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NPR: "Why Are Americans Drinking Less Cow's Milk? Its Appeal Has Curdled"

05/17/2017

NPR: "Why Are Americans Drinking Less Cow's Milk? Its Appeal Has Curdled"

When's the last time you had a glass of cow's milk?

Americans are drinking a lot less milk than they used to. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the average person drinks 18 gallons a year. Back in the 1970s it was more like 30 gallons a year. We once hoisted a glass with dinner, soaked our breakfast cereal or dipped into the occasional milkshake. This habitual milk drinking was no accident.

It started in the 1800s, when Americans moved from farms to cities. "First, you had to have the rise of milk trains that would bring milk from the countryside. That milk was refrigerated with ice," says Melanie DuPuis, a professor at Pace University and author of Nature's Perfect Food: How Milk Became America's Drink.

Before that, she says, milk was not a reliable source of nutrition for city dwellers. Nor was it all that safe. In the 1850s there was a major scandal in New York after thousands of babies died from drinking swill milk — the stuff that came from sickly cows, animals fed from the waste of city grain-alcohol distilleries.

This led to reformers calling for safe milk. At the same time, rural and upstate dairy farmers wanted customers. A political bargain was born. "We are going to make this deal, where we're going to feed those children and enable them to get enough nutrition through this thing that the nutritionists were calling a protective food," says DuPuis. "That will enable your farmers and your farm regions to have a vibrant economy."

Milk get its healthy halo

DuPuis says early-20th century nutritionists mounted studies to better understand the health benefits of milk. For instance, they'd feed dairy products or vegetable oil to rats or dogs, and then they'd measure the results.

"These rats that had dairy products would be sleek and healthy-looking and larger, and the other animals would look scrawny and unhealthy," adds DuPuis. Groups that represented milk interests embraced the research and infused their advertisements with glowing claims about milk's health benefits.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "County executives say look to schools, not local governments, for big savings"

05/16/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "County executives say look to schools, not local governments, for big savings"

For years, three Hudson Valley county executives say, the counties have been finding ways to consolidate local government services, so they are miffed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s shared services initiative.

Cuomo recently mandated that county officials develop plans with local governments to cut property taxes by eliminating duplicative services.

“This was a political ploy by the governor to divert attention from what is happening in the state,” Westchester County Executive Robert Astorino said this morning at a Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress forum at Pace University in Pleasantville.

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FiOS1 News: "Lower Hudson Valley county executives hold Q&A at Pace"

05/16/2017

FiOS1 News: "Lower Hudson Valley county executives hold Q&A at Pace"

. . . A Newburgh nonprofit called Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress hosted the $70-per-ticket event, which reassured business, finance and other industry leaders that the region's executives will protect and serve their and taxpayers’ interests.

The pre-written questions were asked only by Pace University students from the respective counties.

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Journal News: "County executives take aim at health care, opioids, housing"

05/15/2017

Journal News: "County executives take aim at health care, opioids, housing"

Westchester County Executive Robert Astorino, Rockland County Executive Ed Day and Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell addressed members of the Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress at a breakfast talk at Pace University in Pleasantville on May. 15, 2017.  (Photo: Ricky Flores/The Journal News)

The opioid epidemic, better rental housing options and shared services topped the agenda Monday at a meeting of all three Lower Hudson Valley county executives at Pace University.

They spoke at a breakfast meeting before about 100 attendees at Pace University’s Kessell Student Center in Pleasantville, sponsored by Patterns for Progress, a nonprofit that promotes solutions to issues in a nine-county region on both sides of the Hudson from Yonkers to just south of Albany.

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Washington Post: "When it comes to vaccines, rich parents get away with child neglect"

05/12/2017

Washington Post: "When it comes to vaccines, rich parents get away with child neglect"

Linda C. Fentiman is a professor at the Elisabeth Haub Law School at Pace University and author of the new book “Blaming Mothers: American Law and the Risks to Children’s Health.”

Public health experts once again must defend the safety — and necessity — of vaccination, this time in response to misinformation spread among the Somali community in Minnesota by anti-vaccine activists.

The rising skepticism about vaccines is dangerous on its own, of course. Last year, a study in the journal Pediatrics found that more parents than ever believe vaccines are simply unnecessary to prevent childhood diseases. But the anti-vaccine movement highlights another, troubling aspect in the world of child health: Wealthy people are more likely to be let off easy when they do things that can harm their children than low-income people are.

