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Chicago Tribune: "Starting line: Career experts offer 2017 grads job-search advice"

05/03/2017

Chicago Tribune: "Starting line: Career experts offer 2017 grads job-search advice"

"Approach the job search like you would dating. It would be strange to have a dating profile that says 'I am willing to date anyone who will date me,' but you would be surprised to see how often students approach the job search saying 'I'll do anything.' Likewise, applying to 200 jobs with the same resume is like sending out a generic message to everyone on a dating site and hoping someone likes you. Instead, get to know more about the organizations you are pursuing, and show a genuine interest in them by building relationships with people who work there."

--Andrea Tider, career counselor, Lubin School of Business, Pace University, New York

"Don't take your mother's advice -- you really do need to talk to strangers. New grads need to realize the importance of building a network. Meeting new people is crucial to finding future job leads. Professional relationships are not just formed at official 'networking events' or conferences. You can uncover job leads in daily life: while volunteering, on line at the grocery store or even in waiting rooms. Talking to strangers and building connections on a regular basis is a key piece to any successful career."

--Bless Vaidian, director, career counseling, Pace University Career Services, New York

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Journal News: "Tax Watch: 5 takeaways from Westchester's airport privatization RFP bid"

05/01/2017

Journal News: "Tax Watch: 5 takeaways from Westchester's airport privatization RFP bid"

. . . The winner of the privatization deal would be responsible for all of the airport’s capital needs, the RFP states. Sources of funding would include federal funds through the Airport Improvement Plan, the federal Passenger Facility Charge program which brings in $3.5 million a year, and the private company’s own funds.

Airport assets, such as the terminal, runways, hangars and parking facilities have a long useful life. Under the RFP, the operator would be responsible for handing over the airport property to the county at the end of the 40-year lease with a minimum of five years of useful life left in them.

Andrew Crosby, assistant professor of public administration at Pace University, said the out-years of the deal could spell trouble for Westchester, when there would not be enough time for the private operator to receive a profitable return on his investment.

“This could end up putting Westchester on the hook for huge capital costs down the road,” he said. “They are going to invest where there is a return on their investment. You have to wonder what the operator would do in year 35 if a major hangar needs to be rebuilt.”

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Guardian: "Prosecuted by her legal counterpart: 'It destroyed my life in so many ways'"

05/01/2017

Guardian: "Prosecuted by her legal counterpart: 'It destroyed my life in so many ways'"

Taryn Blume: ‘Investigators are scared. Because it could have happened to any of us. And it still could.’ Photograph: Simon Leigh for the Guardian

As a public defenders’ investigator in New Orleans, Taryn Blume was juggling a minimum of 70 cases on any given day. Many of her clients, among the poorest people in the city, were facing the prospect of spending the rest of their lives in prison.

Then something happened that shocked even Blume’s most seasoned colleagues: Blume herself faced felony criminal charges for her work on one such case. The charges were initiated by the same prosecutor her office opposed every day in court.

“One Taryn Blume late of the parish of Orleans, between the first day of January in the year of our Lord, two thousand and fourteen, and the first day of April in the year of our lord, two thousand and fourteen in the parish of Orleans, did impersonate a peace officer or assumed, without authority, any uniform or badge by which a peace officer is lawfully distinguished …” the indictment read.

“I had no idea why or what that meant,” Blume, now 26, told the Guardian.

Prosecutors and public defenders are supposed to be adversaries in the courtroom. But prosecutors have a significant upper hand: a largely unchecked power to bring criminal charges against anyone they want. In most parts of the country, prosecutors don’t wield this tool against their own professional opponents. But in New Orleans, it’s become a pattern.

At least six defense attorneys and investigators say they faced threats of criminal charges by the Orleans parish district attorney for doing their jobs, the Guardian has found. Since DA Leon Cannizzaro took office in 2009, the attorneys have been accused of kidnapping, impersonation and witness tampering in the course of defending their clients. Each case has failed to stand up to scrutiny: all charges that have been brought were eventually dropped or overturned.

Legal experts said the practice of charging public defenders is highly unusual and raises ethical concerns.

“I can’t think of any way to justify what the prosecutor’s office has done,” said Bennett Gershman, a professor at Pace Law School who studies prosecutorial misconduct. He said prosecutors could be using their charging power to gain a competitive advantage or to intimidate defense attorneys.

“It’s an abuse of power by Cannizzaro’s office,” he said.

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Daily News: "A tax cut Democrats should get behind"

05/01/2017

Daily News: "A tax cut Democrats should get behind"

When President Trump addressed the Congress in February, he promised “massive tax relief for the middle class.” Unfortunately, both the President’s one-page tax plan and the plan put forward by House Speaker Paul Ryan are tilted heavily toward cuts for the highest-income individuals. It will be up to congressional Democrats to hold the President to his promise.

Criticizing the Republican proposals won’t be enough. As White House veteran Ron Klain recently observed, “tax reform is one area where the opposition cannot beat something with nothing. Democrats need to have an alternative proposal to put up against the GOP plan.”

