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TechNewsWorld: "OnePlus Offers Free Headsets to Lure Crowd to VR Smartphone Launch"

06/01/2016

TechNewsWorld: "OnePlus Offers Free Headsets to Lure Crowd to VR Smartphone Launch"

. . . "This would be a very expensive launch for most companies, but OnePlus at the moment is an unknown brand to most consumers," noted Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

If OnePlus's strategy is to align itself with the emergence of VR as a mobile device, and if it intends to be known as the consumer electronics brand that's most in alignment with VR applications, it "will be seen as a brilliant move," he told TechNewsWorld.

However, if the VR initiative flops, it "could be seen as a very big mistake because OnePlus could have put far more of its mobile devices in the hands of consumers by simply discounting them," Chiagouris said.

OnePlus "likely could have put more than 100,000 devices in the hands of consumers with big discounts, and the related word of mouth would have been substantial," he argued.

Read more: http://www.technewsworld.com/story/83545.html

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: "Analysis: Companies make up, then break up"

06/01/2016

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: "Analysis: Companies make up, then break up"

. . . After spending billions on acquisitions that stoked its downstream business of making parts for the aerospace, automotive and other markets, Alcoa will spin the unit off into a new company, Arconic, later this year. The thinking: investors are not putting a high enough price tag on Arconic’s fast-growing downstream operations because they perceive Alcoa to be a commodity aluminum producer plagued by global overcapacity and depressed metals prices.

“It’s hard for investors to get excited about that, particularly when commodities prices are falling,” said Bruce Bachenheimer, executive director of Pace University’s Entrepreneurship Lab.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/in-the-lead/itl-2016-companies/2016/05/27/Commentary-Len-Boselovic-Companies-make-up-then-break-up/stories/201605270027

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New York Daily News: "Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton both fewer than 100 delegates shy of securing nominations; both are likely to seal the deal on June 7"

05/18/2016

New York Daily News: "Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton both fewer than 100 delegates shy of securing nominations; both are likely to seal the deal on June 7"

Following Tuesday’s contests in Oregon and Kentucky, Hillary Clinton has 2,291 delegates, making her only 92 delegates short of the 2,383 she needs to formally secure the nomination.
(Photo credit: AARON P. BERNSTEIN/REUTERS)

. . . “By forcing Clinton to campaign and use resources she would rather spend in the general campaign, Sanders will attempt one last rally in the hopes of convincing the super delegates that he has a better chance of defeating Donald Trump than she does,” David Caputo, president emeritus and professor of Political Science at Pace University, told the Daily News.

But, “barring a major and unexpected change of events,” he added, “it is nearly impossible for Sanders to have a larger pledged delegate count than Clinton. This would mean she can stake the claim that she has more delegates and therefore the superdelegates are merely ratifying the choice of the participants in the Democratic nominating processes.”

Because her nomination is imminent, Clinton’s goal throughout the remaining contests, Caputo explained, will be to “figure out a realistic way to bring Sanders and his supporters into their camp.”

“This will likely not happen until the convention, but the foundation for it has to be completed in the period leading up to the final primaries and then during the immediate post primary period,” he said.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/trump-clinton-100-delegates-shy-securing-noms-article-1.2641277

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New York Times: "Is Your Food ‘Natural’? F.D.A. to Weigh In"

05/17/2016

New York Times: "Is Your Food ‘Natural’? F.D.A. to Weigh In"

Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

. . . With so many nuances and thorny questions to address, the F.D.A. could choose to ban the use of the word natural from labels entirely. Food labels have become so crowded with information — nutrition facts, organic certifications, claims about hormones, gluten, whole grains and G.M.O.s — that for many people it is difficult to figure out what to focus on, said Margot Pollans, an expert on food law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University.

After a while, all the label claims can start to seem like white noise. But while “all natural” seems to confuse consumers even further, the F.D.A. is unlikely to forbid its use altogether.

“The problem that the F.D.A. would then encounter is the First Amendment – free speech,” said Marsha Cohen of U.C. Hastings. “The F.D.A. would have a very long road ahead of it to just ban the word completely.”

