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Westchester County Business Journal: "Westchester business leaders size up Trump tax proposal"

05/08/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Westchester business leaders size up Trump tax proposal"

Donald Trump in his Manhattan office. Photo by Bob Rozycki

. . . Philip Cohen, a professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, said wanting to cut corporate taxes is a legitimate goal, but the extent of the proposed cuts opens up far too large a gap in the deficit.

“It can’t be as draconian as it is,” said Cohen, a retired vice president and general tax counsel for Unilever United States Inc. “The 35 percent rate for corporations now is too high, but you can’t cut it to 15 percent. Whether that number should be 25 or 28, you can’t run up these kinds of deficits.”

The Tax Policy Center said the proposal to cut the corporate rate to 15 percent would reduce federal revenue by $6.2 trillion over the first decade of implementation and by an additional $8.9 trillion in the second decade.

A study by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimated the tax plan could cost $5.5 trillion over the next decade. That would increase national debt to 111 percent of gross domestic product, the highest in the country’s history, according to the report.

One proposal of particular concern in New York is a plan to eliminate the deduction for state and local taxes. A study released last month by WalletHub found New Yorkers faced the largest overall tax burden in the U.S. and seventh largest property tax burden.

“It’s unfair to people in our area who own homes or live and work in high tax jurisdictions like New York,” Cohen said. “If you’re a homeowner, upper or middle class, you’ll be hurt by this proposal.”

Read more here.

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PINK SUMMIT 2017: Understanding, Tackling and Surviving Breast Cancer

05/04/2017

PINK SUMMIT 2017: Understanding, Tackling and Surviving Breast Cancer

Pleasantville, NY – May 4, 2017 -- The Greater Hudson Valley (NY) Chapter of The Links, Incorporated will host its second annual PINK SUMMIT in partnership with White Plains Hospital, and Pace University’s College of Health Professions and the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. This community event is made possible through the support of Dr. Jonathan Hill, Dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, and was coordinated by a steering committee comprised of Dr. Pauline Mosley and Dr. Sophie Kaufman, professors at Pace University; Denise Williams, Chair of PINK SUMMIT Planning Committee; and Jamie Bocchino, Community Relations & Events Coordinator of White Plains Hospital. It is free and open to the public, and will be held on Saturday, May 6 at Pace University, Willcox Hall, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville campus, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

WHO and WHAT:

This GHV PINK SUMMIT provides an opportunity for attendees to learn more about breast cancer and to ask questions of the experts. The initiative focuses on women’s health, and the impact of breast cancer from the perspective of survivors, friends, families, health care providers and community advocates and stakeholders.  Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the U.S. It is the most common cancer found among every racial and ethnic group. The rates of getting and dying from breast cancer differ among ethnic groups – Black and African-American women under age 45 have a higher incidence of breast cancer than white women. Additionally, Black women tend to have poorer survival rates than women from other racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. 

“Breast cancer impacts women individually, as a family, and as a community. In 2017, an estimated 252,710 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed. Together, we must increase awareness, and stress the importance of early detection,” stated Karla Jones Penn, President of The Greater Hudson Valley Chapter of The Links. “We are confident providing information sessions like the Pink Summit, and supportive services like our Bosom Besties initiative can fill in the gaps and increase health outcomes.”

“Community organizations like the Greater Hudson Valley Links are indispensable in the fight against breast cancer,” said Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins. “Regular screenings are the best protection against this disease, and the Links work hard to make sure women understand the importance of early detection and have the resources they need to access screenings.  The Links also help women seek treatment and provide tremendous support to survivors. I’m grateful for their efforts to combat this disease and proud to join them in the fight against breast cancer.”

Workshops include:

Beyond Fake News: Fact vs. Fiction in Cancer Risks

Confused by recent news reports on breast cancer risks? This session will help debunk myths and convey the real news on risk factors and screening guidelines.

Speaker: Karen Green, MD

Where to Go From Here: Navigating Next Steps After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Life may seem to stop in its tracks after a cancer diagnosis. An expert panel will provide guidance on tackling this major life challenge one step at a time, and every step of the way.

Speakers: Danielle Calvano, PA-C

Knowledge is Power: Breast Screening & Self-Exams

Learn the latest recommendations for frequency and type of breast screening, as well as guidelines on how to perform a thorough breast self-exam.

Speaker: Caren Greenstein, MD

Body, Mind and Soul: How Nutrition & Holistic Therapies Can Contribute to Better Outcomes

Learn how the powerful role of nutrition and complementary therapies, including healing touch, guided imagery, meditation, and yoga impact the body’s ability to overcome cancer.

Speakers: Cheryl Leslie, Registered Dietitian; Laura Himmelstein, LCSW, CHTP; Alyson Moadel, PhD; and Sophie Kaufman, DPS

Surviving at Work: Your Rights While on the Job

Learn from a seasoned Human Resources executive about your employee rights, options for time off and how to navigate the interview process while undergoing treatment.  

