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Pace School of Performing Arts acting alumna Nabiyah Be makes her film debut in “Black Panther,” the mega-hit movie produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

02/16/2018

Pace School of Performing Arts acting alumna Nabiyah Be makes her film debut in “Black Panther,” the mega-hit movie produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

Pleasantville Patch: "Pace Alum Shines in Black Panther"

From "Pleasantville Patch"

Pace School of Performing Arts acting alumna Nabiyah Be makes her film debut in “Black Panther,” the mega-hit movie produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures.

Nabiyah Be plays Linda, the criminal associate of Erik Killmonger. Be appears alongside an all-star cast including Lupita Nyong’o, Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Angela Bassett, and Forest Whitaker. The film has a nationwide release set for February 16.

“They say ‘Black Panther’ is on track to have a record-setting opening weekend,” said Pace University President Marvin Krislov. “It’s already setting records for excitement here at Pace, where we’re proud to witness the film debut of Nabiyah Be, a graduate of our School of Performing Arts. She graduated with a BFA in acting, but she’s an accomplished singer, too. We’ll be rooting for many more big hits from her—and for many more Pace students to follow in her footsteps.”

“Before I came to Pace, I knew that I had the potential to create, but I didn’t know exactly how to create on my own. I’m born and raised in Salvador, which is the capital of Bahia in Brazil, and they say that people in Bahia are not just born, they debut. Pace enabled that for me,” said Be in the following video.

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Adjunct Professor of International Law at Pace University Benjamin Ferencz keynote address at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s 25th anniversary dinner on Jan. 30 featured in "Palm Beach Post"

02/16/2018

Adjunct Professor of International Law at Pace University Benjamin Ferencz keynote address at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s 25th anniversary dinner on Jan. 30 featured in "Palm Beach Post"

Palm Beach Post: "97-year-old Nuremberg trials prosecutor still pushes for peace"

By Faran Fagen

From "Palm Beach Post"

Benjamin Ferencz’s opening statement at the Nuremberg trials projected onto a large screen during his keynote address at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s 25th anniversary dinner on Jan. 30.

His message of peace and unity echoed through the Boca West Country Club the same way it has resonated throughout the world for decades.

“I hope people recognize that war-making is genocide,” Ferencz said. “We need to stop the glorification of war and work for the glorification of peace.”

Ferencz, of Delray Beach, was 27 when he made his opening statement that led to one of the world’s first convictions of crimes against humanity of Nazi perpetrators at the Nuremberg trials. Now, he’s 97, and the last surviving Nuremberg prosecutor from the trial that condemned genocide and appealed for a rule of law that would protect everyone indiscriminately.

His keynote address at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s What You Do Matters dinner was full of history and hope.

“Seeing him on stage was such a powerful moment for me, and for the entire audience,” said Robert Slatoff, an attorney who lives and works in Boca Raton. “During his speech, I felt as though I was directly connected to a critical part of history, and that feeling immediately reinforced the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s message that ‘what you do matters.’ What each of us does truly matters.”

The Nuremberg trials were a series of military tribunals held by the allied forces under international law and the laws of war after World War II. The trials prosecuted prominent members of Nazi Germany, who planned, carried out, or otherwise participated in the Holocaust and other war crimes. The trials were held in the city of Nuremberg, Germany.

Ferencz, who does 100 push-ups every morning and says, he “won’t be bullied by anybody,” has fought for anti-war legislation ever since the dark times of World War II. Although he’s happy with the progress that’s been made, he feels we have a long way to go to achieve a peaceful balance on the planet.

“I’m a realistic optimist,” he said. “I see the difficulties and they’re quite enormous, but I’m an optimist because I’ve seen the progress and it’s been fantastic. The Wright Brothers learned to fly a plane, we landed on the moon and ended slavery.”

Ferencz was born in a small village in Transylvania in the Carpathian Mountains. He said it was a small house with no running water and no electricity.

He was an investigator of Nazi war crimes after World War II and the chief prosecutor for the United States Army at the Einsatzgruppen trial, one of the 12 military trials held by the U.S. authorities at Nuremberg.

