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"Hartford Courant" featured Seidenberg Alumna Dr. Elizabeth Teracino in "Elizabeth Teracino earns doctorate in economics in the Netherlands"

03/06/2018

"Hartford Courant" featured Seidenberg Alumna Dr. Elizabeth Teracino in "Elizabeth Teracino earns doctorate in economics in the Netherlands"

Dr. Elizabeth Teracino, an alumni of New Canaan High School (Class of 2000), earned her doctorate in the field of economics from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. She publicly defended her Ph.D. dissertation on November 6, 2017 in the Academiegebouw in Groningen, Netherlands. Prior academic degrees include a B.S. in Business Administration from the Tepper Business School at Carnegie Mellon University, and a M.S. in Computer Science and Security from the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University.

Dr. Teracino's dissertation is entitled "Value Co-creation in the Cloud: Understanding Software-as-a-Service-Driven Convergence of the Enterprise Systems and Financial Services Industries." The dissertation addresses innovation management and strategy in emerging technology markets, more specifically due to companies moving into the Cloud and adopting a "Software as a Service" business model.

The physical book is available locally at the New Canaan Library and at the New York Public Library. The digital version of the book can be found online via rug.nl.

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"The Hudson Independent" featured Law Professor Vanessa Merton in "Local Immigrants Face Changes"

03/06/2018

"The Hudson Independent" featured Law Professor Vanessa Merton in "Local Immigrants Face Changes"

Vanessa Merton is tired. Not end-of-a-long-day tired, but rather the deep exhaustion from a day that never ends. Professor Merton directs a small team at the Immigration Justice Clinic of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University. Armed with caffeine and the rule of law, they offer free advice and representation to eligible immigrants seeking to prove their legal status. “Things are massively different than a year ago,” says Merton, and not just for undocumented immigrants.

Merton tells the story of a Marie (not her real name), a client who went through the immigration court system years ago. Marie has worked legally for over a decade, but now fears being deported. “She had a classic asylum case,” Merton says. Before coming here, Marie ran a bakery in Haiti. Government officials demanded that she fire her experienced staff and hire politically connected replacements. She refused. “One night,” Merton says, “they drove trucks into her house. Banging and shooting. She threw her children under a mattress. She doesn’t know how they made it through the night.” Marie had a valid visitor visa, and used it to come to the United States to apply for asylum. Immigration Court granted her a “Withholding of Removal” status, allowing her to stay. Her children are citizens, and she is being sponsored for citizenship. “She’s 59 and works as a home health aide for disabled persons,” Merton says. “Old, settled cases like hers are being re-opened daily. Many don’t even know they have become illegal.”

These re-opened cases are being added to an already crowded court calendar. At the end of 2017, 4,789 Westchester residents were awaiting immigration hearings, part of a national backlog of over 667,000 cases. In Greenburgh alone, 321 residents are waiting an average of 3.2 years for their cases to be processed.

To Merton, this docket is a sign of “the endless struggle to get the federal government to follow its own laws.” Some people being deported have legal status; some are even citizens. She describes one 17-year-old boy who cried out to her in a detention center. “Lawyer! Lawyer! They are going to deport me. I don’t know how this can be happening.” The boy’s father, an American citizen who had raised him here, had recently died. Born in Guinea, his birth certificate listed only his mother’s name. Merton had “a video of him delivering the eulogy at his father’s funeral. Innumerable affidavits. Finally, I told them we’re going to exhume his father, do DNA testing, and you’re going to pay for the whole thing. Only then did the court agree he was a citizen. It would have cost him over $15,000 if he could even find a lawyer to spend seven years on one case.” Merton worries about the hundreds calling her clinic that she cannot help. She knows that some of those callers have, or could prove, legal status but may be deported without a lawyer.

Increasingly, a lawyer is no guarantee of an orderly process. In January, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) issued new guidelines expanding the ability to make arrests at courthouses, including of people appearing for their legalization hearing. Westchester County District Attorney Anthony A. Scarpino, Jr. reacted to this change, “We need members of the immigrant community to feel they can be fairly processed and be willing to come forward as both witnesses and victims of crime. If they cannot feel confident in their treatment in our courts, justice will not be served.”

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The "New York Post" featured "A miracle steal and insane heave decides New York hoops title" at Pace University

03/05/2018

The "New York Post" featured "A miracle steal and insane heave decides New York hoops title" at Pace University

A quarterback won the Section 1’s Class A final — in basketball.

Julian McGarvey, also Ardsley High School’s QB, somehow turned a sure loss into a miracle win on Saturday at Pace University with a last-second interception and Hail Mary.

With 2.4 seconds left, Tappan Zee was up 51-49 and inbounding from underneath its own basket. Tappan Zee played the odds by hurling the ball downcourt to a streaking player, but McGarvey came down with the ball around the opposing 3-point line. Off-balance, he took a dribble and one-handed the prayer that swished through the net, giving Ardsley a 52-51, unthinkable state title.

