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Pace University Launches New PhD in Nursing Program

03/22/2017

Pace University Launches New PhD in Nursing Program

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pace University Launches New PhD in Nursing Program

PLEASANTVILLE, March 21 – Pace University’s College of Health Professions in New York is launching a new PhD in Nursing program in the fall on Pace’s Pleasantville campus.

Slated to be the only PhD in Nursing program from New York City to Binghamton, students in the program will join faculty to tackle the root causes of health problems identified as “social determinants of health.” Following the World Health Organization, the emphasis is on reducing social disparities in health; organizing health services around people’s needs and expectations; integrating health into all sectors; pursuing collaborative models of policy dialogue and increasing stakeholder participation.

Keville Frederickson, EdD, RN, FAAN, is the PhD program project leader and a professor at the Lienhard School of Nursing in the College of Health Professions at Pace.

“This is an exceptional milestone for the College Health Professions as the first PhD,” said Frederickson. “The program will be the only PhD in Nursing in the Hudson Valley. Our graduates will be prepared as nurse leaders, scientists, policy makers, and innovators in health care. Their research will focus on primary health care, a people centered approach to health that makes prevention as important as cure.”

“As dean of the College of Health Professions and the Lienhard School of Nursing, I could not be more pleased to see this excellent program approved,” said Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “The continuing shortage of nurse scientists and faculty has become a barrier to extending important research in primary health care and teaching beginning and advanced practice professional nurses of the future. We at Pace University are hoping to make a difference by offering our program in the Hudson Valley, enabling nurses in the region the opportunity to continue their education with a research doctoral degree.”

“Our goal with the PhD in Nursing is to prepare nurses for the future who are able to tackle the complex problems facing the health care system and the population of New York State with a focus on the Hudson Valley region,” said Frederickson.

To learn more about the program or to apply for fall, visit www.pace.edu/phdnursing

###

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914.906.9680

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ACCA USA Cautions Finance Sector, Consumers, to Take Steps to Combat Cybercrime

03/22/2017

ACCA USA prepares to unveil new professional development cyberdefense course for accountants, finance professionals, this summer

March 22, 2017 01:32 PM Eastern Daylight Time

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fast food chain Arby’s. Quest Diagnostics. Madison Square Garden. Yahoo. Verizon. Even, the Internal Revenue Service. Hardly a week passes without yet another revelation of a cybersecurity breach striking businesses both large and small.

The financial hit on business can be troubling: An IBM report last year found the cost of a breach rose to $4 million per incident. And recently. Home Depot agreed to pay more than $27 million to financial institutions affected by its 2014 data breach, and court documents reportedly identified the total cost to Home Depot at $179 million.

ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants), the global body for professional accountants, has been tracking cybersecurity issues over the last several years, as cyber threats have become more sophisticated and penetrated every aspect of business.

This summer, ACCA USA and The Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University in New York, a National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security-certified Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education, will hold their first-ever cyberdefense course, offering professional development credits to accountants and other finance industry professionals.

“ACCA understands the challenges that accountants face and is determined to equip them with the necessary knowledge and training to address these cyber-challenges,” said Warner Johnston, Head of ACCA USA.

“The threat from cybercrime and hackers has only increased over time,” said Jonathan Hill, Dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University. “The ACCA has been a particularly adept partner in educating financial professionals and the at-risk accounting and CPA professional communities on coping with these threats. This program is specifically designed for these financial professionals to build awareness and tools to protect themselves, their firms and their clients from the ravages of cybercrime.”

Anyone interested in receiving further details about the new course and registration should email acca.usa@accaglobal.com.

In February 2016, ACCA reported that cybercrime was growing too dangerous and powerful to ignore, and a head-in-the-sand attitude to this once nascent, now pervasive threat was no longer an option. In the report, “Cybersecurity – Fighting Crime’s Enfant Terrible”, ACCA and IMA® (Institute of Management Accountants) reported that the theft of financial assets through cyber-intrusions was the second largest source of direct loss from cybercrime.

ACCA stressed that accountants and finance professionals can, and should, play a leading role in defining key areas of a strategic approach to mitigating cybercrime risks. These include:

    Creating reasonable estimates of financial impact that different types of cybersecurity breaches will cause, so that a business can be realistic about its ability to respond to an attack and/or recover from it;

    Defining risk management strategy;

    Helping businesses to establish priorities for their most valuable digital resources to implement a “layered” approach to cybersecurity; and,

    Closely following the work of government and various regulators, to have clear, up-to-date information on adequate legislation and on requirements for adequate disclosure and prompt investigation of cybersecurity breaches.