Parents in affluent communities enjoy a privileged status under the law that manifests most clearly — and most dangerously — when they refuse to have their children vaccinated. These parents are vaccination “free-riders” who are not held legally accountable for putting their own children — as well as other people’s children — at risk of potentially fatal childhood diseases.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Westchester business leaders size up Trump tax proposal"

05/08/2017

Westchester County Business Journal: "Westchester business leaders size up Trump tax proposal"

Donald Trump in his Manhattan office. Photo by Bob Rozycki

. . . Philip Cohen, a professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, said wanting to cut corporate taxes is a legitimate goal, but the extent of the proposed cuts opens up far too large a gap in the deficit.

“It can’t be as draconian as it is,” said Cohen, a retired vice president and general tax counsel for Unilever United States Inc. “The 35 percent rate for corporations now is too high, but you can’t cut it to 15 percent. Whether that number should be 25 or 28, you can’t run up these kinds of deficits.”

The Tax Policy Center said the proposal to cut the corporate rate to 15 percent would reduce federal revenue by $6.2 trillion over the first decade of implementation and by an additional $8.9 trillion in the second decade.

A study by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimated the tax plan could cost $5.5 trillion over the next decade. That would increase national debt to 111 percent of gross domestic product, the highest in the country’s history, according to the report.

One proposal of particular concern in New York is a plan to eliminate the deduction for state and local taxes. A study released last month by WalletHub found New Yorkers faced the largest overall tax burden in the U.S. and seventh largest property tax burden.

“It’s unfair to people in our area who own homes or live and work in high tax jurisdictions like New York,” Cohen said. “If you’re a homeowner, upper or middle class, you’ll be hurt by this proposal.”

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PINK SUMMIT 2017: Understanding, Tackling and Surviving Breast Cancer

05/04/2017

PINK SUMMIT 2017: Understanding, Tackling and Surviving Breast Cancer

Pleasantville, NY – May 4, 2017 -- The Greater Hudson Valley (NY) Chapter of The Links, Incorporated will host its second annual PINK SUMMIT in partnership with White Plains Hospital, and Pace University’s College of Health Professions and the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. This community event is made possible through the support of Dr. Jonathan Hill, Dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, and was coordinated by a steering committee comprised of Dr. Pauline Mosley and Dr. Sophie Kaufman, professors at Pace University; Denise Williams, Chair of PINK SUMMIT Planning Committee; and Jamie Bocchino, Community Relations & Events Coordinator of White Plains Hospital. It is free and open to the public, and will be held on Saturday, May 6 at Pace University, Willcox Hall, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville campus, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

WHO and WHAT:

This GHV PINK SUMMIT provides an opportunity for attendees to learn more about breast cancer and to ask questions of the experts. The initiative focuses on women’s health, and the impact of breast cancer from the perspective of survivors, friends, families, health care providers and community advocates and stakeholders.  Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the U.S. It is the most common cancer found among every racial and ethnic group. The rates of getting and dying from breast cancer differ among ethnic groups – Black and African-American women under age 45 have a higher incidence of breast cancer than white women. Additionally, Black women tend to have poorer survival rates than women from other racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. 

“Breast cancer impacts women individually, as a family, and as a community. In 2017, an estimated 252,710 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed. Together, we must increase awareness, and stress the importance of early detection,” stated Karla Jones Penn, President of The Greater Hudson Valley Chapter of The Links. “We are confident providing information sessions like the Pink Summit, and supportive services like our Bosom Besties initiative can fill in the gaps and increase health outcomes.”

“Community organizations like the Greater Hudson Valley Links are indispensable in the fight against breast cancer,” said Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins. “Regular screenings are the best protection against this disease, and the Links work hard to make sure women understand the importance of early detection and have the resources they need to access screenings.  The Links also help women seek treatment and provide tremendous support to survivors. I’m grateful for their efforts to combat this disease and proud to join them in the fight against breast cancer.”

Workshops include:

Beyond Fake News: Fact vs. Fiction in Cancer Risks

Confused by recent news reports on breast cancer risks? This session will help debunk myths and convey the real news on risk factors and screening guidelines.

