main navigation
my pace

Westchester

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Autism Support Network" featured student David Sharif's piece "I have autism, and I'm in college"

05/01/2018

"Autism Support Network" featured student David Sharif's piece "I have autism, and I'm in college"

David Sharif is a junior at Pace University majoring in political science and minoring in peace and justice studies.

I knew I wanted to go to college at a medium-sized private institution on the East Coast. I knew I wanted to study political science, I wanted opportunities to make change in my community, and I wanted to be able to work with the United Nations, which I think does more to make change than any other organization. I also knew I needed a school that provides support for students with learning differences. I am on the autism spectrum, and I knew I could succeed—but I also knew I’d need help.

I wanted to be a college student in New York to shock the world. I wanted to show that I can do something many people would say an autistic person can’t. I’m attending a prominent university, I’m studying abroad in the countries of my choice, and I’m staying on track to graduate with honors. I’m lucky to be loved by so many people surrounding me, who help me on this path.

That’s why I came to Pace University. And I’m proud to say that it’s one of the best decisions I’ve made. So far, it is all working. I’m maintaining a GPA above 3.5, I’ve made dean’s list multiple times, and I’ve been inducted into the Pi Gamma Mu Honor Society of Social Sciences.

But being at Pace has allowed me to experience so much beyond the classroom, as well. I care about social justice, and I’ve collaborated with groups that strive to protect human rights and create safe environments for people around the world. I am a member of the LGBTQ Center, a volunteer for the Center for Community Action and Research, and a former democracy coach for Generation Citizen, a civic engagement group. Through activism, I’ve developed my teaching skills, discovered the hardships and challenges people are fighting to overcome, and volunteered in several places in the area.

My biggest passion is international diplomacy and world travel. As a delegate for Pace’s Model United Nations team, I’ve attended two conferences in New York City. As a world traveler, I’ve joined two study abroad programs. In January 2017, I studied geological and environmental relations in Ecuador—where I touched the equator, hiked steep cliffs, and observed the behaviors of animals and humans in an archipelago. Then, that fall, I studied global politics and Euro-Mediterranean relations at Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain. I toured Europe during that semester, both on excursions provided by my program and on independent weekend trips to explore European history. My ambition for 2017 was to set a new personal record of 30 countries visited, and I’m proud to say that, yes, I reached my mark.

Pace is dedicated to helping all its students succeed, and it offers two programs that have helped me thrive here. Most important is the OASIS Program, a comprehensive environment for college students with high-functioning autism and other learning differences. Through OASIS, I participate in workshops about employment, practice interviews and apply for jobs with an internship coordinator, work on class assignments with an academic coach, and select my courses with an educational coordinator. It gives me the ongoing support I need to succeed.

That builds on the help I received from the Challenge to Achievement Program (CAP), which helps first-year students who need extra help transitioning to a college environment. CAP helped me develop useful study habits, learn to complete assignments in a timely manner, build strong relationships with classmates and professors, manage my time, register for courses, keep track of my credits, and overall create the success I want for the rest of my college experience.

When I graduate next year, I’ll enter the working world as a capable, productive member of society. After that, I want to give back, by making quality education accessible and safe for people around the world with autism spectrum disorders. I say that individuals with autism can be mysterious, but you must discover what they are using to succeed. Pace has discovered that I use world travel to succeed. My biggest goal is to visit all 193 U.N. member states before I’m 50. But even if I don’t make it, I know I’m succeeding.

Read the article.
 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Dean Johathan Hill's piece "Jonathan H. Hill: A workable cybersecurity solution for Westchester"

05/01/2018

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Dean Johathan Hill's piece "Jonathan H. Hill: A workable cybersecurity solution for Westchester"

Jonathan Hill is the dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University.

It is hard not to feel helpless in the face of the latest news from the war on our digital privacy. Facebook, the place where we share our vacation photos and receive reminders about our best friends’ birthdays, has been “mined” for personal data on millions of individuals, some of which was used to send “fake news” to vulnerable users.

The list of attacks on major consumer sites and major businesses continues to grow unabated. 2018 is not even halfway through and we have already learned of major attacks on the likes of travel search site Orbitz. Attacks are not limited to corporate victims: hospitals, like St. Peter’s Surgery and Endoscopy Center in Albany, which was hit with a major malware attack, are also under threat. Even the Department of Homeland Security was breached by an insider who lifted Personally Identifiable Information (PII) on more than 240,000 staffers and contractors.

