main navigation
my pace

Westchester

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Bloomberg" featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Ex-Goldman Sachs Programmer’s Conviction Upheld in New York "

05/04/2018

"Bloomberg" featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Ex-Goldman Sachs Programmer’s Conviction Upheld in New York "

...“This ruling should certainly clear up any questions that prosecutors have about the reach of the statute,” said Bennett L. Gershman, a professor at Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law in White Plains. “This 50-year-old statute is now being used in the high-tech digital age and it seems able to accommodate not only film and photography, but technology that involves the downloading of computer source code."

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Fios1" featured Dyson Professor Dr. Maria Luskay and senior student Kelly Whritenour in "Pace University students find hope amid devastation in documentary on Puerto Rico"

05/03/2018

"Fios1" featured Dyson Professor Dr. Maria Luskay and senior student Kelly Whritenour in "Pace University students find hope amid devastation in documentary on Puerto Rico"

A new documentary about Hurricane Maria's impact on Puerto Rico debuts in the Hudson Valley this week and it was put together by a group of college students.

A group of Pace University students screened their documentary on Puerto Rico Tuesday at the Jacob Burns Film Center.

“Puerto Rico: Hope in the Dark” is about how the country continues to recover from a hurricane that brutally damaged the country.

"We went down six months later and there was still a lot of devastation. A lot of really tough situations that everybody was living in and people kind of forgot about it so our job was to go down there find out what's still going on and share their stories," Pace University senior Kelly Whritenour said.

"I'm hopeful for them which is the reason ‘Hope in the Dark' is the name of the documentary. We're hopeful that the people of Puerto Rico come through and pull themselves out of this devastation," Pace media professor Dr. Maria Luskay said.

The students spent a week on the island filming the documentary. Spending time at 11 different locations and interviewing more than 60 people. The students spent six weeks editing the documentary together as part of a class at Pace University.

"We were filming literally all day from 7 a.m. sometimes we got back at 10:30 p.m. and everybody had a different role whether it was filming on camera, audio, interviewing. We all did a little bit of everything," senior Kelly Whritenour said.

Watch the news clip.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Examiner News" featured Dyson Professor Maria Luskay in "Pace Student Documentary Highlights the Suffering in Puerto Rico"

05/03/2018

"The Examiner News" featured Dyson Professor Maria Luskay in "Pace Student Documentary Highlights the Suffering in Puerto Rico"

A group of Pace University student filmmakers will have the chance to watch their work on the silver screen next week as they premiere their documentary film project at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville.

The students’ film, “Puerto Rico: Hope in the Dark,” depicts the devastating impact Hurricane Maria left in its path six months after the storm slammed into the island. The two-hour documentary, which will be screened at the Burns on May 1, will share stories of the Puerto Rican people’s strength, hope and resilience as they continue to restore their lives and homes.

For the past 15 years, Pace Professor Maria Luskay has led students on exploratory one-week trips as part of her Producing the Documentary course at the Pleasantville campus. Students have traveled to the Florida Everglades, Cuba, Belize, Portugal, Brazil, Mexico, Costa Rica and The Netherlands documenting important stories that need to be told, Luskay said.

While her course teaches students the conception, production and editing of a documentary, she said her experiential class allows its participants to take in other cultures and provide them unique opportunities.

“Students are learning in the field and experiencing another culture, another world, outside of their classroom,” Luskay said.  “They learn the value and importance of teamwork and organization as well as how to solve problems and adapt to changes in the story as it develops.”

Read more here

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Washington Examiner" featured law professor Bennett Gershman in "Mueller questions 'leak' could mean trouble for Trump lawyers: Experts"

05/02/2018

"Washington Examiner" featured law professor Bennett Gershman in "Mueller questions 'leak' could mean trouble for Trump lawyers: Experts"

...“It seems like the legal team disclosed it to someone outside the legal team, which is a violation of the rules, and that person disclosed it to the Times,” said Pace University law professor Bennett Gershman, a former prosecutor in the Manhattan district attorney’s office and an expert on legal misconduct.

