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Slate: "The Labeling Shortcut"

05/09/2016

Slate: "The Labeling Shortcut"

"The FDA should spend less time worrying about labels and more time better regulating the entire industry," writes Margot Pollans, an assistant professor of law at Pace University and faculty director of the Pace–Natural Resources Defense Council Food Law Initiative.

Read more: http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2016/05/the_fda_s_quest_to_define_natural_won_t_give_us_better_food.html

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New York Daily News: "Republican Veepstakes underway as Trump inches toward GOP nomination"

05/09/2016

New York Daily News: "Republican Veepstakes underway as Trump inches toward GOP nomination; experts say mogul should prioritize age, outsider status"

. . . "If he wants to run as an outsider he has to find someone who is credible but has limited experience. If wants to run with someone who can be President from day one then he picks someone with legislative or executive experience thus making it harder for him to argue he is a true outsider," said David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of Political Science at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/donald-trump-started-running-ma...

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Wall Street Journal: "Pace Law School Gets Mega-Gift, New Name"

05/05/2016

Wall Street Journal: "Pace Law School Gets Mega-Gift, New Name"

Jacob Gershman reported on the major gift and name change for Pace Law School.

From the Wall Street Journal Law Blog:

"It’s the season of giving in the legal education world.

Pace University’s law school outside of New York City is the latest school to benefit from a burst of largesse. A German family has donated what the university says is the largest gift in its history.

The law school is announcing the donation Thursday along with news that it’s renaming itself after the donors’ late matriarch, Elisabeth Haub, a philanthropist and businesswoman who championed environmental causes.

Pace isn’t saying how much it received  at the donor’s request. But school officials say it’s comparable to recent donations made to law schools at George Mason University and Villanova University. Those schools announced gifts of $30 million and $25 million, respectively.

Pace says the money will establish a law school endowment and fund a scholars program within its top-ranked environmental law program. The gift will also endow chairs in environmental law, public international law, the school said. The new name of the school will be the Elisabeth Haub School of Law.

The money comes from the son and daughter-in-law of Elisabeth Haub, who died in 1977. The Haub family owns the Tengelmann Group, a retail conglomerate.

The money comes at a pivotal time for Pace, which has been buffeted by the nation-wide downturn in the legal-education market. Law Blog recently reported that its faculty and staff were forced to take pay cuts to save money for a tuition-matching program.

“We are enormously thankful for the Haub family’s support of our distinctive ‘path to practice’ model of legal education,” the school’s dean, David Yassky, said in a statement. “At a time when many law schools are retrenching, this gift allows us to strengthen our program, especially the in-the-field learning that we believe is so crucial for students’ success in practice.”

Read the original story on the Wall Street Journal Law Blog: http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2016/05/05/pace-law-school-gets-mega-gift-new-n...

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PACE UNIVERSITY RENAMES LAW SCHOOL IN HONOR OF RENOWNED ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATIONIST

05/05/2016

Pace University Renames Law School In Honor Of Renowned Environmental Conservationist

Record Gift Will Create Endowment, Expand Distinguished Environmental Law Program and Fund Research and Teaching Initiatives

 

NEW YORK – Pace University announced today that its law school has been renamed the Elisabeth Haub School of Law in recognition of its long-standing partnership with the family of the late Elisabeth Haub, a tireless environmental advocate and philanthropist, and a generous donation from the Haub family. The gift, the largest that Pace University has received in its history, will establish an endowment for the Law School, strengthen the school’s renowned environmental law program and fund innovative teaching initiatives.

“Pace University is thrilled to deepen and broaden its partnership with the Haub family, bolster our environmental curriculum and continue leading the progress of environmental law and regulation,” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “An extraordinary gift of this kind occurs when donors and institutions come together in support of a shared vision. We are deeply grateful to the Haub family and look forward to building on Elisabeth Haub’s admirable legacy at Pace University.”

“The Haubs’ very generous gift to the Pace University Law School underscores the family’s twin passions for environmental sustainability and education,” Pace University Board of Trustees Chairman Mark Besca said. “We are deeply honored to have the name Haub associated with our law school and will remain fervent educators and advocates for the issues they hold close to their hearts.”

“Our family has enjoyed a longstanding and successful relationship with Pace Law School, working with its world-renowned environmental law programs. We have come to admire the high-impact environmental work done around the globe by graduates of this law school, as well as the school’s deep commitment to innovation in teaching and its strong record of delivering value to its students,” Christian Haub, grandson of Elisabeth Haub, said. “We want to continue the legacy of my grandmother, Elisabeth Haub, who was a pioneer in environmental protection, and endowing this Law School in her name ensures her vision will continue to impact future generations.”

“We are enormously thankful for the Haub family’s support of our distinctive ‘path to practice’ model of legal education,” said David Yassky, Dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law. “At a time when many law schools are retrenching, this gift allows us to strengthen our program, especially the in-the-field learning that we believe is so crucial for students’ success in practice.”

