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New York Times: "America’s Great Working-Class Colleges"

01/18/2017

New York Times: "America’s Great Working-Class Colleges"

According to a study by The Equality of Opportunity Project, Pace ranks second on the list of "colleges ranked by percent of students from the bottom fifth of the income distribution who end up in the top three-fifths."

Read more here.

Also read the Fiscal Times article, "Ranking the Schools that Turn Poor Kids into Wealthy Ones"

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The Elisabeth Haub School Of Law Announces EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck As Haub Visiting Scholar For Spring Semester

01/18/2017

THE ELISABETH HAUB SCHOOL OF LAW ANNOUNCES EPA REGIONAL ADMINISTRATOR JUDITH ENCK AS HAUB VISITING SCHOLAR FOR SPRING SEMESTER

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law (Pace Law) announces that Judith Enck, current Regional Administrator for Region 2 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Administration (EPA), will be the law school’s first Haub Visiting Scholar. Ms. Enck begins her position as a Visiting Scholar on February 1.

“We are so pleased to welcome Judith Enck to Pace Law as our inaugural Visiting Scholar,” said Dean David Yassky. “Her deep knowledge of policy making, government and environmental protection makes her an ideal candidate for the position. At Pace Law, we pride ourselves on being on the cutting edge of environmental legal education. The Visiting Scholar position is just one example of how we do this – by creating new opportunities for all of our students to see the connections between policy making and the law and the real-world application of the two.”

Ms. Enck has a long and distinguished career of public service and environmental protection. She has served as the EPA’s Region 2 Administrator for the past seven years. In this role, Ms. Enck’s responsibilities have been wide-ranging. In cooperation with state and regional authorities in New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and eight federally recognized Indian Nations, she administers federal programs governing air and water pollution; industrial discharges; toxic substances; pesticides; protection of streams, lakes and the ocean; solid and hazardous wastes; the cleanup of chemical spills and abandoned hazardous waste sites; and much more. Ms. Enck is the longest serving Regional Administrator at EPA Region 2.  Prior to joining EPA, Ms. Enck served as Deputy Secretary for the Environment in the New York Governor’s Office. She also served as Policy Advisor in the New York Attorney General’s Office, as Executive Director of Environmental Advocates in Albany and as Senior Environmental Associate at NY Public Interest Research Group.   

“I am honored to serve as the first Haub Environmental Visiting Scholar at a law school that educates some of the best environmental lawyers in the country,” said Judith Enck. “Now more than ever, we need a new generation of lawyers who will stand up for environmental justice, clean air, clean water and fight climate change like our lives depend on it. Because it does.”

Pace Law’s environmental law program is widely recognized and ranked third in the nation by “US News &World Report.” As previously announced, funding for the Visiting Scholars position was made possible by a gift from the Haub family in recognition of the essential role of environmental science, informatics and other technology and allied fields towards formulating environmental policy and law.

In her role at Pace Law, Ms. Enck will collaborate with faculty, guest lecture classes and work closely with students in the Environmental Law program and others. Ms. Enck’s Visiting Scholar positon will run through May of 2017.

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About Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law, (Pace Law) offers J.D. and Masters of Law degrees in both Environmental and International Law, as well as a series of joint degree programs including a Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD) in Environmental Law. The school, housed on the University’s campus in White Plains, NY, opened its doors in 1976 and has over 8,000 alumni around the world. The school maintains a unique philosophy and approach to legal education that strikes an important balance between practice and theory. For more information visit http://law.pace.edu

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Associated Press: "Regional EPA director headed to Pace Law"

01/18/2017

Associated Press: "Regional EPA director headed to Pace Law"

WHITE PLAINS - Judith Enck, the Environmental Protection Administration’s regional director, will become a visiting scholar at Pace University’s law school.

Pace Law announced Tuesday that Enck will become a visiting scholar effective Feb. 1.

Read more here.