Westchester County, one of the nation’s wealthiest counties with its concentration of major corporate headquarters, is seen as a particularly rich target by cyber hackers around the world. The county was the target of a high-profile cyberattack on an industrial control system (ICS) — the Bowman Avenue Dam in Rye Brook — by Iranian hackers, and was also the scene of a sophisticated identity theft ring that allegedly defrauded ride-sharing drivers of millions of dollars.

New technologies, despite being developed in this era when the risk of cyber vulnerability is well known, are under just as much pressure and are, likewise, in danger of being overwhelmed by cyberattacks. Cryptocurrency platforms like Ethereum have suffered ongoing attacks and substantial financial losses. The threats to software-controlled technologies like driverless cars and drones is a significant concern. In addition, the emergence of a variety of “internet of things” devices like home security systems, many of which run on outdated and therefore more vulnerable, software, represents a new opportunity for cyberhackers to attack individuals directly. IBM predicts that more than 11 billion devices will be connected to the internet this year.

While the first generation of cyberhackers were often “script kiddies”’ whose motivations were often just the thrill of breaking in to a closed system, today we grapple with much more sophisticated professional hackers whose motivations are either financial, or destructive in the military offensive context. As such, they are either employed by organized crime rings, or are part of an official or quasi-official national security apparatus from a government that is competing with, or hostile to, the United States. These people are motivated and they are good technologists operating in a world where the stakes for the theft of personal information, the opportunity to take control of an industrial controlling device, or to influence the outcome of an election are the highest that they have ever been. We know that these attacks will continue and that they will increase in number and in sophistication.

Short of turning off our computers and leaving our cellphones in a basket by the door, what solutions do we have? The most powerful tool that we have at our disposal is education. We must teach people both the tools to defend their businesses and homes from cyberattacks, and the open sharing of information, because in that way we can learn from each other and be resilient in the face of ongoing attacks.

At Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, a National Security Agency-certified Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education, we bring government, law enforcement, industry and academic leaders together on a regular basis to share their tools, tactics, successes and failures to ensure that the community is fully aware of the current state of the cybersecurity threat. In this way, we also learn from one another and can build a substantial database of the techniques that have worked in cybersecurity, as well as those that have not worked.

It is unfortunate that, as with any crime, those who have been victimized are often reticent to share their experiences and to admit to their peers that they were attacked. The growing movement to hold corporate officers, including the board of directors and executives, liable for cybersecurity break-ins can make them even less willing to share. This needs to change: the need for open sharing of vulnerabilities, attacks, responses and successful recovery plans is a way to get actionable information into the hands of the chief information security officers, law enforcement professionals and technologists who can employ them as part of a broader national strategy to make the internet safe for business transactions — as well as safe place to wish your best friends an enthusiastic
happy birthday.

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Chronicle of Philanthropy" featured Gary Laermer in Other Notable Appointments "Raikes Has New Racial-Equity Leader; Disney Foundation Names Executive Director"

04/27/2018

"The Chronicle of Philanthropy" featured Gary Laermer in Other Notable Appointments "Raikes Has New Racial-Equity Leader; Disney Foundation Names Executive Director"

Gary Laermer has been appointed vice president for development and alumni relations at Pace University. Previously he was senior vice president and chief development officer at the YMCA of Greater New York.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Chronicle of Higher Education" featured Gary Laermer in "Transitions"

04/27/2018

"The Chronicle of Higher Education" featured Gary Laermer in "Transitions"

...Gary Laermer, senior vice president and chief development officer of the YMCA of Greater New York, will become vice president for development and alumni relations at Pace University on April 30.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Inside Higher Ed" featured professor of computer applications Gregg Ramsay in "Online Students Don't Have to Work Solo"

04/27/2018

"Inside Higher Ed" featured professor of computer applications Gregg Ramsay in "Online Students Don't Have to Work Solo"

...During group projects in his classes, Gregg Ramsay, professor of computer applications at Pace University, assigns one person in each group to serve as “project manager” -- a liaison between the group and the instructor, required to share twice per week an update on the group’s progress.

Ramsay’s students in groups are required to meet weekly on Blackboard Collaborate; if students miss the meeting, they can be “divorced” from the group and receive a failing grade for the project. Never in his 19 years of teaching online has this happened, Ramsay said. He believes online courses don't make group projects unfeasible -- quite the opposite.

“I've had a lot of success with them,” Ramsay said more generally of group projects in online courses. “I've never had any significant issues, and over the years I've been able to design the projects where the students take responsibility for completing their part of the project.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Westchester Rising" featured the College of Health Professions in "Pace Opens Health Center on Pleasantville Campus"

04/27/2018

"Westchester Rising" featured the College of Health Professions in "Pace Opens Health Center on Pleasantville Campus"

Facility run by College of Health Professions was the first nurse-managed academic health care service in the United States.