Later, he became an advocate of the establishment of an international rule of law and of an International Criminal Court. From 1985 to 1996, he was adjunct professor of international law at Pace University in New York.

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Karl Rabago, executive director of the Pace University Energy and Climate Center in New York at The Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University is featured in the "Houston Chronicle" about Oklahoma wind power

02/16/2018

Karl Rabago, executive director of the Pace University Energy and Climate Center in New York at The Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University is featured in the "Houston Chronicle" about Oklahoma wind power

Houston Chronicle: "In Oklahoma, a war over wind power"

By Ryan Maye Handy

From "Houston Chronicle:"

...Karl Rabago, executive director of the Pace University Energy and Climate Center in New York, said he expects the attacks on renewable energy to intensify as wind and solar increase market share and federal energy policy under President Donald Trump seeks to promote oil, natural gas and coal. Last year, for example, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, a former Oklahoma attorney general and a political ally of Hamm, proposed killing federal incentives for wind and solar to help natural gas and coal.

"Adding to the costs of clean energy just as it is finally starting to break through to being really competitive is clearly a strategy that they are using," Rabago said. "It just seems like the baby is showing signs of crawling, so kill it before it walks."

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Legal expert Bennett Gershman of Pace University Law School is featured in "Courier Journal" with other legal experts

02/16/2018

Legal expert Bennett Gershman of Pace University Law School is featured in "Courier Journal" with other legal experts

Courier Journal: "Family's plea: Erase rape charges against our dad before he dies"

by Andrew Wolfson

From "Courier Journal:"

With their father’s mind slipping away to dementia, the family of retired businessman Billy Joe Miles wants one thing: charges of rape, sodomy and bribery expunged to restore his good name before he dies.

The prosecution last month announced plans to dismiss the indictment of the former University of Kentucky board chairman after his accuser's stories about being threatened and targeted by vandals proved untrue.

But Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office says it won’t dismiss the case permanently, or “with prejudice,” as the legal term is known. That means Miles, a once-prominent Owensboro civic leader, is ineligible for expungement.

Terry Sebastian, a spokesman for Beshear’s office, declined to say whether it still hopes to prosecute Miles. Nor would he say if prosecutors still believe the 30-year-old home health worker who says she was raped.

Sebastian would only say that “out of respect for all victims, seeking dismissal without prejudice is the standard practice of our office, and is the default under Kentucky law.”

Legal experts say it's legally and ethically up to prosecutors to determine how to dismiss charges. But law professors Bruce Green of Fordham University, Bennett Gershman of Pace University and Laurie Levenson of Loyola Law School in Los Angeles said refusing to permanently dismiss a case that can never be tried can be an abuse of discretion.

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Economic development and business advocacy group Westchester County Association has teamed with Pace University's Land Use Law Center to put together the Land Use Development Playbook featured in "Bisnow"

02/16/2018

Economic development and business advocacy group Westchester County Association has teamed with Pace University's Land Use Law Center to put together the Land Use Development Playbook featured in "Bisnow"

Bisnow: "Westchester Officials Hope To Boost Development With New Zoning Playbook"

Featured in the photo: Pace University Land Use Law Center Executive Director Jessica Bacher and CBRE Senior Vice President and Westchester County Association Smart Growth Initiative Chair William Cuddy

From: "Bisnow"

With demand for larger-scale development in Westchester County at high levels, one of the biggest restricting factors for developers is municipalities and their zoning and land use procedures. But a new initiative is hoping to change that.

Economic development and business advocacy group Westchester County Association has teamed with Pace University's Land Use Law Center to put together the Land Use Development Playbook, a set of resources, policy suggestions and process outlines to assist the county's towns and cities in updating their procedures.

“Communities often have out-of-date land use documents and zoning or inconsistencies between the two," Pace University Land Use Law Center Executive Director Jessica Bacher told Bisnow. "The lack of updated zoning results in a disconnect with the communities’ view of development and developers’ plans, and developers are often left guessing with what they should propose.” The drive for baby boomers to downsize and stop owning homes, and some millennials' desire to start families in more affordable neighborhoods with better public schools, has Westchester well-positioned to capitalize on New York City's softening multifamily market — but only with the right development. “We believe we’re at an inflection point where our municipalities have an opportunity to really grow and prosper and take advantage of the economic conditions and the impact of New York City,” CBRE Senior Vice President and WCA Smart Growth Initiative Chair William Cuddy said.

