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Examiner: "Pace Seeks Answers on How to Retain its Students"

06/26/2017

Examiner: "Pace Seeks Answers on How to Retain its Students"

More than 200 college and university employees gathered at Pace University last Friday for the first-ever retention conference to provide insight and solutions on how to support students as they work toward earning their degree.

With many institutions throughout the country addressing student success and the effects it has on first- and second-year retention rates, Pace provided several workshops and lectures throughout the day to help address the issue.

“It is our collective responsibility to make sure that all of the students that enter our institutions, whether they are two-year or four-year, have the tools to succeed both in college and outside of college once they graduate,” said Sue Maxam, assistant vice president for student success. “We have an obligation to help our students succeed to the best of our abilities.”

Uday Sukhatme, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, added that if a student drops out before graduation the university has likely failed.

“It is our moral duty to give every admitted student the best shot at success,” he added. “We must use all available resources in as optimal a manner as possible in order to make sure students get the help they need when they most need it.”

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Our Town Downtown: "Pace president concludes tenure"

06/26/2017

Our Town Downtown: "Pace president concludes tenure"

The seventh president to serve Pace University leaves at the end of June, concluding his second five-year term. As of May 31, Stephen J. Friedman had already begun packing away the office he has occupied for the last 10 years.

“Moving is one of the great traumas in life,” Friedman said through laughter. “They list it along with divorces and deaths in the family.”

Friedman, who turned 79 in March, said earlier this year that he does not intend to seek a third term as president, and instead spent the past few weeks fulfilling his remaining duties, and offering wisdom to incoming president Marvin Krislov, who himself served for the last 10 years as a university president, at Oberlin College in Ohio.

“This, if done right, is a very demanding job,” Friedman said of the office he’s held since 2007. “I think I’d like to work a little less hard.”

More importantly, he said, a decade-long tenure seems appropriate.

“It takes seven to 10 years to really affect change in a place this size and this complicated,” he said. “Could I be effective for another two to three years? Sure. This is the most gratifying, and fun, and challenging thing I’ve ever done. On the other hand, I really think Pace would benefit from an infusion of new experience and new ideas.”

Pace is a diverse school attended by many first-generation immigrant students, the chairman of the school’s board of trustees, Mark Besca, said.

“And here’s Steve – coming, probably from the top university in the country – and when he came to Pace, he had a passion for our students second to none, just as much as I did coming from here,” Besca said. “And knowing that – being a first-generation student and getting help from Pace – really changed my life.”

Besca was referring to a Pace career service that helped him gain work in 1979. That approach to student mentoring is now referred to internally as the Pace Path, and seeks to pair Pace students with mentors in their chosen fields, and has grown under Friedman’s leadership.

Moreover, in addition to growing enrollment and large-scale renovations at Pace, Friedman is well-regarded by business and neighborhood boards around Lower Manhattan, according to Jessica Lappin, of the Alliance for Downtown New York.

“President Friedman has been a fixture in Lower Manhattan over the past decade,” Lappin said. “He loves Lower Manhattan and actively worked with the community to improve our neighborhood.”

Friedman earned his bachelor’s from Princeton in 1959 and, three years later, a law degree from Harvard Law School, where he received a Sears Prize for academic excellence and edited the Harvard Law Review. Since that time, he has witnessed radical changes, spurred on by technology, to the nature of jobs graduates are landing, including those from Pace.

“Evolutionary biology, which used to be all about bones and paleontology, is now all about DNA and massive computing power,” he said. “It used to be if you went to business school and didn’t like numbers, you majored in marketing, because that was all about words. Now it’s all about data analytics.”

Friedman, who previously served as dean of Pace Law School, added that while Pace is not a trade school, it is the function of the university to prepare students for the changing workload of an increasingly technical world. Krislov, he said, is the right person to do that.

“I have a very big investment in his success, because we really have accomplished a lot, and Pace is in a very different place than it was 10 years ago, or even 15 years ago,” he said. “And that’s a real springboard for further growth in stature and excellence, and rigor, and academic reputation.”

Friedman said he would be available to Krislov and they have already discussed Pace leadership together. He declined to go into detail about any specific advice offered to Krislov.

“Oh, I don’t think I would share that,” Friedman said, again through laughter. “It’s between presidents.”

http://www.otdowntown.com/local-news/20170621/pace-president-concludes-tenure&template=

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University Business: "Universities expand ways how a mentor can coach a mentee"

06/26/2017

University Business: "Universities expand ways how a mentor can coach a mentee"

. . . Since 2011, Pace University in New York has offered a three-tier leadership development program that includes a mentoring component. Participants in the top tier, who represent the school’s leaders, choose a mentor for 18 months from the president’s operations committee.