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of its University Health Center, Pace University recently opened a new and enlarged health care center on its Pleasantville Campus.

The first nurse-managed academic health care service on a university campus in the United States, UHC first opened its doors at Pace University in 1977. A novel concept at the time, the use of nurse practitioners is now common practice in primary care. UHC offers a wide range of primary health care services and its leading-edge care continues to be a model nationally and internationally.

Read the full article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"New York Law Journal" featured Law School Assistant Dean Jill Backer's piece in "What Is Diversity in the Legal Market? Or Is Everyone a Special Snowflake?"

04/27/2018

"New York Law Journal" featured Law School Assistant Dean Jill Backer's piece in "What Is Diversity in the Legal Market? Or Is Everyone a Special Snowflake?"

In August 2017, it made news that the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division would investigate and bring cases over “intentional race based discrimination in college and university admissions.” Their hypothesis is that some admissions offices are discriminating against White students. Their allegation is that using race as a factor to admit students who have been historically under-represented on the campus is itself discriminatory. Perhaps this is a way for the Justice Department to try to eliminate affirmative action? This got me thinking about the nature, distinctions, and definitions of diversity in our country—especially in the legal market. What exactly is diversity, or is everyone a special snowflake?

In May 2015, the Washington Post reported that the legal profession was the least diverse profession based on information reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). According to the BLS, 88 percent of lawyers are White, surpassing all other professional fields including architects, which are 81 percent White, accountants 78 percent White and physicians at 72 percent White. When analyzing diversity, including Black, Latino, Asian and Native Americans, these groups comprise about 33 percent of the American population but only about 20 percent of all law school grads.

Gender diversity is also still not achieved in the legal profession and the “old boys network” is still alive and well in 2018. Law firms can deny this, but the metrics make it an obvious state of affairs. The Diversity Lab created the Mansfield Rule based on the Rooney Rule in the National Football League. The Rooney Rule states that one black person must be interviewed for every head coaching job in the NFL. Likewise, the Mansfield Rule asks that firms consider at least 30 percent women and minority lawyers as part of the pool of candidates for all governance roles, senior lateral positions, and equity promotions. In 2016, there were 44 global mega-firms that had agreed to the Mansfield Rule, hopefully affording a greater number of female attorneys partner track positions to improve upon the meager 20 percent of female partners. So, does this new rule mean all women in the law should be given protected status? Should it just be for leadership roles that women are given special status? Currently, just over half of all law students are women, yet only one-third of lawyers are women. Is it necessary to make adjustments for the loss of women who choose not to enter practice?

In the 2017 study “A Portrait of Asian Americans in the Law,” it was stated that Asian American enrollment in law school has gone down 43 percent since 2009. The term “bamboo ceiling” was coined to give context to the struggle for Asian Americans to gain leadership roles at top law firms. It is almost like no one can break the ceilings to gain access to law firm leadership seats. Currently, Harvard University is being sued by both the Justice Department and the Students for Fair Admissions, a non-profit organization that challenges admission policies. The claim is that the university discriminated against Asian American applicants by utilizing a cap, limiting the number of Asian American admitted. This case continues to be litigated.

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Pleasantville Patch" featured Dyson Professors Michelle Land and John Cronin with Pace University students, faculty and staff in "High School, College Students Walk For World Water"

04/26/2018

"Pleasantville Patch" featured Dyson Professors Michelle Land and John Cronin with Pace University students, faculty and staff in "High School, College Students Walk For World Water"

Pace University in Pleasantville hosted the Westchester Walk for World Water on Saturday in partnership with the Children's Environmental Literacy Foundation (CELF) Student Ambassadors. Participants included more than 100 Pace students, staff, faculty, community members and students from local high schools including Bedford, Eastchester, Irvington, Kent Place, Scarsdale, Sleepy Hollow/Tarrytown and The Hackley School, including CELF student ambassadors.

Participants walked one mile with large buckets of water on their heads to demonstrate the trek that many women around the world make each day to collect water.

Westchester Walk for World Water, organized by the Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment at Pace University and CELF, was held to draw attention to the scarcity of safe drinking water around the world and raise funds to provide LifeStraw® Community filters to schools in need. While most of us are just steps to the nearest source of clean drinking water, in many parts of the world people (mostly women and children) walk miles to find water.

