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Law 360: "Law Profs Urge NY’s Top Court To Take On $10B Saudi Appeal"

08/11/2017

Law 360: "Law Profs Urge NY’s Top Court To Take On $10B Saudi Appeal"

Law360, New York (August 9, 2017, 5:05 PM EDT) -- Experts in New York state civil procedure said Wednesday that a New York appellate court incorrectly dismissed a Saudi contractor’s $10 billion fraud suit against Barclays PLC by misinterpreting the state’s standards for when a case is filed too late.

Patrick M. Connors, a professor at Albany Law School, and Jay C. Carlisle II, an emeritus professor at Pace Law School, said that the First Judicial Department of the New York Supreme Court's Appellate Division wrongly applied a federal standard for determining when the statute of limitations began running on MBI International Holdings Inc.’s suit against the British bank when it dismissed the contractor’s case in June.

According to the two professors, the intermediate appellate court used the Second Circuit’s rule that the statute of limitations expired two years after a fraud occurred, instead of New York’s standard that the clock starts on fraud claims only after a victim had time to conduct a thorough investigation.

Because of that, the New York Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, should allow MBI to appeal the lower appellate court’s ruling, Connors and Carlisle said.

“It is not the mere duty of inquiry that begins the two-year limitations period, as the First Department held. It starts when a reasonably diligent inquiry would have revealed the fraud,” Connors and Carlisle said in a brief filed with the New York Court of Appeals.

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Fortune: "15 Ways Food Companies Try to Convince You Their Packaged Products Are ‘Natural"

08/11/2017

Fortune: "15 Ways Food Companies Try to Convince You Their Packaged Products Are ‘Natural"

Browse the shelves at your local grocery store, and you’ll find highly-processed product after highly-processed product marketing itself as a natural option.

This is communicated in a variety of ways. Terms such as “whole,” “real,” and “fresh” are liberally used, as are references to farmers and harvests. But one of the most popular strategies is also the most straight-forward: sales for products containing the term “natural” rose from $29.6 billion in the 52 weeks ending July 6, 2013 to $43.7 billion in the 52 weeks ending July 1, 2017, according to data from Nielsen.

A quick visit to my neighborhood supermarket bore this out. String cheese packages were stamped with the term “natural,” as were containers of frozen gluten-free chicken nuggets. The word, while frequently used on its own (“100% Natural,” and “All Natural”), was also deployed to describe flavors, colors, sources, even carbonation.

So -- what does natural actually mean? And why are companies allowed to use it to describe everything from boxes of Cookie Crisp cereal to bottles of raspberry iced tea?

The short answer: natural doesn’t mean much of anything. “You may think it means straight from the earth or tree, but not a chance,” Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition at New York University, told Fortune in an email. The FDA hasn’t established a formal definition of the term (it is currently reviewing comments from the public). As it stands, the agency advises that “natural” only be used to describe products for which “nothing artificial or synthetic (including all color additives regardless of source) has been included in, or has been added to, a food that would not normally be expected to be in that food.” These parameters are broad (processed foods fall under the “natural” umbrella) and ambiguous (what does “not normally be expected to be in that food” mean, exactly?). They’re also largely besides the point: at the moment, the FDA doesn’t have the legal authority to intervene even if a company violates its definition of natural.

Still, in the wake of the FDA’s indecision, a number of class action lawsuits have been brought against companies for labeling products “all natural” that contain synthetic, artificial, or GMO ingredients. As a result, some major food manufacturers have preemptively stopped using the term -- only to start using similar claims.

Even if the FDA puts its foot down, “companies are always going to be able to find a new synonym or creative marketing term" that doesn't run afoul of regulations, says Margaret Pollan, an assistant professor of environmental food law at Pace Law School.

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The New York Times: “Google Gender Debacle Speaks to Tech Culture Wars, Politics”

08/10/2017

The New York Times: “Google Gender Debacle Speaks to Tech Culture Wars, Politics”

The Associated Press interviewed communications professor Jennifer Lee Magas about the firing of a Google engineer over a controversial memo on gender in the workplace. The story has appeared in media outlets across the country including “The New York Times,” “U.S. News and World Report,” "ABC News" and the “Houston Chronicle.”