Several months earlier, ACCA issued a report, “Cyberwarriors with Calculators”, in partnership with Pace University, revealing that top-level managers in the finance industry are adapting to address cybercrime threats. The survey of ACCA professionals, including Chief Financial Officers, Managing Directors, Senior Vice Presidents and practicing accountants, found weak communication between line managers and senior managers about attacks and attempted attacks, and that the application of fundamental risk management cybersecurity practices should be applied more consistently throughout firms.

“In order for our nation to continue to prosper in a rapidly changing world we must diligently protect our public and private technological infrastructures and maintain the trust of the international community,” the report stated. “Computers, servers and the Internet are indispensable tools for financial professionals – and they are under relentless attack. For accountants, measures must be taken to ensure that the sensitive personal and corporate financial information they handle is safe: accountants need to be at the forefront of cybersecurity.”

ACCA members were asked about company policies and personal practices regarding cybersecurity, and how evidence of cyberattacks is communicated within firms. The findings highlighted weaknesses:

    Nearly 50% indicated it was somewhat or very likely that consultants would be hired after a breach.

    Nearly 70% said they had a high or very high level of awareness of their company’s cyber risk management policies and procedures.

    57% said their IT systems were well-protected against cyber threats.

    32% had no knowledge of company policy on data encryption in transit or in storage.

    Auditors are more concerned about cybercrime today than a year ago (58% for auditors compared with 48% for accountants).

    27% of accountants felt their firms adhered to Control Objectives for Information and Related Technologies (COBIT 5) standards whereas 43% of auditors believed their firms followed the standards.

In another report, ACCA and Pace also delved more deeply into the growing number of incidents involving skimming devices, which rip off consumers at gas pumps and ATMs. A skimmer is an electronic device used to read and store electronic data. The new research focused on devices that read and recorded data from consumer payment cards, such as ATM, credit, debit, prepaid and electronic gift cards.

The report illustrated how skimmer scams were spreading globally, and noted that in the first half of 2011, the U.S. ranked number one in the world in financial losses associated with skimming fraud. The report noted:

    One of the most common types of skimmer is the ATM skimmer, used to record data contained on the magnetic strip on the back of an ATM card. A skimmer may be placed on a stand-alone ATM, such as one at a convenience store or gas station.

    Security standards with European credit, debit and ATM cards differ from standards in the U.S., rendering it easier to conduct skimmer fraud in the U.S.

    The U.S. is pivotal for criminal gangs because it has more ATMs than another country and because it is not EMV-compliant (cards do not contain a global chip) and its EMV cards skimmed can easily be cloned. Cards that are cloned by criminals are also used in other non-EMV countries, such as Ghana, Costa Rica, Mexico and Malta.

About ACCA

ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) is the global body for professional accountants. We aim to offer business-relevant, first-choice qualifications to people of application, ability and ambition around the world who seek a rewarding career in accountancy, finance and management. We support our 188,000 members and 480,000 students in 178 countries, helping them to develop successful careers in accounting and business, with the skills required by employers. We work through a network of 100 offices and centers and more than 7,110 Approved Employers worldwide, who provide high standards of employee learning and development. Through our public interest remit, we promote appropriate regulation of accounting and conduct relevant research to ensure accountancy continues to grow in reputation and influence. For more information about ACCA, visit www.accaglobal.com.

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. The Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University prepares men and women for professional work, research, and lifelong participation in a new and dynamic information age. Located in the financial capital of the world, the Seidenberg School offers a wide variety of courses and exposure to internships and work with leading corporations, banks, federal agencies, and global entities. Degrees and certificates are conveniently available on Pace’s campuses in New York City and Westchester County as well as online and in special programs. Visit http://www.pace.edu/seidenberg/

Contacts

For ACCA

Jeff Simmons, 917-673-0024

jeff@anatgerstein.com

or

Jaime Williams, 718-793-2211

Jaime@anatgerstein.com

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Wall Street Journal: "What You Won’t Learn From One Wall Street Watchdog Report"

03/21/2017

Wall Street Journal: "What You Won’t Learn From One Wall Street Watchdog Report"

UBS Financial Services Inc. of Puerto Rico has made legal payouts to dissatisfied local investors, but not all those payments can be searched using an online tool from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. Photo: Ana Martinez/Reuters

. . . Jill Gross, a law professor who studies securities arbitration for Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, in White Plains, N.Y., said “to be honest, I’m pretty shocked” that BrokerCheck treats corporate and individual broker settlements differently.

In Puerto Rico, hundreds of complaints have been filed against Puerto Rico’s five largest brokerage firms since the fourth quarter of 2013, according to people familiar with the matter. Finra arbitrators, after examining evidence and testimony, have delivered 25 decisions requiring defendants to pay damages in a total of 30 cases.

