main navigation
my pace

Westchester

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Daily Mail: "Massive credit bureau hack raises troubling questions"

09/08/2017

Daily Mail: "Massive credit bureau hack raises troubling questions"

It could be the worst-ever data breach for American consumers, exposing some of the most sensitive data for a vast number of US households.

The hack disclosed this week at Equifax, one of the three major credit bureaus which collect consumer financial data, potentially affects 143 million US customers, or more than half the adult population.

While not the largest breach -- Yahoo attacks leaked data on as many as one billion accounts -- the Equifax incident could be the most damaging because of the nature of data collected: bank and social security numbers and other personal information of value to hackers and others.

"This is the data that every hacker wants to steal your identity and compromise your accounts," said Darren Hayes, a Pace University professor specializing in digital forensics and cybersecurity.

"It's not like the Yahoo breach where you could reset your password. Your information is gone. There's nothing to reset."

Some reports suggested Equifax data was being sold on "dark web" marketplaces, but analysts said it was too soon to know who was behind the attack and the motivation.

"This could be a mercenary group or it could be a nation-state compiling it with other data" for espionage purposes, said James Scott, a senior fellow at the Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology, a Washington think tank.

"This is the kind of information I would go after if I were a nation-state, to set up psychographic targeting for information and political warfare."

Read Article

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Journal News: "Unspeakably harsh': Local immigration advocates react to Trump decision on DACA"

09/06/2017

The Journal News: "Unspeakably harsh': Local immigration advocates react to Trump decision on DACA"

Hudson Valley immigration advocates denounced President Trump's decision to end an Obama-era amnesty program that grants about 20,000 area residents temporary status in the U.S.

The announcement prompted a harsh rebuke from top New York organizations and elected officials, including Gov. Andrew Cuomo and state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who threatened to sue the Trump administration.

Known as "dreamers," recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, are given temporary legal status if they arrived in the country prior to June 2007 and before their 16th birthday.

But on Tuesday, Trump called for an end to the program and gave Congress six months to proposenew legislation before he phases it out.

"His recission of DACA demonstrates how cruel and harsh our immigration laws are," said Tom McDonnell, a professor at Pace University Law School in White Plains.

"You’re talking about people who are essentially Americans, who contribute to our society," McDonnell said. "And who, I would say the chances are at least even, will be permanently barred from returning to this country. It’s like taking an American and throwing them into a foreign country.”

There were more than 45,000 DACA applications approved in New York state as of April 2015, making it the fourth largest recipient of dreamers in the country behind California, Texas and Illinois, respectively.

Hundreds of them are students at Lower Hudson Valley universities, and approximately 87 percent of them are employed full time and pay taxes.

But DACA has also been under the microscope since the presidential election, when Trump ran his campaign based in large part on a promise of more restrictive immigration policies. He vowed to eliminate the program during the campaign, but later said he would not cut the program — until making the announcement this week.

Vanessa Merton of the Immigrant Justice Clinic at Pace University said a repeal of DACA would affect some of the most productive members of the immigrant community.

“It’s like you had a perfect child who’s behaving perfectly, and then you had some siblings who were not doing as well from your point of view as a parent," Merton said. "And you just decided that you’re going to completely disown and banish the child who’s doing everything that you want.”

Read full article:

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westchester County Business Journal: "Business trade-show attendance still strong, although some opt out"

09/05/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Business trade-show attendance still strong, although some opt out"

The Westchester County Business Journal interviewed Professor Ibraiz Tarique about trade shows. From the article:

Ibraiz Tarique, professor of human resources and talent management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and author of “Seven Trends in Corporate Training and Development: Strategies to Align Goals with Employee Needs,” said the problem is not about the content of the event, but whether companies are sending the right people to attend.

“You need to find the individual with the right traits and skills,” he said. “Not everyone benefits from participating in these conferences. You need someone with the right sociability skills, a high level of learning agility, the ability to network and the ability to pass the knowledge learned at these events back to the company.”

Without those traits, Tarique added, companies gain nothing if the wrong employees are sent to conferences. “They can be very expensive and the worst thing anyone can do, ad hoc, is send someone to a conference,” he said.

Read the full article here

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westchester County Business Journal: "Richard Ottinger receives environmental award from American Bar Association"

09/04/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Richard Ottinger receives environmental award from American Bar Association"

Richard Ottinger, Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law dean emeritus, was recently recognized for his leadership in environmental policy by the American Bar Association. Ottinger received the organization’s 2017 Award for Distinguished Achievement in Environmental Law and Policy on Aug. 13. 