NEW YORK — The Google engineer who blamed biological differences for the paucity of women in tech had every right to express his views. And workplace experts and lawyers say Google likely had every right to fire him.

Special circumstances have contributed to the outrage and subsequent firing. These include the country's divisive political climate and Silicon Valley's broader problem with gender equity.

But the fallout should still serve as a warning to anyone in any industry expressing unpopular, fiery viewpoints.

Though engineer James Damore has filed a labor complaint against Google over his firing, experts say he's not likely to prevail.

Jennifer Lee Magas, public relations professor at Pace University, says Damore "forfeited his job" by making the remarks.

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Westchester County Business Journal: "Pace University becomes cyber central"

08/10/2017

Pace University becomes cyber central

A few of the workshop participants, from left: Steven Ma, Patriot High School, Nokesville, Virginia; Ron Conwell, Clarkston High School, Clarkston, Michigan; Karen Cavaness, Crockett County High School, Alamo, Tennessee; Douglas Vermes, Scarsdale High School.

Teachers from 14 states came to Pace University in Pleasantville to learn the latest in detecting cybersecurity threats. 

The July 13-21 workshop was conducted by Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. It was part of the GenCyber program, funded by the National Security Agency and the National Science Foundation, which is designed to help recruit more young people to enter the field of cybersecurity.

The 23 teachers who participated learned about how to counter cyberthreats. They will bring what they learned back to their respective schools and students in an effort to train students for future careers in cybersecurity.

Teachers learned to use Raspberry Pi, a hand-held computing device used to teach security concepts, such as encryption. They also participated in a treasure hunt designed to create awareness of fundamental cybersecurity principles through puzzles and other challenges, according to Andreea Cotoranu, assistant dean for academic innovation in the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Cotoranu was this year’s GenCyber director.

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Pleasantville Patch: "Pace's New President Welcomed at Pleasantville Campus"

08/10/2017

Pleasantville Patch: "Pace's New President Welcomed at Pleasantville Campus"

PLEASANTVILLE-BRIARCLIFF MANOR, NY - From Pace University: Pace University’s Pleasantville campus gave its new President Marvin Krislov an enthusiastic welcome yesterday when he arrived at the University’s Pleasantville campus. Krislov, formerly president of Oberlin College, officially began his duties as Pace University’s eighth president on August 1. Krislov, 56, succeeds Stephen J. Friedman.

About Pace University
Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, School of Education, and College of Health Professions. http://www.pace.edu.

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NBC New York: "Prison Dog Training Programs Rehabilitate Canines and Cons"

08/08/2017

NBC New York: "Prison Dog Training Programs Rehabilitate Canines and Cons"

Kimberly Collica-Cox, associate professor of criminal justice at Pace University in New York, has studied how the symbiotic relationship between humans and dogs can be useful in prisons. Collica-Cox helped develop a program through Pace that uses animal assisted therapy to teach incarcerated mothers better parenting skills.

“What we find is that dogs can trigger feelings of safety in humans, which will allow them to sort of open up and communicate more, which can be very helpful in a correctional setting,” she said, adding that there’s a great deal of research to support these findings.

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GoodCall: "Should Recent Grads Take Any Job They Can Get to Avoid Living at Home?"

08/08/2017

GoodCall: "Should Recent Grads Take Any Job They Can Get to Avoid Living at Home?"

SHOULD RECENT COLLEGE GRADS TAKE THE SUMMER OFF TO REST?

Jim Davis, assistant director of the Lubin School of Business Programs and Services at Pace University Career Services, tells GoodCall®, “I don’t think it’s a good idea to take a summer off after graduating.” Davis believes students lose momentum when they do. “Also, most employers are expecting students to be ready to go when they graduate – I don’t think it sends the right message to employers who want motivated workers.”

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Greenwich Sentinel: "Greenwich Resident Receives ANA-NY Award"

08/08/2017

Greenwich Sentinel: "Greenwich Resident Receives ANA-NY Award"

The American Nurses Association – New York (ANA-NY) introduced the 31 recipients of its 2017 Future Nurse Leader Awards. Started in 2014 to recognize the high quality of students graduating from nursing schools in New York and foster engagement and ongoing professional development, the award is given to graduating students in honor of their scholarship, professional dedication and commitment to community service.