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: "Obama leaves complex legacy about race in America"

01/17/2017

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: "Obama leaves complex legacy about race in America"

Photo: Joshua Lott/Getty Images. President Barack Obama speaks during his farewell address in Chicago on Tuesday.

. . . "He will be remembered for many, many things in many, many quarters, but a big part of his legacy is the ground he laid when he became the first African-American president," said Randolph M. McLaughlin, a civil rights attorney and Pace University professor of law.

"For the African-American community and the African-American children, we can look up and be proud that someone from our community became president. We can tell our children 'You can become president one day,' and that really wasn't true before. That was a myth," Mr. McLaughlin said.

Read more here.

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Wall Street Journal: "Two States Consider Letting Lawmakers Overrule Certain Court Rulings"

01/17/2017

Wall Street Journal: "Two States Consider Letting Lawmakers Overrule Certain Court Rulings"

A proposed bill in Washington would require a simple majority in the legislature to ‘reject the determination of the court’ following a ruling declaring a legislative act unconstitutional. Photo: Ted S. Warren/Associated Press

... “The bedrock principle of American democracy is a clear demarcation between branches of government, and that the ultimate power to determine what the constitution means is in the hands of the court,” said Randolph McLaughlin, a professor at Pace Law School in New York.

Mr. McLaughlin described the proposals as “an end-run” around the constitutional amendment process. “I think that’s a dangerous precedent and takes us down a route that constitutionally would be disastrous.”

Read more here.

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Journal News: "After Indian Point, where will we get electricity?"

01/13/2017

Journal News: "After Indian Point, where will we get electricity?"

The Indian Point power plant on the shores of the Hudson River in Buchanan. (Photo: File photo by Frank Becerra Jr./The Journal News)

. . . Karl Rabago, the executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law, is a fan of the governor’s approach.

“We don’t want to dig a hole in our effort to reduce greenhouse gases that it’s impossible to climb out of,” Rabago said. “We’re losing 2,000 megawatts of non-carbon generation and we don’t want to back fill with generation that produces carbon because we’ll backslide on our commitments.”

LED lights and solar panels

In 2015, about two-fifths of the state's net electricity generation came from natural gas, one-third from nuclear power and one-fifth from hydroelectricity, according to figures from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Nearly four-fifths of the state’s renewable energy comes from hydroelectric power. New York is home to the Robert Moses Niagara plant, the largest hydroelectric plant east of the Rockies.

Rabago said he’s confident the power lost by Indian Point’s shutdown can be made up through a combination of hydro, wind and solar power combined with energy efficiencies like replacing fluorescent lights with LED lighting. Metro-North parking lots, he suggested, could be outfitted with solar panels as some schools are doing now.

Read more here.

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CBS New York: "Cuomo: Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant To Close By April 2021"

01/10/2017

CBS New York: "Cuomo: Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant To Close By April 2021"

FILE - The Indian Point nuclear power plant in Buchanan, New York. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

. . . Environmentalists suggest it wasn’t a matter of if the plant would close, but when.

“The plant had to be shut down at some point. I don’t think we should be surprised,” Todd Ommen, Pace University Law School said.

Read more here.

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Journal News: "New twist on EagleFest, Feb. 11"

01/09/2017

Journal News: "New twist on EagleFest, Feb. 11"

Teatown's Eaglefest will take place Feb. 11, 2017 (Photo: frankbjrphotos, Frank Becerra Jr/frankbjrphoto)

Teatown’s 13th Annual EagleFest will be taking flight with an expanded program at Westchester’s Croton Point Park in Croton-on-Hudson on Feb. 11. The annual festival gives visitors a unique opportunity to view eagles both close-up and in their natural environment. There are some new features this year including food trucks, entertainment and a screening of the award-winning documentary film “The Eagle Huntress.” It's about a young Mongolian girl becoming the first female Eagle Hunter in the 1,000-year history of her tribe. It will be shown at 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. at Wilcox Hall on Pace University’s Pleasantville campus. Discounted general admission tickets are on sale now at www.eventbrite.com. Pre-sale tickets are $17 adults (12+), $10 /children (6-11) and free for children 5 and under.  Tickets sold at the venue on the day of the event are $22, $12. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. For info, teatown.org. Rain date is Feb. 12.