Many more cases have ended with settlements. Local residents agreed to 483 settlements with Puerto Rico’s five largest firms and their brokers in 2016, according to Securities Litigation and Consulting Group. That is up from up from 197 in 2015 and 5 in 2014.

The five brokerages paid a combined settlement total of about $160 million, according to SLCG and people familiar with the matter.

SLCG tallied up the settlements and payouts by compiling information from individual brokers’ BrokerCheck files. The Wall Street Journal was able to verify the numbers independently.

Of the settlement total, about $140 million was paid by UBS Financial Services Inc. of Puerto Rico, the largest brokerage on the island by assets under management.

Read more here.

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North Country Public Radio: "Under new energy law, will it matter if these SLC towns say no to wind farms?"

03/20/2017

North Country Public Radio: "Under new energy law, will it matter if these SLC towns say no to wind farms?"

Photo: Janice and Joe Pease said they would consider moving away from Hopkinton and selling their home if the North Ridge Wind Farm is built nearby. Credit: Lauren Rosenthal

. . . So, what happens with a project that isn’t so popular? Do local voices have any say in what goes on in their backyard?

Karl Rábago, executive director of the Energy and Climate Center at Pace Law School, said the answer is simple: "Wind farms and solar farms don’t go where they’re not loved, in the end. It’s not worth it to a developer."

Rábago knows of what he speaks: He used to build wind farms back in the mid- to late-2000s and had to walk away from projects that communities refused to welcome. Even if they’re opposed, Rábago said local people can still have their say by negotiating with the developers. That means figuring out what it would take to get on board with a project, whether it's more money or a change in location for a wind tower, and asking for that.

"I think it’s important for local communities to try to be supportive but also, like I say, open and direct about what is needed to make sure that we really do have a rising tide that lifts all boats," Rábago said.

Listen to the story.

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New York Post: "Most college-bound kids believe they will earn more than their parents: study"

03/20/2017

New York Post: "Most college-bound kids believe they will earn more than their parents: study"

. . . Andrew Raghunanan, who is set to complete Pace University’s five-year accounting MBA program after transferring three years ago from Westchester Community College, is one of those students who believes in the monetary value of getting a college education.

He said he took his first accounting class in high school, and he realized then that he wanted to go into the field “because of the salary and because I just love playing with numbers.”

The 23-year-old Raghunanan’s parents immigrated from Trinidad and Tobago in the 1970s, and he is the first member of his family to go to college. He is set to start working at KPMG in Connecticut in October, after finishing his studies, and expects to start making “above $60,000.”

He, like other survey respondents, says he “most definitely” expects to become wealthier than his mother, who works as an assistant in a dental office, and father, who is employed at a tool company in New Jersey.

“I do expect to become wealthier than my parents, since neither of them went to college,“ added John Schilling, a Denver high school student who plans to enter NYU’s pre-med program this fall. “They both worked very hard and were able to obtain pretty well-paying jobs to help support our family, but neither of them are even close to a doctor’s salary.”

On the other hand, at least some college students are currently heading toward graduation day without a clear idea of their earnings prospects.

Brianna Perriello, a senior who will graduate in May from Pace after having studied marketing and integrated communications, said she has taken a part-time job with Westchester Magazine and plans to continue working part time while going to graduate school. “Salary really didn’t play that big a part” in selecting her course of study, she said.

Will she become wealthier than her parents?

“I’d like to,” she said, “but it’s really not that important.”

Read more here.

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New York Times: "Scientists Bristle at Trump Budget’s Cuts to Research"

03/17/2017

New York Times: "Scientists Bristle at Trump Budget’s Cuts to Research"

Photo: A scientist working with the Zika virus at a National Institutes of Health lab in Bethesda, Md., last year. President Trump would cut the budget for the National Institutes of Health by 18 percent. Credit Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

. . . Judith Enck, a regional E.P.A. official in the Obama administration and now a visiting scholar at Pace University School of Law, called the proposed science cuts in her former agency “nonsensical.”

Noting that one of the programs being cut monitors chemicals known as endocrine disrupters, she said, “Not having the latest science on endocrine disrupters will make more people sick. And that is not something the states will pick up.”

Read more here.

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Law360: "Trump's Proposed DOJ Budget Cuts Would Gut Civil Rights"

03/17/2017

Law360: "Trump's Proposed DOJ Budget Cuts Would Gut Civil Rights"

Law360, New York (March 16, 2017, 9:14 PM EDT) -- The Trump administration's Thursday proposal to cut the U.S. Department of Justice’s budget even as spending on immigration enforcement and other areas increases is another indication that the new administration will put less emphasis on civil rights, fair lending, antitrust and other areas, experts say.