In the end, that may not be necessary. The fear of litigation has already caused food industry giants like PepsiCo, Frito-Lay, Campbell Soup and others to abandon their use of the word on products, said Jason J. Czarnezki, the executive director of environmental law programs at Pace University. Across the food industry, the number of products claiming to be “natural” fell to roughly 22 percent in 2013 from about 30 percent in 2010.

“I think companies are moving away from words that in some ways might be considered consumer fraud,” Mr. Czarnezki said.

The F.D.A. should nonetheless issue a strict definition of “natural,” he said — one that not only excludes artificial, synthetic and genetically engineered ingredients but that also restricts foods that have a large carbon footprint. Mr. Czarnezki said it is up to the agency to help consumers make sense of all the confusion.

“Even the most educated consumer can’t know what the word means,” he said.

Read more: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/05/17/is-your-food-natural-f-d-a-to-weigh-in/

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ELISABETH HAUB SCHOOL OF LAW AT PACE UNIVERSITY CELEBRATES RENAMING AND GIFT FROM HAUB FAMILY

05/16/2016

Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University Celebrates Renaming and Gift from Haub Family

Law School Held Community Celebration and Reception for Haub Family

WHITE PLAINS – The Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University celebrated its renaming and long-standing partnership with the Haub Family at events at the school on Friday. On May 5, Pace University announced that its law school has been renamed the Elisabeth Haub School of Law in recognition of its long-standing partnership with the family of the late Elisabeth Haub, a tireless environmental advocate and philanthropist, and a generous donation from the Haub family. The gift, the largest that Pace University has received in its history, will establish an endowment for the Law School, strengthen the school’s renowned environmental law program and fund innovative teaching initiatives.

Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino proclaimed May 13, 2016, to be Elisabeth Haub School of Law recognition day in Westchester. The Law School kicked off its celebrations Friday with an event for students, faculty members, alumni and staff. Later on Friday evening, a smaller reception was held in honor of the Haub family with Christian and Liliane Haub present. Also in attendance were Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman, Chief Judge and former Law School Board of Visitors member Janet DiFiore, Department of Environmental Conversation Commissioner and Law School alumnus Basil Seggos and Environmental Law professor Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

“Pace University is thrilled to deepen and broaden its partnership with the Haub family, bolster our environmental curriculum and continue leading the progress of environmental law and regulation,” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “An extraordinary gift of this kind occurs when donors and institutions come together in support of a shared vision. We are deeply grateful to the Haub family and look forward to building on Elisabeth Haub’s admirable legacy at Pace University.”

“We are enormously grateful to the Haub family for their support of the law school and our approach to legal education,” said David Yassky, Dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law. “We are so pleased we could celebrate this gift with the entire Law School community. At a time when many law schools are retrenching, this gift allows us to strengthen our program, especially the in-the-field learning that we believe is so crucial for students’ success in practice.”

“Our family has enjoyed a longstanding and successful relationship with Pace Law School, working with its world-renowned environmental law programs,” Christian Haub, grandson of Elisabeth Haub, said. “We have come to admire the high-impact environmental work done around the globe by graduates of this law school, as well as the school’s deep commitment to innovation in teaching and its strong record of delivering value to its students. We want to continue the legacy of my grandmother, Elisabeth Haub, who was a pioneer in environmental protection, and endowing this Law School in her name ensures her vision will continue to impact future generations.”

In addition to providing an endowment, the Haub family’s gift will fund specific initiatives in the school’s Environmental Law program, which is ranked third in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. It will create the Haub Scholars program, providing reduced tuition to a select group of the most highly-qualified and promising environmental law students. The program will enable these students to study or attend conferences abroad, ensuring that the Haub Scholars have a truly global experience.

The gift also endows a Chair in Environmental Law, a Chair in Public International Law and an annual Visiting Scholar in a related field, in recognition that environmental science, informatics and other technology and allied fields are essential elements in formulating environmental policy. It will also fund innovative teaching initiatives such as online courses and apprenticeships with law firms and nonprofits.