Speaker: Natasha Bowman, JD, SPHR, Human Resources

Lean on Me: Coping with the Impact of Cancer in the Family

Guidance and resources for both survivors and family members on coping with a cancer diagnosis; and the profound healing power of social support.

Speakers: Victoria Assumma, LCSW-R, ACSW; Professor Pauline Mosley, DPS

Looking Ahead: A Glance at Exciting Advances in Cancer Screening & Treatment

A glance at recent advances and those just on the horizon that promise to make a big difference in cancer care, including screening techniques, immuno-oncology, and clinical trials.

Speakers: Della Mackower, MD and Yael Zack, MD. Moderator: Una Hopkins, DNP

High-profile community leaders will also be in attendance, and enhance the program with remarks:

Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins; Karla Jones Penn, GHV; Cynthia Rountree, GHV: Bosom Besties Program; Robin Williams, GHV: Vice President of Programs; and Jonathan Hill, Dean of the Seidenberg School.

Karla Jones Penn, Chapter President of the GHV Chapter of The Links; Jamie Bocchino, Community Relations & Events Coordinator of White Plains Hospital; Dr. Sophie Kaufman, Pace’s College of Health Professions (breast cancer survivor) and Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems Professor Pauline Mosley (breast cancer survivor) and Dean Jonathan Hill will be available to speak with press.

WHEN and WHERE: Saturday, May 6 at Pace University, Willcox Hall, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville campus, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Parking: Entrance #1 Lot A/B.

Media contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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FiOS1 News "Coping With Finals Stress"

05/04/2017

FiOS1 News "Coping With Finals Stress"

May means finals time for college students around the nation. Pace University's campus in Pleasantville is putting therapy dogs to work to help students de-stress from all the craziness. FiOS1 News' Mary Mueller has the story.

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Journal News: "Trump tax plan is 'outrageously' irresponsible: Pace U. tax professor"

05/04/2017

Journal News: "Trump tax plan is 'outrageously' irresponsible: Pace U. tax professor"

"What is wrong with the Trump administration’s tax plan? Almost everything." writes Philip G. Cohen, an associate professor of taxation at Pace University Lubin School of Business.

"National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn says the proposal contains 'one of the biggest tax cuts in American history.' The tax plan would drop big corporations' current top rate of 35 percent to 15 percent; provide the same 15 percent rate for business income from other entities; lower the top individual rate from 39.6 percent to 35 percent; repeal the 3.8 percent tax on an individual's net investment income and eliminate both the estate tax and the alternative minimum tax.

"If enacted, this would result in an explosion of the federal deficit and a significant curtailment in government benefits and services. The plan is, in short, outrageously fiscally irresponsible.

"President Trump’s tax plan is also unfair. For many middle-class taxpayers, the elimination of the deduction for state and local income tax and property tax will send their federal tax liability soaring. Wealthy taxpayers, who already have significant limitations on most itemized deductions, would make out like bandits.

"Doing away with most itemized deductions, under the Trump design, would be balanced with a larger standard deduction. While the increased standard deduction may benefit some working-class individuals, especially those without homeownership, the major tax benefits would clearly be derived by very wealthy individuals and corporations.

Read more here.

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Chicago Tribune: "Starting line: Career experts offer 2017 grads job-search advice"

05/03/2017

Chicago Tribune: "Starting line: Career experts offer 2017 grads job-search advice"

"Approach the job search like you would dating. It would be strange to have a dating profile that says 'I am willing to date anyone who will date me,' but you would be surprised to see how often students approach the job search saying 'I'll do anything.' Likewise, applying to 200 jobs with the same resume is like sending out a generic message to everyone on a dating site and hoping someone likes you. Instead, get to know more about the organizations you are pursuing, and show a genuine interest in them by building relationships with people who work there."

--Andrea Tider, career counselor, Lubin School of Business, Pace University, New York

"Don't take your mother's advice -- you really do need to talk to strangers. New grads need to realize the importance of building a network. Meeting new people is crucial to finding future job leads. Professional relationships are not just formed at official 'networking events' or conferences. You can uncover job leads in daily life: while volunteering, on line at the grocery store or even in waiting rooms. Talking to strangers and building connections on a regular basis is a key piece to any successful career."

--Bless Vaidian, director, career counseling, Pace University Career Services, New York

Read more here.

 

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Journal News: "Tax Watch: 5 takeaways from Westchester's airport privatization RFP bid"

05/01/2017

Journal News: "Tax Watch: 5 takeaways from Westchester's airport privatization RFP bid"

. . . The winner of the privatization deal would be responsible for all of the airport’s capital needs, the RFP states. Sources of funding would include federal funds through the Airport Improvement Plan, the federal Passenger Facility Charge program which brings in $3.5 million a year, and the private company’s own funds.

