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"The Examiner" featured Pace University's University Health Care in "Pace Celebrates 40 Years of Health Care With Opening of New Center"

04/19/2018

"The Examiner" featured Pace University's University Health Care in "Pace Celebrates 40 Years of Health Care With Opening of New Center"

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of its University Health Care (UHC), Pace University last Thursday opened a new and enlarged facility on its Pleasantville campus.

The first nurse-managed academic health care service on a university campus in the United States, UHC opened its doors at Pace in 1977. A novel concept at the time, the use of nurse practitioners is now common in primary care. UHC offers a wide range of primary health care services and its leading edge care continues to be a model nationally and internally.

The center, which moved from the Goldstein Fitness Center to the Paton House, is about 2,000 square feet with four patient exam rooms, a procedure room, larger reception area and a lab. More than 1,700 patients, including students, staff, faculty, alumni and their families are treated there each year.

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"Nyack News & Views" featured Haub Law Professor Karl Coplan in "Earth Matters: Life on a (Carbon) Budget"

04/18/2018

"Nyack News & Views" featured Haub Law Professor Karl Coplan in "Earth Matters: Life on a (Carbon) Budget"

As she wrapped up a recent talk on the current state of polar ice, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory geophysicist Dr. Robin Bell spoke of the need for us all to live sustainably. As a shining example, she cited her own husband, environmental law professor Karl Coplan, who works hard to live on a carbon emissions “budget” of four tons a year. “He does it,” said Bell. “I try really hard . . .”

Coplan blogs about his endeavor to live within his ambitiously low budget of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, and is working on a book about living sustainably on a tiny fraction of the typical American’s annual 44-ton carbon output.

Earth Matters spoke to Coplan by phone last week about his quest to curb his carbon footprint. The interview has been edited and condensed. 

EM: What inspired you to start tracking your carbon budget?

It wasn’t anything sudden. It was more of an evolution than an epiphany.

I’ve taught environmental law since 1994 at Pace College Law School, in the Environmental Litigation Clinic. Before that, I worked at a law firm that did a lot of public-interest environmental work. So I’ve always been sensitive to our environmental footprint. I always got the smallest, best-mpg car to get to work and back, and all the rest. Climate change seemed like something way off in the future, and not something we have to fight right now, like Indian Point dumping radioactive tritium into the Hudson River, or nitrogen coming from NYC sewage treatment plants (to give examples from cases I worked on).

We have environmental laws because people make business and personal decisions without considering  environmental impact. We justify coming in and taking action, and wag our fingers at people who choose to pollute to make a dime. But if you look at your own choices—how you get to work or where you go on vacation—you realize that, like the old Walt Kelly comic, we have met the enemy and he is us: every one of us with a high-emissions lifestyle, especially in the U.S.

So, I came back from a sabbatical ten years ago and thought: What can I do? I realized that I should start keeping track of my own carbon footprint with trackers that were beginning to appear online.

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"Times Union" featured Haub Law Professors Michael Mushlin and Bennett Gershman piece "Is justice best served by never-ending punishment?"

04/17/2018

"Times Union" featured Haub Law Professors Michael Mushlin and Bennett Gershman piece "Is justice best served by never-ending punishment?"

Michael B. Mushlin and Bennett L. Gershman are professors of law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University.

Forty-seven years ago Herman Bell, along with two other men, ambushed and fatally shot New York City police officers Joseph Piagentini and Waverly Jones outside a housing project in Harlem. The officers were chosen for death simply because they were police officers. Bell was convicted of murder and sentenced to 25 years to life in prison, where he has been incarcerated in maximum security for the past four decades.

During this time Bell has aged from an angry and belligerent young man to an elderly and mature man who has been a constructive force for improving the condition of his fellow prisoners and bettering the life of those in the outside world. He is genuinely remorseful for the terrible pain he caused and is dedicated to making the remaining years of his life useful and meaningful for others.

In granting Bell parole, the parole board decided he has been punished enough and is entitled to release. The board's decision was based on Bell's lengthy period of confinement, his good record in prison, his genuine pain and sorrow for his heinous crime, and the almost nonexistent risk of recidivism. Indeed, New York's Department of Corrections and Community Supervision's own data reflects Bell's minimal risk to public safety; people over 65 with murder-related convictions have the lowest risk of recidivism. The board's decision also may have been influenced by a powerful letter in which Jones' son expressed forgiveness for Bell's killing his father and said that paroling Bell would bring Jones's family "joy and peace." Denying Bell parole, he wrote, "would cause us pain as we are reminded of the painful episode each time he appears before the board."

It is noteworthy that New York's parole board was reconstituted by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who appointed new board members who in turn promulgated new regulations designed to make parole less vindictive and more focused on rehabilitation. The board's decision to parole Bell underscores the board's new approach. In the past, release on parole was rare. Today parole is more available to people who legitimately have earned it.