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John R. Nolon, Distinguished Professor of Law at Pace University, wrote a Blog about Low Carbon Land Use in "Law Professor Blogs Network"

02/16/2018

John R. Nolon, Distinguished Professor of Law at Pace University, wrote a Blog about Low Carbon Land Use in "Law Professor Blogs Network"

Law Professor Blogs Network: "Low Carbon Land Use: Paris, Pittsburgh, and the IPCC"

IPCC: Post 4: Shaping Human Settlements: A Series 

by John R. Nolon Distinguished Professor of Law at Pace University

From "Law Professor Blogs Network:"

The concept that municipal governments can physically shape their development is not well understood. The uniform, single-use land use pattern originally created by zoning designed communities to accomplish discrete objectives such as protecting child health and safety, controlling traffic congestion, and providing housing and commercial space to meet market demands.  As time progressed, the environmental and economic harm caused by the resultant urban patterns led many local governments to reshape their settlements.

The 1972 Petaluma Plan discussed in the previous post rebalanced the future housing stock of the City through zoning reform that required an even mix of single-family and multi-family housing. The local legislature changed its land use law to achieve more environmentally friendly design, protect open space, create a greenbelt around the community, provide for a variety of housing choices, evenly distribute housing between the east and west sides of the City, and to service growth efficiently.  Only in retrospect do we recognize these strategies as mitigation measures that reduce per capita energy consumption and protect the sequestering environment.

Petaluma’s reforms were not novel, even in 1972. In 1937, for example, the local legislature in Bridgeport, Connecticut amended its zoning ordinance to allow small commercial developments along major arterials in single-family neighborhoods in order to reduce downtown traffic congestion. As the population increased in Bridgeport’s single-family zones, more and more residents drove to the central business district to shop for goods and services. The commercial uses allowed in these new small districts included hardware, grocery, and drug stores, bake shops, and beauty parlors.  Permitting these developments reduced downtown congestion but also vehicle trips and vehicle miles travelled, one of the largest contributors to CO2 emissions.  This climate change mitigation effect was not on the minds of Bridgeport’s legislators at the time, but the zoning technique they created can be used today to reduce carbon emissions from vehicle travel.

A decade after Bridgeport’s innovation, the Village of Tarrytown, New York, adopted a floating zone to provide affordable garden apartments to attract workers needed for employers whose businesses were essential to stabilize the Village’s real property tax base.  The 1947 zoning ordinance created a floating garden apartment zone, but it did not specify where the dwelling units would be permitted. This was left to private-market developers who could petition the Village legislature for a zoning map amendment, allowing them to build garden apartments. Significant landscaping was required to buffer the effect of multi-family housing in single-family neighborhoods where the new housing type was permitted. By zoning for workforce housing close to jobs and requiring significant landscaping, the Village created a mechanism that communities today can use to mitigate climate change.

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Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

02/16/2018

Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

Pleasantville Patch: "Pace University Hires Communications Strategists"

From Pleasantivlle Patch:

Seasoned communications strategists will support Pace President Marvin Krislov and highlight University successes.

Marie Ternes and Jesse Oxfeld have joined Pace University as Executive Director of Media Relations and Director of Executive Communications, respectively.

Ternes comes to Pace from DKC, a public relations firm consistently named one of the most influential public relations companies in the United States, where she served as executive vice president. Her client list included Fortune 50 companies, tech start-ups, biotech firms, and real estate leaders. Prior to that she worked as Chief of Staff to former Congressman Anthony Weiner in New York and Washington, D.C. As Executive Director of Media Relations, she will sharpen the University's focus on press engagement and help tell the story of the nation's most upwardly mobile private nonprofit university.

