PHOTO: Riverkeeper attributes rising deaths of Atlantic sturgeons to construction on the replacement for the Tappan Zee Bridge, above. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

. . . When the Fisheries Service issued an opinion on the bridge project, it concluded that dredging or pile driving would probably kill two of each species of sturgeon over the entire project. As for boat collisions, it concluded that given the relatively small increase in traffic and anticipated speeds, “it is unlikely that there would be a detectable increase in the risk of vessel strike.”

The project was “likely to adversely affect, but not likely to jeopardize the continued existence” of the fish, it concluded.

Daniel E. Estrin, supervising attorney at the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, urged officials to reconsider that assumption in light of the recent mortalities. The Hudson’s sturgeon population, he said, cannot sustain such losses.

“This is do-or-die time for the Atlantic sturgeon,” Mr. Estrin said. “The numbers are pretty damning.”

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/22/nyregion/group-petitions-to-save-a-prehistoric-fish-from-modern-construction.html

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City & State: "Panel On STEM Education In New York City"

07/23/2015

City & State: "Panel On STEM Education In New York City"

This summer many teenagers are just kicking back and relaxing. But thanks to several free summer programs offered throughout New York City select teens are participating in programs to promote STEM education (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). City & State spoke with three teens in these programs about why they are important for them personally and their fellow students.

The guests were:

Jahanara Nares is participating in Girls Who Code and spending her summer learning computer science and other technology skills at AT&T, which supports various STEM programs across New York City. The company has contributed nearly $2 million to the City's Education Department to develop and implement a STEM curriculum and last year contributed $1 million to Girls Who Code.

Nicholas Austin is a mentor at Pace University's STEM Collaboratory Summer Program. He participated in the program in the previous two years.

Pavan Khosla is a participant in the Brooklyn Science Innovation Initiative at Kingsborough Community College.

See the video: http://www.cityandstateny.com/27/28/30/gwc-panel.html#.VbE7pJzwqPH

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MarketWatch: "3 reasons the Apple Watch disappointed"

07/23/2015

MarketWatch: "3 reasons the Apple Watch disappointed"

. . . first-generation devices usually have more buzz and fewer features than second-generation devices. “People who buy the first generation of a device are the ones who feel like they got burned,” says Darren Hayes, director of cyber security and an assistant professor at Pace University. “They were probably the coolest person on the block at the time, but those that bought the first generation iPad didn’t have the camera. I would advise on holding off and seeing what the second version will have.”

Read more: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/3-reasons-buyers-may-have-rejected-the-apple-watch-2015-07-21

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Westchester Magazine: "Pace University Training The Next Generation Of Cybersecurity Experts"

07/23/2015

Westchester Magazine: "Pace University Training The Next Generation Of Cybersecurity Experts"

Over the last several years, it’s become increasingly clear how important cybersecurity is on both a national and personal level. Think about it: Everyday we walk around with high-tech computers, chock full of personal information and data, in our pockets. We are more susceptible than ever to getting our devices hacked and having our important information stolen. Due to this this heightened need for security, the National Security Agency (NSA) has been developing and preparing the next generation of highly trained cybersecurity experts—and it’s happening in our own backyard.

On their Pleasantville campus, Pace University recently wrapped up its first ever GenCyber cybersecurity workshop for high school teachers. From July 6 to July 17, about 25 high school teachers from around the country gathered at Pace to learn the fundamentals of cybersecurity and how, in turn, to teach it to their students.  

Read more: http://www.westchestermagazine.com/Blogs/914INC-Incoming/July-2015/Pace-University-Cybersecurity-NSA-Program/

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New York Times: "Medical Care Is a Right"

07/21/2015

New York Times: "Medical Care Is a Right"

To the Editor:

Re “If Law ‘Is Here to Stay,’ So Are Doubts About It” (news analysis, front page, June 26):

As a nurse practitioner and a professor of nursing at Pace University, I am baffled by those who are so eager to overturn a law that provides health care to millions of people, the Affordable Care Act. Do they think it’s just fine that Americans die routinely of preventable and treatable illnesses because they have no insurance? writes CAROL ROYE, author of “A Woman’s Right to Know: How Women’s Health Became a Political Pawn — and the Surprising Alliances Working to Reclaim It.”