Gershman said members of Trump’s legal team could only share the document with outside experts or White House staff with Trump’s explicit or implied permission. “A lawyer has to advise him of the risks, and then his consent is valid,” he said.

"Even if it’s negligent, sloppy, whatever — you’re violating the rules. You have to safeguard this information,” Gershman said. “This is one of the critical rules that embraces lawyer-client relationships. This is one of the most critical rules there is in our legal system.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Hudson Valley News Network" featured the Pace Immigration Law Society in "Bracco Receives Immigrant Advocate Award"

05/02/2018

"Hudson Valley News Network" featured the Pace Immigration Law Society in "Bracco Receives Immigrant Advocate Award"

Carola Bracco, Executive Director of Neighbors Link, was honored by the Pace Immigration Law Society (PILS) at its Second Annual Persistence Dinner.

The organization started three years ago with the intention to provide education and outreach in the law school and in the local community.

The Persistence Dinner was held at Pace Law School recently in White Plains. It honors warriors in the immigration field who do not give up in the face of adversity while advocating for immigrant rights.

As executive director of Neighbors Link, Bracco played a vital role helping to craft legislation that became the Immigrant Protection Act (IPA). The act was vetoed by the former County Executive, Rob Astorino. The bill was reintroduced and signed into law by current County Executive George Latimer and is considered a model for New York State.  Through her leadership and work on the IPA, Bracco helped bring together the community of service and advocacy organizations that work with the immigrant population of Westchester.

Comprised of the 20 member coalition of organizations that worked together toward passage of the IPA, this committee will give Westchester its first cohesive working group to support immigration policy and services. Bracco currently serves on the boards of Northern Westchester Hospital, the National Council for Workforce Education, Nonprofit Westchester, and the New York Immigration Coalition. She is also a member of the New York State Taskforce for Agricultural Labor. Often quoted in the press, Bracco is highly sought after to speak at conferences and before legislative committees.

Emily Bendana, president of the Pace Immigration Law Society and Student Attorney with John Jay Legal Services, said of Bracco’s selection, “She is a leader we look up to and try to emulate. She is strong and shows perseverance in the face of adversity. She is an innovator. She is compassionate and passionate. She is all the things we strive to be. It was never a question that Carola needed to be the person PILS honored. Her name came up over and over again. I personally am from Passaic County, New Jersey. Westchester is not my backyard and PILS members don’t know everyone involved in Westchester, but we do know Carola. Her leadership reaches that far.”

Bendana went on to say, “Every hour we spend learning, practicing, advocating, and fighting is with the intention to someday be able to have the type of impact on the community and on individual lives that she and Neighbors Link have had.  We chose Carola because of her gifts of shrewd strategy, profound wisdom, prudent judgment, and the ability to create brilliant, patient, discerning teamwork.”

In her remarks, Bracco said, “I am grateful for this honor from the Pace Immigration Law Society because it sends a loud, clear message that this work is critical.  I represent a whole team of people that includes our exemplary legal team of Karin Anderson and Elizabeth Mastropolo, plus Neighbors Link staff and our supportive board of directors.  They have all put their hearts and souls into this work and have equally earned this award.”

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Examiner News" featured Biology Dyson Professor Dr. Melissa Grigione in "Coyote in Thornwood Park Attack Had Rabies"

05/02/2018

"The Examiner News" featured Biology Dyson Professor Dr. Melissa Grigione in "Coyote in Thornwood Park Attack Had Rabies"

...Dr. Melissa Grigione, a professor at Pace University’s Department of Biology and Health Science, said it is uncommon for a coyote to attack a person in northern Westchester.

Unusual behavior is one of the first signs that an animal has rabies, according to the county Department of Health. A rabid animal may become abnormally aggressive, may lose its fear of people, act excitable or irritable or unusually tame or lethargic. Staggering and frothing at the mouth is another sign.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Press Release: Pace Student Awarded Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grant

05/02/2018

Press Release: Pace Student Awarded Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grant

Dyson Honors College senior Kelsey Parker awarded a Fulbright to conduct research on the effect of mine sites on soil health in Zambia

Pace University announced that honors student Kelsey Parker has been selected to receive a Fulbright award to conduct research in Zambia. Parker is a senior majoring in Environmental Science in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace. Her proposed research, “The Effects of Copper Mining on Soil Health in Zambia,” will involve a comparative study of the soil ecology of active and restored mine sites in Zambia to determine what is necessary to treat them.