The "Westchester County Business Journal" published a story about the honor. From the article:

“I needn’t tell you that this is an unprecedented time of challenge to the environment, indeed the sustainability of our nation and the world,’’ Ottinger said in his acceptance speech. “Our contributions to utilize the law to overcome the deliberate destruction of all environmental treaties, laws and regulations is needed as never before.”

Ottinger served as dean of Pace’s Law School from 1994 through 1999 and in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1965 to 1985. He is credited with crafting the 1974 Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act, which in part encouraged the development of hydroelectric power and the conservation of electric energy and natural gas.

His other work included preventing Storm King Mountain from being transformed into a generating facility and blocking the construction of an eight-lane highway along the Hudson River from New York City to Putnam County.

At Pace, Ottinger created the Energy and Environment Center, which promotes energy efficiency and renewable energy. He has also been involved in the writing, editing and co-authoring of more than 100 works on energy and the environment.

“Most of these activities Dick has undertaken as a volunteer, above and beyond his formal positions as legislator or professor or dean,” said professor of environmental law, Nicholas Robinson, who nominated Ottinger for the award. “Upon leaving the deanship, he was appointed as the sui generis dean emeritus here, and while he may be ‘retired’ from a paying job, he has never retired from his efforts to build environmental law, reform energy law and protect the environment.”

Read the original article here

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Examiner: "Science Lovers, Community Celebrate Solar Eclipse Together at Pace"

08/27/2017

The Examiner: "Science Lovers, Community Celebrate Solar Eclipse Together at Pace"

Photo: Patch.com.

Pace University made news around Westchester with an eclipse viewing party that attracted an estimated 500 community members to campus. Adjunct faculty member Matt Ganis and Westchester amateur astronomers spoke to attendees about the science of the eclipse while guiding the crowd to view the event through special glasses and a telescope.

From The Examiner:

New Pace President Marvin Krislov said the university opened up the grounds after his son told him he was traveling to South Carolina for the event to be in the Totality Zone. Krislov then realized many that were part of the general public would be interested. He thought the school might get a more modest gathering of enthusiasts but was pleased with the turnout.

“All I know is that universities should be places where people come together for educational events,” he said. “So we have a faculty member who is talking about the science of it. We have food and everybody loves food. People brought their telescopes and it’s just terrific.”

Read the full Examiner article here. The Journal News posted a gallery of clips from the event here and Patch posted photos from around the country including the one above of two boys at Pace. News 12 was also on campus interviewing eclipse viewers.

News 12, The Journal NewsFiOS1 NewsWestchester Magazine, Patch and Hudson Valley News Network, as well as the websites of several municipalities, promoted the celebration in advance, helping to draw a record number of community members to campus for an educational event.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

CNBC: "Trump's attack on Amazon has some basis in truth"

08/18/2017

CNBC: "Trump's attack on Amazon has some basis in truth"

President Donald Trump attacked Amazon again on Wednesday, saying the e-commerce giant is responsible for killing jobs and damaging "tax paying retailers."

While 140 characters can't capture the nuance of Amazon's complex tax situation, Trump's claims aren't entirely baseless and could potentially gain support from a number of states.

Amazon currently collects sales tax in every state where it's required for the products the company actually sells. But more than half of items purchased on Amazon come from third-party merchants, who use various parts of Amazon's storage, payments and logistics systems and generally aren't required to collect sales tax.

That tax-free zone gives Amazon sellers a significant edge over physical retailers, who are already struggling to stay afloat.

"It is an unfair advantage that's killing retailers, especially small businesses and specialty retailers," said Paul Rafelson, a state and local tax attorney and adjunct law professor at Pace University in New York.

Online merchants don't have to collect sales tax if they don't have a physical presence in a particular state. It gets tricky for sellers on Amazon's marketplace.

Read more:

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Journal News: "At work during the eclipse? Companies letting employees sneak a peek"

08/18/2017

The Journal News: "At work during the eclipse? Companies letting employees sneak a peek"

Monday's solar eclipse is being called a once-in-a-lifetime event.

A solar eclipse is when the moon goes between Earth and the sun resulting in an obstruction of the sun and blocking sunlight. The total solar eclipse covers a band of the United States roughly 70 miles wide plus some other countries.

Although in the Lower Hudson Valley, it won't be a rare total eclipse, those who venture outdoors between 1:30 to the peak at 2.44 p.m. will witness a partial eclipse.