“At one moment it looks like the whole world was ending and I’m about to start bawling on the court because I just missed the free throws to win the game for my team,” McGarvey told the Journal News. “And then they throw one down half court, I catch it, stumble a little bit, throw it as I’m falling back and it found the bottom of the net.”

McGarvey, who’ll be playing football at Marist, was the tournament’s MVP and finished with 11 points, four rebounds, four assists and five steals.

“I’d say the quarterback arm helped a bit,” McGarvey said. “Throw it up high and let your receiver catch up to it. This time I hit the spot — right in the bottom of the net.”

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"Fox News Insider" featured "High School Player's EPIC 70-Foot Buzzer-Beater Wins State Championship" at Pace University

03/05/2018

"Fox News Insider" featured "High School Player's EPIC 70-Foot Buzzer-Beater Wins State Championship" at Pace University

A New York state high school senior made the clutch play of a lifetime, rifling a 70-foot buzzer-beater to win the state championship for his team. 

Julian McGarvey's miracle shot quickly went viral on Saturday, as Ardsley High School defeated Tappan Zee High School for the Section 1 title at Pace University.

McGarvey had just missed a pair of free throws in the waning moments of the championship game, the Journal-News reported.

After a foul by Ardsley, McGarvey intercepted Tappan Zee's long inbounds pass, took a dribble and heaved the last-second 70-footer.

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FiOS 1 News covers Pace donation to Food Bank for Westchester

03/02/2018

FiOS 1 News covers Pace donation to Food Bank for Westchester

Pace students and Chartwell's organized a donation for the Food Bank for Westchester.

More than 100 students gathered on February 27 to pack boxes with food and inspiring notes as part of Ellen DeGeneres’ Million Acts of Good campaign, aimed at spreading good will. In partnership with General Mills, the campaign donated pallets of food to be packed by students across the country and then donated to charitable organizations. Pace donated more than 250 “Matter Boxes” with food, supplies and personal notes to Food Bank for Westchester for distribution.

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Pace University students hold 'Never Again' rally to take on gun violence on "Fios1 News"

03/02/2018

Pace University students hold 'Never Again' rally to take on gun violence on "Fios1 News"

Fios1 News: "Pace University students hold 'Never Again' rally to take on gun violence"

From "Fios1 News:"

Attendees said that after the tragedy in Florida, they could not stay silent

For 17 seconds, the Pace University community stopped on Wednesday to remember the lives of the 17 victims of the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

"I felt like I really owed it to those students and to any student who has ever felt scared," said Lindita Kulla.

Students held a "Never Again" rally on Wednesday to say that thoughts and prayers simply are not enough after the tragedy in Florida and encourage others to take a stand by voting and being involved in the community.

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Student Lindita Kulla featured on "News 12" after anti-gun rally at Pace

02/28/2018

Student Lindita Kulla featured on "News 12" after anti-gun rally at Pace

News 12: "Pace University students hold rally to honor Parkland victims"

From "News 12:"

Students at Pace University held a rally on campus to honor the students killed in the Parkland, Florida shooting.

A total of 17 people died in the school shooting.

Student organizer Lindita Kulla says she believes it’s not just an issue in Florida, it’s for all students everywhere.

“I want to pay respect and be in solidarity with the students at the high school in Parkland. I think that by working together and coming together as a community as students, I feel like we can create active change. And as a body of students that have the ability to create this change through voting and through our voices, I think that we can do a lot,” says Kulla.

During the rally, the group read the names of the 17 people who were killed in Florida.

Kulla says that members of the school’s political action center will be talking to the students about how to get involved. She says the Center for Community Action and Research at Pace will be signing up students for voter registration.

Read the article and view the video here.

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"Pace Students Say 'Never Again' To School Gun Violence, Lax Legislators" - Daily Voice

02/28/2018

"Pace Students Say 'Never Again' To School Gun Violence, Lax Legislators" - Daily Voice

Daily Voice: "Pace Students Say 'Never Again' To School Gun Violence, Lax Legislators"

by Jon Craig

From the "Daily Voice:"

"I refuse to be a target," more than 100 Pace University students chanted on Wednesday, Feb. 28.

"I refuse to be scared," they shouted.

"I refuse to be silent," they said in unison.

Their pledge closed out a 17-minute tribute to the 17 victims of Parkland, Fla.'s high school shooting on Feb. 14, just two weeks ago and still very fresh on the minds of the college students on Pace's Pleasantville campus.

Lindita Kulla, a sophomore from Watertown, CT, said she visited the site of the Newtown elementary school shootings on her way back to college after the Presidents Day break. "I just touched a railing and the only words out of my mouth were 'Never Again.'" Kulla said, sparking applause.

So Kulla helped organize Wednesday's rally as well as a voter registration drive.

She said that if our nation's current elected officials don't begin passing tougher gun control laws, "We'll elect new ones who will. . . . As a body of students we can effect change."

Cornell Craig, assistant dean of diversity and multicultural affairs, said, "This is an opportunity for students to express their concerns."

Despite mild weather and sunny skies, Wednesday's mood was serious and somber.