“I’m so happy for and proud of Kelsey,” said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “She’s an amazing example of the smart, ambitious students we educate at Pace, and this Fulbright award is yet another great opportunity for her to learn and explore. We’re excited to see the research she brings back from her studies of soil ecology in Zambia.”

While at Pace, Parker has been a part of the Student-Faculty Undergraduate Research Program conducting research with Marcy Kelly, Ph.D., professor and assistant chair of the Department of Biology. “I have watched Kelsey grow from a reserved first-year student living in New York City for the first time to one of the most talented, engaging and courageous students that I have ever worked with,” said Professor Kelly. “Kelsey is passionate about what she believes in and puts all of her energies into each endeavor in which she engages. It is not at all surprising that Kelsey was awarded the Fulbright.”

“I’m overjoyed and still surprised that I got a Fulbright,” said Parker. “I came to Pace from a tiny town in West Virginia, a state with the lowest education attainment levels in the United States, so even graduating was a huge accomplishment. I have to thank Theresa Frey, the Fulbright advisor for Pace for meeting with me and encouraging me so much along the way. I’m looking forward to an exciting year ahead and once I complete my Fulbright I hope to pursue a Ph.D. in environmental science.”

After completing her Fulbright, Parker hopes to write her findings in a manuscript, earn a doctorate in conservation biology, and pursue her career goal to combine the above and below ground aspects of plant growth to restore ecosystems.

About The Fulbright Program:  The Fulbright Program is an international educational exchange program sponsored and managed by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries under policy guidelines established by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board (FSB) and in cooperation with a number of private organizations. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement as well as record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields. The Fulbright Program awards approximately 8,000 grants annually to undertake graduate study, advanced research, university lecturing, and classroom teaching.. Roughly 1,600 U.S. students, 4,000 foreign students, 1,200 U.S. scholars, and 900 visiting scholars receive awards, in addition to several hundred teachers and professionals’ year to approximately 130 countries, where they lecture and/or conduct research in a wide variety of academic and professional fields. Approximately 370,000 "Fulbrighters" have participated in the Program since its inception in 1946. Select Pace University students have been receiving the Fulbright award for the past 17 consecutive years.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law). The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

Follow us on Twitter at @PaceUnews or on our website: http://www.pace.edu/news

###

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Hill" featured Law Professor Miriam Rocah's opinion piece "In the Cohen case, don’t buy the ‘vast government conspiracy’ defense"

05/01/2018

"The Hill" featured Law Professor Miriam Rocah's opinion piece "In the Cohen case, don’t buy the ‘vast government conspiracy’ defense"

Miriam Rocah was an assistant U.S. attorney in the Southern District of New York from 2001 to 2017 and held many supervisory positions, including chief of the Organized Crime Unit and co-chief of the White Plains Division. She is a Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University. Daniel S. Goldman was an assistant U.S. attorney in the Southern District of New York from 2007 to 2017, deputy chief of its Organized Crime Unit and a senior trial counsel in the Securities and Commodities Fraud Unit. Both provide frequent legal analysis on MSNBC, CNN and other networks.

Attorney Michael Cohen has not been charged with a crime but President Donald Trump and his defenders apparently are so concerned about what incriminating information Cohen may give to prosecutors in the Southern District of New York (SDNY) that they have begun a campaign to discredit the entire federal criminal justice system.  

These attacks, however, distort how the system actually works, do not withstand scrutiny, and come at the expense of public confidence in our criminal justice process.

One theory advanced by Professor Alan Dershowitz (and echoed by President Trump) goes like this: Prosecutors misrepresent the evidence to a judge to get a search warrant of Cohen’s emails, home and office. After conducting these searches, prosecutors threaten Cohen with a life sentence and threaten innocent family members or associates with prosecution for crimes they did not commit in order to coerce Cohen to cooperate with authorities. Once the prosecutors have extorted Cohen into flipping, they then force him to give false testimony in order to charge other innocent people further up the chain.  