Read more of David Yassky's editorial 

 

 

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The Journal News: "Video: Mobile App Development Bowl at Pace University"

05/01/2017

The Journal News: "Video: Mobile App Development Bowl at Pace University"

Over 400 students took place in mobile app development bowl at Pace University. It brought students together to come up with apps to solve problems for the elder population. Mark Vergari/lohud

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Inside Higher Ed: "How to Humanize the Online Class Setting"

04/21/2017

Inside Higher Ed: "How to Humanize the Online Class Setting"

Kit Kittelstad is a freelance blogger and adjunct communications instructor at Pace University.

At least once a semester, some student sends me an e-mail that goes something like this: "Professor K., This was my first online class. I had no idea what to expect! But, you made it totally manageable and I even enjoyed myself!"

This is why I keep sending in those druthers, semester after semester. Sure, it's a fair argument when someone defends the impossibility of forming tight-knit bonds with students in an online class setting. The whole face-to-face factor holds some serious weight when the two are placed on a scale. 

However, I also know the perks of an online class. Busy students can maintain packed schedules full of internships, part-time jobs, in-class seminars and everything else that goes into the making of a "full package."  Maybe they also write for the student newspaper, joined a mock trial team or are involved in a drama club or dance troupe. 

In the hopes of encouraging professors new to teaching online, I'd like to share three simple tips that have allowed me to emerge from each semester feeling as though I created some tight-knit bonds.

Read more here.

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ThinkProgress: "A leaked draft of the Clean Water Rule rewrite circulating around Washington has Scalia’s legacy all over it"

04/20/2017

ThinkProgress: "A leaked draft of the Clean Water Rule rewrite circulating around Washington has Scalia’s legacy all over it"

CREDIT: AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

. . . “If this rule were adopted, it would be an outrageous contraction of the scope of the Clean Water Act that is contrary to Congress’ clear intent, and this arbitrary reversal would never withstand review in court,” Karl Coplan, a professor at Pace Law School, told ThinkProgress.

But finalizing a rule based on Scalia’s interpretation in the Rapanos case could lead to legal trouble down the road for the administration. Lower courts have generally been split in their decisions about giving deference to Kennedy’s definition, or Kennedy and Scalia’s definition together. No court has upheld the Scalia opinion on its own — it’s always been taken in conjunction with the Kennedy test.

That means the Trump administration’s rewrite directly contradicts how the Court of Appeals has been interpreting the Rapanos decision, and throws into question how favorably the Court of Appeals would view the Trump administration’s rule if it were ever challenged in court. And if the challenge were to reach the Supreme Court while Kennedy was still on the bench, convincing a majority of justices to side with the administration’s rule would mean convincing Kennedy to disagree with his own opinion in favor of a definition he rejected more than a decade ago.

“If the Trump administration proposes a new rule along the lines of what is in the current draft I would bet good money that it would be overturned in court, and I say that without even knowing how they might embellish the record or try to defend this new approach,” Mark Squillace, professor at the University of Colorado Law School, told ThinkProgress in an email after reviewing the draft.

Perhaps further complicating matters concerning the Trump administration’s rewrite of the rule, industry groups close to EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt are reportedly pushing for the EPA to outsource rewriting the rule to private law firms. That would allow Pruitt to bypass career EPA employees who worked on promulgating the Obama administration rule, and would mean less public scrutiny of the decision-making process. Legal experts told Politico that such a move would be “likely legally doable,” but “almost unheard of.”

On April 19, amid rumors of outsourcing the rule-making process and Pruitt’s reported intention to rewrite the rule as quickly as possible, 26 environmental and conservation organizations sent Pruitt a letter asking the agency to reconsider basing the rewritten rule on Scalia’s opinion.

“We especially fear the damage that a final rule would inflict on the nation’s waterways if, as Executive Order 13,778 forecasts, it relies on a legal test that a majority of the justices on the Supreme Court rejected and that would weaken the federal rules so that they protect fewer resources than they have in several decades,” the letter read.

If the Trump administration moves forward and finalizes a rule based on Scalia’s opinion, the rule is certain to face a suite of challenges from environmental groups in court. And while the draft of the rule could certainly change before being finalized, Ann Powers of Pace Law School said that drafting a rule based on Scalia’s opinion certainly represents a step towards rolling back clean water protections for much of America’s wetlands and waterways.

“This is not a done deal tomorrow, but it is certainly a critical step in the path to undoing a great deal of protections for our national wetlands,” Powers said. “It would be very unfortunate if this were to be implemented.”

Read more here.

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WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "Judith Enck: Adirondacks"

04/19/2017

WAMC/Northeast Public Radio: "Judith Enck: Adirondacks"

"Environmental conditions in the Adirondacks and Catskills have improved because of strong national environmental protection policies," says Judith Enck, the Elisabeth Haub Visiting Scholar at Haub Law School at Pace University. "Those improvements are now at risk if President Trump’s proposed budget, coupled with his anti- science policies, are put in place.

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Westchester Magazine: "914INComing’s Spring/Summer 2017 Networking Events"

04/19/2017

New York State Legislators Town Hall

This April 28 Town Hall event will feature a two-way dialogue with key state officials on pressing issues including the decommissioning of Indian Point, broadband investment, tuition, economic development initiatives, and pension reform.  The Town Hall will take place from 8 am to 10 am at Pace University’s Pleasantville Campus at 861 Bedford Road.

http://www.westchestermagazine.com/Blogs/914INC-Incoming/April-2017/Spring-Summer-2017-Networking-Events/

 

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