Oxfeld began his career as a journalist and has more recently worked in marketing communications. He was an editor at "New York Magazine" and the theater critic for the "New York Observer." He has been a copywriter at Ogilvy and the director of content at Vox Creative, Vox Media's content studio. He has also worked on speechwriting and editorial projects for several political communications firms. In his new role reporting to President Marvin Krislov, Oxfeld will develop presidential communications and work closely with the university's media relations and editorial staff to ensure consistent messaging that strengthens Pace's position as a leading private educational institution.

"Pace has an impressive story of student success, and more than any other private university we demonstrate the transformational impact of an education," said Krislov. "We are a well-kept secret that needs to be less well-kept. I know Marie and Jesse will use their skills and expertise to shine a bright spotlight on the important work that we do."

"With President Krislov at the helm, there has never been a more exciting time to be at Pace," said Ternes. "Every day Pace is creating transformational opportunities for its students and I couldn't be more thrilled to be a part of that."

"Pace does important, meaningful work, and not enough people know about it," said Oxfeld. "I'm excited to help President Krislov tell that story."

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Mimi Rocah, distinguished criminal justice fellow at Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law opened a conference at Pace Law titled “Child Sex Trafficking – It’s Happening in Westchester County.” featured in "Westchester Rising"

02/14/2018

Mimi Rocah, distinguished criminal justice fellow at Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law opened a conference at Pace Law titled “Child Sex Trafficking – It’s Happening in Westchester County.” featured in "Westchester Rising"

Westchester Rising: "Pace Conference Addresses Child Sex Trafficking"

Featured in the photo: From left are Pound Ridge Police Chief David Ryan; Cindy Kanusher, executive director of Pace Women’s Justice Center; Alison Boak, of the International Organization for Adoles- cents; J.S., a child sex trafficking survivor; Mimi Rocah, former assistant U.S. attorney; and Carol Barry, executive director of the Pace Criminal Justice Institute.

From "Westchester Rising:"

Child sex trafficking is not a phenomenon that is happening in foreign countries or in other states. It is happening right here in Westchester County, and it is a subject that needs to be talked about to help protect children.

That was the message that Mimi Rocah, distinguished criminal justice fellow at Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law and a former assistant U.S. attorney imparted to about 100 state and federal law enforcement officials, social services providers, parents and educators as she opened a recent conference at Pace Law titled “Child Sex Trafficking – It’s Happening in Westchester County.”

“We are not helpless in the face of these horrible acts,” said Rocah. “There are things we can do as members of law enforcement, as parents, service providers and educators... We need to get the facts, raise awareness, and arm ourselves with tools for prevention.”

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Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., R.D.N., assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University is quoted in "Aaptiv" speaking about small diet changes

02/14/2018

Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., R.D.N., assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University is quoted in "Aaptiv" speaking about small diet changes

Aaptiv: "10 Small Diet Changes That Help Weight Loss

Written by Jenn Sinrich

From "Aaptiv:"

...One of the main reasons that diets generally don’t work—and that people avoid them at all costs—is because they force you to cut out foods you probably love. The good news: experts agree that that’s the entirely wrong way to achieve healthy and long-term weight loss. “When people change too much about their diet at once, they tend to give up before they reach their goals,” says Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., R.D.N., assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at the College of Health Professions at Pace University. “We believe that small changes add up to big success—small changes at a time, which eventually become habits, make for lasting weight success.” So, before you toss out everything in your pantry, give these small diet changes a try.

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Pace University's Dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law David Yassky and Professor Bennett L. Gershman are featured in "Politico Magazine" with an opinion piece on "Trump Can Fire Mueller, But Not a Grand Jury"

02/14/2018

Pace University's Dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law David Yassky and Professor Bennett L. Gershman are featured in "Politico Magazine" with an opinion piece on "Trump Can Fire Mueller, But Not a Grand Jury"

Politico Magazine: "Trump Can Fire Mueller, But Not a Grand Jury"

From "Politico Magazine:" By David Yassky and Bennett L. Gershman

President Donald Trump appears more determined than ever to fire special counsel Robert Mueller—despite White House protestations to the contrary. Americans must begin to prepare for the constitutional crisis that will ensue.