Many eclipse viewers will be at work during that time. In anticipation of Monday's event, which hasn't occurred in 38 years, local businesses are planning to take it outside.

Journal News Article

...Pace University in Pleasantville is inviting the public to a viewing on campus starting at 1:30 p.m. Hosted by the new college president Marvin Krislov, it includes a Q&A with astronomy professor Matt Ganis. It takes place at the main quad off 861 Bedford Road in Pleasantville from 1:30 to 3 p.m. 866-722-3338; pace.edu/westchester 

 

Hudson Valley News Network Article

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Ladders: "Why we should get rid of generational labels in the workplace"

08/15/2017

The Ladders: "Why we should get rid of generational labels in the workplace"

They isolate employees

Helene Cruz, Director of Career Counseling at Pace University Career Services, said she is proud that her team is multi-generational.

“We have established a culture that cultivates learning from one another across seven generations,” she said. “We appreciate our millennial colleagues and rely on the fact that they are technically-savvy and creative, ready to bring new ideas to the table and not afraid to embark on new initiatives.”

All employees, no matter their age, contribute to the organization, Cruz said. 

“We glean a tremendous amount of insight from our millennial teammates because they are closer in age to the students and can more fully express the student perspective/experience,” she said. “In turn, because employer representatives are also our clients, many Baby Boomers and Gen X staff have previously worked in various industries, have hired employees, and therefore can speak to the needs of the employers, which we share with our millennial teammates.”   

The focus should not be on how generations differ, but on how they can work together, Cruz said.

“Establish environments where they interact with multiple generations,” she said. “Highlight the strengths of people at different ages in life, and how each person adds value. Find or create situations where different generations can interact meaningfully.”

 

Read:

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Statement on Racism and Violence in Charlottesville, Virginia

08/14/2017

Statement on Racism and Violence in Charlottesville, Virginia

What occurred in Charlottesville, VA, is tragic and I condemn the bigotry and hatred exhibited. The Pace Community mourns the loss of life and the injuries inflicted on those who were defending what we hold dear in our country—equality and respect for one another no matter our race, creed, or ethnic background.

As we observe Constitution Day this September 18 and the document that created our government and laws, and guaranteed basic rights for every citizen, we will thoughtfully and respectfully discuss our current cultural climate and different perspectives. It is our common bond and a reminder of what is right and just, and wrong and indefensible, of who we are as a people, and of who we must always strive to be. It is proof that bigotry, violence, and hatred can never prevail.

Ours is a diverse, inclusive, and welcoming community and we can show by example our openness to learn from one another. There is no better place for this to occur than at an institution devoted to education. I look forward to these discussions.

Marvin Krislov
President
Pace University

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

El Paso Times: "UTEP among nation's best at lifting students from poorest backgrounds, study finds"

08/14/2017

El Paso Times: "UTEP among nation's best at lifting students from poorest backgrounds, study finds"

The University of Texas at El Paso is one of several of the nation’s schools that is helping generate large returns for students from the poorest backgrounds, according to a working paper released recently week by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

The report lists UTEP among 10 schools that are strong engines of upward mobility for the nation’s poorest children. But, the report contends, those engines are slowing down.

The study, which was drafted in part by Raj Chetty and Emmanuel Saez, pioneering economists of socioeconomic inequality and mobility, focuses on each university’s “mobility rate,” the share of its students who come from the lowest fifth of the U.S. income distribution and end up in the top 20 percent. This metric is measured by multiplying the fraction of students from the lowest income bracket, or “access,” by the share who end up with incomes in the top fifth, or “success rate.” Researchers used data for more than 30 million college students from 1999 to 2013 for the study.

 

For UTEP, the findings indicate that just less than 25 percent of its students from the poorest backgrounds reach the uppermost income quintile. That is well behind the 58 percent of students who reach the highest quintile from “Ivy Plus” schools, the report’s listing of Ivy League universities and other elite schools such as Stanford and Duke. But only 3.8 percent of Ivy Plus students are from the lowest income bracket, compared with UTEP’s 28 percent. That gives UTEP a mobility rate (6.8 percent) that is more than three times higher than the Ivy Plus schools’ 2.18 percent.

The school with the highest mobility rate, according to the study, is California State University, Los Angeles with 9.9 percent. The school with the highest number of students from poor backgrounds who reached the uppermost income quintile was Pace University in New York, which boasts a success rate of 55.6 percent. Pace’s mobility rate, according to the study, is 8.4 percent.

 

Read: 

Pages