Mid-level managers in tier two select a mentor for one year from tier one graduates or the school’s management council. Those in tier three—nonmanagerial—pick their mentor for nine months from the tier two graduates.

“We hear from graduates that this is one of the best aspects of the program,” says Susan Donahue, Pace’s director of organizational learning and development. “But they can’t pick someone from their functional area; they need to have an outside perspective.”

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Pace University’s 54th Annual Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner Honors President Stephen J. Friedman with the 2017 Leaders in Management Award on Wed., June 14

06/15/2017

Pace University’s 54th Annual Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner Honors President Stephen J. Friedman with the 2017 Leaders in Management Award on Wed., June 14

Faculty award honoree is William Offutt, Professor of History and Faculty Adviser of the Pforzheimer Honors College at Pace

Young Alumnae Emcee: Ashley Scott ’17, BFA Acting Major, Pace School of Performing Arts

New York, NY – June 15, 2017 – At its Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner last night, Pace University recognized President Stephen J. Friedman as the honoree of the 2017 Leaders in Management Award, and this year's Homer and Charles Pace Faculty Award recipient, William Offutt, JD, PhD. The event was held at the American Museum of Natural History.

“President Friedman has overseen a period of tremendous accomplishment and growth, one that has set the stage for Pace to reach new heights in the coming years,” said Mark M. Besca ’81, Chairman, Pace Board of Trustees. “Thanks to his vision and commitment, Pace leads the way in educating the next generation of thinking professionals who will take the reins of the 21st century economy and form the executive, entrepreneurial, and innovator class of tomorrow.”

Friedman is the seventh President of Pace University. President Friedman has presided over an increase in enrollment, and advocated for the value of combining education in liberal arts and professional preparation, all for the purpose of creating opportunity for students and improving the nation’s global competitiveness.

Under his leadership, Pace has established new academic and study abroad programs, launched significant renovations of the New York and Pleasantville campuses, and built a solid financial foundation for advancing Pace’s mission.

Prior to his presidency, he served as Dean of Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law and is a former Senior Partner of Debevoise & Plimpton LLC. He served as a Commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury and law clerk to Justice William Brennan at the Supreme Court of the United States. He also has an extensive background as a leader of nonprofit organizations.

The 2017 faculty award honoree is William Offutt, Professor of History and Faculty Adviser of the Pforzheimer Honors College at Pace’s New York City Campus. He has been a Pace faculty member since 1990. He has taught classes on colonial and revolutionary America, the Civil War, Constitutional history, and American women’s history. An accomplished scholar, his book, Patriots, Loyalists, and Revolution in New York City, 1775-1776, is part of a simulation game in the “Reacting to the Past” series, which has been adopted by dozens of colleges around the world. He was director of Pace’s New York City Honors Program (2001-07), which in 2003 became the Pforzheimer Honors College. He has advised hundreds of Honors College students and graduates.

The Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner began in 1962 as the Leaders in Management Award Dinner to highlight the support and encouragement the University receives from the corporate community. Pace's signature fundraising event celebrates the University's continued advancement and honors distinguished individuals with remarkable entrepreneurial and visionary talents. This gala embraces the University's identity as a leader in higher education. Proceeds from the dinner directly support student scholarships and special projects, including the New York City Masterplan—making a critical difference in the lives of Pace students and their educational futures.

Pace University is shaped by its enduring traditions of opportunity and innovation. More than 100 years after its founding, Pace continues its commitment to providing access to a diverse population while innovating to meet the needs of the global economy. A January 2017 study ranked Pace first in New York and second in the nation at catapulting students from the bottom fifth of income distribution into the top fifth. The Equality of Opportunity Project study found that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennials.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its College of Health Professions, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Media contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

 

 

 

 

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Journal News: "NY bill passes: Elephants out as entertainment"

06/12/2017

Journal News: "NY bill passes: Elephants out as entertainment"

Elephants would be banned from circuses and other performances in New York within two years under a bill the state Legislature recently approved.

The measure will now head to Gov. Andrew Cuomo's desk for review. The bill was praised by animal-rights groups and advocated for by students at Pace University in Westchester County.