There is already considerable speculation about how Congress would react to a replay of the Saturday Night Massacre, when President Richard Nixon ordered his attorney general to fire the Watergate special prosecutor. Senators of both parties have warned the president against dismissing Mueller, some in very strong language (dismissal would cross a “red line” or be “explosive”). Members of Congress would no doubt demand an immediate, serious congressional inquiry into the matters the special counsel is investigating, if not impeachment proceedings based on the dismissal itself. But in light of the current level of intense partisan conflict, it seems more likely that Republican leaders in both houses of Congress would allow Mueller to be fired without consequence, and perhaps even defend such a firing.

However, there is another route that may well lead to a showdown between two branches of the government. For months, Mueller and his team have been presenting evidence to a federal grand jury – that grand jury has already indicted two people, and two other former Trump aides have pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. (And those are the indictments we know of – others may still be sealed.) We ordinarily think of a grand jury as a “decider of fact,” similar to a trial jury. But a grand jury is actually an investigatory body independent of the prosecutor. The grand jury here could continue its work even past the potential dismissal of Mueller and his entire staff, and indeed could draft indictments of senior White House officials or key staff of the 2016 Trump campaign.

Trump can fire Mueller, but he can’t fire the grand jury.

Under the federal rules of criminal procedure, a grand jury is empaneled by a judge and can be discharged only by that judge (or another judge, in case the empaneling judge is removed from the case or is no longer on the bench). Ordinarily, a judge’s decision to discharge a grand jury is ministerial, because the prosecutor defines the grand jury’s “scope of work” – the prosecutor asks the grand jury to issue indictments on particular charges, and the grand jury either does so or doesn’t (though it almost always does, in run-of-the-mill cases). When the grand jury has decided on the charges proposed by the prosecutor, the judge discharges the grand jury.

But that is just ordinary practice, and the events we are contemplating are not ordinary. Last August, Chief Judge Beryl A. Howell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia empaneled a grand jury to hear evidence from the special counsel. That grand jury would not automatically terminate if Mueller and his team were fired. Legally, the individual U.S. citizens currently hearing evidence from Mueller’s investigation will remain a duly constituted grand jury until Howell discharges them. And Trump does not have the power to order Howell to do so.

In the event Mueller and his team were to be fired, Howell will have a big decision to make.

f she permits the grand jury to continue, she will hardly be acting without precedent. When America’s founders wrote the Constitution, and for 150 years thereafter, it was not uncommon for so-called runaway grand juries to go beyond the prosecutor’s “instructions” in issuing indictments. These runaway grand juries became virtually extinct after the 1930s, when a new law required a prosecutor’s signature before an indictment can be issued.

A runaway jury in the modern era, in a case with these stakes, would put us in uncharted territory. But again: Nothing in the Constitution, or in any statute or rule, would prevent that grand jury from continuing to work or from issuing a report detailing its findings. The requirement that indictments bear a prosecutor’s signature would prevent the grand jury from issuing indictments on its own – but it would be legally possible, albeit wholly unorthodox, for a federal prosecutor other than Mueller (say, any of the nation’s 93 United States attorneys, whether motivated by conscience or ambition) to sign and file an indictment prepared by Howell’s grand jury.

Whether to permit any of that would be up to Howell, as would a host of other decisions about how to proceed. Indeed, if Mueller turns out to be a latter-day Archibald Cox (the Watergate special prosecutor Nixon ordered fired), then Howell will be today’s counterpart to John Sirica. Sirica, who in 1974 held the same position now held by Howell, was the fiercely independent jurist who ordered Nixon to turn over recordings of Oval Office conversations – in effect, declaring that not even the president is above the law.

To follow this train of suppositions to one possible conclusion, we can envision Trump demanding the firing of a prosecutor who is actually in the process of trying one or more of the president’s close associates, on facts that could constitute an impeachable offense.

Of course, Howell’s decisions would soon be appealed to the Supreme Court, as were Sirica’s. While many pundits accuse the court of politicization, we expect that in such an extraordinary situation, the Roberts court would act to protect the Constitution, just as the Burger court did in 1974. It would then be up to Trump to either submit to a Supreme Court ruling or precipitate a true moment of national crisis.

Elected officials, and citizens, should give thought to that scenario, among others, in preparing for the perilous months ahead.

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