"CELF is thrilled to once again partner with Pace University on a student event that addresses one of the most pressing issues of our time: the global freshwater crisis," said Katie Ginsberg, Founder and Executive Director of CELF. "Just as we see young people across the country stand up and address societal issues, the CELF Student Ambassadors work to build awareness of the global fresh water crisis. We are so proud of them for speaking up and for contributing their talent and energy to the Walk. As high school students, they are already making an impact by educating their own communities about this crisis and enabling students in Kenya to have access to fresh water."

"Photos or stories of women and children throughout the developing world traveling miles for water, often of terrible quality, is not enough," said Michelle D. Land, Director of Programming, Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment, Pace University. "Our water walk helps Pace students briefly experience what it is like to have to do this every day."

John Cronin, Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Dyson College Institute for Sustainability and the Environment, Pace University, delivered the keynote address, "Water, Water, Everywhere . . . and Nowhere."

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Community Health" featured dietitian nutritionist Christen Cupples Cooper, founding director of the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University in "Is a plant-based diet right for you?"

04/25/2018

"Community Health" featured dietitian nutritionist Christen Cupples Cooper, founding director of the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University in "Is a plant-based diet right for you?"

To many, the thought of giving up barbecued chicken, steak and pork chops doesn’t sound too appealing. But if you’re trying to eat better, that doesn’t necessarily mean you must pass up your favorite main course to fill up on a salad.

Some research shows that when plant-based foods are the star of diets — with meat, fish, dairy and eggs playing supporting roles — people (sometimes called flexitarians) may lead healthier lives than meat eaters.

“Evidence shows that a plant-based diet can help prevent against heart disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes,” says registered dietitian nutritionist Christen Cupples Cooper, founding director of the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University in New York City. “Some of the healthiest populations in the world eat a plant-based diet.”

Fulfill your own needs

Different than a vegan diet — which excludes meat, eggs and dairy altogether — a plant-based diet centers on mainly fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers (think yams and potatoes) while just minimizing consumption of meat, dairy products and eggs.

“A plant-based diet is not an all-or-nothing proposition,” says Chanté Wiegand, a naturopathic doctor and director of education at the Synergy Co. in Jackson, Wyoming.

Cooper agrees, adding there’s no reason to give up anything on a plant-based diet. “That is part of its beauty — it is a moderate approach to eating,” Cooper says.

Plants are packed with valuable nutrients in the forms of vitamins, minerals, complex carbohydrates, fiber and phytonutrients. “All the things your body needs to radiate health from the inside out.” Wiegand says.

Plant diets also support healthy guts and digestion and may lower the risk of stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis. “Most health authorities agree ... eating mostly plant foods lowers rates of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer,” Cooper says.

According to Wiegand, by eating more plant foods, you’re also consuming less refined and processed foods and sugars. “This will help to balance your blood sugar to support healthy energy and mood all day long,” she says, adding that it can also help decrease cholesterol levels and aid in weight loss.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Westchester Business Journal" featured Pace President Marvin Krislov and Gary Laermer in "Pace University names Gary Laermer as VP for development and alumni relations"

04/25/2018

"The Westchester Business Journal" featured Pace President Marvin Krislov and Gary Laermer in "Pace University names Gary Laermer as VP for development and alumni relations"

Pace University announced Monday it has hired Gary Laermer as vice president for development and alumni relations.

Laermer, a Pace alumnus, most recently led philanthropic and charitable efforts at YMCA of Greater New York. In his new role at Pace, he will direct the university’s fundraising and institutional advancement efforts. He’s also responsible for engaging Pace’s community of more than 140,000 alumni.

In a statement accompanying the announcement, Pace President Marvin Krislov praised Laermer as not only a talented fundraising professional, but as an example of “everything we do at Pace. He was a first-generation college student when he came to Pace as an undergraduate, and today we couldn’t be happier to be welcoming him back to campus in a senior leadership role.”

Laermer will start the job April 30. He arrives at Pace as the college is imagining its lower Manhattan campus. The school has also recently completed about $100 million worth of work at its Pleasantville campus, updating its academic and athletic facilities and adding dormitory space.

Laermer holds a bachelor’s degree in agency administration from Pace and a master’s in information management from Southeastern University in Lakeland, Florida. He grew up in the Bronx and resides in Bergen County, New Jersey.

“Pace has an extraordinary legacy and exciting trajectory,” Laermer said.  “Alumni all over the world are doing amazing things and I am excited to work with them and engage them with Pace.”

Read the article.

Pages