While President Donald Trump's budget proposal is almost certainly not expected to become law, the document does set out the administration’s priorities and main areas of focus. Immigration enforcement and violent crime reduction have clearly taken the lead, and, based on the budget outline released by Trump's Office of Management and Budget, it appears that other areas within the Justice Department's purview will have to face less funding.

"There's only so much money to go around," said Michael Weinstein, a partner at Cole Schotz PC and a former federal prosecutor.

The Trump administration's budget blueprint requests $27.7 billion for the Justice Department for 2018, a $1.1 billion, or 3.8 percent, drop from the 2017 allocation to the department under the continuing resolution that expires in April.

However, even with that drop, the administration is seeking to increase funding for the FBI by $249 million, or 3 percent, over the current continuing resolution and an additional $175 million to go after what the document calls "the worst of the worst criminal organizations and drug traffickers in order to address violent crime, gun-related deaths and the opioid epidemic."

Funding for immigration judge teams, to deal with illegal entry and unlawful presence cases, will see a jump of nearly $80 million from the existing continuing resolution and increases the number of Justice Department officials that will work on immigration cases.

The proposed budget also provides an additional $171 million for short-term detention space for federal detainees, including undocumented immigrants, over existing levels.

Those funding increases, coming with the broader cuts that the Trump administration wants to see inside the Justice Department, means that certain areas are going to have to take a backseat to immigration and other priorities, said Randolph McLaughlin, a professor at Pace University Law School.

"Clearly the areas that will be cut are the areas that are of interest to civil rights litigators," he said.

Read more here.

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New York Law Journal: "Pace Recognizes DiFiore"

03/16/2017

New York Law Journal: "Pace Recognizes DiFiore"

Courtesy photo/Mark Liflander

Chief Judge Janet DiFiore, second from right, was recognized by the Elizabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University Wednesday at its 22nd annual Leadership Awards event. Joining DiFiore, from left, is law professor Jay Carlisle, dean David Yassky, and university president Stephen Friedman.

http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/id=1202781207463/Pace-Recognizes-DiFiore

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amNewYork: "Trump’s EPA cuts could have drastic effect on NYC, experts say"

03/16/2017

amNewYork: "Trump’s EPA cuts could have drastic effect on NYC, experts say"

President Donald Trump's planned cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency could negatively impact New York City, experts say. Above, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt addresses employees at the agency's headquarters on Feb. 21, 2017, in Washington, D.C. (Credit: Aaron P. Bernstein / Getty Images)

. . . Among the “potentially serious implications” for NYC, according to the recently departed regional EPA administrator for the city (and elsewhere) Judith Enck, would be a risk to the safety of drinking water.

“New York (City) is unique in that not all our drinking water is filtered. It’s a real wonder,” explained Enck, a Barack Obama appointee who resigned her post on Jan. 18 and is now a visiting scholar at Pace University’s Haub Law School.

The reason New Yorkers can drink unfiltered water from the Catskills is “because there is a real effort to protect it at the source. EPA staff are very diligent about looking at (water) test results” to make sure parasites such as cryptosporidium and harmful bacteria and pathogens do not raise to unsafe levels and sicken the people who drink it.

Cutting staff that performs such jobs — as well as EPA police who patrol reservoirs in Westchester and the Catskills — will reduce protections, she said.

Congress appropriates money for upgrades that flows to the state and then the city to beef up water infrastructure that, in NYC, “is really old and really vulnerable to problems,” she said.

Our metropolis “has a massive problem with sewage discharges into its waterways,” such as the Hudson and East rivers, the Gowanus Canal and New York Harbor, after rainfalls, Enck continued.

EPA staff typically responds — as hundreds of employees did after Superstorm Sandy — to help damaged sewer plants get back online, but the cuts “would affect the EPA’s ability to respond to emergencies,” she said.

Read more here.

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Journal News: "Micro-apartments offer big style in Yonkers"

03/16/2017

Journal News: "Micro-apartments offer big style in Yonkers"

. . . "It’s one of the hot trends in planning and housing," said Justin Woods, an urban planner and professor at Pace University. "It started in the tech hub in Silicon Valley and spread to Seattle. You’re starting to see them pop up in places throughout the country."

Woods said the tiny housing is mostly built for millennials, adults who are between 20 and 36 years old.

"A lot of research has shown that millennials aren’t as concerned with space like for entertaining, they’re much more concerned with amenities and location," Woods said.

Read more here.

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