Two weeks ago, 17 school children and staff members were gunned down at a south Florida high school. Kulla read the names of Parkland's school shooting victims, following by 17 seconds of silence.

"We hope this was not in vain," she said.  "The violence has gone on for too long in this country."

Event co-sponsors included these student organizations at Pace: Women’s P.O.W.E.R. Group, Organization of Latin American Students (O.L.A.S.), Lambda Sigma and Pride at Pace.

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Karl Rabago. executive director of Pace's Energy and Climate Center is quoted in "City Newspaper" about solar energy

02/28/2018

Karl Rabago. executive director of Pace's Energy and Climate Center is quoted in "City Newspaper" on solar energy

City Newspaper: "Power struggle"

by Jeremy Moule

From "City Newspaper:"

"...The Solar Energy Industry Association says as many as 23,000 people, from factory workers to installers, could lose their jobs this year because of the tariff.

If fewer customers buy the panels because of increased cost, "it will be telegraphed through the rest of the system, so domestic installers and domestic component manufacturers will also face some level of reduced business," says Karl Rabago, executive director of Pace University law school's Energy and Climate Center. "That, by the way, is where the layoffs will happen in the United States."

But the tariff's effect won't be felt evenly across the industry.

Bob Kanauer of LTHS Solar in Penfield says he doesn't expect the tariff to impact his business much, since his customers "pretty much demand" US-made equipment. And he expects that even with the tariff, some of the foreign-made panels will still be cheaper.

The tariff will mostly impact large projects and buyers who are looking for the absolute lowest price possible on a solar energy system, he says.

SunCommon, a 60-employee company based in the Town of Ontario, designs and builds residential, commercial, and community solar projects. Kevin Schulte, the company's CEO, says the tariff is having a minimal impact on the quotes SunCommon is currently getting from its suppliers. And the systems are still cheaper than buying electricity from a utility, he says.

Schulte says he's more concerned about the challenges posed by the artificially low price of natural gas and the persistent misbelief that Upstate New York doesn't get enough sun for solar to work. Some parts of the year are more productive than others, but about the only time panels don't produce electricity during the daylight hours is when they are blocked by snow.

Solar is attractive to many people and businesses because it's a clean energy source that lessens their contribution to climate change. But its economics make it feasible. Buyers are recouping their investment through energy savings faster than they used, to thanks to rapid, drastic improvements in the technology and a sharp drop in systems' prices. As a result, the number of solar installations has soared. In 2017, New York had 78,323 solar systems – from individual home systems to utility solar farms. That number was 9,079 in 2011.

The tariff threatens to upset the economic dynamics working in solar's favor. And just as it is affecting different parts of the solar industry differently, it may hit some places in the US harder than others.

"New York's probably fine from the tariff," Schulte says. It'll most impact project development in markets where solar is already lagging, he says.

Pace Energy and Climate Center's Rabago echoes what Schulte says about New York. The state has a good solar resource and strong policies that support the technology, they say. Some of the policies are very technical, but others aren't, such as tax incentives for buyers. And the state's renewable-energy standard should also accelerate renewables growth, they say.

Massachusetts also has strong solar policies and good resources, Schulte and Rabago say. California and Arizona, which both have far more large, utility-scale solar farms than New York, may take a hit. But the already strong solar industries in those states should prove resilient.

The Carolinas and Georgia may be in a more precarious position when it comes to solar, Schulte says. Both have low electricity prices and don't have policies as aggressive as New York's, he says.

And Rabago says that foreign solar producers will likely find a way to bring down the cost of the panels to compensate for the tariff to some extent, Rabago says. Since solar energy systems have already been getting cheaper, it's possible that the tariff could just slow that trend or that prices could flatten, he says."

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Pace University students in Pleasantville plan rally to remember the mass shooting victims, reported Daily Voice

02/27/2018

Pace University students in Pleasantville plan a rally to remember the mass shooting victims, reports Daily Voice

Pleasantville Daily Voice: "Never Again' Anti-Gun Rally Organized By Pace Students"

By Jon Craig

From "Pleasantville Daily Voice:"

"Two weeks ago, 17 school children and staff members were gunned down at a south Florida high school.

On Wednesday, Feb. 28 at noon, for 17 minutes, Pace University students plan a rally to remember the mass shooting victims.

To attend, go through Pace's entrance 2 at 861 Bedford Road,  Pleasantville. The rally is planned on Miller Lawn / Shirley Beth’s Way.

The vigil is expected to begin with a moment of silence and the reading of names of the 17 student and staff shooting victims from the high school in Parkland, Fla.

Speakers include a School of Education student on behalf of future educators; a Political Science Association student, a Center for Community Action and Research speaker; and Lindita Kulla, a student organizer, about the importance of this event, future action and future opportunities to be involved in response to school shootings.

Other event co-sponsors include the following student organizations at Pace: Women’s P.O.W.E.R. Group, Organization of Latin American Students (O.L.A.S.), Lambda Sigma and Pride at Pace."

Read the full article here.

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