This is a reckless attack on career prosecutors and federal judges in an attempt to undermine a basic premise of our criminal justice system: the impartial cultivation of evidence and the objective application of that evidence to the criminal laws. If the Dershowitz theory is to be believed, our entire system is a sham and thousands of criminals are wrongfully convicted every year based on false testimony by cooperating witnesses. With 26 years of combined experience as prosecutors in the SDNY, we know firsthand that this theory is utterly fallacious.

The Dershowitz theory assumes that prosecutors have far more power than they in fact have, particularly in white-collar cases where mandatory minimum sentences do not apply. Prosecutors do not control or decide a defendant’s sentence — that is the role of judges — so baseless threats that Cohen will spend the rest of his life in prison have no merit and would carry no weight with an experienced defense attorney. The same goes for cooperation: Prosecutors can recommend leniency but a judge ultimately determines the sentence.  

Second, when prosecutors discover evidence of serious crimes, it is incumbent upon them to investigate those crimes regardless of how they learned about them. The reality is that good information often comes from bad actors. If, during the course of an investigation, prosecutors believe an individual — Michael Cohen in this case — is well situated to cooperate and provide evidence, then it is perfectly appropriate and wise to seek his cooperation. Indeed, as our experience prosecuting organized crime cases taught us, cooperator testimony is often the only path to hold accountable those more responsible for these crimes who often insulate themselves from the core criminal activity.

To be sure, there may be times when prosecutors uncover criminal conduct by family members and close friends of a target because, as you might expect, criminals prefer to rely on those they trust when committing crimes. But prosecutors simply do not threaten to charge innocent people, including family members, with crimes they have not committed to convince targets to cooperate.

The decision to cooperate is made by the cooperator himself after extensive consultation with experienced defense counsel about the benefits and risks. Once an individual decides to cooperate, he must truthfully and forthrightly admit all of his own criminal conduct, and that of everyone he knows. It is an all-or-nothing exercise; one cannot cooperate against some people but not against others, or about some crimes but not others. Once the prosecutors have heard the witness’s information, they then must determine if that information is corroborated by comparing it to other evidence.  

Critically, prosecutors do not offer cooperation agreements to witnesses if their information is not corroborated and vetted, and prosecutors do not charge other targets based solely on the uncorroborated testimony of one cooperating witness.

The notion that someone could “compose,” or make up, a story to fit the prosecution’s narrative is belied by the requirement that a cooperator’s testimony must be extensively corroborated by other evidence. If, for example, Michael Cohen were innocent but made up a story admitting his own guilt under oath before a federal judge — which he would be required to do as part of his cooperation — as well as that of the president or other individuals, his story would not be corroborated by any other evidence. In fact, such a fabricated story almost certainly would be directly contradicted by other independent evidence. He therefore would not be believable to the prosecution or to a jury.

In our experience, savvy defense attorneys who know their client is in trouble commonly attempt to “put the government on trial.” This tactic involves attacking the prosecution and the system in an effort to distract a jury (or the public) from compelling evidence against a defendant. It’s a defense of last resort and almost always backfires. More than 90 percent of federal criminal jury trials result in a conviction and many of those trials rely heavily on cooperator testimony. In other words, juries don’t buy the “vast government conspiracy” defense, and neither should the American public now.

Read the article.

 

 

Associated Colleges
Available Graduate Degrees
Class Locations

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Pace President Marvin Krislov and Dyson student Gabe Rivera on Fox 5 NY

05/01/2018

Pace President Marvin Krislov and Dyson student Gabe Rivera on Fox 5 NY

Pace President Marvin Krislov and student Gabe Rivera appeared on Fox 5 NY. They were interviewed by Fox 5's Ernie Anastos about Dyson's 2018 travel course, Producing the Documentary, and the filming and production of "Puerto Rico: Hope in the Dark."
 
View the video here.
 

Pages