The gift continues Pace University’s longstanding collaboration with the Haub family, building on Elisabeth Haub’s extraordinary legacy of promoting the progress of environmental law, with particular emphasis on activities that impact policy, promote a balanced approach to sustainable growth and reflect the global nature of environmental issues. Haub devoted much of her life to the stewardship of sustainability, forming the first foundation dedicated to establishing laws for nature conservation and environmental protection.

Since her death in 1977, Elisabeth Haub’s children and grandchildren have continued her environmental work through the family business – the Tengelmann Group, a German retail holding company – and by founding the Elisabeth Haub Foundations for Environmental Law and Policy. Elisabeth’s daughter-in-law, Helga Haub, shared her vision and continued her work by expanding the Haub Foundations to the United States and Canada. Elisabeth’s son, Erivan Haub, embraced his mother’s commitment to the environment in the family business, establishing sustainable management practices within Tengelmann long before corporate social responsibility became a professional standard. Liliane Haub, the third generation of the Haub family to focus on sustainability, has assumed responsibility for continuing her mother-in-law’s work and has been instrumental in deepening the family’s relationship with Pace Law.

In 1997, Pace University and the International Council of Environmental Law, in collaboration with the Haub family, created the Elisabeth Haub Award for Environment Diplomacy. Given annually, the prestigious award recognizes the innovation, skill and accomplishments of diplomats, international civil servants and other negotiators who work to shape the world environmental order.

Pace University also shares Elisabeth Haub’s commitment to empowering women. The earliest Pace Law School classes were selected based in part on gender parity at a time when many law schools reserved very few places for female law students. Years later, the School launched the Pace Women’s Justice Center, a leading provider of civil legal services and training focused specifically on domestic violence. The Elisabeth Haub School of Law will become just the second law school in the United States named solely for a woman. (The Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law at Arizona State University is the other.)

About Elisabeth Haub School of Law

The Elisabeth Haub School of Law, the law school at Pace University, offers J.D. and Masters of Law degrees in both Environmental and International Law, as well as a series of joint degree programs including a Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD) in Environmental Law. The school, housed on the University’s campus in White Plains, NY, opened its doors in 1976 and has over 9,000 alumni around the world. The Haub School is led by Dean David Yassky, who has served in a variety of public, political, academic and private sector positions over a legal career that spans four decades. The school maintains a unique philosophy and approach to legal education that strikes an important balance between practice and theory.

About Pace University

Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high-quality education for the professions with a firm base in liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York Metropolitan Area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, enrolling almost 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its College of Health Professions, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

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New York Times: "Saving Farm and Factory Jobs"

05/16/2016

New York Times: "Saving Farm and Factory Jobs"

The production line of a lamp factory in Suining, China. Despite efforts to revive manufacturing in the United States, economists say the chances of a recovery are slim, and developing countries face extra challenges as industry fades. Credit Zhong Min/European Pressphoto Agency

To the Editor:

Re “Moving On From Farm and Factory” (Economic Scene column, April 27):

Eduardo Porter’s article on the futility of trying to bring back manufacturing jobs to the United States from abroad makes it clear that our presidential candidates are embarking on a fool’s errand when they claim they can do it.

Not only would higher tariffs on foreign goods mean higher prices for Americans, but the increase in American jobs would be severely limited because manufacturing jobs are decreasing throughout the world.

Displaced workers and adversely affected local economies would be much better off with measures to enhance the safety net via better unemployment insurance and job training. More job sharing with higher hourly wages may also be necessary.

Politically these policies may be harder to sell, but they are more likely to be effective than the absurd notion that we can return to the halcyon industrial era long past.

ANTHONY A. CUPAIUOLO

South Lake Tahoe, Calif.

The writer is professor emeritus of public administration at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/07/opinion/saving-farm-and-factory-jobs.html

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Business Insider: "Target boycott has reached a boiling point — and sales may suffer as a result"

05/16/2016

Business Insider: "Target boycott has reached a boiling point — and sales may suffer as a result"

. . . Ultimately, access to goods will outweigh moral outrage for many consumers, says Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York.

"The boycott is not going to last very long," Chiagouris told Business Insider. "There is a big difference between signing a petition compared to not taking advantage of a big sale at Target. People will always take advantage of the sale."