In addition to providing an endowment, the gift will fund specific initiatives in the school’s Environmental Law program, which is ranked third in the nation: it will create the Haub Scholars program, providing reduced tuition to a select group of the most highly-qualified and promising environmental law students. The program will enable these students to study or attend conferences abroad, ensuring that the Haub Scholars have a truly global experience.

The gift also endows a Chair in Environmental Law, a Chair in Public International Law and an annual Visiting Scholar in a related field, in recognition that environmental science, informatics and other technology and other allied fields are now an essential element in formulating environmental policy.

The gift also includes funding for innovative teaching initiatives such as online courses and apprenticeships with law firms and nonprofits. “This is a pivotal moment for the legal profession and for law schools,” Yassky said. “We aim to create Law School 2.0 by connecting the classroom more directly to the courtroom and the boardroom, and this funding will help us get there.”

The Haub gift comes amid numerous calls for change in legal education. President Obama has suggested that law school be a two-year program instead of the current three-year requirement, and regulators including the American Bar Association and the New York State Court of Appeals have encouraged more apprenticeship training to supplement traditional classroom instruction.  The Haub School of Law already offers a Semester-in-Practice option for third-year students, and an accelerated “Spring-Start” program enabling students to graduate in two-and-a-half years.

The gift continues Pace University’s longstanding collaboration with the Haub family, building on Elisabeth Haub’s extraordinary legacy of promoting the progress of environmental law, with particular emphasis on activities that impact policy, promote a balanced approach to sustainable growth and reflect the global nature of environmental issues. Haub devoted much of her life to the stewardship of sustainability, forming the first foundation dedicated to establishing laws for nature conservation and environmental protection.

Since her death in 1977, Elisabeth Haub’s children and grandchildren have continued her environmental work through the family business – the Tengelmann Group, a German retail holding company – and by founding the Elisabeth Haub Foundations for Environmental Law and Policy. Elisabeth’s daughter-in-law, Helga Haub, shared her vision and continued her work by expanding the Haub Foundations to the United States and Canada. Elisabeth’s son, Erivan Haub, embraced his mother’s commitment to the environment in the family business, establishing sustainable management practices within Tengelmann long before corporate social responsibility became a professional standard. Liliane Haub, the third generation of the Haub family to focus on sustainability, has now assumed responsibility for continuing her mother-in-law’s work and has been instrumental in deepening the family’s relationship with Pace Law.

In 1997, Pace University and the International Council of Environmental Law, in collaboration with the Haub family, created the Elisabeth Haub Award for Environment Diplomacy. Given annually, the prestigious award recognizes the innovation, skill and accomplishments of diplomats, international civil servants and other negotiators who work to shape the world environmental order.

Pace University also shares Elisabeth Haub’s commitment to empowering women. The earliest Pace Law School classes were selected based in part on gender parity at a time when many law schools reserved very few places for female law students. Years later, the School launched the Pace Women’s Justice Center, a leading provider of civil legal services and training focused specifically on domestic violence. The Elisabeth Haub School of Law will become just the second law school in the United States named solely for a woman. (The Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law at Arizona State University is the other.)

About Elisabeth Haub School of Law

The Elisabeth Haub School of Law, the law school at Pace University, offers J.D. and Masters of Law degrees in both Environmental and International Law, as well as a series of joint degree programs including a Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD) in Environmental Law. The school, housed on the University’s campus in White Plains, NY, opened its doors in 1976 and has over 9,000 alumni around the world. The Haub School is led by Dean David Yassky, who has served in a variety of public, political, academic and private sector positions over a legal career that spans four decades. The school maintains a unique philosophy and approach to legal education that strikes an important balance between practice and theory.

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high-quality education for the professions with a firm base in liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York Metropolitan Area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, enrolling almost 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its College of Health Professions, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

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TIME Ideas: "It’s Time for the FDA to Define ‘Natural’"

05/04/2016

TIME Ideas: "It’s Time for the FDA to Define ‘Natural’"

Workers fill a trailer with tomatoes, in Florida, on Feb. 6, 2013. Joe Raedle—Getty Images

Paul Greenberg is the author of American Catch and Environmental Author-in-Residence at Pace University, and Jason J. Czarnezki is Executive Director of Environmental Law Programs at Pace University.

Americans have until May 10 to add their comments on what the word should mean

For anyone with a deep, enduring faith in the meaning of nature, it may come as something of a shock to learn that the word “natural” means nothing at all—at least when it comes to the business of marketing processed food. Every year, U.S. corporations sell tens of billions of dollars worth of food products labeled as “natural.” Yet, to this day, the Food and Drug Administration has never formally defined the term. The word is a kind of orphan child, undefined by government, misused by industry and without a provenance or a use for the average American consumer.

Read more: http://time.com/4317988/fda-natural-definition/

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Homeland Security Today: "Security Concerns Surround Summer 2016 Rio Olympics"

05/04/2016

Homeland Security Today: "Security Concerns Surround Summer 2016 Rio Olympics"

. . . Joseph Ryan, professor and chair of the Department of Criminal Justice and Security at Pace University, told Homeland Security Today that in the current threat environment, dangerous security incidents are no longer a matter of “if” but of “when.” However, he is optimistic that the games will be safe.