Speaker: Karen Green, MD

Where to Go From Here: Navigating Next Steps After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Life may seem to stop in its tracks after a cancer diagnosis. An expert panel will provide guidance on tackling this major life challenge one step at a time, and every step of the way.

Speakers: Danielle Calvano, PA-C

Knowledge is Power: Breast Screening & Self-Exams

Learn the latest recommendations for frequency and type of breast screening, as well as guidelines on how to perform a thorough breast self-exam.

Speaker: Caren Greenstein, MD

Body, Mind and Soul: How Nutrition & Holistic Therapies Can Contribute to Better Outcomes

Learn how the powerful role of nutrition and complementary therapies, including healing touch, guided imagery, meditation, and yoga impact the body’s ability to overcome cancer.

Speakers: Cheryl Leslie, Registered Dietitian; Laura Himmelstein, LCSW, CHTP; Alyson Moadel, PhD; and Sophie Kaufman, DPS

Surviving at Work: Your Rights While on the Job

Learn from a seasoned Human Resources executive about your employee rights, options for time off and how to navigate the interview process while undergoing treatment.  

Speaker: Natasha Bowman, JD, SPHR, Human Resources

Lean on Me: Coping with the Impact of Cancer in the Family

Guidance and resources for both survivors and family members on coping with a cancer diagnosis; and the profound healing power of social support.

Speakers: Victoria Assumma, LCSW-R, ACSW; Professor Pauline Mosley, DPS

Looking Ahead: A Glance at Exciting Advances in Cancer Screening & Treatment

A glance at recent advances and those just on the horizon that promise to make a big difference in cancer care, including screening techniques, immuno-oncology, and clinical trials.

Speakers: Della Mackower, MD and Yael Zack, MD. Moderator: Una Hopkins, DNP

High-profile community leaders will also be in attendance, and enhance the program with remarks:

Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins; Karla Jones Penn, GHV; Cynthia Rountree, GHV: Bosom Besties Program; Robin Williams, GHV: Vice President of Programs; and Jonathan Hill, Dean of the Seidenberg School.

Karla Jones Penn, Chapter President of the GHV Chapter of The Links; Jamie Bocchino, Community Relations & Events Coordinator of White Plains Hospital; Dr. Sophie Kaufman, Pace’s College of Health Professions (breast cancer survivor) and Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems Professor Pauline Mosley (breast cancer survivor) and Dean Jonathan Hill will be available to speak with press.

WHEN and WHERE: Saturday, May 6 at Pace University, Willcox Hall, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville campus, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Parking: Entrance #1 Lot A/B.

Media contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

# # #

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FiOS1 News "Coping With Finals Stress"

05/04/2017

FiOS1 News "Coping With Finals Stress"

May means finals time for college students around the nation. Pace University's campus in Pleasantville is putting therapy dogs to work to help students de-stress from all the craziness. FiOS1 News' Mary Mueller has the story.

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Journal News: "Trump tax plan is 'outrageously' irresponsible: Pace U. tax professor"

05/04/2017

Journal News: "Trump tax plan is 'outrageously' irresponsible: Pace U. tax professor"

"What is wrong with the Trump administration’s tax plan? Almost everything." writes Philip G. Cohen, an associate professor of taxation at Pace University Lubin School of Business.

"National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn says the proposal contains 'one of the biggest tax cuts in American history.' The tax plan would drop big corporations' current top rate of 35 percent to 15 percent; provide the same 15 percent rate for business income from other entities; lower the top individual rate from 39.6 percent to 35 percent; repeal the 3.8 percent tax on an individual's net investment income and eliminate both the estate tax and the alternative minimum tax.

"If enacted, this would result in an explosion of the federal deficit and a significant curtailment in government benefits and services. The plan is, in short, outrageously fiscally irresponsible.

"President Trump’s tax plan is also unfair. For many middle-class taxpayers, the elimination of the deduction for state and local income tax and property tax will send their federal tax liability soaring. Wealthy taxpayers, who already have significant limitations on most itemized deductions, would make out like bandits.

"Doing away with most itemized deductions, under the Trump design, would be balanced with a larger standard deduction. While the increased standard deduction may benefit some working-class individuals, especially those without homeownership, the major tax benefits would clearly be derived by very wealthy individuals and corporations.

Read more here.

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