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/target-boycott-impact-on-sales-2016-5

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E-Commerce Times: "Walmart Tests 2-Day Subscription Shipping"

05/16/2016

E-Commerce Times: "Walmart Tests 2-Day Subscription Shipping"

Walmart on Thursday began testing a two-day unlimited shipping service priced at US$49 a year.

Subscribers will get more than a million items, including the most commonly purchased items on Walmart.com, delivered to their door in two days or fewer, Walmart spokesperson Bao Nguyen said.

"Customers will continue to enjoy their two favorite features -- no minimum order requirements and free returns online and in stores," he told the E-Commerce Times.

The service, called "ShippingPass," launched last year as a three-day shipping pilot program with a $50 annual subscription fee.

Interested consumers can join the waiting list.

Consumer Acceptance

Consumer reaction to the three-day ShippingPass pilot likely was not been favorable "because Amazon has already trained consumers to expect to receive many goods in two days or less," said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University.

Read more: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/83505.html

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O'Dwyer's PR News: "FDA Examines Definition of 'Healthy'"

05/12/2016

O'Dwyer's PR News: "FDA Examines Definition of 'Healthy'"

The Food and Drug Administration plans to re-evaluate its official definition of what constitutes "healthy" food. An update to that agency's meaning of the term could have a direct effect on how food companies today market their products.

The decision to revisit the definition, which has not been updated since the 1990s, comes as the FDA is expected to issue its final revised updates to the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages later this year.

The agency seeks to update the Nutrition Facts label to make it more consistent with new scientific information, as well as the updated dietary guidelines released by the USDA in January. That government policy statement scaled back previous recommendations on dietary cholesterol and accounted for an updated scientific distinction between healthy fats — such as nuts — from regular fats.  The updated dietary guidelines also shifted its focus to account for overall eating patterns, emphasizing food choices in the context of the patterns in which they are consumed, versus simply listing foods that Americans should avoid or eat more of.

Discrepancies between the FDA’s current definition of “healthy,” compared to recent scientific findings and the USDA's newest dietary guidelines, have become a source of confusion. One example is the avocado, which is now considered a super food, though it remains considered “unhealthy” according to the FDA’s definition, due solely to its total fat content.

Currently, the FDA allows food brands to market their product as "healthy" only if it meets the agency’s nutrient content criteria requirements, which largely places an emphasis on fats, cholesterol and sodium. That strict — and arguably, dated — criteria made headlines last year, when popular granola bar maker Kind was served with an FDA warning letter for labeling its snacks as "healthy," a term the agency said didn’t meet the FDA’s requirements that govern the use of that claim.  The company responded, stating its use of the word "healthy" was apt, as the product’s fat content is derived from nuts, a food now recommended in the latest USDA dietary guidelines. The FDA later agreed to allow Kind to continue use of the word “healthy” as a sort of broad, philosophical claim about the company, if not its food products.

Kind in February hired public affairs powerhouse Glover Park Group for lobbying help on FDA issues.

“I think [the FDA] realized they were caught out by this, and they needed to rethink their standards and do something about the facts that the Kind case brought out,” said E. Melanie DuPuis, a professor and chair of environmental studies and science at Pace University.

DuPuis, who is also author of Dangerous Digestion: The Politics of American Dietary Advice, told O’Dwyer’s that the notion of a new definition for "healthy" opens a potential Pandora’s box for food marketers, because like all industries, they rely on processes they want to keep stable, and when the definition of a term they use starts changing, companies have to change those processes.

Read more: http://www.odwyerpr.com/story/public/6887/2016-05-11/fda-examines-definition-healthy.html

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Bloomberg Law: "Pace University’s Law Dean on Name Changes and the State of Legal Education"

05/12/2016

Bloomberg Law: "Pace University’s Law Dean on Name Changes and the State of Legal Education"

Last week, Pace University announced that its law school would rebrand itself as the Elisabeth Haub School of Law, named after the late German environmentalist.

In an interview, the law school’s dean David Yassky fielded questions about the news, his views on the state of legal education, and the recent “kerfuffle” around George Mason University’s law school being named after the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Read more: https://bol.bna.com/pace-universitys-law-dean-on-name-changes-and-the-state-of-legal-education/

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