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Hudson Valley News Network: "Kuh Named First Haub Professor of Environmental Law"

06/08/2017

Hudson Valley News Network: "Kuh Named First Haub Professor of Environmental Law"

WHITE PLAINS – Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law announces that Katrina Fischer Kuh will join the Law School’s faculty as the first Haub Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law.

An accomplished scholar with extensive experience working in the government and private sectors to protect the environment and natural resources, Professor Kuh will begin her role as a full time faculty member teaching classes in the fall of 2017.

“We are so pleased to welcome Katrina Kuh to Pace Law as the Haub Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law,” said Dean David Yassky. “Our Environmental Law Program is nationally recognized, and the addition of Professor Kuh and her environmental law and teaching expertise, along with her experience working in environmental litigation only bolsters the program. Professor Kuh is a tremendous addition to the Law School.”

“Professor Kuh’s cutting edge research offers new and creative approaches to deal with climate change,” said Jason Czarnezki, Associate Dean and Kerlin Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law.  “Her addition further strengthens our world renowned environmental faculty.”

“I’m humbled and excited to join one of the country’s most respected and innovative environmental law programs,” offers Professor Kuh.  “Pace faculty, alumni and students have long been at the forefront of developing law and policy to protect the environment and promote sustainability.  I look forward to contributing to this important work and thank the Haub family for the opportunity.”

Professor Kuh comes to the Elisabeth Haub School of Law from the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University where she taught Environmental Law, International Environmental Law, Global Climate Change and U.S. Law, Administrative Law, and Torts.  Her scholarship, which focuses on climate change, sustainability, and second generation environmental challenges, has been widely published. Professor Kuh is also the co-editor of “The Law of Adaptation to Climate Change: United States and International Aspects” and Co-Chair of the International Bar Association Working Group on the Legal Aspects of Climate Change Adaptation.

Prior to her work in academia, Professor Kuh worked in the environmental and litigation practice groups in the New York office of Arnold & Porter LLP and served as an advisor on natural resource policy in the United States Senate.  She received her law degree from the Yale Law School and served as a law clerk to Judge Charles S. Haight of the District Court for the Southern District of New York and Judge Diana Gribbon Motz of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.

Pace Law’s environmental law program is nationally recognized and is ranked third in the country by “US News & World Report.” As previously announced, funding for the Haub Professor of Environmental Law was made possible by a gift from the Haub family.

http://hudsonvalleynewsnetwork.com/2017/06/07/kuh-named-first-haub-professor-environmental-law/

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Journal News: "Suffer the children: When broken romance turns deadly"

06/08/2017

Journal News: "Suffer the children: When broken romance turns deadly"

Photo: New Rochelle Police Commissioner Patrick Carroll talks about the arrest of Neil White in the alleged suffocation death of his 7-year old daughter Gabrielle White, during a press conference in New Rochelle, June 7, 2017.

. . . “In any family, children are associated with their parents and in any divorce situation it’s likely that children are used as pawns," said Linda Fentiman, an author and professor of criminal law and health law at Pace University Law School in White Plains.

Fentiman noted that it is more common for men, and not women, to target their own children to hurt their female partner. 

“There are certain kinds of domestic violence, sometimes called intimate terrorism, in which the partner deliberately targets the children as a way of getting at the mother," she said. "So, a lot of domestic violence is both physical and psychological."

Fentiman said that 30 to 60 percent of instances of child abuse also involve domestic violence, and vice versa.

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New York State Legislature Votes to Ban Elephants in Entertainment

06/07/2017

New York State Legislature Votes to Ban Elephants in Entertainment

Bill Sponsored by Senator Murphy and Assemblywoman Paulin Originated With Pace Environmental Policy Clinic Students

PLEASANTVILLE, NY -- June 7, 2017 – A bill that bans the use of elephants in circuses and other forms of entertainment is headed to Governor Andrew Cuomo for his signature following passage in both houses of the New York State legislature. The “elephant protection act,” originated and lobbied by students of the Pace University Environmental Policy Clinic, supported by The Humane Society of the United States, and sponsored by State Senator Terrence Murphy (R-40) and Assemblywoman Amy Paulin (D-88), cites the “physical  and  psychological harm  due  to  the  living  conditions  and  treatment to which [elephants] are subjected.”

Students of Pace’s Environmental Policy Clinic devoted their spring semester to assuring passage of the legislation which would make New York the first state in the nation to institute such a ban. They maintain that the methods used to train elephants have a direct impact on the survival of the species.