Read more here.

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Hudson Independent: "Officials Call for Barge Plan in Hudson to be Scrapped"

01/05/2017

Hudson Independent: "Officials Call for Barge Plan in Hudson to be Scrapped"

Pace University professor John Cronin, flanked by Pace students and elected officials, spoke during a press conference at Kingsland Point Park in Sleepy Hollow. — Photo by Rick Pezzullo

Last month, several elected officials and students from Pace University’s Environmental Policy Clinic called on the U.S. Coast Guard to scrap plans to create 43 new anchorages in 10 locations along the Hudson River after it was revealed the federal agency allegedly violated its own protocol.

At a frigid press conference at Kingsland Point Park in Sleepy Hollow on December 5, Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino, state senators Terrence Murphy (R/Yorktown), David Carlucci (D/Clarkstown) and Sue Serino (R/Hyde Park), professor John Cronin from Pace University and students from the Pace Environmental Policy Clinic charged the Coast Guard was circumventing its own procedures to benefit the shipping industry with anchorages for oil barges from Yonkers to Kingston.

“This is not about politics. It is about doing the right thing for the people who live in the Hudson Valley,” said Murphy, who also asked the Coast Guard to extend the public comment period beyond December 6. Murphy’s district extends into Sleepy Hollow.

“We’re here to collectively and loudly tell the Coast Guard we’re not here to turn back decades of progress on the Hudson River,” Carlucci said. “We’re not going to stop while our Hudson River is in jeopardy. Together we will make sure we protect the integrity of the Hudson River.”

On December 5, students from Pace sent a petition to Coast Guard Admiral Paul Zukunft demanding the immediate withdrawal of the proposal based on research they had done on the Coast Guard’s July 2015 “Waterways Management Anchorage Management Tactics, Techniques and Procedures.”

The students contended, prior to publishing the proposal in the federal register in June, the Coast Guard should have completed two major studies, addressing river hazards and impacts, conducted public sessions with mariners, environmental groups and government, and provided all members of the public the opportunity to change the plan.

“How amazing is it that it took students from Pace University to shame and embarrass (the federal government)?” Astorino remarked. “The process has been trampled on. Voices need to be heard in the process that are trying to be stymied by the federal government.”

Read more here.

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CBSNewYork: "Rockland Community Reacts To Call For Clemency In Brinks Robbery Case"

01/05/2017

CBSNewYork: "Rockland Community Reacts To Call For Clemency In Brinks Robbery Case"

Inside the courtroom by sketch artist Marilyn Church. (credit: Marilyn Church)

. . . There now stands a memorial where the two officers were killed — a thruway entrance roadblock that was ambushed by the gang as they tried to escape. Judith Alice Clark didn’t fire a weapon, but as a driver in one of the vehicles she was ruled criminally liable and convicted.

The governor believes she deserves a measure of mercy.

“She talked about her sorrow and her complicity and why she did it,” he said earlier this week. “I found her very impressive overall and I think she’s going to be impressive to the parole board.”

Robert Van Cura was police chief in South Nyack that day.

“I think she’s done some good things in prison and I think that earns her some form of mercy and starts to pay back the debt that she owes to our society,” he said. “But I don’t think letting her our of prison is in the cards.”

Thanks to the governor, she has a chance at release she didn’t have before.

“It’s a courageous act by the governor,” Pace Law School Professor Bennet Gershman told CBS2. “I have to say, because there’s no question that what she did in killing law enforcement officials in the line of duty was horrible.”

Read more here.

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