The 2017 cohort of Future Nurse Leaders includes Old Greenwich-resident Henry L. Snyder, who graduated from Pace University in May. His nominator writes, “Henry’s service to our nursing program has been unparalleled… Henry’s work with the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) and our Nursing First Year Interest Group highlight his leadership and ability to mentor students. He works tirelessly to advance nursing on campus and engage students in community activities, such as the Dance marathon that raises funds for our local children’s hospital.” Snyder served as Co-Chair, Nursing First Year Interest Group; Vice President, Resident Assistant Council; Director, P4K Dance Marathon; President, National Residence Hall Honorary; CHP Representative, Student Government; and Chair, Setters Leadership Conference. He was also the Founding President of the NSNA Pace University Chapter.

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GoodCall: "How Important Is Your College Major?"

08/08/2017

GoodCall: "How Important Is Your College Major?"

COLLEGE MAJOR CHOICE: PASSION VERSUS PAYCHECK?

The popularity of STEM and business majors has led many to pursue degrees in these disciplines, but Jennifer Lee Magas, MA, JD, clinical associate professor of public relations at Pace University, tells GoodCall®, “I’ve seen students miserable in classes they either dislike or struggle with because they feel pigeonholed into a certain major.”

Magas has spent more than 20 years helping students choose a college major, and she thinks making the decision based solely on job demand is a recipe for disaster. “Students who don’t base their choice of major on the job market may find that they’re struggling to get a job in that field, but the extra effort it takes is worth the outcome.”

She believes it’s important for students to pursue their passions. “As they say, choose a job you love and you’ll never work a day in your life; while a bit contrived, the message is true.”

Magas admits it may take time for liberal arts majors to find a well-paying job – and be promoted to the position they want. “Eventually, you’ll have a career that you’ve worked hard for and that gives you satisfaction at the end of each day, and that is worth more than any ‘secure’ job you hate.”

However, she also stresses the importance of aligning a college major with your skillset. “If you’re no good at math, don’t go to school for actuarial science because you hear it has good pay and job security.” In the long run, she says it’s more important to choose a career that accentuates your strengths. “Having polished and excellent skills at something makes you invaluable – it just may take a little longer to get the job that requires those skills.”

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HVNN: "Westchester Named a Top 10 Digital County for 5th Straight Year"

08/08/2017

HVNN: "Westchester Named a Top 10 Digital County for 5th Straight Year"

For the fifth consecutive year, Westchester County has been named one of the top 10 digital counties in the United States by the Center for Digital Government (CDG) and the National Association of Counties (NACO).

“This award recognizes how the hardworking employees in our Information Technology department are leveraging technology every day to deliver critical services and improve the lives of our residents,” said County Executive Robert P. Astorino. “I’m very glad to hear that Westchester County is once again a leader in its field, from cybersecurity to social media.”

Westchester has been named a top 10 digital county for 12 of the past 15 years thanks to the county’s focus on cost-saving initiatives, efficiencies, and shared services, added Astorino.

“For Westchester, this means strategic investments in a world-class telecommunications network, advanced applications and solutions to streamline the delivery of government services, and collaboration with local municipalities,” said John McCaffrey, Westchester’s Chief Information Officer. In addition to the county receiving the prestigious honor, McCaffrey himself has been named one of Government Technology’s Top 25 Doers, Dreamers and Drivers for 2017. Each year, the magazine selects 25 individuals or teams who move government forward, using innovative technology to solve public-sector challenges and improve the performance of critical programs. “It’s a tremendous honor, and I certainly owe a great deal of gratitude to the vision of county leaders who understand that innovation is central to running an effective 21st century local government.”

Successful initiatives over the last year include:

  • Mobile Application Development Bowl in partnership with Pace University to show how mobile applications can be used to address real world challenges within the community. In April 2017 more than 350 students from over 40 high schools and colleges competed in the competition.

 

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