“The elephant protection act reflects the values of my generation, who don’t want animals to suffer for the sake of human entertainment,” said Paola Idrovo, a student in Pace’s Environmental Policy Clinic. “Through the experience of writing and lobbying for the bill, we gained a first-hand understanding about the cruelty to which entertainment elephants are subjected and how that threatens the entire species.”

“A performing elephant is a tortured elephant,” said Michelle Land, Pace clinical professor of environmental law and policy. “Given the global controversy about elephants in the wild, New York State has a duty to end these practices that foster false values and misinformation about the species. We believe New York’s leadership will embolden other states to prohibit performing elephants, and put an end to this barbaric relic of a bygone era.”

Senator Terrence Murphy said, “It is a fact that elephants used for entertainment purposes suffer irreparable physical and psychological harm that shortens their lifespans. They spend a significant portion of their lives crammed inside trucks, trains or trailers, and then they are poked, prodded or shocked into performing tricks. Thankfully, we have come to our senses as a society and we no longer tolerate the abuse of performing elephants. We have taken a bold step as the first state to pass legislation outlawing elephants having to suffer for our amusement. Let us hope it starts a national and international trend.”

“Performance elephants have been exploited and abused for too long,” Assemblywoman Amy Paulin said. “We can no longer ignore the cruelty that they have endured for our amusement. Confinement, torture and unhealthy living conditions have led to early death for these intelligent, gentle animals.”

“Elephants are a treasured species, and there is growing popular support for their protection,” said Brian Shapiro, New York state director for The Humane Society of the United States. “We applaud Senator Murphy and Assemblymember Paulin for their leadership, and respectfully urge Governor Cuomo to sign this historic bill into law.”

The Pace Environmental Policy Clinic trains undergraduate students through a program of learning and service that encourages students to apply their Pace University education to the solution of real-world problems in the professional world. This interdisciplinary course, housed within Dyson College, is an example of the “Pace Path,” where students apply classroom theory directly to a real-world experience, and is co-taught by Professors John Cronin and Land.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences:  Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as numerous courses that fulfill core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

 

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Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

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Agence France-Presse: "Bloomberg leads mass coalition declaring support for Paris climate deal"

06/05/2017

Agence France-Presse: "Bloomberg leads mass coalition declaring support for Paris climate deal"

Former New York mayor, Michael Bloomberg, seen here meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron and Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo, leads a group of US business and government leaders pledging continued support for the Paris climate accord (AFP Photo/CHRISTOPHE PETIT TESSON)

. . . Darren Rosenblum, law professor at Pace University in New York, says the business community is coming together to address the most direct threat posed by a US pullout -- loss of competitiveness as the rest of the world barrels toward a greener economy.

"I do think that in the end, the effect is a positive one," he said.

"It starts to put in place the mechanisms for US companies and local governments to follow international norms."

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Journal News: "Trump budget will have negative effect on the nursing workforce: View"

06/05/2017

Journal News: "Trump budget will have negative effect on the nursing workforce: View"

"On the heels of the announcement of President Trump’s proposed federal budget, the public is beginning to visualize what the world may look like after the Trump administration is through with it," writes Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean and Professor, College of Health Professions, Pace University. "Those of us in the health care industry are concerned for the future health of an already aging and ailing population.

"At the College of Health Professions at Pace University in New York, we prepare future health care professionals to enter the workforce. Reacting to President Trump's proposed budget, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the National League for Nursing expressed alarm at the negative impact that the budget will likely have on the nursing workforce, nursing research, and the nation's access to high-quality nursing care. I echo their concerns.

"Their concern is in response to the budget’s near elimination of funding for programs that help educate aspiring nurses and nurse educators. For more than 50 years, Health Resources and Services Administration's Title VIII Nursing Workforce Development Programs have improved access and quality of health care in under-served communities. This funding strengthens educational programs, faculty recruitment and retention, clinical lab enhancements, loans, scholarships, and services that assist students in completing their nursing education. Many students have benefited from workforce funding over the years, including myself in pursuit of baccalaureate and master’s degrees in nursing. Because of this support, I have given back a hundred fold over nearly 50 years of clinical practice and higher education, as have many of my colleagues.

"Eliminating $146 million in Title VIII nursing program funding seems in direct opposition to the President's stated goal of increasing access and reducing costs. Private and state funding will not be sufficient to meet current and future nursing and nurse educator demands. Nurses are critical contributors to a healthy population. Without sufficient providers, who will address the growing health care needs of our nation?

Read more here.

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