“You can always expect something is going to happen,” said Ryan. “Security teams must be absolutely vigilant.”

Prof. Ryan chaired an Advisory Group for the US Department of Justice that developed security strategies for the 1996 summer Olympics. He is also a 25-year veteran of the New York City Police Department and was their expert on evaluations of all levels of police management, and on community policing and violence.

“Right now, there are no red flags,” said Ryan. “If we go back to Egypt to the Arab Spring Uprising, if something like that were to happen in Brazil—which I am more than confident will not—that would be a major red flag.”

Ryan added, “I am presuming that from all the lessons learned from previous games, particularly the Munich games where we lost so many lives, Brazil is really going to crack down and make sure the security of the athletes is the number one priority. There is no reason that I am currently aware of to suspect any concerns regarding security.”

Based on his experience, Ryan said security personnel will likely be on the lookout for several indicators leading up to the Olympic Games, including chatter and unusual activity at sports facilities prior to the games. Security personnel should not wait for day one of the games to begin securing these facilities---vigilance is needed now to ensure nothing dangerous is entering two or three months beforehand.

Read more: http://www.hstoday.us/briefings/daily-news-analysis/single-article/secur...

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Financial Times: "Cruz quits and hands victory to Trump"

05/04/2016

Financial Times: "Cruz quits and hands victory to Trump"

. . . Before Mr Cruz’s announcement, David Caputo, a politics professor at Pace University in New York, said Mr Trump had essentially won the nomination several weeks ago. “All the factors were there for his winning — enthusiastic supporters, weak opposition and little co-ordinated effort to stop him, plus a favourable set of primary elections.” He said one of the interesting things to watch for now was who the New York mogul would pick as his vice-presidential running mate.

Read more: http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/4e168026-1183-11e6-839f-2922947098f0.html#axzz47e4zSJqn

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Journal News: "Housing trend focuses on downtown train stations"

05/03/2016

Journal News: "Housing trend focuses on downtown train stations"

The new construction project on Bank Street near the White Plains train station in downtown White Plains April 27, 2016.  (Photo: Frank Becerra Jr./The Journal News)

. . . The concept is gaining momentum in the lower Hudson Valley as more people look for urban or semi-urban amenities in their downtowns, said Seth Pinsky, an executive vice president at RXR Realty, at a recent forum at Pace Law School. The talk, sponsored by the Westchester Municipal Planning Federation, explored millennials and empty-nesters as the demographic key to downtown revitalization.

Read more: http://www.lohud.com/story/marketplace/real-estate/2016/04/30/housing-do...

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The Journal News: "Pace students, profs help asylum seekers in Texas"

05/03/2016

The Journal News: "Pace students, profs help asylum seekers in Texas"

Photo: Pace University School of Law student Katine Patino talks about the CARA Family Detention Pro Bono Project attended by law professors and students during spring break at the ICE facility in Dilley, Texas. (Photo: John Meore/The Journal News)

From The Journal News website, lohud.com:

Pace University School of Law students and professors spent their spring break with the CARA Family Detention Pro Bono Project, providing legal assistance to women and children seeking asylum in the United States.

They volunteered to help Central American children and mothers housed in the country's largest immigrant detention center in Dilley, Texas. For a week, they joined the CARA Pro Bono Project to help ensure that clients who had recently crossed the border had legal representation as they begin to make their way through a complex asylum process.

Students and professors told The Journal News that despite a thorough orientation they weren't fully prepared to hear the tales of misery that filled their legal meetings with clients. Pace professor Vanessa Merton, who organized and led the trip with two colleagues, shared the story of a Salvadoran shopkeeper who earned about $30 a week. Gang members demanded she pay them $60 weekly or they would kill her daughter in front of her before killing her. She believed them -- they had already shot her father, brother and uncle to death.

Students met with many families who had just been released from two days in the "hielera" (ice box) or the "perrera" (dog house) — stark holding units with "extremely cold temperatures and where many children became sick, said Professor Vikki Rogers.

"I'm pretty impervious," said Merton, the faculty supervisor of Pace's Immigration Justice Clinic and the driving force behind the trip. Merton has worked with survivors of the September 11 attacks and Haiti's devastating 2010 earthquake. But, she said, "This was violence on a magnitude I never imagined."

As a result of their efforts, more than 90 women and children were released to join family members already residing in the United States. 

Read the full story here: http://www.lohud.com/story/news/2016/05/02/pace-students-spring-break-helping-asylum-seekers-detained-texas/83655718/

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Washington Post: "Hulu may soon offer live TV, including sports"

05/02/2016

Washington Post: "Hulu may soon offer live TV, including sports"

Hulu is reportedly looking into offering live-streaming content from a handful of cable channels for about $40 per month. (Dan Goodman/AP)

. . . Hulu will still need to offer its own original programming to stand out from the pack, said Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. "Fox and Disney content will be a very strong beginning for the new service. However, since that programming can be obtained in other ways, Hulu will need to do more than offer Fox and Disney content."

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/05/02/hulu-may-soon-offer-live-tv-including-sports/

 

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