The decision to parole Bell has generated understandable opposition from many quarters, including New York City Mayor Bill DiBlasio, the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, and Piagentini's family. Indeed, Diane Piagentini, Joseph Piagentini's widow, supported by the police union, has petitioned the state Supreme Court to rescind the April 17 parole, claiming that "parole is not appropriate for cold-blooded cop-killers."

We, and over a hundred organizations, believe the board did the right thing. The board emphasized that rehabilitation is a meaningful goal in our penal system and that continued vengeance needs to be tempered with justice and mercy. Otherwise parole becomes a meaningless abstraction.

We understand but strongly disagree with the position of Diane Piagentini and the police unions. This was a horrible crime committed many years ago during incendiary times by a young man with a warped political ideology. He has been in prison for over 44 years. He is a changed man. He has expressed remorse and will be a constructive force for society's betterment. Will keeping him in prison until he dies contribute to public safety? Should hatred and vengeance continue to drive our penal system? Or is justice and humanity better served by paroling him?

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"Retail Dive" featured Law Professor Paul Rafelson in "What's at stake in the e-commerce sales tax debate"

04/17/2018

"Retail Dive" featured Law Professor Paul Rafelson in "What's at stake in the e-commerce sales tax debate"

...For smaller retailers and marketplace sellers "disruptive" might not begin to cover it. To Paul Rafelson, Pace University law professor and co-founder of the newly formed trade association Online Merchants Guild, the debate represents an "existential crisis."

"There's so much of the community that is not going to be around, and I don't think people realize that, in six months, maybe a year when the full force of what is happening is realized," he told Retail Dive. Rafelson and the members of his association are concerned about a tangential problem that SCOTUS may or may not weigh in on: What does a decision mean for marketplace sellers? Should marketplaces collect state sales tax on behalf of third party sellers?

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FiOS 1 News interviews Pace students and Professor Melissa Cardon about Relay for Life

04/16/2018

FiOS 1 News interviews Pace students and Professor Melissa Cardon about Relay for Life

FiOS1 News interviewed student organizers, survivors and Lubin Professor Melissa Cardon about their involvement in the 2018 Relay for Life.

View the video here.

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"Pride Publishing Group" featured Pace University's professor of Environmental Law Robert Kennedy, Jr. in "Ambassador Andrew Young visits Nashville for screening and program with Robert Kennedy, Jr."

04/16/2018

"Pride Publishing Group" featured Pace University's professor of Environmental Law Robert Kennedy, Jr. in "Ambassador Andrew Young visits Nashville for screening and program with Robert Kennedy, Jr."

...Kennedy served from 1986 until 2017 as senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), a non-profit environmental organization. He served from 1984 until 2017 as board member and chief prosecuting attorney for Hudson Riverkeeper. For over thirty years Kennedy has been a professor of Environmental Law at Pace University School of Law in White Plains, New York. Until August 2017, he also held the post as supervising attorney and co-director of Pace Law School’s Environmental Litigation Clinic, which he founded in 1987. He is currently professor emeritus at Pace. Kennedy co-hosts Ring of Fire, a nationally syndicated American radio program, and has written or edited ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers and three children’s books.

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"Westchester Magazine" featured Pace University and Law Attorney Anthony J. Enea in "White Plains Law Firm Ranked Among the Best in New York"

04/12/2018

"Westchester Magazine" featured Pace University and Law Attorney Anthony J. Enea in "White Plains Law Firm Ranked Among the Best in New York"

Plus, more awards and recognitions for top-tier Westchester execs and businesses.

Pace University Bestows Distinguished Service Award to Westchester Elder Law Attorney Anthony J. Enea

Westchester elder law attorney Anthony J. Enea of White Plains and Somers’ Enea, Scanlan & Sirignano, LLP was honored at the 23rd annual Law Leadership Awards Dinner on March 8. The event was presented by the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University. Enea received the Distinguished Service Award for his contributions to the legal community over the past thirty years by educating and protecting the rights of seniors as well as disabled individuals and their families. Enea, a Pace Law alumnus, was named Best Lawyers’ 2018 Elder Law “Lawyer of the Year” in White Plains and Westchester County’s Leading Elder Care Attorney at the Above the Bar Awards. “We are thrilled to recognize honor Anthony Enea ’85 with the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University Distinguished Service Award,” said Pace University Dean David Yassky. “Anthony is a prime example of what our students can accomplish with their Pace Law degrees. He is a universally recognized leader in the fields of elder law and trusts and estates, having helped thousands of families to resolve challenging issues and achieve security.”

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"Pleasantville Patch" featured freshman student Igby Rigney in "Ossining Teen To Guest Star On CBS Show"

04/11/2018

"Pleasantville Patch" featured freshman student Igby Rigney in "Ossining Teen To Guest Star On CBS Show"

He appeared in other cable series as well as commercials.