Airport assets, such as the terminal, runways, hangars and parking facilities have a long useful life. Under the RFP, the operator would be responsible for handing over the airport property to the county at the end of the 40-year lease with a minimum of five years of useful life left in them.

Andrew Crosby, assistant professor of public administration at Pace University, said the out-years of the deal could spell trouble for Westchester, when there would not be enough time for the private operator to receive a profitable return on his investment.

“This could end up putting Westchester on the hook for huge capital costs down the road,” he said. “They are going to invest where there is a return on their investment. You have to wonder what the operator would do in year 35 if a major hangar needs to be rebuilt.”

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Guardian: "Prosecuted by her legal counterpart: 'It destroyed my life in so many ways'"

05/01/2017

Guardian: "Prosecuted by her legal counterpart: 'It destroyed my life in so many ways'"

Taryn Blume: ‘Investigators are scared. Because it could have happened to any of us. And it still could.’ Photograph: Simon Leigh for the Guardian

As a public defenders’ investigator in New Orleans, Taryn Blume was juggling a minimum of 70 cases on any given day. Many of her clients, among the poorest people in the city, were facing the prospect of spending the rest of their lives in prison.

Then something happened that shocked even Blume’s most seasoned colleagues: Blume herself faced felony criminal charges for her work on one such case. The charges were initiated by the same prosecutor her office opposed every day in court.

“One Taryn Blume late of the parish of Orleans, between the first day of January in the year of our Lord, two thousand and fourteen, and the first day of April in the year of our lord, two thousand and fourteen in the parish of Orleans, did impersonate a peace officer or assumed, without authority, any uniform or badge by which a peace officer is lawfully distinguished …” the indictment read.

“I had no idea why or what that meant,” Blume, now 26, told the Guardian.

Prosecutors and public defenders are supposed to be adversaries in the courtroom. But prosecutors have a significant upper hand: a largely unchecked power to bring criminal charges against anyone they want. In most parts of the country, prosecutors don’t wield this tool against their own professional opponents. But in New Orleans, it’s become a pattern.

At least six defense attorneys and investigators say they faced threats of criminal charges by the Orleans parish district attorney for doing their jobs, the Guardian has found. Since DA Leon Cannizzaro took office in 2009, the attorneys have been accused of kidnapping, impersonation and witness tampering in the course of defending their clients. Each case has failed to stand up to scrutiny: all charges that have been brought were eventually dropped or overturned.

Legal experts said the practice of charging public defenders is highly unusual and raises ethical concerns.

“I can’t think of any way to justify what the prosecutor’s office has done,” said Bennett Gershman, a professor at Pace Law School who studies prosecutorial misconduct. He said prosecutors could be using their charging power to gain a competitive advantage or to intimidate defense attorneys.

“It’s an abuse of power by Cannizzaro’s office,” he said.

Read more here.

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Daily News: "A tax cut Democrats should get behind"

05/01/2017

Daily News: "A tax cut Democrats should get behind"

When President Trump addressed the Congress in February, he promised “massive tax relief for the middle class.” Unfortunately, both the President’s one-page tax plan and the plan put forward by House Speaker Paul Ryan are tilted heavily toward cuts for the highest-income individuals. It will be up to congressional Democrats to hold the President to his promise.

Criticizing the Republican proposals won’t be enough. As White House veteran Ron Klain recently observed, “tax reform is one area where the opposition cannot beat something with nothing. Democrats need to have an alternative proposal to put up against the GOP plan.”

Read more of David Yassky's editorial 

 

 

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The Journal News: "Video: Mobile App Development Bowl at Pace University"

05/01/2017

The Journal News: "Video: Mobile App Development Bowl at Pace University"

Over 400 students took place in mobile app development bowl at Pace University. It brought students together to come up with apps to solve problems for the elder population. Mark Vergari/lohud

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Inside Higher Ed: "How to Humanize the Online Class Setting"

04/21/2017

Inside Higher Ed: "How to Humanize the Online Class Setting"

Kit Kittelstad is a freelance blogger and adjunct communications instructor at Pace University.

At least once a semester, some student sends me an e-mail that goes something like this: "Professor K., This was my first online class. I had no idea what to expect! But, you made it totally manageable and I even enjoyed myself!"

This is why I keep sending in those druthers, semester after semester. Sure, it's a fair argument when someone defends the impossibility of forming tight-knit bonds with students in an online class setting. The whole face-to-face factor holds some serious weight when the two are placed on a scale. 

However, I also know the perks of an online class. Busy students can maintain packed schedules full of internships, part-time jobs, in-class seminars and everything else that goes into the making of a "full package."  Maybe they also write for the student newspaper, joined a mock trial team or are involved in a drama club or dance troupe. 

In the hopes of encouraging professors new to teaching online, I'd like to share three simple tips that have allowed me to emerge from each semester feeling as though I created some tight-knit bonds.

Read more here.

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