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/06/opinion/medical-care-is-a-right.html

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Georgia Public Broadcasting: "KKK, New Black Panthers Rally In South Carolina"

07/21/2015

Georgia Public Broadcasting: "KKK, New Black Panthers Rally In South Carolina"

. . . Randolph McLaughlin, a law professor at Pace University who has litigated against the KKK in the past and written about them, said, "Nothing that the Klan does or could do would surprise me. They have longed embraced Confederate symbols and emblems and the Confederate flag. So I think, in a sense, we have to thank them for showing the nation what the Confederate battle flag -- I call it the Confederate flag -- what it really represents and who really supports the flag."

Listen to the interview: https://soundcloud.com/gpbnewsfeatures/kkk-rally-preview

Read the story: http://www.gpb.org/news/2015/07/17/kkk-new-black-panthers-rally-south-ca...

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Bloomberg: "Five years into its merger, United was supposed to be an integrated, well-oiled machine. What happened?"

07/21/2015

Bloomberg: "Five years into its merger, United was supposed to be an integrated, well-oiled machine. What happened?"

PHOTO: United Airlines passengers wait in line at San Francisco International Airport on July 8, when a massive computer glitch grounded flights. Photographer: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

. . . Andrew Coggins Jr., a management professor at Pace University in New York, calls himself a United loyalist because the airline has gone to great lengths to accommodate his family, including after a death in Hawaii that required flight arrangements at very short notice. But even Coggins acknowledged "adventures" he had while flying the friendly skies, such as a three-day ordeal traveling from Roanoke, Va., to Hong Kong following a string of delays and cancellations. "After having so many adventures, I just kind of go with the flow," said Coggins, who has flown more than a million miles on United. "I only really get upset with them when it's something they could've avoided."

Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-07-17/the-making-of-united-s...

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The Hill's Congress Blog: "Bipartisan international tax reform should not cross red lines"

07/21/2015

The Hill's Congress Blog: "Bipartisan international tax reform should not cross red lines"

PHOTO: Senator Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

The Senate Finance Committee recently released a series of bipartisan working group reports on tax reform, writes Philip G. Cohen, an associate professor of Taxation at Pace University Lubin School of Business and a retired vice president-Tax & General Tax counsel at Unilever United States, Inc. One of the papers, The International Tax Bipartisan Tax Working Group Report, reflected the work of a group of Senate Finance Committee members whose co-chairs are Sens. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.).

Especially with this Congress, efforts at bipartisanship should generally be applauded. Just as with international agreements, however, with respect to tax reform, it is important that critical red lines not be crossed. No deal is better than a bad deal. Furthermore, enacting international tax reform in a vacuum, i.e., without a simultaneous reduction in the overall corporate rate reduction, would open a Pandora's box with regard to shifting jobs and income offshore.

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/economy-budget/248214-bipartisan-international-tax-reform-should-not-cross-red

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New York Daily News: "Amazon's Prime Day a 'huge success' despite social media complaints, company says"

07/21/2015

New York Daily News: "Amazon's Prime Day a 'huge success' despite social media complaints, company says"

. . . “Amazon is the overwhelming No. 1 choice for most trusted e-commerce brand, and that level of trust is so high, consumers are willing to cut it some slack,” Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in Manhattan, told the Daily News.

“But if their deals aren’t impressive going forward, they could end up losing that goodwill. At some point, these wonderful deals won’t be perceived as being so wonderful.”

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/amazon-prime-day-huge-success-d...

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Newsday: "Letter: Training sites lacking for nurses"

07/17/2015

Newsday: "Letter: Training sites lacking for nurses"

While I support writer Patricia Morton's idea to create "entrepre-nurses," she failed to include a significant part of the nursing shortage puzzle: insufficient clinical placement sites for student learning ["Creating entrepre-nurses," Opinion, July 6].

Without addressing this critical barrier to admitting larger numbers of both undergraduate and graduate nursing students, entrepreneurial efforts will not solve the problem. We need to expand the opportunities and accelerate the education process to prepare nurses to obtain the doctoral credentials necessary to address the national faculty shortage.

Harriet R. Feldman, Bellmore

Editor's note: The writer is a registered nurse and dean of the Pace University College of Health Professions and the Lienhard School of Nursing.

 

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