An Ossining teen and Pace University freshman will be a guest star on an episode of "Blue Bloods" on CBS. Igby Rigney will appear on the episode airing Friday, April 13 at 10 p.m.

Rigney, 17, has appeared in commercials as well as the cable series "Billions" on Showtime and "Orange is the New Black" on Netflix, the Daily Voice said.

Locally, he was seen in the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival's "Our Town" and the Mount Pleasant Community Theater's production of "Guys and Dolls."

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"The Seattle Times" featured Pace University's Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship in "When internships don’t pay, some colleges will"

04/11/2018

"The Seattle Times" featured Pace University's Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship in "When internships don’t pay, some colleges will"

...Pace University posted more than 4,000 internships last year, about 40 percent of them unpaid, and provides grants for many internships in the nonprofit sector.

“We’re not trying to proselytize with these students, but we’d like their eyes to be open to the second and third sectors in our economy,” said Rebecca Tekula, executive director of Pace’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship.

The center pairs students with nonprofits in and around New York City, like Greyston Bakery, Housing Works and the Legal Aid Society. Elizabeth Pooran interned last year at Senior Planet Exploration Center in Chelsea, a community space designed to teach technology, including digital photography and the internet, to older adults to encourage them to lead independent, connected lives. And Latino U College Access, a fledgling nonprofit that works with first-generation college students, has used Pace interns for three of its five years.

“I always say that my organization was built with the support and by the hands of Pace University interns,” said Shirley Acevedo Buontempo, the founder.

Students in the Wilson internship program receive $16 an hour, or $4,480 for eight weeks. Some 120 students have participated since 2009, with grants totaling about $500,000.

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"The Journal News" featured freshman student Igby Rigney in "'Blue Bloods' guest star is Ossining H.S. grad"

04/11/2018

"The Journal News" featured freshman student Igby Rigney in "'Blue Bloods' guest star is Ossining H.S. grad"

Igby Rigney is living his dream.

The 2017 Ossining High School grad will guest star on the CBS series "Blue Bloods," Friday at 10 p.m.

In the episode, "Risk Management," series regulars Danny (Donnie Walhberg) and Baez (Marisa Ramirez) race to find a missing girl who will die within 72 hours without her heart medication. 

Rigney will guest star as Evan Scott in the episode. "While I can't say much — don't want to ruin the fun of the episode — Evan knows the girl who has gone missing," he says.

Friends and family will watch the episode at a viewing party in Ossining at 6 Degrees of Separation Restaurant and Brewery.

Rigney, a student at Pace University, has also appeared in "Billions" and "Orange is the New Black," as well as "Our Town" with the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival, "Antigone" with Fusion Theater, and "Richard III with Bridge Production Group."

In between auditions, he had some advice for other would-be actors in the Hudson Valley:

What was the experience like?

"It was awesome. Everyone had a very specific job and the precision with which everything was run was impressive. I was shuttled between hair and makeup — which felt more like a party — costume, and set. Once we got down to the business of doing the scene, it felt great to be working with such an accomplished team. While there was the tension of getting the shot, you could still tell that everyone there loved the work they do."    

How did you get the part in "Blue Bloods"?

"My agents were able get me an audition. I got to work on the script, learning a bit about the circumstances and getting a feel for the kind of person Evan is. There was probably a week's worth of prep time, so when I got into the room I felt pretty comfortable as Evan.

The casting director really enjoyed my take on the character and recommended me to the production for a callback. In the callback, I just had a ton of fun with the team, and walked out knowing I had done the best job I could. A day later I got the call from my agents during class that I would be guest starring on the episode." 

Are there more opportunities for actors in our area as more productions film here? 

"Yes and no. While there is certainly much being shot in Westchester, casting is still focused from the pools in New York and Los Angeles. However, Westchester is close to the city, so as long as you are willing to make the commute you can take advantage of those opportunities. Westchester also has some great theater opportunities— especially with the upcoming expansion of the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival's community program."

Some quick advice for other kids who want to get into the industry?

"You just have to go for everything at 150 percent, and even when you do, you will be told no most of the time. For that reason the knowledge that you did the best job you possibly could has got to be the thing you rely on to keep going." 

You’ve done theater, film and television. Do you have a preferred medium? 

"I don't have much of a preference though if I was forced to choose, probably theater. Theater — for the most part — has the most amount of time for exploration, and while the finished performance is important my favorite part is the process. There is also a thrill of knowing that no other audience will ever see the performance you give in that moment, and that makes every night special."

What else can we expect to see you in?

No clue! But things are moving; I have auditions at least two or three times a week. This summer I will be involved in the Trentino Music Festival in the Dolomites in Italy.

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